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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 18, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... in this great tragedy, there is a unanimous conviction amongst all who knew him that sir david was of the best. , ~ , , . earlier a minute's silence was held in the house of commons as tributes poured in for the conservative mp. and while his death leaves a vacuum, that will not and can never be filled, we will cherish his memory, we will celebrate his legacy. these tributes are a powerful testimony, to the respect,
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the affection and yes, the love, that david was held in across politics and across different communities. southend on sea will be granted city status in honour of sir david who had campaigned for the change. in other news... the former us secretary of state, colin powell, has died of covid complications at the age of 8a. are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, particularly towards women? we have a special report. and ford is to invest more than £200 million in its halewood plant in merseyside, safeguarding jobs for 500 workers.
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the prime minister has led a series of warm tributes to sir david amess, the conservative mp who was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery at a church in essex on friday. in the house of commons, mps from across the parties lined up to praise sir david for his dedication to the people he represented, his skill at campaigning, and his kindness and gentleness. tonight, borisjohnson and mps across the political spectrum have been attending a service of remembrance for sir david at st margaret's church in westminster. among the speakers was the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby. the noble calling of politicians in a democracy is to make all manner of sacrifices, seen and unseen, for the freedom and prosperity of our nation. and it is for that reason that across the nation we should be
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thankful to everyone who is here and throughout especially the house of commons who gives so much despite the cynicism, abuse and cruelty that they so often endure. too often when great tragedies happen, we have to reflect that the best seem to be the first to suffer. in this great tragedy, there is a unanimous conviction amongst all who knew him that sir david was of the best. this afternoon, borisjohnson told the house of commons that sir david's dearest wish and long—standing campaign will be made reality southend on sea, in his constituency, will be given city status. and earlier, sir david's family visited the church hall in
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leigh—on—sea where the politician was killed. 0ur political editor, laura kuenssberg reports. holding on. at a church that should be a place of sanctuary. instead, for their father, and husband, a place of violence. this family shattered, left reading messages from others. "thank you for all you have done." a simple note among the blanket of flowers. a way to express sorrow and support at parliament, too. then the ultimate mark of respect... bell rings. ..to still the commons' usual clamour. 0n so many of their minds perhaps, a phrase sir david himself wrote. "when mps are doing theirjobs, it could happen to any one of us." sir david was taken from us
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in a contemptible act of violence. striking at the core of what it is to be a member of this house, and violating the sanctity both of the church in which he was killed, and the constituency surgery that is so essential to our representative democracy. granting his dearest political wish. her majesty has agreed that southend will be accorded the city status it so clearly deserves. but mps on all sides have fears about their and their staff's safety. this place can be the scene of tantrums and torment. not today. i want to lean across, reach across and to acknowledge the pain that is felt on the opposite benches, and i do. of course our differences matter — after all, that is what democracy about. but today, we are reminded
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that what we have in common matters far more. in a packed commons, the only empty spot sir david's old seat. his close friend furious at how mps are treated, urging a crackdown on online abuse. we are now systemically vilified, day after day, and i simply say to you, ladies and gentlemen, that enough is enough. i would like to drag mark zuckerberg of facebook and jack dorsey of twitter to the bar of the house. isn't it fitting that his last acts were acts of service to his constituents? we must not give up on the accessibility i of members of parliament. if we do, the sponsors - of those who attacked david, and who attacked me, will have succeeded. i but an argument about civility in politics doesn't explain why, like five years ago,
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a family's in pain. it brought it back very physically. i was shaking and unable to process it, really. that moment when you're told that they haven't made it, and weeks and months of despair and anguish that follow, i guess. if you were a young couple now, when she first said, "i think i want to go into parliament", would you try to persuade her not to do it? she had a vision for the society she wanted to see, and she would have taken personal risk to see it. so, i wouldn't have tried or succeeded in trying to convince her to do anything differently, but i do think that there will be people that will be put off. this place is fuelled by difference, by argument. but tonight, a moment to remember, a man who believed in their common cause. let's speak now to bob stewart,
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the conservative mp for beckenham, who was a friend of sir david amess and was at tonight's service for him held at st margaret's church in westminster. a very moving ceremony it was. that's right, it was incredibly moving, put together over the weekend, just amazing, it shows how people can move really fast when it is necessary. lovely service, most moving. is necessary. lovely service, most movinu. , ., ., , is necessary. lovely service, most movin. , ., ., , ~ is necessary. lovely service, most movin. , ., ~ moving. tell us what he was like as a friend to — moving. tell us what he was like as a friend to you. _ moving. tell us what he was like as a friend to you, because _ moving. tell us what he was like as a friend to you, because you - moving. tell us what he was like as l a friend to you, because you became very close friends.— very close friends. yes, when i met him i very close friends. yes, when i met him i came — very close friends. yes, when i met him i came into _ very close friends. yes, when i met him i came into parliament- very close friends. yes, when i met him i came into parliament in - very close friends. yes, when i met | him i came into parliament in 2010, ii him i came into parliament in 2010, ii and a half years ago, he immediately befriended me and gave me wise counsel on one particular occasion stop he. me to become a member of the all—party group which he was proud to be the chair of, and
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i was in qatar last week when he was there, and in particular he also falls me, not that forceful, but you know what i mean, push to me, to become part of the parliamentary intelligence security forum which is a huge organisation of parliamentarians, up to about 50 nations, run by congressman robert pete enjo in the united states, and david miss one of the founding fathers of it. he has been involved in these forums for a while, no one knew about that in parliament, but he did it. i was dragged in, knew about that in parliament, but he did it. iwas dragged in, i knew about that in parliament, but he did it. i was dragged in, i use that word loosely, by my friend david, and when i heard about the death of david, i rang robert on saturday afternoon, from qatar. he
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had already heard, he was broken. he said, he could hardly speak, bless him, and i remember particularly he said, my best friend has been murdered. and he was almost in tears. and itjust shows the effect of david amess, notjust in his constituency, notjust in parliament, but across the world, and i can tell you, a lot of people in various parliaments will be very, very sad about what has happened. i have to say, i am gutted. i was a soldier, i know 13 men were killed close to me in my time. i got used to that. it is hard but it is a martial profession, and in a way you expect that people will be winded andindeed expect that people will be winded and indeed die, and as i say, i have
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been witness and close to 13 —— wounded. i never expected this sort of thing to happen to someone who is a member of parliament, so i am pretty gutted. i’m a member of parliament, so i am pretty gutted-— a member of parliament, so i am pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you — pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you would _ pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you would be. _ pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you would be. he - pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you would be. he was - pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close friend you would be. he was such| pretty gutted. i'm sure, is a close i friend you would be. he was such an approachable man, what was his secret for getting on with so many people who may at first sight not really have a lot of —— a lot in common with them? really have a lot of -- a lot in common with them? decency, fundamentally _ common with them? decency, fundamentally decency - common with them? decency, fundamentally decency was i common with them? decency, - fundamentally decency was something that absolutely ran all the way through david's body. not only that, he had a wicked sense of humour, got a hurtful sense of humour, but a wicked sense of humour. getting the pope when he couldn't find a rosary, getting the pope to bless a boiled sweet in his hand. that sort of sense of humour. last week
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apparently, he was with the eimear of qatar and apparently, he was with the eimear of qatarand said, apparently, he was with the eimear of qatar and said, as a parting gift, what can we give a man who has everything? so he said, i tell you what, a signed copy of my book, here it is. what a great sense of humour. he fell around laughing. that sort of humour marked out the man, and he had a very profound christian faith, he was a roman catholic, he believed to utterly and completely. what the sadnesses, robert and i last met in august, he had come overfor the wedding of david's water and it was a wonderful wedding, i wasn't invited, not that close, but robert was. but i had dinner with robert
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and with david in maiden lane thereafter. and it was clear that david was absolutely beloved by congressman robert, and was a huge friend. they had been friends for a very long time. it must be awful for him, because the organisation that he set up, which david was profoundly involved in, has actually been dealt a really severe blow in the tummy. been dealt a really severe blow in the tummy-— been dealt a really severe blow in the tumm . ., ., 1,, ,, ., the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we a- reciate the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we appreciate you _ the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we appreciate you talking _ the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we appreciate you talking to _ the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we appreciate you talking to us, - the tummy. colonel bob stewart, we appreciate you talking to us, thank i appreciate you talking to us, thank you. southend is to become a city in order of the long campaign fought by said david stamp —— fought by david amess. well, we can speak now to the labour leader of southend on sea borough council, ian gilbert about the fact that southend
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is being awarded city status. they cannot be a more fitting honour. ., , , ., honour. no, this is something that he was hugely _ honour. no, this is something that he was hugely passionate - honour. no, this is something that he was hugely passionate about, l he was hugely passionate about, never missed an opportunity to press southend's case to become a city. speaking to colleagues of his and friends and seeing a statement from his family over the weekend, it is clear everybody believes this is a huge part of his legacy and something he would be extremely pleased and proud. what something he would be extremely pleased and proud.— something he would be extremely pleased and proud. what will it mean to the peeple — pleased and proud. what will it mean to the peeple of _ pleased and proud. what will it mean to the people of southend _ pleased and proud. what will it mean to the people of southend after- pleased and proud. what will it mean to the people of southend after that l to the people of southend after that extraordinary campaign by sir david? i hope that the owner that is accorded will help to bring the community together in this really tough time. it is an honour, a mark of status, it adds to the prestige
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of status, it adds to the prestige of our area. it helps to raise our profile, and i hope it is something that local people can unite around. tell is a little bit about said david's campaigning tactics, because he was absolutely dogged in promoting southend—on—sea. yes. he was absolutely dogged in promoting southend-on-sea. yes, he was completely _ promoting southend-on-sea. yes, he was completely relentless, _ promoting southend-on-sea. yes, he was completely relentless, the - promoting southend-on-sea. yes, he was completely relentless, the last i was completely relentless, the last time i met david amess was when we were launching together our city status bed, and he had largely almost entirely organise the events himself personally, he brought along a traditional town prior in regalia, he had assembled local dignitaries and so on, and like so much of his work it had a serious purpose but was done with a real sense of fun and not taking himself too seriously
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as well. it was a really happy and joyful occasion. he as well. it was a really happy and joyful occasion-— as well. it was a really happy and joyful occasion. he does sound like he could be — joyful occasion. he does sound like he could be quite _ joyful occasion. he does sound like he could be quite eccentric- joyful occasion. he does sound like he could be quite eccentric at - he could be quite eccentric at times. . , . he could be quite eccentric at times. ., , ., . ., times. he was a character. i recall the image — times. he was a character. i recall the image of— times. he was a character. i recall the image of him _ times. he was a character. i recall the image of him addressing -- i the image of him addressing —— dressing up as a medieval knight when he was awarded his knighthood, i think he got the mickey taken out of him for that, but that sense of fun and pursuing some time series courses but doing it in a lively, engaging and fun way. —— sometimes serious. it was one of the reasons why you was such a popular member of parliament. it why you was such a popular member of parliament. . , why you was such a popular member of parliament. ., , ., , , parliament. it has happened quite ruickl parliament. it has happened quite quickly about _ parliament. it has happened quite quickly about southend-on-sea . parliament. it has happened quite quickly about southend-on-sea is quickly about southend—on—sea is being granted city status, announced today, what are the next steps? i must be honest, i have not had time
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to take in the detail of the news. it actually broke, the prime minister's statement, whilst we were together to sign the book of condolence in the civic centre, still don't know exactly the practicalities of how this enacted, or when it will be enacted by her majesty, but we are all obviously looking forward to that day. it is excellent news _ looking forward to that day. it is excellent news and a terribly sad circumstances, but thank you for talking to us. —— under terribly sad. a 25—year—old british man, ali harbi ali, arrested at the scene on suspicion of sir david's murder is still being questioned by counter terrorism police. he is being held at a london police station. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has more.
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in a picture taken several years ago, ali harbi ali, the man arrested at the church hall where sir david amess was killed. the murder, just after midday on friday, was initially investigated by essex police, but quickly taken over by scotland yard's counter terrorism command, when a possible extremist motivation was identified. since then, the arrested man has been in custody being questioned. first in essex, and then in the capital. ali harbi ali was born in southwark, in south london, the oldest of four children. he grew up in croydon an went to school there. his father was an adviser to a former somali prime minister, his uncle is somali ambassador to china. ali harbi ali was referred to the counter extremism programme prevent some years ago, but he was not a formal mis subject of interest. more than three days into this investigation, counter terrorism detectives do have a potential motive for the killing, islamist extremism
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and a desire to kill a british politician, but it is still not clear why sir david amess in particular was targeted. the man in custody, ali harbi ali, was arrested at belfairs methodist church just after the stabbing. but he is thought to live in kentish town in london. croydon, wher he grew up, is in the far south of the capital. his parents are divorced and his father's uk address is in bounds green north london. counter terrorism command searches of the three properties are now over. the flat in a kentish town town house was a hive of police activity yesterday, but today it was quiet. it seems that the investigation of the murder of sir david amess is not expanding, but remains focused on the man arrested at the scene. the suspect is still being questioned at a police station in london. he is being detained under the terrorism act. he has not been charged with any offences.
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daniel sandford, bbc news, new scotland yard. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are broadcaster penny smith, and martin bentham from the evening standard. the former us secretary of state colin powell has died at the age of 84 following complications from covid—19, although he was fully vaccinated. he was the country's top military officer before becoming its first african—american secretary of state during the presidency of george bush. the former us secretary of state colin powell has he's perhaps best remembered for arguing at the un for war against iraq based on intelligence about their weapons of mass destruction intelligence which turned out to be false. 0ur north america editorjon sopel looks back at his life. until saddam hussain's invasion of kuwait in 1990, colin powell was relatively unknown. after it, he became a household name, as america's first black commander of the us military.
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he developed the powell doctrine — don't start a war unless you know how you are going to end it. in many ways, he was a reluctant warrior, having been injured during the vietnam war, but if force is to be used, then let it be overwhelming. our strategy to go after this army is very very simple. first we're going to cut it off and then we're going to kill it. born in the slums of harlem, the son ofjamaican immigrants, and drifting as a teenager, few would have imagined that he would rise to such heights. culminating in being appointed america's top diplomatjust before 9/11. it's a great honour for me to submit the name to the united states senate of colin l powell, as secretary of state. and at the un, he made a case for the invasion of iraq that he would later ruefully admit was based on incorrect information. there can be no doubt that saddam hussein has biological weapons and the capability to rapidly produce more, many more,
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and he has the ability to dispense these lethal poisons and diseases in ways that can cause massive death and destruction. but for all that, this moderate republican was being courted by both parties to run to become the country's first african—american president. powell decided against, instead throwing his weight behind democrat barack 0bama's bid for that place in history. this morning a great soldier, a great statesman, a great american, has endorsed our campaign for change. i am so proud that i have had this chance to serve my nation. this venerated soldier in later life used his ammunition sparingly, only intervening when he felt something needed saying, like earlier this year after the attempted insurrection at the capitol when he called for donald trump to stand down immediately. i wish he would just do what nixon did and that's step down.
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somebody ought to go up there and tell him it's over. the plane is waiting for you, you are out. colin powell preached tolerance and moderation. he was a trailblazer, a leader, warrior and statesman. and according to many of the tributes today, a genuine american hero. the former us secretary of state colin powell, who has died at the age 0f811. tributes have been pouring in. the 44 president said... barack 0bama said... presidentjoe biden expressed...
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0ur correspondent in washington is barbara plett usher. powell did have some unde health : powell did have some underlying health issues, what is being reported about his treatment? yes. reported about his treatment? yes, it has been — reported about his treatment? yes, it has been reported _ reported about his treatment? yes it has been reported that he reported about his treatment? 123 it has been reported that he got covid even though he had been fully vaccinated and yet he died, which is not common. if you have been fully vaccinated, and he did have underlying health conditions, other ailments he was battling, more significantly something called meyler, which is a cancer of the white blood cells in the bone marrow, which can greatly reduce or suppress the immune system and it is probable that his lowered immunity may have been a factor for him, contracting the disease, and then dying of it. his wife also
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reportedly came down with the disease even though she had been double vaccinated but she responded well to treatment.— well to treatment. clearly he was very highly _ well to treatment. clearly he was very highly regarded, _ well to treatment. clearly he was very highly regarded, as - well to treatment. clearly he was i very highly regarded, as evidenced by some of those warm tributes. yes. by some of those warm tributes. yes, former presidents, _ by some of those warm tributes. 12: former presidents, current president, former secretaries of state, currently secretaries of state, currently secretaries of state, former military men, and current, two former british prime minister is, multiple senators, and other politicians, there has been a staggering number of high—level people coming forward to give their praise, and they are remarkably similar at what they say, things like when it comes to power as a professional, they talk about him is a great american, a true patriot and public servant, a trailblazer who broke through racial and class ceilings, he was a great leader, but they also talk about him personally, many have said they considered him
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to be a good friend, a man of integrity, a good sense of humour, compassionate, he walked the walk, he did what he said, believed he should do, and what others should do, so the tributes have been remarkably strong and you have had tributes from president biden, president bush, president 0bama as well, biden and 0bama also thanked him for endorsing their candidacies for president, because mr powell was in court identified as a republican for much of his career and yet he did endorse democrat and voted for president biden in 2020 because he did not want to vote for mr trump. there result of that kind of unique element to him appealing to both sides of the political divide. brute sides of the political divide. we saw in the _ sides of the political divide. we saw in the obituary report that he had gone to the un and presented
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that evidence that turned out to be false, he also, as was said, argued you should not begin a war until you —— unless you knew how to ended. given the situation in iraq, what did he say afterwards, after he left office when he could feel my be more honest about what was going on? the powell honest about what was going on? ii2 powell doctrine honest about what was going on? ti2 powell doctrine was on display in the i991 powell doctrine was on display in the 1991 gulf war when the americans assembled this coalition to get saddam hussein out of kuwait. they stopped at a certain point and didn't keep forces in the country over an extended period but that was definitely not the case in the wars that followed 9/11. mr powell was asked by president bush to make the pitch for war, the case against saddam hussein, from what we understand he was sceptical of the information he got from the vice president offers, so he went to the
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cia and researched it there. until he felt comfortable with what he would say, he believed the cia leaders that there was a clear case that saddam hussein had chemical and biological weapons, that saddam hussein had chemical and biologicalweapons, but that saddam hussein had chemical and biological weapons, but afterwards, as you said, when it became clear that the intelligence was false or many related, he felt very badly about it. he said in interviews that he thought it was a blot on his record at ——. manipulated. he took responsibility for it and it was something that he found to be a stain on its reputation and he was conscious that he was an african—american leader, a military man and secretary of state, so it was something that he deeply regretted later. i think it will be something that will always be associated with his name, the intervention he made at the un. thank you very much. goto energy has become the latest energy supplier to go out of business since the start
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of september amid a massive spike in gas prices. the company, which supplies around 22,000 households in the uk, has ceased to trade. customers will be protected by 0fgem's safety net, which will ensure they are assigned a new supplier and will not have their supply interrupted. around 2 million customers have seen their energy supplier go bust in the last seven weeks. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello again. we're in a very cloudy but very mild airstream at the moment, but we've had some outbreaks of rain and drizzle already. for a while overnight, it will be drier, a few breaks in the cloud leading to some mist and fog patches. then we've got thickening cloud coming back into western areas, and it's here we're going to find some rain more widely by the end of the night. temperatures reach 18 degrees in a few places today. lows will be 12 to 1a degrees typically. a lot of cloud to start on tuesday, some outbreaks of rain, heavy at times over these western hills. heading into the afternoon, most of the wet weather is across northern and western areas, may cheer up a bit later in northern ireland. but it's across the east anglia
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and the southeast that we should see some sunshine developing, lifting temperatures to 20 or 21 degrees. even where we have cloud and outbreaks of rain, it is very mild 17 to 19 degrees. there's more rain in the forecast on wednesday, but by the time we get to thursday and friday, with the winds from the north, it's going to feel much colder than it does right now.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: politicians attend a memorial service to honour sir david amess, who was stabbed to death on friday. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, addressed the congregation. in this great tragedy, there is a unanimous conviction
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amongst all who knew him that sir david was of the best. let us keep silence. earlier, a minute's silence was held in the house of commons, as tributes poured in for the conservative mp. and while his death leaves a vacuum that will not and can never be filled, we will cherish his memory, we will celebrate his legacy. these tributes are a powerful testimony to the respect, the affection and, yes, the love, that david was held in across politics and across different communities. southend on sea will be granted city status in honour of sir david, who had campaigned for the change. in other news, the former us secretary of state colin powell has died of covid complications
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at the age 0f811. are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, particularly towards women? we have a special report. in georgia in the us, jury selection has began today in the trial of three white men accused of killing ahmaud arbery, a black man who was outjogging last year. black activists have called the killing a "modern—day lynching". this is what ahmaud arbery�*s mother said ahead of the trial. this day means a lot to me. thinking back when ahmaud was first killed, we went through three prosecutors, we went through three prosecutors, we went through no arrests and we finally made it this far, so this morning, i am very grateful. 0ur correspondent aleem maqbool has been following the story. just remind us of the background to this, if you would. i
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just remind us of the background to this, if you would.— this, if you would. i think a lot of people will— this, if you would. i think a lot of people will think _ this, if you would. i think a lot of people will think of _ this, if you would. i think a lot of people will think of that - this, if you would. i think a lot of people will think of that summerj this, if you would. i think a lot of. people will think of that summer of protest last year against racism to be all about george floyd, and thirdly the video of george floyd's killing in minneapolis did spark it, but the sentiment had been rising across the us that something had to be done, because of a series of killings during last year, and ahmaud arbery�*s was one of them. it happened in february last year, eight when he 5 euros black man jogging. eight when he 5 euros black man jogging, he was a keen athlete and wasjogging through a jogging, he was a keen athlete and was jogging through a town in southern georgia when two white men, a father and son, decided that he fitted the description of a suspect in a series of burglaries in the area and so decided to arm themselves and chased him in a pick—up truck, and a third white man alsojoined them. he did not actually recognise either the two white men or the black man at the time but decided to join
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white men or the black man at the time but decided tojoin in the chase and actually, it was he who obstructed ahmaud arbery and finally a fight broke out, and in the end, ahmaud arbery was shot dead, and was shocked a lot of people was notjust the nature of the killing, the fact that these men decided that they could do this, it was not something they could leap to the police, but also at what happened afterwards, because nobody was charged, there were no detentions after this murder for ten weeks, until a video went viral in this case, and so there was huge debate about, as you said in your introduction, how much does look like the kind of lynchings that happened decades earlier but also the response from the police afterwards. the response from the police afterwards— the response from the police afterwards. , ., �* , , afterwards. tell us what's been happening _ afterwards. tell us what's been happening today- _ afterwards. tell us what's been happening today. jury - afterwards. tell us what's been j happening today. jury selection afterwards. tell us what's been - happening today. jury selection has started, happening today. jury selection has started. and _ happening today. jury selection has started. and in _ happening today. jury selection has started, and in these _ happening today. jury selection has started, and in these kinds - happening today. jury selection has started, and in these kinds of- happening today. jury selection hasj started, and in these kinds of cases — we saw in the derek chauvin case
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about the killing of george floyd in minneapolis— a lot does depend on who is selected on these juries. but this is just one case. this who is selected on these juries. but this isjust one case. this is who is selected on these juries. but this is just one case. this is about the murder case that is taking place in georgia, but there will be another case, a federal case, a hate crime case, that will also take place at the beginning of next year. but all eyes are on this very high—profile case in georgia, when it finally does go to trial. we expect it in a couple of weeks' time. : : ~ expect it in a couple of weeks' time. : ., ,, i. , expect it in a couple of weeks' time. : ., «i i. , . time. aleem, thank you very much. aleem maqbool. _ while social media has benefits for many of us, it also acts increasingly as a forum for abuse and threats. a bbc panorama investigation has been looking at how online abuse is rising against women in particular and why the police, government and social media companies aren't doing more to stop it. 0ur specialist disinformation reporter marianna spring has been talking to women who've found themselves the targets of online hatred. i'm declaring ruth davidson
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the duly elected leader... the attacks that have come directly to me, a lot of them have been about my politics. you know, some of it has been about my physical appearance. a lot of it has been about the fact that i'm gay. and a lot of it has been about the fact that i'm a woman who has opinions. ruth davidson is the former leader of the scottish conservatives. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening, for being threatening in the street. the fact that it's through the medium of their phone doesn't stop that being threatening. and it's notjust politicians. dr rachel clarke used twitter during the pandemic to encourage people to get their covid jabs. she says she was bombarded with abuse as a result. i have reported misogynistic abuse, threats of rape, threats of being killed over and over again. most of those reports have never resulted in anyone being blocked
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or issued with temporary ban on twitter. twitter says it takes action when its rules are violated, and that closing accounts isn't the only option. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because, last night, i got some of the worst abuse that i've received doing thisjob, really. i mean, i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile, and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—women content, some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly, within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend
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content that breaks its rules, and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes at a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence, both online and in the real world. i carry on speaking out on social media because i will not allow misogynistic bullies and trolls to prevent me from connecting with the public. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can see that full report — on panorama — on the bbc iplayer. public health experts are calling for the covid vaccine booster programme to be rolled out faster and to all over—50s or the country could face a surge in hospital numbers amongst older people. with infection rates and hospitalisations many times higher than most of western europe,
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there are fears that without further protection, more of us could suffer from severe illness in the coming weeks. in the last seven days, 869 deaths have been reported. that's11% higher than the previous week. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. boosterjabs in york today. health leaders say millions are being invited for third doses. it means that i'm at less risk of infecting others and spreading the disease, so it's really important to me. but with uk case numbers rising, there are concerns that as immunity wanes from earlierjabs, more people are vulnerable. we really need that to speed up. every week that passes, if there is waning in those groups, they are more vulnerable at a time when we have high levels of infection, so we need to accelerate this booster campaign. weekly covid hospital admissions relative to the population were rising from july in the uk, france and germany, though with higher case numbers, they've not fallen back like in france and germany.
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in israel, admissions rose faster, but thanks to boosterjabs then started coming down. in israel, where they started vaccinating very early and therefore they've had a longer period to see the decline in benefit, they've seen an increase in case numbers. and when they reinstituted a number of measures, including the third dose, the booster dose, they saw a very good beneficial decline within a few weeks of giving the boosters. the hope is that the boosterjab roll—out will do the same in the uk, offering more protection as winter approaches, for example in care homes, where some residents have been getting both the covid and the flu jabs. but there are still challenges in reaching some in younger age groups who may have had just one dose, or none. having made a rapid start to the vaccination programme, the uk has fallen back a bit compared with some other leading economies, with 66% of the population, notjust adults, having had the first two doses.
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though the uk did start a bit later than some others giving jabs to 12—15—year—olds. little scratch. take a deep breath in. there is still some way to go vaccinating teenagers, and case rates among school pupils have been the highest of any age group. the possibility ofjabbing children aged five and over has moved a step closer, with the european medical regulator now evaluating the use of the pfizer vaccine in that age range. hugh pym, bbc news. here, the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 49,156 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means there were more than 44,000 cases on average per day in the past week. currently, there are more than 7,000 people in hospitalfrom covid. there were another 45 deaths — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test — which mean, on average, there were 124 deaths per day in the past week.
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a man has pleaded guilty to a charge relating to the flight in which the footballer emiliano sala died. mr sala was travelling on a single engine aircraft to wales in 2019 after signing a multi—million—pound transfer deal to cardiff city. david henderson, who's 67 and seen here on the left, admitted trying to arrange a flight for a passenger without permission or authorisation. he will still go on trial after denying a separate charge of endangering the safety of an aircraft. the ford motor company is investing more than £200 million in its halewood plant on merseyside, to build power units for electric vehicles. partly funded by the government, it will be the first dedicated factory, assembling components for electric cars in europe, safeguarding 500 jobs. our business correspondent ben king has the full story. ford has been making cars in north—west england for more than a century.
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but in nine years' time, the company will make petrol and diesel things of the past. the new era will be electric and it starts at this plant in halewood on merseyside. electric power units, motoring transmission in one, will start rolling off the production lines in 2024. this is our first investment in electrified components in europe. and 500 people we have in halewood today, and this will really secure the future of those jobs for the foreseeable future. so, great news for the people in halewood. it is a small part of ford's plan to go electric, a £230 million investment, some of which is government money. it's also spending billions on two plants in the usa, in kentucky and tennessee. but it comes on the back of nissan investing £1 billion in its factory in sunderland.
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building up more than 600 jobs. the plan see the construction of a gigerfactory, the giant battery facility which makes up such an important part of the manufacture of electric cars. the more investments we have like that, the more it will draw in other components into the electric vehicle supply chain. we are in the transition phase from internal combustion to electric. once you start the momentum, like with this investment, it will attract more companies in. the owner of vauxhall is also investing 100 million at its plant in ellesmere port. but critics say it's still not enough. what we're seeing is that other european countries are racing ahead in building battery plants, clean technology, new vehicle production, and comparatively there's limited action in the uk. the electric future of the uk car industry is far from assured, but today's news is another important step on the road. ben king, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news:
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politicians attend a memorial service to honour sir david amess, who was stabbed to death on friday. the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, addressed the congregation. southend on sea will be granted city status in honour of sir david, who had campaigned for the change. the former us secretary of state colin powell has died of covid complications at the age of 84. rescue efforts have been stepped up in the southern indian state of kerala, following devastating flooding. at least 27 people, including five children, have died and many more are missing. homes have been swept away by the rising floodwaters, and there have been landslides, after days of heavy rain. here's our south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan. every year, this region braces itself for monsoon season.
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once again, the forces of nature are showing no mercy. heavy rainfall and landslides have left a devastating and deadly mark in the southern state of kerala. as rivers overflow, villages have been cut off. "this was my livelihood," this shopkeeper says. now, everything is gone. rescuers have been retrieving the bodies of the dozens who have died. many of the victims were young. officials say they've found three children who had been buried together under the mud, holding onto each other. translation: the hill broke off near us, there's been _ a lot of damage and loss. the house is gone, children have gone, the water came in our homes. that's when they moved us here. with many homes submerged, relief camps have been set up. to many in kerala, these scenes evoke painful memories of 2018
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when the state experienced the worst floods in a century, leaving 400 people dead and hundreds of thousands displaced. experts say that in the last two decades, the number of cyclones over the arabian sea have doubled due to rising sea temperatures. a changing climate and a cycle of devastation, and with more heavy rain forecast in the coming days, it looks like the misery could continue. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. england have been ordered to play their next uefa home game behind closed doors after the periodic euro final against italy and wimbley. uefa has also imposed a ban for second game which is suspended for two years. here is our sports editor dan roan.
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they were the scenes that shamed english football. ticketless fans storming wembley this summer, on what was meant to have been one of the proudest days in the history of the stadium. the crowd disorder overshadowed england's first ever euros final. and today, the fa was hit with a stadium ban by uefa. ordered to play its next two england matches in european competition behind closed doors, the second of which is suspended for two years, along with 100,000 euros fine for a lack of order and discipline. in a statement, the fa said... 0ne former chief superintendent and football policing expert said lessons had to be learned. hugely embarrassing. it could have resulted in fatality, serious injury, there may well have been a situation where emergency services could not have been got into wembley if they needed to. so no—one should underestimate the impact of what went wrong on that particular day,
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which is why i really urge and hope that both the police and the fa will change this culture of defensiveness and denial and actually have a transparent and honest conversation about how to fix things for the future. the transformation of wembley and the commercial development surrounding it in recent years has made policing matches more of a challenge. stewarding is another concern, with many fans entering the stadium for the euros final illegally via a disabled entrance. graham and his son tim, who uses a wheelchair, were at the match and were caught up in the chaos that day. there's a few dozen england fans who have somehow managed to pour in through the outer door, and there's five stewards trying to hold them back. it was like a scene out of game of thrones or lord of the rings, where you could feel that they were about to come crashing through. and it was like them trying to hold them back and it was, it was really quite scary. today's punishment, the most serious ever imposed on the fa by uefa, means there will be no fans
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here next summer, when england play their opening nations league match at home, and there are fears it could have jeopardised a joint uk and ireland bid to stage the world cup in 2030. last week saw clashes between the police and hungary fans during a world cup qualifier at wembley. fifa is still investigating. the security arrangements at the national stadium under ever increasing scrutiny. dan roan, bbc news, wembley. more now on the death of the mp sir david amess, who was stabbed to death at belfairs methodist church in essex on friday. since the arrest of the suspect, somalis and people of somali heritage have been receiving death threats, and some youth clubs and community centres have had to close because of threats to safety. leaders from the somali community have condemned the attack but are bracing themselves for a rise in tensions. charlotte gallagher has been speaking to kahiye alim, from the council of somali organisations. the main issue for us is the
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labelling of somali heritage. as far as i understand, the perpetrator was born here. all he has in common with similes is his parents were somali. and now some community centres have had to close and some youth clubs have had to close.— have had to close. that's my understanding, _ have had to close. that's my understanding, yes. - have had to close. that's my understanding, yes. how- have had to close. that's my i understanding, yes. how does have had to close. that's my - understanding, yes. how does that make ou understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? — understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? sad. _ understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? sad. it _ understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? sad. it is - understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? sad. it is a - understanding, yes. how does that make you feel? sad. it is a sad - understanding, yes. how does that| make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. peole make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have — make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have to _ make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have to feel. _ make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have to feel. people - make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have to feel. people have i make you feel? sad. it is a sad day. people have to feel. people have to j people have to feel. people have to fearfor people have to feel. people have to fear for their safety. the muslim council of britain is offering new guidance in the aftermath of sir david amess's that. we can speak now to zara mohammed, who is the secretary general of the muslim council of britain. thank you very much forjoining us. where in the country in particular are you issuing this guidance to? it is going to beat nationally, because we appreciate that although the
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somali community has been targeted right now given the identity of the alleged suspect, there could be... there is a lot of anxiety across british muslim communities and we have got guidance around hate crime reporting, why you should do it, how you should do it, making that accessible, as well as keeping mosques safe and secure. because we know when incidents like this happen, often, places of worship can be a target. brute happen, often, places of worship can be a target-— happen, often, places of worship can beataruet.~ , , ,, ., be a target. we must stress, though, that there is — be a target. we must stress, though, that there is a — be a target. we must stress, though, that there is a southend. .. _ be a target. we must stress, though, that there is a southend. .. southend| that there is a southend... southend has a muslim community, sir david amess was mp for that community as well and he was on really good terms with them. i well and he was on really good terms with them. , ., with them. i spoke with the local mos: ue with them. i spoke with the local mosque in _ with them. i spoke with the local mosque in southend, _ with them. i spoke with the local mosque in southend, and - with them. i spoke with the local mosque in southend, and they . with them. i spoke with the local. mosque in southend, and they were devastated and heartbroken. they regarded him as notjust the local mp but a friend of the family. he had seen some of them grow up, attended their weddings, celebrations and even the opening of the essex mosque in the area, so for them they could not quite comprehend
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how anyone could do anything like this. they themselves to be quite anxious, but there's such a nice community feeling, a lot of people coming together, really supportive of each other at this time.- coming together, really supportive of each other at this time. where in articular of each other at this time. where in particular are _ of each other at this time. where in particular are you _ of each other at this time. where in particular are you seeing _ of each other at this time. where in particular are you seeing signs - of each other at this time. where in particular are you seeing signs of i particular are you seeing signs of threat and of people being really targeted? i threat and of people being really tarreted? ., threat and of people being really tarreted? «i . ., , targeted? i think particularly, we have heard _ targeted? i think particularly, we have heard from _ targeted? i think particularly, we have heard from our _ targeted? i think particularly, we have heard from our somali - have heard from our somali affiliates and divinity groups that they have received a death threats and also online. we had a lot of violent abuse, and also online. we had a lot of violentabuse, islamophobic and also online. we had a lot of violent abuse, islamophobic comments and hatred, critically on the online space and social media. haifa and hatred, critically on the online space and social media. how are you tellin: space and social media. how are you telling people _ space and social media. how are you telling people to _ space and social media. how are you telling people to respond _ space and social media. how are you telling people to respond if - space and social media. how are you telling people to respond if they - telling people to respond if they are targeted in this way? i telling people to respond if they are targeted in this way?- are targeted in this way? i think what is really _ are targeted in this way? i think what is really important - are targeted in this way? i think what is really important are - are targeted in this way? i think- what is really important are member this time is the legacy of sir david, which was really to support the communities and bring lots of people together, so our guidance is focused both on directive response, in terms of hate crime reporting,
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securing our places of worship, but also coming together notjust as muslim communities but is broader communities and making sure that we are engaging in that goodness together as well, so i think making sure the people are signposted to where they can get help and advice, and sometimes it is a simple as a conversation, we have a national network of affiliates with lots of different support on offer, so we really do hope that there is not too much hate crime and abuse, but as well as a good opportunity for people to come and commemorate the david's legacy and life as well. what sort of support are you getting or keeping places of worship safe? we, our guidance is going to be around things like securing the friday prayer, closing the door, having extra patrol, looking to work with local police and fire service and partners to see what additional risk assessments can be put in place, particularly as many young
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people attend services and classes. also thinking about personal safety, coming and going, our evening prayer in the night, morning prayer, and just generally people feeling safe and secure to actually go and... there is an idea that maybe thereby to be targeted, especially the very visibly muslim or visibly somali about so i thinkjust small things like that, but hopefully will be ok for many people. like that, but hopefully will be ok for many people-— for many people. what sort of su ort for many people. what sort of support would _ for many people. what sort of support would be _ for many people. what sort of support would be useful- for many people. what sort of support would be useful to i for many people. what sort of l support would be useful to have for many people. what sort of - support would be useful to have from other parts of society, outside the muslim communities you are referring to? i muslim communities you are referring to? ., , : , muslim communities you are referring to? «i , ., , ., to? i think it is really important for us to continue _ to? i think it is really important for us to continue to _ to? i think it is really important for us to continue to hear - to? i think it is really important - for us to continue to hear messages of 0—tolerance and community spirit, and from our politicians, from our political leaders, but also there is great collaboration that goes on at local community levels, whether at interfaith level, i think that needs to continue, that racism and intolerance or hate crime are not welcome in our society, they don't
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rep is and who we are and they are not part of us, so i think working with our different partners is really important as well as hearing that message that this is about all of us is communities coming together, not selling seeds of hatred and division. zara together, not selling seeds of hatred and division. ., ., a, ., hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank ou hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank you very — hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank you very much _ hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank you very much for _ hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank you very much for talking - hatred and division. zara mohammed, thank you very much for talking to i thank you very much for talking to us. our apologies, there seemed to be a bit of a crackle on that line to zara mohammed. hope you could hear what she was saying clearly enough. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello again. we're in a very cloudy but very mild airstream at the moment, but we've had some outbreaks of rain and drizzle already. for a while overnight, it will be drier, a few breaks in the cloud leading to some mist and fog patches. then we've got thickening cloud coming back into western areas, and it's here we're going to find some rain more widely by the end of the night. temperatures reach 18 degrees in a few places today. lows will be 12 to 14 degrees typically. a lot of cloud to start on tuesday, some outbreaks of rain, heavy at times over these western hills. heading into the afternoon, most of the wet weather
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is across northern and western areas, may cheer up a bit later in northern ireland. but it's across the east anglia and the southeast that we should see some sunshine developing, lifting temperatures to 20 or 21 degrees. even where we have cloud and outbreaks of rain, it is very mild, 17 to 19 degrees. there's more rain in the forecast on wednesday, but by the time we get to thursday and friday, with the winds from the north, it's going to feel much colder than it does right now.
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this is bbc news, i am christian fraser. the house of commons falls silent in memory of the murdered conservative mp, sir david amess. after a minute's silence, mps on all sides remembered their colleague — and friend. the prime minister paid tribute to sir david and his relentless campaign to have his constituency, southend recognised as a city. i am happy to announce that her majesty has agreed that southend will be accorded the city status it so cearly deserves. colin powell, who rose to become america's first black secretary of state has died at the age 84. president biden said he'd lost a dearfriend and a patriot
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of unmatched honor and dignity. has china's burgeoning military arsenal, gone hypersonic?

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