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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 18, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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today at one, the family of sir david amess visit the scene of his killing in essex. they say they're shattered by his death, but are grateful for the public support they've received. other mps have been speaking out, about the abuse and threats they routinely endure. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years so of course i take it very seriously. and we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we're doing everything we can, you need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. borisjohnson will lead the tributes to sir david on the floor of the commons. also this lunchtime... are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, especially towards women?
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good news for hundreds of ford workers on merseyside, with a multi million pound investment, to make components for electric cars. and, cameron norrie becomes the first british player, to win the prestigious indian wells tournament, in california. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big moments, all the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so please to win my biggest title. and coming up on the bbc news channel. responding from his ryder cup heartbreak — rory mcilroy rose back to winning ways with his 20th pga tour title at the cj cup.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the widow of sir david amess has visited the church where he was stabbed and killed during a constituency surgery on friday. accompanied by members of her family, julia amess spent around 15 minutes looking at some of the flowers that had been left in his memory. mps are returning to westminster for a special parliamentary session this afternoon to pay their own official tributes, and there'll be a special service at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. since sir david's death, a number of mps have been speaking out, about the abuse and threats they receive, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps security arrangements. last night sir david's family issued a statement saying they're �*shattered' by his death. our political correspondent, chris mason, is live at westminster for us this afternoon. chris. westminster is a sombre and thoughtful place this lunchtime. mps morning a colleague and asking big questions about their safety.
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downing street saying it is up to individual mps and the police whether they want to press ahead with meeting constituents face—to—face. but there is good reason why so many are worried. parliament reopening this morning. mps returning here, remembering sir david amess. he mps returning here, remembering sir david amm— david amess. he was “ust a really nice, david amess. he was “ust a really decent. h david amess. he wasjust a really nice, decent, honourable - david amess. he wasjust a really - nice, decent, honourable gentlemen. and to be taken in such a horrible and evil way, is frankly, hard to believe. many people are numb today. my believe. many people are numb today. my crime and a tragedy, but an attack on democracy, too. yet again, many here feel frightened and vulnerable. i'll some mps considering walking away from politics? considering walking away from olitics? , ., , ., politics? yes, i do question whether... _ politics? yes, i do question whether... it's _ politics? yes, i do question whether... it's not - politics? yes, i do question whether... it's notjust - politics? yes, i do question i whether... it's notjust about politics? yes, i do question - whether... it's notjust about me, it's about my staff and my family as well. but i'm passionate about
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wanting to change the world and... and nobody is going to stop me. chris bryant received a death threat over the weekend, a man has since been arrested. every mp you speak to is asking themselves questions about their safety, particularly when they are away from the security at westminster.— are away from the security at westminster. ~ , u, westminster. when the news came throu . h westminster. when the news came through about _ westminster. when the news came through about david _ westminster. when the news came through about david amess, - westminster. when the news came through about david amess, just i through about david amess, just after i finished my surgery, i was just in profound shock thinking he had been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like all of us and this is how his life ended. it is scary because _ this is how his life ended. it is scary because you _ this is how his life ended. it is scary because you just don't know, even _ scary because you just don't know, even if_ scary because you just don't know, even if you — scary because you just don't know, even if you have security guards at surgeries, — even if you have security guards at surgeries, if— even if you have security guards at surgeries, if you are walking about the town_ surgeries, if you are walking about the townjust going shopping, even if you _ the townjust going shopping, even if you are _ the townjust going shopping, even if you are not out of doing yourjob as an _ if you are not out of doing yourjob as an mp_ if you are not out of doing yourjob as an mp this could happen because people _ as an mp this could happen because people can — as an mp this could happen because people can follow you and target you. people can follow you and target ou. , ., �*, you. this morning, said david's family came — you. this morning, said david's family came to _ you. this morning, said david's family came to see _ you. this morning, said david's family came to see the - you. this morning, said david's family came to see the many . you. this morning, said david's- family came to see the many flowers left in his memory in essex. as his
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colleagues in westminster ask what can, what should change, given how much mps value face—to—face conversation with voters. we much mps value face-to-face conversation with voters. we need to resond to conversation with voters. we need to reapond to it. — conversation with voters. we need to reapond to it. we _ conversation with voters. we need to respond to it, we need _ conversation with voters. we need to respond to it, we need to _ conversation with voters. we need to respond to it, we need to make - conversation with voters. we need to respond to it, we need to make sure| respond to it, we need to make sure we're doing everything we can and we need to make sure we are doing that due diligence on everything. at the end of the day, my feeling is, it is a personal one, we mustn't allow those who attack on democracy, who want to threaten us and stop us from talking to our constituents and serving our communities, we cannot allow them to it's just five years since flowers were last left at parliament when the labour mpjo cox was murdered. parliament when the labour mp 10 cox was murdered-— was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked — was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked it _ was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked it happen, _ was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked it happen, but - was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked it happen, but in - was murdered. here we are again. i am shocked it happen, but in some | am shocked it happen, but in some way am shocked it happen, but in some way to— am shocked it happen, but in some way to not— am shocked it happen, but in some way to not surprise. in some ways our political — way to not surprise. in some ways our political discourse has got better, — our political discourse has got better, if— our political discourse has got better, if you go back to 2016 and the brexii— better, if you go back to 2016 and the brexit campaign if you go back to that _ the brexit campaign if you go back to that period in the aftermath of that, _ to that period in the aftermath of that, while it was still up in the air, our— that, while it was still up in the air, our political debate then was more _ air, our political debate then was
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more toxic— air, our political debate then was more toxic than it is now. but it's still pretty— more toxic than it is now. but it's still pretty bad. more toxic than it is now. but it's still pretty bad-— still pretty bad. this lunchtime, preparations— still pretty bad. this lunchtime, preparations for _ still pretty bad. this lunchtime, preparations for this _ still pretty bad. this lunchtime, | preparations for this afternoon's commemorations. as westminster reflects. the prime minister will lead the reflections in the commons this afternoon, couple of hours set aside for those reflections from mps. after that mps and peers heading across the road from parliament to the church in the grounds of westminster abbey for a service of remembrance. westminster abbey for a service of remembrance-— westminster abbey for a service of remembrance. chris, thank you for that. let's speak to our security correspondent, frank gardner who joins us. frank, what do we know about the man who has been arrested? he is frank, what do we know about the man who has been arrested?— who has been arrested? he is british born and raised, _ who has been arrested? he is british born and raised, 25 _ who has been arrested? he is british born and raised, 25 years _ who has been arrested? he is british born and raised, 25 years old, - who has been arrested? he is british born and raised, 25 years old, grewl born and raised, 25 years old, grew up born and raised, 25 years old, grew up in croydon. his parents came from somalia in the 1990s. his father was an adviser to somalia's prime
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minister and that caused some people to look at a possible somali connexion. but so far there doesn't seem to be any connexion to their prescribed somali terrorist group, al shabaab. the detectives al sha baab. the detectives questioning al shabaab. the detectives questioning have until friday. he has been rearrested under section 41 of the terrorism act 2000. they are going through every line of enquiries, police have recovered the weapon that was used to murder sir david amess, that was recovered from the scene. the suspect made no attempt to flee the scene at all. witnesses at the time said he didn't alter what is known as the cry that some people carrying out what are known as jihadist attacks often cry or shout out. that wasn't heard. anyhow, everyone is keeping an open
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mind about it. his father has been questioned by counterterrorism police and his phone has been taken away for analysis as well. because the police are saying very little, they haven't updated since saturday so there is a dearth of information, frankly. so there is a dearth of information, frankl . . ~ so there is a dearth of information, frankl . ., ,, from politicians to reality tv stars, for many in the public eye, having to deal with abuse, is a fact of life and its particularly bad for women. social media is a big problem, with tech firms saying they re doing all they can to tackle online hate. but a panorama investigation, has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. here's our specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring. kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. my instagram, that's my workplace.
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no—one walks into their office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening.
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as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received doing thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content. some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures
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to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes at a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can see more on all of this on panorama, tonight, at 7.30, on bbc one. almost 3.6 million covid booster jabs have been administered in a month, according to the latest nhs england figures. 40% of people aged 50 and over who are eligible have been given a vaccine. the health secretary says the boosters "will help keep the virus at bay." but there are concerns around the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths which remain higher in the uk than elsewhere in western europe.
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our health correspondent jim reed is with me now. we know the figures are rising when it comes to hospitalisations and infections, but as far as boosters are concerned, is the take—up as high as we would like? this are concerned, is the take-up as high as we would like? this campaign was announced _ high as we would like? this campaign was announced in _ high as we would like? this campaign was announced in september- high as we would like? this campaign was announced in september across i was announced in september across the whole of the uk. anyone over 50, just to remind you, health and social care workers and some people with underlying health conditions qualify for this third jab. the important thing to remember, you are eligible if you are six months after your second jab, so it won't be everyone. those figures showing 3.6 million people have now been given this jab across england. john roberts, who has looked into this says it is less than half of the people who are eligible, who have actually received the jab. the concern by some is this programme is not moving may be as fast as occurred and that could leave some
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people more vulnerable this winter. the nhs says it is now inviting more people to come forward and the numbers, the rate so far are in line with independent guidance. this is england stop elsewhere, scotland and wales don't publish data in quite the same way. in northern ireland the same way. in northern ireland the focus has been on healthcare workers rather than the elderly. they are just starting to roll that out now. across the uk, if you offered this jab, come forward and take it, because it offers more protection, orshould take it, because it offers more protection, or should do, this winter. , . ~ protection, or should do, this winter. , ., ,, , ., ford is investing more than 200 million pounds in its halewood plant on merseyside, to build power units for electric vehicles. partly funded by the government, it will be the first dedicated factory, assembling components for electric cars in europe, safeguarding 500 jobs. our business correspondent, ben king, has the full story. ford has been making cars in north—west england for more than a
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century. but in nine years, the company will make petrol and diesel things of the past. the new era it will be electric and it starts at this plant in halewood on merseyside, electric power units, motoring transmission in one will start rolling off the production lines in 202a. start rolling off the production lines in 2024.— lines in 2024. this is our first investment — lines in 2024. this is our first investment in _ lines in 2024. this is our first investment in electrified - lines in 2024. this is our first - investment in electrified components investment in electrified components in europe. 500 people and we have in halewood, this will secure the future of those jobs for the foreseeable future. great news for the people in halewood. it is foreseeable future. great news for the people in halewood.— the people in halewood. it is a small part _ the people in halewood. it is a small part of _ the people in halewood. it is a small part of all's _ the people in halewood. it is a small part of all's plan - the people in halewood. it is a small part of all's plan to - the people in halewood. it is a small part of all's plan to go i small part of all's plan to go electric. a £230 million investment, some of which is government money. it is spending billions on two plants in the usa in kentucky and the usa. -- plants in the usa in kentucky and the usa. —— tennessee. but it comes off the back of nissan investing in its factory in sunderland. the plan see the construction of a giger factory, the giant battery facility
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which makes up such an important part of the manufacture of electric cars. ~ ., , , ., part of the manufacture of electric cars. more investments we have like that, the cars. more investments we have like that. the more _ cars. more investments we have like that, the more it _ cars. more investments we have like that, the more it will _ cars. more investments we have like that, the more it will draw _ cars. more investments we have like that, the more it will draw in - cars. more investments we have like that, the more it will draw in other l that, the more it will draw in other components into the electric vehicle supply chain. we are in the transition phase from internal combustion to electric. once you stop the momentum, like with this investment, it will attract more companies in. investment, it will attract more companies in-— companies in. vauxhall is also investin: companies in. vauxhall is also investing 100 _ companies in. vauxhall is also investing 100 million - companies in. vauxhall is also investing 100 million at - companies in. vauxhall is also investing 100 million at its - companies in. vauxhall is also l investing 100 million at its plant investing 100 million at its plant in ellesmere port. but critics say it is still not enough.— in ellesmere port. but critics say it is still not enough. what we are seeinu is it is still not enough. what we are seeing is other _ it is still not enough. what we are seeing is other european - it is still not enough. what we are | seeing is other european countries are racing — seeing is other european countries are racing ahead in building battery plants, _ are racing ahead in building battery plants, clean technology, new vehicle — plants, clean technology, new vehicle production and comparatively there is_ vehicle production and comparatively there is limited action in the uk. the electric future of the uk car industry is far from assured. but this news is another important step on the road. our top story this lunchtime. the family of sir david amess visit the scene of his killing in essex. they say they're shattered
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by his death but are grateful for the public support they've received. and coming up, when a computer mixed up a t—shirt with a number plate. coming up on the bbc news channel, a new british men's number one and the new indian wells champion, cameron norrie makes history to seal one of the biggest wins in tennis. hundreds of people, naked and covered only in white body paint, have been photographed next to the dead sea in israel to draw attention to its dramatically receding shoreline. it's all part of a live installation by the artist spencer tunick, who s used similar photo—shoots around the world, to highlight environmental change. our middle east correspondent, tom bateman, has the full story. they came in the desert sun with nothing to show but themselves. bare footsteps in front
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of the artist's lens. this mass of the living is here to highlight the fate of the dead sea. the photographer spencer tunick is on his third visit here, drawing attention to the sea's receding shoreline. all over the world, he has used naked subjects to show the plight of the environment. i love all the participants who came and risked everything, risked their bodies, their reputations! but they are true art warriors and they are adventurers. it's been taking a while to get the shot exactly right but you can see and feel what the point is here, about humans' impact on nature. they are painted as white as the sea salt columns left by this mineral rich water. the dead sea sits at the lowest point on earth. the shoreline is shared betweenjordan, israel and the occupied west bank and it's being starved of its fresh water supply.
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here, you can just soak up the beauty, it's why people want to come, of course, but it's so sad at the same time because you know that at so many points across the shoreline, this won't be possible in even a few years' time. the dead sea is shrinking. this expert says it's entirely a man—made problem with the sea's sources dammed forfarming and drinking water. since the 1970s, there have been large water diversions pumping water out of the sea of galilee, westwards to israel and eastwards tojordan. and basically, we are slowly losing this very unique and wonderful kind of ecological system. it's so serious the ground around the dead sea is collapsing into huge sinkholes. for now, the art of preserving what we use is the message of this naked attraction. it's fascinating because you see so many people taking part
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in this act of art. i'm helping him and i am enjoying myself. tom bateman, bbc news, on the dead sea coast. in the last few minutes it's been confirmed — in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary of in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary of state in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary of state colin in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary of state colin powell in the last few minutes it's been confirmed that the former us secretary of state colin powell has died _ secretary of state colin powell has died. , . , secretary of state colin powell has died. , ., , secretary of state colin powell has died. ,., _._ , secretary of state colin powell has died. ,., ,,, died. his family say it is because of complications _ died. his family say it is because of complications related - died. his family say it is because of complications related to - died. his family say it is because | of complications related to covid 19. he was the first african—american to hold the post of secretary of state after a military career. his family said they have lost a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and great american. he was 84. rescue efforts have been stepped up in the southern indian state of kerala following devastating flooding. at least 26 people, including five children, have died and many more are missing. homes have been swept away by the rising floodwaters and there have been landslides after days of heavy rain. here's our south asia correspondent,
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rajini vaidyanathan. every year, this region braces itself for monsoon season. once again, the forces of nature are showing no mercy. heavy rainfall and landslides have left a devastating and deadly mark in the southern state of kerala. as rivers overflow, villagers have been cut off. "this was my livelihood", this shopkeeper says. now, everything is gone. rescuers have been retrieving the bodies of the dozens who have died. many of the victims were young. officials say they've found three children who had been buried together under the mud, holding onto each other. translation: the hill broke off near us, there's been _ a lot of damage and loss. the house is gone, children have gone, the water came in our homes. that's when they moved us here.
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with many homes submerged, relief camps have been set up. to many in kerala, these scenes evoke painful memories of 2018 when the state experienced the worst floods in a century. leaving 400 people dead and hundreds of thousands displaced. experts say that in the last two decades, the number of cyclones over the arabian sea have doubled due to rising sea temperatures. a changing climate and a cycle of devastation and with more heavy rain forecast in the coming days, it looks like the misery could continue. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. a teenager has been arrested in connection with the death of a 14—year—old boy at a railway station in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was stabbed on saturday, and died in hospital. police scotland has begun a murder inquiry, saying a 16—year—old boy has been arrested in connection with the attack.
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scotland's covid passport scheme has come into force today a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. a team at great ormond street children's hospital has helped develop a pioneering technique which has doubled the number of children able to receive a new heart. around 50 children are waiting for transplants in the uk but donated hearts the correct size for the child are rare. the agonising wait to find out if a suitable organ is available is more than twice as long for children and babies. here's alastair fee. at the age of eight, it was thought that lucy was the oldest child in the world to receive a donor heart that did not match her blood type. she is able to do everything that other children can whereas we've never had that, she's never been able
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to do everything that other children can do. this is the heart—lung bypass machine. you got the artificial heart, the artificial lung. we come back up here, this is the new edition which allows us to do a mismatch heart transplants in more patients than ever before. more transplants thanks to new research here at great ormond street hospital means more lives saved. traditionally what we used to do is drain the patient's blood and throw it away and replace it with three times their circulating volume with donated blood and products which can go into litres. what this technology does is allow us to target particularly antibodies that cause rejection and not use that amount of blood. for children like lucy, that is ending years of waiting for a donor. she was born with a congenital heart defect, diagnosed atjust 18 months. after her fourth birthday, she was told she needed a transplant. finally performed thanks to this new research three and a half years later.
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it meant lucy wasn't waiting as long as she had to. the thought of having to wait any more years, if we were still waiting now, i don't know what the effect on our mental health and ourfamily life, the fact that this new research, this new development means they can do more transplants on children is just amazing and it's going to make such a difference. until now, the wait for a donor has been twice as long among children and babies. what this means is we can double the age range of the patients we can offer it, we've expanded that donor pool that is available so they've got a chance of getting a heart quicker, not laying on a waiting list for so long. the team here at great ormond street hospital have now performed heart transplants using this device on ten children. all have survived with no need for re—transplantation, or any additional time spent in hospital. lucy has made a good recovery and for the first time is able
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to have a normal, happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her new heart is working fantastically. all the scans and tests and everything she's had has shown that everything is brilliant so we've got a future now. you just can't put into words how amazing it is that we have, you know, another chance at life. right now, around 50 children in the uk are waiting for a heart transplant. this technique will help to bring that number down. as for lucy, she now wants to climb a mountain and is looking forward to going on holiday to italy next summer. alistair fee, bbc news. we that breaking news some moments ago, the death of colin powell, former us secretary of state, his family saying he died from
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complications relating to covid19. he was fully vaccinated. jonathan beale is here. the first black us secretary of state. part of so many administrations involved in american foreign policy, this is a huge loss. yes, it's notjust the first black us secretary of state under george w bush. but also the first black chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, the most senior us military position, after a 35 year career in the military, the son of a jamaican immigrant, brought up in harlem. he made his mark on us politics. we will remember, probably, most of all him as us secretary of state, getting up at the united nations, giving that speech about the justifications for going to war with iraq, the invasion in 2003, presenting, i think, iraq, the invasion in 2003, presenting, ithink, to iraq, the invasion in 2003, presenting, i think, to his regret, what was essentially faulty intelligence about the so—called weapons of mass destruction in iraq.
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that, as i say, a point of regret but a big politicalfigure. important because of who he was, his background, and you know, as you say, the first lack chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and the first black us secretary of state. he was critical of president trump later on, did not like his politics and made that very clear but he leaves a big hole and is someone who has broken through many barriers for black americans.— broken through many barriers for black americans. jonathan, thank ou. black americans. jonathan, thank you. remembering: _ black americans. jonathan, thank you. remembering: powell- black americans. jonathan, thank you. remembering: powell who. black americans. jonathan, thank. you. remembering: powell who has died at the age of 84. a bronze disc, believed to be the world's oldest map of the stars, is to go on display at the british museum in the new year. the nebra sky disc, discovered in germany in 1999, is understood to be more than 3,500 years old. it measures around 30 centimetres, with gold symbols representing the sun, moon and stars which are thought to have been objects of worship. when a man in surrey received a fine for driving in a bus
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lane in bath in somerset more than 100 miles away, he assumed it was a mistake. but when david knight from dorking looked at the photographic evidence, he couldn't even find a car in the picture. jon kay takes up the story. we got this through the door. laughing. it's not often you can laugh at a parking ticket but paula and dave knight can't stop chuckling. because when they looked closely at the penalty notice they were sent from bath, they spotted a mistake. so my number plate my wife bought me for my birthday is my nickname, basically. it's kn19 ter, which is knighter, which is what my mates know me as. the poor lady that's walking down the bus lane has got a t—shirt on very similar and it's knitter. where her handbag strap goes across, its blocking one of the letters out. so the technology in the cameras thought that lady's sweatshirt,
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knitter, was your car? yes, that's correct, yes. she's been sort of changed over to a vehicle instead of the person overnight and, yes, i thought it was bizarre. yeah, i couldn't believe it when i got it through. first of all, my wife accused me of being in bath without her. so that was the first thing to explain — that i wasn't there. then, obviously, when i looked at the picture, i realised it was nothing to do with us at all really. paula rang the council in bath to challenge the £90 fine. initially, the woman on the other end of the phone was not amused. she said, you realise, madam, you know, you were caught in a bus lane. and then she actually looked at the picture and burst out laughing. so saw the funny side. so i'm hoping that they've cancelled the ticket. are you going to bath again? i'm a bit worried about going to bath.
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i don't know if we'll take the van in with us if we go, we might take the train. jon kay, bbc news. time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello, clive. it is a cloudy day today, big temperature fluctuations in store for the week ahead and lets look at the jet stream to find out why. the upper level winds are here up why. the upper level winds are here up with this pattern we are on the warmer side of thejet up with this pattern we are on the warmer side of the jet stream so we draw in milderairfrom warmer side of the jet stream so we draw in milder airfrom the south, along the sea track, picking up moisture in the form of cloud and we also have some rain around and this is the main rain pushing steadily east, we see that running into more of the south—east of england, and the heavier rain into scotland. other areas are dry, but it's damp, drizzly, low cloud, misty weather, mild with temperatures of 16 or 17.
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