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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 18, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. we'll have much more on this throughout the morning. and in our other main news.
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the women disappearing from public life under taliban—controlled afghanistan. we hear their stories and speak to the ministry now in charge of their futures. it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i am so happy with how i treated all the occasions, big moments, the matches.
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yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. mps will gather in westminster today to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are �*shattered' by his death. aru na iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp.
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he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement sir david's family gave this plea. "we ask people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all. this is the only way forward. set aside hatred and work towards togetherness. please let some good come from this tragedy." this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. mps have been speaking about the abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to speak in debates and representing my constituents. it is hard day to day to constantly think about reporting every abuse and intimidation and harassment, but i have to say, something
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has got to be done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem, but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is central to what we do. we can't just lock ourselves away. the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. for now, southend is in mourning
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for a man who dedicated his life to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered labour mpjo cox, says it brought back terrible memories when he heard of the attack on sir david amess. i thinkjust when you get that... ..when i got that call on friday ijust had a very immediate and sort of very physical reaction to it. i was back in that moment five years ago when i got the call aboutjo and i found it very hard to function. i picked the kids up from school and went away for the weekend just to try and get away from it all. but i also, i guess the other sort of emotion was just the sort of... the terrible sadness for the family, knowing what they're going through, knowing those moments of hope when you know that there's been
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an attack but you hope it's not too bad, to then the realisation that the worst possible thing that you could ever imagine in your life has just happened to you and that you then have to tell your loved ones about it. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, is at westminster. a jonathan blake, is at westminster. truly sombre di pay a truly sombre day as mps gather to pay tribute to sir david amess. forgetting about the political allegiances, paying tribute to one of their own?— of their own? yes, it will be a sombre day — of their own? yes, it will be a sombre day at _ of their own? yes, it will be a sombre day at westminster, l of their own? yes, it will be a | sombre day at westminster, it of their own? yes, it will be a i sombre day at westminster, it is of their own? yes, it will be a - sombre day at westminster, it is the first chance mps have had to express their condolences and their sadness at the death of sir david amess in person and those attributable dominate proceedings here at westminster today. normal business has been largely suspended and the house of commons will be led by the prime minister, borisjohnson, at around 3.30 this afternoon when
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members of parliament on all sides of the political spectrum will put into their own words, their affection and their respect for sir david amess which, we have heard in the last couple of days since his death, was felt on all sides here, and pay those tributes publicly. that will be the overwhelming mood today. yes, one of sadness with a sombre tone, but also one of reflection and of respect for the passing of a colleague. but alongside those tributes that is also a determination here by mps and others to perhaps take this as an opportunity in the wake of such a terrible tragedy to address some of the pressing concerns that many mps have about their own safety and the risks they face in the course of doing theirjob day—to—day. 0ne risks they face in the course of doing theirjob day—to—day. one of those who has been speaking out is the mp for the rhondda in south wales, the labour mp, chris bryant, who has revealed he faced another
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death threat in the wake of what he said after sir david amess was killed, appealing for people to be kinder to each other. this morning he said he has reflected on whether he said he has reflected on whether he would continue to do his job. 0h, allthe time, yes, i do question whether... because it's notjust about me, it's about my staff and it's about my family as well. but i don't believe that poverty is necessary. poverty doesn't come from heaven like some mysterious dispensation and land on some people's doorsteps and not on others. it has human causes and it has human remedies. i believe that we can tackle climate change, i believe that any man's death diminishes me so i must care about human rights in every country in the world. i care passionately that people in the rhondda are using food banks more than they ever have done in the past.
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so i'm passionate about wanting to change the world and... ..and nobody's going to stop me. the passions that mps have, the causes they believe in and their convictions in many cases, which have brought them into public life of the reasons why they do the job and want to continue doing it as openly and excessively as possible. backbenchers like sir david amess don't have protection, they go about their business largely on their own. but others, such as senior government ministers do have a different level of protection and the deputy prime minister has been speaking this morning about the threats and intimidation he has faced and his thoughts on the whole debate around mp's security. there
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will be peeple _ debate around mp's security. there will be people who _ debate around mp's security. there will be people who have _ debate around mp's security. there will be people who have had - debate around mp's security. there will be people who have had worse threats _ will be people who have had worse threats than me and i feel for female — threats than me and i feel for female colleagues who have come off twitter— female colleagues who have come off twitter because it is so vile. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years. so of course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it. we need to make sure we are doing everything we can. we do that due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day my feeling is, it's a personal one, we mustn't allow those who want to threaten us, who want to stop us talking to our constituents serving our communities, we can't allow them to win. it will be a chance for the mps to remember sir david amess in their own words but also address the issues on the safety around mps. there will be a church service led by the archbishop of canterbury in the grounds of westminster abbey. jonathan, thank you very much. jonathan, thank you very much. jonathan blake, our political
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correspondent. let's speak now to sir peter fahy. he's a former chief constable of greater manchester police. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. the question occupying so many people right now, how do you protect mps on democracy, people's access to those mps, while at the same time effectively identifying and stopping threats. threats which are ever more present because of social media? yes, absolutely. clearly there will be quite a bit of focus on the prevent programme. which was put in place after thejuly the prevent programme. which was put in place after the july the 7th bombings, when we realised a lot of the threats were coming from inside the threats were coming from inside the country. this suspect was referred at some point. it is like any other programme which is put in place to try and deter young people from getting involved in knife crime or drugs, gangs, you know, it is
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voluntary and it will have its successes and it will have people who will sadly go on to commit violent attacks. but as all your clips have said, in terms of protection for mds, there is a balance between accessibility but putting in common—sense measures to protect them. both putting in common-sense measures to protect them-— protect them. both of the guests i have spoken _ protect them. both of the guests i have spoken to — protect them. both of the guests i have spoken to about _ protect them. both of the guests i have spoken to about this - protect them. both of the guests i have spoken to about this already | have spoken to about this already today have said there needs to be a rebranding in effect of prevent in order to encourage the families and friends of people who are of interest to the security services to report any changes in their behaviour or any concerns they might have. is that something you would agree with? it have. is that something you would agree with?— have. is that something you would agree with? have. is that something you would aaree with? , , , agree with? it has been suggested in the ast, i agree with? it has been suggested in the past. i don't _ agree with? it has been suggested in the past, i don't think— agree with? it has been suggested in the past, i don't think there - agree with? it has been suggested in the past, i don't think there is - agree with? it has been suggested in the past, i don't think there is any i the past, i don't think there is any great mystery about prevent. it is like many other programmes we have had to try and deter people from getting involved in violence. 0ften young people. if you look at most murders, most violent attacks and
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other forms of criminal behaviour, often the people involved in those will have been in and out of prison, they will have been on rehabilitation programmes and you can say that those programmes have failed. the critical aspect of prevent, it is not getting enough referrals from friends and family. these are often the key people who notice the change in behaviour, notice the change in behaviour, notice if a particularly a young person is spending a lot more time on the internet and seems to have had their mind poison. i am not sure thatjust calling it a different name will solve that. it away from having such a police focus to just making it clear at this is a multi—agency approach, it is involving local voluntary organisations, charities and schools and it is about safeguarding young people and that is similar to many other programmes. but at the beginning of prevent, it was often associated with the police spying, there were a lot of concerns amongst
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a lot of communities, particularly the muslim community about british foreign policy and people drawn into prevent is because they disagreed with the foreign policy. as time has gone on, a lot of that has changed, but there is a lot of support particularly from mosques and people from within the muslim community, but the trouble is a lot of that reputation has continued and it is a complex programme. it is a really difficult issue about how you change somebody�*s attitude and they way of thinking. somebody's attitude and they way of thinkina. ~., ., ., ., ., thinking. moving on from that, how do ou thinking. moving on from that, how do you begin _ thinking. moving on from that, how do you begin to _ thinking. moving on from that, how do you begin to address _ thinking. moving on from that, how do you begin to address the - thinking. moving on from that, how. do you begin to address the question of aligning the resources, the policing and security resources that we have with the need? because as we look at the question of security of mps and their staff, a suggestion from the home secretary that bodyguards could be a practical solution, but as a practical given mps are in all sorts of locations on any given day? what do you think
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needs to happen? mps themselves have a big role in saying whether they want more security. are they the best people to address that? yes. best people to address that? yes, absolutely- _ best people to address that? yes, absolutely. mps _ best people to address that? yes, absolutely. mps decide _ best people to address that? ye: absolutely. mps decide to take advice from a security assessment or not. already the police and security services have a very sophisticated system of trying to assess the risk, the threat and harm from a particular individual and how to prioritise that and which resources to use. some of these forms of security it is about physical security it is about physical security and some of that can be provided by the private sector. but it comes down to what that individual, what that mp wants to do and where they see the balance. 0ne and where they see the balance. one of the crucial aspects, we can never take it as normal that somebody gets a death threat. that is a very serious offence. as in the debate we have had about violence against women and this issue of precursor events, part of it is also not in
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any way accepting that somehow for threats of violence, death threats, that sort of violent abuse is anyway some sort of occupational hazard for people like mps or other public figures. at least give it more investigation so more people are convicted. that will act as an example to others to make it clear that the rest of society and the criminal law regards this as a serious matter.— criminal law regards this as a serious matter. . , ., , , serious matter. finally and briefly, 'ust on serious matter. finally and briefly, just on that — serious matter. finally and briefly, just on that question _ serious matter. finally and briefly, just on that question of— serious matter. finally and briefly, just on that question of empty - just on that question of empty security, do you think the decision on whether an mp should have more security shouldn't be taken entirely out of the hands of the mps themselves, but it should be a third party, someone with security experience? party, someone with security experience?_ party, someone with security exerience? ., ., ., ., ,, experience? no, that cannot happen. an adviser can _ experience? no, that cannot happen. an adviser can give _ experience? no, that cannot happen. an adviser can give that _ experience? no, that cannot happen. an adviser can give that advice, - experience? no, that cannot happen. an adviser can give that advice, but l an adviser can give that advice, but it is for any individual, including an mp if they want to take that advice and to what extent they want to curtail their activities, particularly in terms of mps access
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to their constituents, which is a crucial part of democracy. thank you very much- — crucial part of democracy. thank you very much. former _ crucial part of democracy. thank you very much. former chief _ crucial part of democracy. thank you very much. former chief constable l crucial part of democracy. thank you | very much. former chief constable of greater manchester police there. if you want to get in touch over any of the stories we are covering, you can get in touch on twitter. it's been a month since the new taliban government in afghanistan banned girls from secondary schools across most of the country. it's also forbidden women, except for those in the public health sector, from returning to work. this has raised fears that women in afghanistan will once again be trested as second—class citizens by a hardline taliban regime. the bbc has now obtained exclusive access to the former women's affairs ministry in the capital, kabul, that's now been replaced by the feared taliban vice and virtue ministry. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye reports. at 17, her life, with all its possibilities, has been shut down.
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before the taliban took over, she would have been preparing for school, along with her brother, each morning. now afghan girls face the biggest rollback in human rights in recent times. at the top of her class, she wanted to be a doctor. the family lives hand—to—mouth and education was their path
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to a better future. under an all—male taliban regime, women are disappearing from public life. they haven't been allowed to return to work yet. those who have marched to claim back their rights have been beaten. we met one of the protesters who was lashed with electric cables in kabul. till august, she supported herfamily of six. now, she's out of a job. the taliban are keen to show they're more moderate
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than their last time in power. their actions so far belie the claims. this used to be the women's affairs ministry, which no longer exists under the taliban government. it's been replaced by the ministry of vice and virtue, which used to be the most feared section of the previous taliban regime. "what future do women have in an afghanistan ruled by the taliban?", we are here to ask. it's hard to imagine afghan women journalists would get to question the taliban like this. surrounded by their men, i asked a taliban spokesman when girls could go back to school, women to work. your government, your leaders have said that women should not
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return to work right now because of the security situation. you said the same thing about girls going to secondary schools. so it's not true that you have allowed them and they are not going. how much time? don't you think the women and girls in your country deserve to know when they can go back to their education, when they can go back to theirjobs? they are the future of afghanistan, but half of this country's population has no place in it right now. afghan girls are asking if the world will hold the taliban to account. yogita limaye, bbc news, kabul.
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the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today, a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events, including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. 0ur reporterjamie mcivor is in our glasgow newsroom. hello to you. how has this last fortnight gone? what issues has that thrown up? fortnight gone? what issues has that thrown u - ? . , fortnight gone? what issues has that thrown u? . , ., , thrown up? certainly it remains controversial _ thrown up? certainly it remains controversial in _ thrown up? certainly it remains controversial in scotland. - thrown up? certainly it remainsj controversial in scotland. some thrown up? certainly it remains. controversial in scotland. some in the affected sectors really do believe they are having an unfair burden here. just to remind you of the people who are affected by this, nightclubs, large unseated events, anything with more than 500 people indoors or 4000 outdoors, so potentially something like a music festival or any event with more than
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10,000 people. an obvious example of that being a major football match. the reason for this grace period was to try to give businesses time to get their systems up and running, actual enforcement begins today and it is council officers who will be responsible for that enforcement. to begin with they will go for a softly softly approach, all about explanation, help and encouragement. but ultimately, if anyone is found wanting, they could face prosecution. being a monday i would imagine the first big test may come tomorrow when celtic are playing a major football game. tomorrow when celtic are playing a majorfootball game. you cannot major football game. you cannot imagine majorfootball game. you cannot imagine many people heading out to a nightclub on a monday anyway. as you have explained, the hospitality sector is frustrated about this, but give us a sense of what covid cases are like in scotland and what officials are saying? share
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are like in scotland and what officials are saying?- officials are saying? are the reasons behind _ officials are saying? are the reasons behind the - officials are saying? are the | reasons behind the scheme? officials are saying? are the - reasons behind the scheme? the scottish reasons behind the scheme? tia: scottish government would reasons behind the scheme? tt2 scottish government would like to see the scheme as a natural way of helping business, it's not so much about trying to encourage younger people to be vaccinated, although thatis people to be vaccinated, although that is a factor, this could actually, in the scottish government's view, reduce any possibility of restrictions being reimposed as the autumn and winter going on. so in that sense, helping business. in terms of where case numbers are, over the past fortnight they have averaged around 2500 cases a day. that is down on the figures we were seeing a few weeks ago when we were seeing a few weeks ago when we got to around 6000. on the other hand, that decline in recent weeks, it now seems the numbers have plateaued. 0n the other hand, the numbers in hospital in scotland who have tested positive for covid recently are coming down, just over 800 a day at the moment. some nhs wards in scotland are under
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significant pressure. two nhs boards will be getting military assistance from tomorrow.— will be getting military assistance from tomorrow. , . . ~' , ., ., from tomorrow. jamie, thank you for that. a teenager has been arrested in connection with the death of a 14—year—old boy who was found seriously injured at a railway station in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was attacked on the platform of high street railway station on saturday. police scotland launched a murder inquiry and said a 16—year—old boy has been arrested in connexion with the incident. 0fficers said inquiries are continuing after the arrest. two suspects in the murder lastjuly of the dutch investigative crime reporter peter r de vries are due to appear in the amsterdam district court. de vries, a household name in the netherlands, was shot five times, including at least once in the head, after leaving a nearby tv studio. 0ur correspondent anna holligan is following the case. it's not an understatement to say most of the netherlands will be watching, because this is the first time we will see these two suspects in public in court.
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in terms of what we can expect, this is not actually the start of the trial, so this is a proforma hearing which is required to keep them in detention for longer. we are expecting the prosecution probably to give an indication of how their investigation is going. we are likely to hear from the defence, too, any of their wishes. these two men have been kept in restrictive custody since they were arrested. they were detained within an hour of peter r de vries being shot, just after he came out of that studio in central amsterdam. these two men, one of them is 21 years old, his name is delano g, only the first name under dutch law. he is from rotterdam and another man, who is 35 years old originally from poland is suspected of driving the getaway car. we are expecting the court to be packed. it's going to be a very difficult day, especially for the friends and family but also for the country, that's really having to deal
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with a kind of surge of gun—related violence linked to the global narcotics trade. an american congressman has warned that a reported test of a hypersonic missile by china should serve as a call to action. mike gallagher, who serves on the house of representatives armed services committee, said china had an increasingly credible capability to undermine us defences. the financial times says the device circled the globe in a low space—orbit before cruising towards its target. china has denied the report saying it was a routine spacecraft test. ford has announced a transformation of its plant at halewood on merseyside in a move that will secure hundreds ofjobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 2024. it's part of plans to make its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe electric by 2030.
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0ur our business correspondent katie prescott told me it is part of a bigger change in the uk car market. it is not long now until 2030 when cars with internal combustion engines will not be allowed to be sold in the uk. there was a question over this plant which sells gearboxes for petrol and diesel cars. the fact it is going to be part of the electric vehicle supply chain going forward is great news for the 500 people working there but also it is seen as a vote of confidence for the uk car industry as a whole as we move through this rather strange transitional period. i think we can hear now from stuart rowley, the president of ford europe about this investment. this rowley, the president of ford europe about this investment.— about this investment. this is our first investment _ about this investment. this is our first investment in _ about this investment. this is our first investment in electrified - first investment in electrified components in europe and these power units, _ components in europe and these power units, these _ components in europe and these power units, these are the components that take the _ units, these are the components that take the energy from the battery and turn that _ take the energy from the battery and turn that into traction to drive the wheels _ turn that into traction to drive the wheels it — turn that into traction to drive the wheels. it is like an electric motor and transmission combined. 500
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people _ and transmission combined. 500 peopie we — and transmission combined. 500 people we have inhaled today and this will_ people we have inhaled today and this will secure the future for the foreseeable future. we have a great workforce _ foreseeable future. we have a great workforce in halewood, we have excellent — workforce in halewood, we have excellent labour relations, we have a productive plant, good quality. we did get— a productive plant, good quality. we did get support from the uk government from the automatic transformation fund and we are really. — transformation fund and we are really, really pleased about that. we also — really, really pleased about that. we also have the technology in halewood, precision machinery, skills— halewood, precision machinery, skills to — halewood, precision machinery, skills to produce these components so we _ skills to produce these components so we are _ skills to produce these components so we are happy to make that choice. tell us— so we are happy to make that choice. tell us more — so we are happy to make that choice. tell us more about the importance of this for halewood, merseyside. this investment could have gone elsewhere, couldn't it? yes, halewood — elsewhere, couldn't it? yes, halewood was _ elsewhere, couldn't it? yes, halewood was in _ elsewhere, couldn't it? yes, | halewood was in competition elsewhere, couldn't it? 123 halewood was in competition with another ford factory in cologne for the production of these parts. the fact it stayed in the uk is a real boost for the car industry and we had stuart rowley say that they had got a contribution from the uk government. we don't know exactly
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how much that is of the £230 million investment they are making here, but there are reports in newspapers today that it could be in the region of £30 million. as we had, it is testament to the relationship ford has with the workers at halewood so they will be huge sighs of relief and a lot of the light that this investment has been made. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. the women disappearing from public life under taliban—controlled afghanistan — we hear their stories, and speak to the ministry now in charge of their futures. it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches.
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ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells. let's return to our top story this morning — the tributes being paid today to conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed in a knife attack on friday while meeting constituents. a man was arrested at the scene — he's been named as ali harbi ali — and the bbc has been told he was referred to the counter—terrorist prevent scheme some years ago, although he was never a formal subject of interest to mi5. peter neumann is a professor of security studies at king's college london
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and i asked him how difficult it is for security agencies to track radical people online. it is difficult but not impossible because even though they are online it doesn't mean necessarily that they do not interact with people so a lot of people that are in messaging forums and chat rooms, they are still talking to people, they are not entirely self radicalised, they interact with people and the fact this particular individual has come to the attention of prevent programme means at some point someone must have noticed something. of course there are a lot of people who may start to look at material online who may engage in conversations online but who are not actually a credible threat, who will never go on to carry out a threat. it must be incredibly difficult to figure out how to separate those people out.
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how do you spot the ones who will actually take action and those who will not? absolutely. security agencies today are faced with a different problem from many years ago. many years ago it used to be the case that there was very little information available. today there is too much information on the internet. it is full of threats and awful behaviour and it is really difficult, nobody has figured out how to distinguish the dangerous ones from the ones who are just letting off steam and that is the challenge for security agencies. how do you address that because clearly there are far more possible threats being talked about and there are members of the security agencies and police to deal with those? absolutely. i think it is notjust about the particular threat that these people issue at some point. it is about combining it with other information, so for example if you know somebody
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is part of a network of extremists and has hung out with extremists in the past and has a record of activity then that threat comes it is much more serious than someone you have never heard about before but these sorts of calculations are quite new, even to security agencies, and there is room forfailure and of course there is a risk that people will slip through. on an average year 7000 people or so are referred to the prevent programme which is meant to stop people becoming radicalised. someone i spoke to earlier this morning was saying that the biggest weakness in his opinion in prevent is the lack of input from family and friends of individuals because prevent to many people has a bad name. would you agree with that? i do agree with that. compared to other european countries referrals that
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come from within the community, from community members, parents, people around these individuals, is very low in britain, only 6% to 7% of reports come from communities and that needs to change, and part of that is to also rebrand prevent to make it less about spying on muslim communities, that is the sort of image it has, but to make it more about taking care of people and helping people and helping people assisting them preventing them from people going into criminality, and i think that is one important thing that has been criticised for a very long time but has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? how do you begin that rebranding, begin to give people a different impression of what it is about? one important thing for example for parents to be willing to report people around them including their own children would be the perception that when you call prevent you are not
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calling the police. a lot of people are reluctant to report their own kids because they may end up in prison, but to rebrand it in a way that parents understand they are calling people that are going to help them, that are not immediately arresting their kids but are assisting them in preventing their kids from doing bad things and this perception that you are calling the police and you are going to get someone arrested is something that has prevented people from using those hotlines. from politicians to reality tv stars and others in the public eye, hate on social media has become a fact of life — and it's particularly bad for women. companies say they're trying to tackle online hate ? but a panorama investigation has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women. 0ur specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring, has more. kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer,
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she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into their office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life
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for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—women content. some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram,
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says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes at a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can find out more about this on panorama this evening at 7.30pm, on bbc one. cameron norrie has become the first briton to win the indian wells title after fighting back from a set and break down in california. the british number one won in three sets against nikoloz basilashvili
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to win the men's singles title. he'll now rise to 16th in the world rankings. he gave his reaction after the match. what an incredible week i have had here. it was a stran-e match what an incredible week i have had here. it was a stran-e match and what an incredible week i have had here. it was a stran-e match and it here. it was a strange match and it was over quite quickly in the last set i was expecting it to be longer and he made a couple of errors towards the end and i still don't really know what i'm experiencing. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big moments, all the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. let's get some of the day's other news. the spanish prime minister, pedro sanchez, has pledged to outlaw prostitution in the country. mr sanchez told his socialist paty�*s congress that prostitution "enslaved" women. currently, there is no punishment for those who offer paid sexual services as long as it does not take
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place in public spaces. rescue teams in india have stepped up their efforts to help evacuate survivors in the southern state of kerala, following devastating floods. the authorities have moved hundreds of families from low level areas to safer places. the floods have killed at least 26 people, including five children. but many more people remain missing. the military government in myanmar says it will release more than 5,600 people who have been detained since the coup in february. the coup leader min aung hlaing said the amnesty was for humanitarian reasons. he blamed outlawed opposition groups for stoking unrest in myanmar. the wait for a heart transplant can be an agonising one, and for children it tends to be much longer than it is for adults. but now a team at great 0rmond street hospital has helped develop a new technique which has doubled the number of children able to receive a new heart. that gives them hope for a longer and healthier life.
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alistair fee reports. at the age of eight, it was thought lucy was the oldest child in the world to receive a donor heart that didn't match her blood tape. she is able to do everything that other children can, whereas we have never had that. she has never been able to do everything that other children can do. so, this is the heart—lung bypass machine. you've got the artificial heart, the artificial lung, and if we come back up here this is the new addition, which is allowing us to do mismatched heart transplants in more patients than ever before. more transplants thanks to new research here at great 0rmond street hospital means more lives saved. well, traditionally, what we used to do is drain the patient�*s blood and throw it away and replace it with the times with the times their circulating volume with donated blood and blood products, which can go into litres. what this technology does is allow us to target the particular antibodies that then can cause
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rejection and not use that amount of blood. for children like lucy, that's ending years of waiting for a donor. she was born with a congenital heart defect, diagnosed atjust 18 months. after her fourth birthday, she was told she needed a transplant. finally performed thanks to this new research three and a half years later. it meant that lucy wasn't waiting as long as she had to. i mean, the thought of having to wait any more years... if we were still waiting now i don't know what the effect on our mental health and family life... the fact that this new research and this new development means that they can do more transplants on children is just amazing and it's going to make such a difference. until now the wait for a donor has been twice as long among children and babies. what this means is that we can double the age range of the patients we can offer it so we have expanded that donor pool that is available to them so they've got a chance
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of getting a heart quicker and not lay on a waiting list for so long. the team here at great 0rmond street hospital have now performed heart transplants using this device on ten children. all have survived, with no need for the transplantation or any additional time spent in hospital. lucy has made a good recovery and for the first time is able to have a normal happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her new heart is working fantastically. all the scans and tests and everything she has had have shown that everything is brilliant, so we've got a future now. we just can't put into words how amazing it is that we have, you know, another chance at life. right now, around 50 children in the uk are waiting for a heart transplant. this technique will help to bring that number down. as for lucy, she now wants to climb a mountain and is looking forward to going on holiday to italy next summer.
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alistair fee, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. the women disappearing from public life under taliban—controlled afghanistan — we hear their stories, and speak to the ministry now in charge of their futures. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change — the winners have been awarded £1 million. science editor david shukman has more.
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each year we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances of repairing our planet. inspired by the missions to the moon, the aim is to heal planet earth, to try to tackle the most serious environmental problems. at the ceremony to hand out the awards, a call to action from sir david attenborough. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and if we can put our minds to it, i believe we can do that. congratulations. the winning teams are mostly small but with big potential. a project to grow coral in the bahamas, using special tanks to speed up the process of restoring reefs. a portable machine developed in india to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser, so that farmers don't burn their fields and cause air pollution.
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and a clever design in thailand, using renewable energy to make hydrogen. winning this prize is recognition that we are going in the right direction. it will support us to go into mass production and it will boost us towards our goal of accelerating the access of green hydrogen for everyone. the earthshot for build a waste—free world goes to... ..the city of milan! another global challenge is waste. and the city of milan wins a prize for collecting unused food and giving it to people who need it most. the final prize, for restoring nature, went to costa rica, a country that once cleared most of its forests but has now doubled the number of trees. the plan now is for the winning projects to be scaled up so they can make a real difference globally.
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we will have to see how well that works out in practice. but in any event they will offer something badly needed in the run—up to the climate summit in glasgow next month, a sense of optimism. david shukman, bbc news. one of the recipients was the creator of a small machine called the aem electrolyser which uses clean hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels, to help power our world. i've been speaking to its co—founder, vaitea cowan, who gave me her reaction to the win. still very excited, not much sleep, full of adrenaline, and an immense wave of pride for our team and our accomplishments so far. explain exactly what it is because hydrogen is usually produced by burning fossil fuels and of course we do not want to be doing that. absolutely not. that is why the electrolyser
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is a key technology to fight climate change. 0ur electrolyser uses electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen and hydrogen that is produced can either be stored or used directly for synthetic fuels and it is no carbon emissions in production or usage. the electricity you make it from is all coming from renewable sources i believe. absolutely. solar, wind. one of the advantages is the electrolyser can use the reliability of the renewables and have a great performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process at all? when using green electricity there are no carbon emissions. the only emission is oxygen. the machine itself is a small machine. what can it typically power? it can do a lot. it will generate green hydrogen which is an energy carrier
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and as an energy carrier hydrogen can either hold and store this energy which can be used for energy storage, for microgrids to store energy for days or weeks for example, so long—term energy storage solution, for homes, communities, neighbourhoods, but that is not all. 0ur electrolyser is already replacing fossil fuels in transportation, in heating and cooling and also in the power to gas sector, so for industrial. homes are being heated by our electrolyser, some planes are fueled by it, and in australia we have green methane being produced by the electrolyser and direct air capture technology so hydrogen plus c02 making green methane as a synthetic fuel. give us an idea about how
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you have got to this point. tell us how you became interested in this area and the challenges of getting to this point. sure, i mean, it is ajourney. one of the key learnings is this is not a race, it is a marathon. and for me i grew up spending a lot of time in nature, i was born in new caledonia which is an island in the pacific next to australia and new zealand and so i had the chance to discover the wonders of the sea and spend a lot of time just outdoors, so after studying business in montreal i moved to a northern thailand province and i had just finished my studies, full of curiosity and ambition, and i read about this amazing project, solar hydrogen, and i had to go and meet the people behind it and understand their vision and together we had the opportunity to promote green hydrogen this in southeast asia as an alternative
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to diesel generators and then i had the chance to cofound in november 2017 and it feels like we are in a green rocket ship. that is a wonderful description. time is of the essence, isn't it, as we try to deal with carbon emissions ahead of cop26, the un climate summit of course coming in a few weeks' time. finally, i wonder what winning this prize in the profile it has given to you, what this will allow you to do next in terms of scaling up the development of this project. simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. it is not only a huge source of motivation for us but also a great source of validation that we are going in the right direction, our technology has immense potential to fight climate change and the way to fight climate change is with scale and speed and that is exactly what the prize
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will enable us to do, to go into mass production of our systems, we started building and with this prize we can accelerate the development of our electrolyser and to make green hydrogen accessible for all. there've been protests in el salvador against what demonstrators are calling the increasing bukele. the president has attacked similar protests a few months ago, claiming demonstrators were fighting "a dictatorship that doesn t exist." catherine karelli reports. democracy is not up for negotiation. that is the message from the thousands of people who took to the streets of the capital on sunday with a host of grievances against the president. at
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with a host of grievances against the president.— the president. at the top of the list, bitcoin. _ the president. at the top of the list, bitcoin. just _ the president. at the top of the list, bitcoin. just last _ the president. at the top of the list, bitcoin. just last month, . the president. at the top of the j list, bitcoin. just last month, el salvador became the first country in the world to adopt the cryptocurrency as legal tender. many feared it will bring instability and inflation to a struggling economy. translation: me inflation to a struggling economy. translation:— inflation to a struggling economy. translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby — translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby revealed. _ translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby revealed. it _ translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby revealed. it was - translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby revealed. it was a - translation: we demand that the bitcoin lobby revealed. it was a law| bitcoin lobby revealed. it was a law that the public was not consulted on. itjust benefits those that have money, those swindlers that launder money. money, those swindlers that launder mone . �* ., money, those swindlers that launder mone . ~ ., ., ., money. also on the agenda, the firina of money. also on the agenda, the firing of five _ money. also on the agenda, the firing of five supreme _ money. also on the agenda, the firing of five supreme court - money. also on the agenda, the i firing of five supreme courtjudges earlier this year. replacement scene is friendly to the president were swiftly voted on. the court then ruled that the president could seek a second consecutive term. critics see it as a power grab. translation: the people of el salvador have decided to come out onto the streets to denounce publicly the treading on
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of the democratic system, of the militarisation of public security and the loss ofjudicial guarantees in our population. the and the loss ofjudicial guarantees in our population.— in our population. the president's ratinas in our population. the president's ratin . s at in our population. the president's ratings at home _ in our population. the president's ratings at home remain _ in our population. the president's ratings at home remain high - in our population. the president's ratings at home remain high but i in our population. the president's i ratings at home remain high but he has faced backlash from abroad including from the biden administration. for his part, he dismissed the march as a failure. the beijing 2022 winter olympics flame has been lit at greece's ancient 0lympia — just over 100 days before the start of the games in february. the chinese capital will become the first city to host both the winter and summer games when it stages the events but there have been protests and calls for boycotts over the country's human rights record in the run—up to the games. a rare waterspout was spotted off the coast of cuba on saturday. the residents along the south coast were witness to the spectacular phenomenon looming over the area in the late afternoon. waterspouts are tornadoes that occur over a body of water but never reach land —
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they're much less dangerous than their land counterparts. despite the drama — no damage was reported. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. for many of us today it's going to be fairly cloudy with a band of rain moving from the west towards the east. this week generally, it's going to be fairly changeable, there will be heavy rain at times, gales possible, especially so in the north. very mild at first but in the second half of the week it is going to turn that much colder. so here's that band of rain which has moved through northern ireland, continuing to push over to the east, getting into the south—east later and also the north—east. behind it, still a lot of cloud, some showers, some drizzle especially on the coasts and hills, but brightening up a touch in northern ireland. it's the same for much of england and wales, any sunshine today will be at a premium. there'll be a lot of cloud,
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some hill and coastal drizzle and then we've got the rain coming into the south east then the channel islands. the temperatures — we're looking at ten in lerwick, 17 in belfast and hull, 18 in london. through this evening and overnight eventually we lose the rain from the south—east and also the north—east. we'll have a drier interlude before the next band of rain sweeps in from the west, accompanied by strengthening winds. but these overnight temperatures are mild for the time of year. they actually are closer to what we'd expect in the afternoon rather than overnight. so tuesday sees our band of rain pushing northwards and eastwards followed on by some showers. not reaching the far south—east, now here we should see some sunny spells and temperatures could get up to about 21 degrees. but even if you are in the cloud and the rain, temperatures are still above average for the time of year, which roughly is about 12 to 15 north to south. wednesday we start off with a fair bit of rain across england and wales, easing off a touch through the day. drier for northern ireland, much of scotland and the south
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of england before more rain sweeps in to the north—west and the south—west and it's starting to cool down from the north. thursday will be a shock to the system, we've got a brisk northerly wind, this weather front sinking south taking rain and some hill snow with it but a lot of sunshine, but it's going to feel colder across the board. a good 10 degree drop in temperature for some but add on the wind chill and it will feel more like four or five degrees along the north sea coastline. then as we head in through the week into friday and saturday, we hang on to the cooler conditions. there still will be some dry weather around but we're also expecting some rain as we head into the weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. we'll have much more on this throughout the morning.
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and in our other main news... it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i am so happy with how i treated all the occasions, big moments, the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. mps will gather in westminster later to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. a number of mps have spoken of the abuse and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps security arrangements. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are "shattered" by his death. aru na iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp.
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he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement, sir david's family gave this plea. this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. mps have been speaking about the abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to speak in debates and representing my constituents. it is hard day to day to constantly think about reporting every abuse and intimidation and harassment, but i have to say, something has got to be done.
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i don't know the answer to solving this problem, but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is central to what we do. we can't just lock ourselves away. the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. for now, southend is in mourning for a man who dedicated his life
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to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered labour mpjo cox, says it brought back terrible memories when he heard of the attack on sir david amess. i thinkjust when you get that... ..when i got that call on friday ijust had a very immediate and sort of very physical reaction to it. i was back in that moment five years ago when i got the call aboutjo and i found it very hard to function. i picked the kids up from school and went away for the weekend just to try and get away from it all. but i also, i guess the other sort of emotion was just the sort of... the terrible sadness for the family, knowing what they're going through, knowing those moments of hope when you know that there's been an attack but you hope it's not too
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bad, to then the realisation that the worst possible thing that you could ever imagine in your life has just happened to you and that you then have to tell your loved ones about it. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, is at westminster. jonathan, the shop just continues to reverberate. it will be a sombre day at westminster. mps returning from the autumn break for the party conferences to express i am sure their tributes to sir david amess in their tributes to sir david amess in their own words. we will hear that in the house of commons this afternoon. the prime minister will lead the tributes from around 3:30pm. normal business has been largely suspended and the day will be devoted to tributes to sir david amess and later this evening a church service in saint margaret's
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church in the grounds of westminster abbey by the archbishop of canterbury in memory of the conservative mp who was stabbed to death in his constituency on friday. this is the first chance, although we have had many tributes, he was killed, from mps keen to talk about the work that he did and demand that he was. i am sure we will hear more of that this afternoon. i am sure there will be smiles as well because he was someone who was well regarded, well liked. he was a big character a big personality and i am sure many mps will recall their own interactions and their own experiences of working with him and knowing him. what we will also hear today and what we have also heard so far i am sure is more discussion and more debate about what needs to be donein more debate about what needs to be done in the wake of the death of sir david amess about the threats mps face and the risks they face in the
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course of doing the job is day—to—day. we know it happened in a constituency surgery when sir david amess held appointments with individuals who had come to talk to him about their problems. it is something mps do week in, week out in their own constituencies in the course of doing the job. we have seenin course of doing the job. we have seen in tragic circumstances here, what makes them accessible also makes them incredibly vulnerable. there is a real debate and a real sense of urgency that something needs to be done, arrangements need to be made to improve in general the security around constituency mps in the course of doing their work. here at westminster, they are well protected, there are armed police at every entrance, patrolling the estate as well but when they go back to their constituencies they go about their business on their own or with a couple of staff members with them. we will hear that debate play out in westminster as well.- out in westminster as well. thank
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ou. borisjohnson will lead tributes in the commons this afternoon for sir david amess, there'll then be a special service at the nearby st margeret�*s church. let's speak now tojess phillips mp, she's the shadow minister for domestic violence and safeguarding and labour mp for birmingham yardley. thank you forjoining us. it is a difficult day for mps and others, of course. what are your thoughts today? tt course. what are your thoughts toda ? , , , today? it feels terribly reminiscent, - today? it feels terribly reminiscent, i- today? it feels terribly reminiscent, i am - today? it feels terribly i reminiscent, i am afraid today? it feels terribly - reminiscent, i am afraid to say, today? it feels terribly _ reminiscent, i am afraid to say, of five years ago when mps were recalled after the murder ofjoe recalled after the murder of joe cox. recalled after the murder ofjoe cox. today i feel deep sorrow and sadness. ——jo cox. today i feel deep sorrow and sadness. —— jo cox. cox. today i feel deep sorrow and sadness. ——jo cox. notjust cox. today i feel deep sorrow and sadness. —— jo cox. notjust for the sadness. ——jo cox. notjust forthe family sadness. —— jo cox. notjust for the family of david but that all of his colleagues in the house today who made that journey, colleagues in the house today who made thatjourney, sat on a train this morning and thought about what they were going to work for today,
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was not something they thought the case just a week ago. it is hard. was not something they thought the casejust a week ago. it is hard. i had to say there is great comfort in being back here in westminster with colleagues who understand that experience, which i certainly was pining for over the weekend. he had soken of pining for over the weekend. he had spoken of the _ pining for over the weekend. he had spoken of the threats _ pining for over the weekend. he had spoken of the threats and _ spoken of the threats and intimidation you have faced as a result of doing the job you do. what are your thoughts on how to deal with that now going forward? t are your thoughts on how to deal with that now going forward? i think these are two _ with that now going forward? i think these are two different _ with that now going forward? i think these are two different things - with that now going forward? t t1 “ta; these are two different things and we have to be careful in the sort of discussion around what has happened, which none of us know the clear facts yet in david's case. but this is being all put together but the idea of the vitriol and the threats of violence that members of parliament face and, look, i do not have any sort of easy solution because i know that in many regards
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it is not something i am expecting someone to be able to do for me, it is me he has to make the decision about how close i am to my constituents and often the best security advice in the world, it is quite hard to follow when you are in your hometown and walking around and your hometown and walking around and you are amongst the people and he want to be amongst them. notjust because i want to be a good representative but because i live there. i cannot say i have any single solution. i how social media interacts with our democracy is something that has been debated for a long time and there has got to be some solution about how easy it is to terrorise any elected representative. th to terrorise any elected representative. to terrorise any elected reresentative. , ., ., representative. in terms of how accessibility _ representative. in terms of how accessibility for _ representative. in terms of how accessibility for those _ representative. in terms of how accessibility for those who - accessibility for those who represent ? as you represent does equal vulnerability, what are your
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thoughts? you said it is up to you how close you get to your constituents. would you change the way you work going forward? do you think there should be more security in general? we think there should be more security in veneral? ~ ., think there should be more security in veneral? ~ . . ., think there should be more security in veneral? ~ . . . in general? we have changed the way we work in the _ in general? we have changed the way we work in the last _ in general? we have changed the way we work in the last five _ in general? we have changed the way we work in the last five years. - in general? we have changed the way we work in the last five years. you - we work in the last five years. you are more likely to have a booking system, you have barriers and systems in place and panic systems in place. you can never mitigate for every single risk and any front line worker will face that same vulnerability. it is the same with nurses, police officers, doctor's receptionist in my constituency. it is the same sort of risk management that we are going to have to do. i am not... i don't want to be a member of parliament who was among the people i represent. it wouldn't be a good job to have and i wouldn't be a good job to have and i wouldn't be any good at it if i were not close to my constituents. t be any good at it if i were not close to my constituents. i know you
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drew a distinction _ close to my constituents. i know you drew a distinction between _ close to my constituents. i know you drew a distinction between what - drew a distinction between what happens online and what has happened in a shocking situation with sir david amess. in terms of tolerance and how we build a more tolerant society going forward, there is a link, isn't there? there is. i do not know if you have seen what chris bryant said, we sometimes pull to much bile in the cauldron of politics. that does not mean politicians should take responsibility but it is part of the picture where there is a lack of tolerance sometimes from one side of the debate to another and that pervasive. —— is pervasive. brute the debate to another and that pervasive. -- is pervasive. we have to lead from — pervasive. -- is pervasive. we have to lead from the _ pervasive. -- is pervasive. we have to lead from the front _ pervasive. -- is pervasive. we have to lead from the front without - to lead from the front without question. whilst absolutely nobody is deserving of any abuse or violence they face because of their job, it is on politicians to make sure that we are... when we are
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discussing how we get things done, we don't make out like there aren't other people involved. they are not master and commander. we are people who had to work notjust cross party but cross community to get anything done. we have got to be much more honest about how things actually change in our country and how it is actually governed because actually we need to demystify what politics is. when i said i was a front line worker, that sticks in the plural because people do not consider people like me to be mine workers but that is what we are, we work on the front line in constituencies week in, week out. —— front line workers. we have to do our best to say when we work with other political parties. you will always get a better pensionjudy in politics. why is it prime ministers
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questions people tune into? —— punch and judy. that always should be rough and tumble and i am no stranger to that. there is always a line when we must be honest about the times we work together. thank ou for the times we work together. thank you forjoining _ the times we work together. thank you forjoining us. _ the times we work together. thank you forjoining us. thank— the times we work together. thank you forjoining us. thank you. - the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today, a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events, including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. jamie mcivor is our correspondent in scotland. he told me more about the reasons behind this divisive scheme. certainly the scottish government would like to see this scheme as a natural way of helping business. not so much about trying to encourage more younger people to get vaccinated, though that is a factor. in the view of the scottish government this could reduce any
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possibility of restrictions being reimposed as the autumn and winter go on. perhaps in that sense helping business. in terms of where case numbers are in scotland, over the last fortnight they have averaged around 2500 cases a day, that is well down on the figures we were seeing a few weeks ago when they had got to rant about 6000. that decline in recent weeks, it now seems the numbers have plateaued. 0n the other hand the numbers in hospital in scotland who had tested positive for covid had been coming down. just over 800 a day at the moment. some nhs boards in scotland are under significant pressure. she will be getting military assistance from tomorrow. —— two will be getting. a teenager has been arrested in connection with the death of a 14—year—old boy who was found seriously injured at a railway
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station in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was attacked on the platform of high street railway station on saturday. police scotland launched a murder inquiry and said a 16—year—old boy has been arrested in connection with the incident. 0fficers said inquiries are continuing after the arrest. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. let's speak now to the conservative mp robert buckland who was the government'sjustice secretary until september. welcome. thank you forjoining us.
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what are your thoughts today? unfortunately we have a technical issue and we cannot actually connect with robert buckland right now but we will fix that and be with him shortly. i think i can hear we might be able to go to him. yes, let's try. good morning. can you hear me? good morning, hello. tt is try. good morning. can you hear me? good morning, hello.— good morning, hello. it is obviously a difficult day _ good morning, hello. it is obviously a difficult day for _ good morning, hello. it is obviously a difficult day for politicians - good morning, hello. it is obviously a difficult day for politicians and - a difficult day for politicians and all of those who knew and cared for sir david amess. what is uppermost in your mind today? t sir david amess. what is uppermost in your mind today?— in your mind today? i want to talk about the positive _ in your mind today? i want to talk about the positive contribution . in your mind today? i want to talk. about the positive contribution that david made over nearly 40 years in public life. he quietly and without fuss got on with representing his constituents. we have heard so much about what he achieved as a backbench mp. i think that quiet stillness is indeed a story of many mps over the years. he would want, i
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think his life and legacy, to be celebrated as something hugely positive. a forceful good in his community and in parliament. —— a force for good. as we grieve with the family and friends of david and constituents, i think he would want us to remember him with a smile and a sense of candy, which was very much his approach to politics. —— sense of can do. much his approach to politics. -- sense of can do.— much his approach to politics. -- sense of can do. that is an element of olitics sense of can do. that is an element of politics that _ sense of can do. that is an element of politics that is _ sense of can do. that is an element of politics that is not _ sense of can do. that is an element of politics that is not always - of politics that is not always acknowledged when we more often see the more public rough and tumble of the more public rough and tumble of the world. . , , the world. that is right. it is important — the world. that is right. it is important to _ the world. that is right. it is important to reflect - the world. that is right. it is important to reflect on - the world. that is right. it is - important to reflect on kindness and how operation and bringing people together. that is such an important element of the politics he practised and the vast majority of us in parliament. i go about my
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constituency duties on the basis of not worrying about how people voted, what i can do as an mp to help them. that is the ethos that crosses party divides. it is important we take huge comfort and support from that concept and remind people that politics can be a forceful good as well as a source of division and debate. . ., ., , , debate. dominic raab said this mornin: debate. dominic raab said this morning on _ debate. dominic raab said this morning on that, _ debate. dominic raab said this morning on that, he _ debate. dominic raab said this morning on that, he wishes - debate. dominic raab said this | morning on that, he wishes that could be bottled and it would be a lovely thing, wouldn't it, if this very positive outlook were to be pervasive and to continue forward? it is not a face that is most seen. society in very general terms, it is probably fair to say, is becoming more divided and there does seem to be often less tolerance of opposing views within society. how do you make sure that is... that there is
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the ongoing legacy of this is that there is more tolerance. t the ongoing legacy of this is that there is more tolerance.- the ongoing legacy of this is that there is more tolerance. i think we need to be — there is more tolerance. i think we need to be constantly _ there is more tolerance. i think we need to be constantly vigilant - there is more tolerance. i think we i need to be constantly vigilant about the way in which we, as a civilised society can interact with each other. the test of a civilised society is not whether we agree, it is the way in which we disagree. i think in this country historically we have been rather good at civilised, restraint and a respectful disagreement. what has changed is social media. no doubt what people will say to each other is very different from the language and demeanour we see, particularly from people who are anonymous, posting horrible, hateful, threatening and worse things on social media every week. particularly women mps bear the brunt of this appalling abuse. that is why i think this is an opportunity for us to draw breath, to stand back and just think about the fact that have consequences and
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that we need to be constantly vigilant to make sure our society does not descend into a divided, hate ridden series of camps which do not communicate with each other. tt not communicate with each other. it is time to say there should not be fake accounts online to enable people to make the comment you are talking about. should all accounts be verified going forward? there needs to be _ be verified going forward? there needs to be traceability - be verified going forward? there needs to be traceability other i needs to be traceability other councils there needs to be mobility of any investigating authority to establish the source of the comments and the abuse. most definitely. i think the online harm's draft bill which will be looked at by mps in parliament, by parliamentarians, is a chance for us to legislate to get that right. i think it people know that right. i think it people know that they can be traced, that they can be held accountable for what they say, just like you and i and publicly, i think that will help
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regulate and tamper some of the more extreme behaviours we have seen. —— temper. argument and debate is part of my life and that can be quite lively and vigorous. when a line is crossed and people are put in fear sometimes of their lives, clearly thatis sometimes of their lives, clearly that is wrong and that is why we need greater accountability. robert buckland, thank _ need greater accountability. robert buckland, thank you _ need greater accountability. robert buckland, thank you very _ need greater accountability. robert buckland, thank you very much - need greater accountability. robert buckland, thank you very much for| buckland, thank you very much for joining us. do let me know what you think about that. almost 3.6 million covid booster jabs have been administered in a month according to the latest nhs england figures. two in five people aged 50 and over who are eligible have come forward. the health secretary says the boosters �*will help keep the virus at bay'. but there are concerns around the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths which remain higher in the uk
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than elsewhere in western europe. we can talk now to our correspondent from the financial times, which has published an article about how the uk has fallen behind european peers in the battle against covid ahead of winter. joining us now is the financial time's chief data reporter, john burn—murdoch. remind me where we are in terms of this to programme and how it is being rolled out. it feels quite different this time with the initial roll—out. different this time with the initial roll-out. . , ~ , roll-out. that is right. the key thin . roll-out. that is right. the key thin to roll-out. that is right. the key thing to bear— roll-out. that is right. the key thing to bear in _ roll-out. that is right. the key thing to bear in mind - roll-out. that is right. the key thing to bear in mind is - roll-out. that is right. the key thing to bear in mind is that i roll-out. that is right. the key| thing to bear in mind is that the roll-out. that is right. the key - thing to bear in mind is that the uk began its vaccination campaign a month or two earlier than most of our peers in western europe. at the time it was a very good thing. what it means to several months down the line now, the number of people who had the second dose of five or six months ago, long enough ago for immune protection to be waning somewhat is much larger here than it is across the channel. it means it
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is across the channel. it means it is no longer sufficient for us to simply keep pace with what is happening in france, germany, italy and spain, we need to be boosting people considerably earlier and in greater numbers, otherwise we have large numbers of older people who could be experiencing waning immunity and have not yet got that boost. ~ , ., ., ., ~ immunity and have not yet got that boost. ~ , ., ., immunity and have not yet got that boost. ~ ., , ., , ., boost. when you look at statistics, the number _ boost. when you look at statistics, the number of _ boost. when you look at statistics, the number of people _ boost. when you look at statistics, the number of people aged - boost. when you look at statistics, the number of people aged 65 - boost. when you look at statistics, the number of people aged 65 to l boost. when you look at statistics, i the number of people aged 65 to 84 being admitted to hospital has gone up being admitted to hospital has gone up 19% over the last week alone. from what you are saying, obviously, rolling out a booster programme swiftly is pretty important. what is happening with that? t swiftly is pretty important. what is happening with that?— happening with that? i think the issue we have _ happening with that? i think the issue we have got _ happening with that? i think the issue we have got here - happening with that? i think the issue we have got here is, - happening with that? i think the issue we have got here is, like i issue we have got here is, like anything with this virus, there are multiple factors involved. 0ne anything with this virus, there are multiple factors involved. one is the fact because the uk has been much slower than the rest of europe to vaccinate children, when children came back to school, the virus was circulating quite freely. many of the kids unwittingly passed on to people of older generations and that
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has fed through in small numbers to the older and more vulnerable population. many of them are experiencing wedding immunity because they got the second dose is five, six months ago, even more. you have a situation where the number of people who are vulnerable, both due to exposure to the virus and low levels of protection is now probably causing the uk to have high rates of infections, admissions and deaths than other countries. it is really critical to pick up the the pace on the booster and roll—out out as much as possible so we do not see the elevated number staying with us through winter, which point the nhs will come under even more pressure for other reasons as well.— for other reasons as well. looking at the trends _ for other reasons as well. looking at the trends you _ for other reasons as well. looking at the trends you have _ for other reasons as well. looking at the trends you have identified i at the trends you have identified that what potentially lies ahead in the coming weeks and months? figs rare the coming weeks and months? as we have all learned _ the coming weeks and months? as we have all learned over _ the coming weeks and months? as we have all learned over the _ the coming weeks and months? as we have all learned over the last - the coming weeks and months? as we have all learned over the last 18 - have all learned over the last 18 months, it is hard to know what is coming round the corner. i have not seen any indications we are
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expecting a rapid surge in hospital admissions or deaths, for example. equally, we are not seen signs of them going down. that means, 15% of critical care hospital beds in england are currently occupied by covid patients. in a country like spain, the equivalent number is only 5%. 15% is not a high number but it means there is a lot less slack in our system than other countries have. as the weather gets cooler and wetter over the winter, there will be more time spent indoors, spent mixing indoors in the uk, and that could all put a little more pressure on the system. identity we are talking about a surge, by any stretch of imagination. —— i do not think. if we get a low hill of cases in admissions and deaths, that is not a good thing and that might need to be taken to make sure things do
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not get worse. to be taken to make sure things do not get worse-— not get worse. anki for “oining us. -- thank you t not get worse. anki for “oining us. -- thank you fort not get worse. anki forjoining us. -- thank you forjoining _ not get worse. anki forjoining us. -- thank you forjoining us. - ford has announced a transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 2024. it's part of plans to make its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe electric by 2030. we can speak now to andy roach, the plant manager at ford in halewood. how hard will it be to make the switch? tt how hard will it be to make the switch? , . ., ~ switch? it is a huge undertaking. their work _ switch? it is a huge undertaking. their work starts _ switch? it is a huge undertaking. their work starts immediately. i switch? it is a huge undertaking. i their work starts immediately. my engineers was working on processes
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to manufacturing their units. then the technology will be used for a huge training programme. andy, i am havin: huge training programme. andy, i am having trouble — huge training programme. andy, i am having trouble hearing _ huge training programme. andy, i am having trouble hearing you _ huge training programme. andy, i am having trouble hearing you because i having trouble hearing you because we have some technical issues with the line. just, in a nutshell, you havejust the line. just, in a nutshell, you have just described obviously have a sort of challenges ahead. in terms of what it will mean for the workforce if you could tell us what... how important it is? this is something we have been working towards for this is something we have been working towards for many this is something we have been working towards for many years this is something we have been working towards for many years at halewood. t working towards for many years at halewood. . ,., ,., , working towards for many years at halewood. . , ~ , . halewood. i am so sorry, andy. we are struggling _ halewood. i am so sorry, andy. we are struggling to — halewood. i am so sorry, andy. we are struggling to hear. _ halewood. i am so sorry, andy. we are struggling to hear. we - halewood. i am so sorry, andy. we are struggling to hear. we will - halewood. i am so sorry, andy. wej are struggling to hear. we will have to leave it for now, unfortunately. thank you. thank you. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london.
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the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change — the winners have been awarded £1 million. milan was one of the earthshot winners. let's speak to milan's vice mayor, anna scavuzzo. she's in charge of the city's food policy. welcome. thank you forjoining us. yourfood policy has been welcome. thank you forjoining us. your food policy has been quite ground—breaking in milan and that is why it has been recognised. just explain to us what you do and how much food is diverted from potentially going to waste, to actually feeding the hungry? thank ou ve actually feeding the hungry? thank you very much _ actually feeding the hungry? thank you very much for _ actually feeding the hungry? thank you very much for the _ actually feeding the hungry? thank you very much for the question. . actually feeding the hungry? thank you very much for the question. i l you very much for the question. i would like to underline the importance of a system that is linked to this hobby the zero food waste hubs are four. we are going to scale up the system.
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also, we would like each neighbourhood to fight against foodways. nowadays we have food rescued every month. we are assisting, together with each hot of charities ? for hub of charities, distributing food to families. so it's very important, the link between the hubs, the charity and the enterprises continues. the food can go to families directly. 50. can go to families directly. so, what have _ can go to families directly. so, what have you _ can go to families directly. so, what have you identified as being the most important areas to tackle? ijust the most important areas to tackle? i just want to give some statistics on food waste across the eu. it is absolutely unbelievable to know that 50%, up to 50% of food is wasted across the eu in households, supermarkets and restaurants, and along the food supply chain, but at
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the same time more than 16 million people in the eu depend on food aid. it is a critical thing to fix, isn't it? tell us about the key findings that you have had their in terms of how to transform that?— that you have had their in terms of how to transform that? yes, i think it is important _ how to transform that? yes, i think it is important for— how to transform that? yes, i think it is important for the _ how to transform that? yes, i think it is important for the results. - how to transform that? yes, i think it is important for the results. but i it is important for the results. but also, the very important educational approach. in order to avoid throwing away food in families. so you have to reach different targets, working on a different scale on different podiums. good food must not be thrown away. you will have to rescue it. and you have to plan different actions in order to involve all of the community, all of the population. from children, young people at university, to people at
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work and families. a different activity and attitude and habits for everybody. i underline the importance of this activity that can be doing everywhere by all of us. and so you have to find your way to face and to fight against food waste. and it's important to be engaged. the awareness of the population. you have to reach the goals. thank you very much forjoining us. and congratulations on winning that award. thank you. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines. borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today, before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday.
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a number of mps have spoken of the abuse and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps' security arrangements. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to another death threat, after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. now it is time for the sport. hello.
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good morning. cameron norrie has made history by becoming the first british player to win the men's title at indian wells. he fought back from a set and a break down to beat nikoloz basilashvili. norrie will now rise to a career—high 16th in the world, and is in the running to reach the season—ending atp finals. patrick gearey reports. cameron norrie has spent his life on the move. he's lived in south africa, new zealand, london and texas. now, though, is he finally arriving? here he was in his biggest match, in the best year of his career. but this wasn't in the plan. nicoloz basilashvili, above him on your screen, below him in the rankings, smashed his way to the first set. then to a break up in the second as well. norrie was nowjust trying to survive, waiting for a chance, a moment when the energy changed. you know it when you feel it. 0h, brilliant! norrie took the second and, with it, the control.
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the new british number one has the lungs of an endurance athlete and the instinct of a fighter. basilashvili had no ropes to lean on. it all ended with one last wild swing. norrie was indian wells' first british champion. still don't really know what i'm experiencing. it was an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big matches. so i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. this autumn, emma raducanu has cracked america and now it's norrie. british tennis is rising in the fall. patrick gearey, bbc news. steve bruce says he'll carry on as best he can, after seeing his newcastle side lose their first match under new ownership. it had started so well against spurs too. ahead inside two minutes, much to the delight of their new owners. but tottenham replied with three of their own. harry kane scored one and set up son hueng min in first half stoppage time. 3—2 it finished, in steve bruce's
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one thousandth game in management, but it left more questions for him to face about his future. rory mcilroy has claimed the 20th pga tour title of his career, after a final round of 66 helped him win the cj cup at the summit club in las vegas. he trailed by nine shots after 36 holes, but a superb 62 on saturday put him in contention, and on sunday he made five birdies and this eagle to claim his second win of 2021. there are two more opening round group matches today in the t20 world cup. ireland take on the netherlands, and sri lanka face namibia. both games will be played in abu dhabi. it's after scotland beat bangladesh by six runs in their opening group match, thanks to a man of the match, all—round performance from chris g reaves. he struck 45 with the bat and took two wickets in his first t20 international. england have a warm up match
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against india this afternoon. you can follow the games via five live sport extra and the bbc sport website. that is it from me for the moment. thank you. there's been a big increase in the number of people seeking help for suspected episodes of psychosis since the covid pandemic. according to nhs data, which was analysed by the charity rethink mental illness, there was a 75% increase in the number of people referred to mental health services between april 2019 and april 2021. i can discuss this further with brian dow, who's the deputy chief executive of rethink mental illness. welcome. thank you forjoining us. first of all, could you just explain what psychosis is and describe what somebody experiencing it would be feeling think —— feeling and experiencing. feeling think -- feeling and experiencing.—
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feeling think -- feeling and experiencing. feeling think -- feeling and ex-ueriencin. ~ .. , feeling think -- feeling and ex-ueriencin. ~ , ., experiencing. --? well, it can be a s mtom experiencing. --? well, it can be a symptom of _ experiencing. --? well, it can be a symptom of a _ experiencing. --? well, it can be a symptom of a mental _ experiencing. --? well, it can be a symptom of a mental illness - experiencing. --? well, it can be a symptom of a mental illness such i experiencing. --? well, it can be a. symptom of a mental illness such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, or even a severe depression. and of course it can be an indication of something else. in terms of how it presents itself, it is both people experiencing hallucinations, so, seeing or hearing things that others don't. but also, delusions, believing things that are not grounded in reality. it can be a very frightening experience for somebody. and of course sometimes the great challenge in experiencing something like psychosis is being able to have the capacity to step out of that and explain to somebody who you need to help you. it can be a really difficult thing when you encounter people.— a really difficult thing when you encounter people. a really difficult thing when you encounter --eole. �* ., , ., . encounter people. being able to have the ca aci encounter people. being able to have the capacity to _ encounter people. being able to have the capacity to step — encounter people. being able to have the capacity to step back _ encounter people. being able to have the capacity to step back and - encounter people. being able to have the capacity to step back and seek. the capacity to step back and seek help and to be able to explain what is going on, is not necessarily going to be possible when somebody has got to that point. at what stage
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do people tend to seek help when they are experiencing psychosis? t they are experiencing psychosis? i think it really depends. in the past, frankly, there haven't been the services there for people. it's important to stress that point, actually. even though we are seeing this potentially really significant increase, this is not because the nhs has failed. in terms of the levels of target that exist for people accessing early intervention services, the earlier people access treatment, the better in terms of outcomes, that has been exceeded. this is not about the nhs feeling. it is actually about potentially the effects of the pandemic itself. fimd effects of the pandemic itself. and can ou effects of the pandemic itself. and can you explain — effects of the pandemic itself. and can you explain a _ effects of the pandemic itself. and can you explain a bit more about that? are you talking about the pressures that people have been experiencing and not been able to get help during that?— experiencing and not been able to get help during that? well, it would seem so. get help during that? well, it would
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seem so- 0ne _ get help during that? well, it would seem so. one of— get help during that? well, it would seem so. one of the _ get help during that? well, it would seem so. one of the things - get help during that? well, it would seem so. one of the things we - seem so. one of the things we learned over the last 18 months or so is that if we act late, we act much more expensively, both in terms of the cost to us as citizens, but also in terms of the loss of lives. and i think it would appear that the effects of the pandemic, notjust in terms of the potential threat to life, but almost does what michael other pressures that have been brought to bear in terms of people but financial situations, the grief so many people have gone through, the fear and anxiety and also the worries about relationships, home, job etc, that combination of unique factors that have occurred as a result of the pandemic may be the driving factor in the alarming increase in the number of people suspected, and it's important to make that point, suspected of being in psychosis. we don't know for certain. let's not wait to find out. we have major problems on our hands. let's act quickly. in terms of the
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numbers we have said there has been a 75% increase since the start of the pandemic. in terms of the figures it is 12,655 referred in july 2021, up from more than 8020 19. -- july 2021, up from more than 8020 19. —— more than 8000 in 2019. the rise has been continuing that ? but since that 75% increase. you mention about early intervention and that acting late means ex —— acting more expensively. that is in terms of the resources from the state or however else somebody looks to deal with it. but in terms of the length of time that someone is then affected by it, what impact does it have on that and the outcomes for somebody individually?— the outcomes for somebody individually? the outcomes for somebody individuall ? ~ , , individually? well, i suppose if somebody _ individually? well, i suppose if somebody is — individually? well, i suppose if somebody is experiencing - individually? well, i suppose if- somebody is experiencing psychosis and it is at crisis point, you can have a snowball effect. let's
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imagine somebody is in a job and they have, until that point, been relatively well. 0bviously having psychosis in the workplace can be very challenging in terms of colleagues and so on. so you can see the effect can be great. that is why stepping in early, being able to get access to that treatment and get the support that is needed, means that all of the outcomes are much better in the long and medium term. thank ou ve in the long and medium term. thank you very much _ in the long and medium term. thank you very much indeed _ in the long and medium term. thank you very much indeed for _ in the long and medium term. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. from politicians to reality tv stars, for people in the public eye hate social media has become a fact of life ? and it s particularly bad for women. companies say they re trying to tackle online hate, but a panorama investigation has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. 0ur specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring, has more.
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kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into your office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians are also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street,
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for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content. some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks.
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facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can find out more about this on panorama this evening at 7.30pm, on bbc one. today marks world menopause day, which is held every year on the 18th of october. the aim is to raise awareness of the menopause and the support
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options available for improving health and wellbeing. jonny may isjulia champion and doctor polar breaks. julia, i know that you went through the menopause when you were 50. tell us what your experiences have been? it's been very on and off since i was 15. i suppose that is when it first started. it is actually my birthday today, i've turned 53. and i think i am through the worst of it. last year i suffered from insomnia, anxiety, quite a lot of weight gain. but other than that, i think i got off quite lightly. a lot
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of my friends are having terrible night sweats. depression. they are feeling very angry. it could have been a lot worse. i think my experience is better than most, to be honest. did experience is better than most, to be honest. , , ., experience is better than most, to be honest-— experience is better than most, to be honest. , ., , ., be honest. did you take anything, do an hint to be honest. did you take anything, do anything to mitigate _ be honest. did you take anything, do anything to mitigate what _ be honest. did you take anything, do anything to mitigate what you - be honest. did you take anything, do anything to mitigate what you are - anything to mitigate what you are experiencing? t anything to mitigate what you are experiencing?_ experiencing? i tried different thin . s. experiencing? i tried different thins. i experiencing? i tried different things. i tried _ experiencing? i tried different things. | tried hrt _ experiencing? i tried different things. i tried hrt for - experiencing? i tried different things. i tried hrt for a - experiencing? i tried different things. i tried hrt for a little | things. i tried hrt for a little while. another is hugely helpful for a lot of my friends but it wasn't actually right for me. —— i know thatis actually right for me. —— i know that is usually helpful. i'm afraid i did take sleeping tablets at points. with the weight gain i think thatis points. with the weight gain i think that is something you have to live within your 50s because i found i was putting on weight particularly around my middle. i was doing nothing different to what i'd done before. in my 20s i could just stop having sugar in my coffee for a week and i would lose a few pounds. it is very hard once you hit the menopause to lose that weight. i have been on diets, i have been hitting the gym
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regularly. it is coming off slowly but it is not easy. t regularly. it is coming off slowly but it is not easy.— regularly. it is coming off slowly but it is not easy. i hear you. as a 50-year-old _ but it is not easy. i hear you. as a 50-year-old i'm _ but it is not easy. i hear you. as a 50-year-old i'm there _ but it is not easy. i hear you. as a 50-year-old i'm there as - but it is not easy. i hear you. as a 50-year-old i'm there as well - but it is not easy. i hear you. as a| 50-year-old i'm there as well with 50—year—old i'm there as well with this! i guess we have to change our outlook a bit, don't we? brute this! i guess we have to change our outlook a bit, don't we?— outlook a bit, don't we? we do. that's why _ outlook a bit, don't we? we do. that's why it's _ outlook a bit, don't we? we do. that's why it's so _ outlook a bit, don't we? we do. that's why it's so important - that's why it's so important companies are doing this research and bring it out in the open. and making you feel you are not alone. let's bring in polar breaks. it is a day every year when we talk about the menopause but it is a daily thing. forso many the menopause but it is a daily thing. for so many women out there. are we getting better at talking about it? is the way it is discussed and handled improving? julia about it? is the way it is discussed and handled improving?— about it? is the way it is discussed and handled improving? julia will be leased to and handled improving? julia will be pleased to hear _ and handled improving? julia will be pleased to hear that _ and handled improving? julia will be pleased to hear that one _ and handled improving? julia will be pleased to hear that one of - and handled improving? julia will be pleased to hear that one of the - pleased to hear that one of the survey— pleased to hear that one of the survey results was that women felt happiest, _ survey results was that women felt happiest, healthiest and sexiest at 53 years _ happiest, healthiest and sexiest at 53 years of age. sol happiest, healthiest and sexiest at 53 years of age. so i think there is a lot— 53 years of age. so i think there is a lot more — 53 years of age. so i think there is a lot more focus on menopause now,
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partly— a lot more focus on menopause now, partly through social media. that can be _ partly through social media. that can be good and bad. i think raising awareness — can be good and bad. i think raising awareness is — can be good and bad. i think raising awareness is good. at one of the other— awareness is good. at one of the other findings awareness is good. at one of the otherfindings in awareness is good. at one of the other findings in the survey was that more — other findings in the survey was that more than 50% of women still felt that— that more than 50% of women still felt that they needed more information about menopause. i think the difficulty for women is knowing where _ the difficulty for women is knowing where to— the difficulty for women is knowing where to go. knowing where to go to .et where to go. knowing where to go to get good _ where to go. knowing where to go to get good quality information. i would — get good quality information. i would recommend women's health concern, _ would recommend women's health concern, the patient facing arm of the british— concern, the patient facing arm of the british medical society. the reason — the british medical society. the reason i — the british medical society. the reason i would recommend that is the information— reason i would recommend that is the information there is put together by experienced experts in the field of menopause. experienced experts in the field of menopause-— menopause. that is interesting because i would _ menopause. that is interesting because i would think - menopause. that is interesting because i would think perhaps| menopause. that is interesting - because i would think perhaps that most people would think to go to their gp. are you saying that is not necessarily best? t their gp. are you saying that is not necessarily best?— necessarily best? i think the more information _ necessarily best? i think the more information that _ necessarily best? i think the more information that women _ necessarily best? i think the more information that women can - necessarily best? i think the more information that women can get . information that women can get before _ information that women can get before they go to the gp the better. ithink— before they go to the gp the better. i think there are challenges with menopause care delivery both in primary— menopause care delivery both in primary and in secondary care. and we are _ primary and in secondary care. and we are very— primary and in secondary care. and we are very aware of that at the british— we are very aware of that at the british medical society. we have made _ british medical society. we have made our— british medical society. we have made our education programme much more _ made our education programme much more versatile. so clinicians can
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take _ more versatile. so clinicians can take on— more versatile. so clinicians can take on a — more versatile. so clinicians can take on a variety of different levels — take on a variety of different levels of _ take on a variety of different levels of information. but i think the other— levels of information. but i think the other thing which we offer through— the other thing which we offer through women's health concern is the opportunity to have an expert opinion— the opportunity to have an expert opinion for— the opportunity to have an expert opinion for a minimal amount of money — opinion for a minimal amount of money. and i think that menopause care should — money. and i think that menopause care should be delivered in the nhs. ideally— care should be delivered in the nhs. ideally by— care should be delivered in the nhs. ideally by gps or primary care clinicians _ ideally by gps or primary care clinicians. that could be practice nurses— clinicians. that could be practice nurses or— clinicians. that could be practice nurses or even pharmacists. julia said hrt was _ nurses or even pharmacists. julia said hrt was not _ nurses or even pharmacists. tit. 2. said hrt was not right for nurses or even pharmacists. tit. 2 said hrt was not right for her. there is never a one size fits all for anything, there is never a one size fits all foranything, is there is never a one size fits all for anything, is there? there is never a one size fits all foranything, is there? how there is never a one size fits all for anything, is there? how varied is it in terms of what works for different people? t is it in terms of what works for different people?— is it in terms of what works for different people? i think that is such an important _ different people? i think that is such an important thing. - different people? i think that is such an important thing. i - different people? i think that isj such an important thing. i think different people? i think that is - such an important thing. i think one of the _ such an important thing. i think one of the most — such an important thing. i think one of the most important things with women _ of the most important things with women experiencing menopause is to listen _ women experiencing menopause is to listen to— women experiencing menopause is to listen to what they are saying and follow _ listen to what they are saying and follow the — listen to what they are saying and follow the nice macro guidelines published in 2015 which recommends individualised care. they may be other— individualised care. they may be other forms of hrt forjulia, or other— other forms of hrt forjulia, or other nonhormonal prescriber bulk methods— other nonhormonal prescriber bulk
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methods of improving management during _ methods of improving management during the menopause transition and beyond _ during the menopause transition and be ond., . . during the menopause transition and be ond. . . , during the menopause transition and be ond. . ., , .,, beyond. julia, i am sure your ears ricked beyond. julia, i am sure your ears pricked up — beyond. julia, i am sure your ears pricked up when _ beyond. julia, i am sure your ears pricked up when polly _ beyond. julia, i am sure your ears pricked up when polly said - beyond. julia, i am sure your ears pricked up when polly said the - pricked up when polly said the findings indicated that women are happiest, healthiest and sexiest at 53. it's important to talk about there being a good life potentially through the menopause and on the other side because so much of the time watts talked about with the menopause is some of the things women go through are not pleasant? definitely. i am living my best life now. i am definitely. i am living my best life now. iam happier. happierthan i have ever been, i think. it helps if you have an understanding partner because it is not easy for partners, fathers and brothers. so men have to educate themselves. so that they can support the women in their lives. i am very lucky in that way. yeah, i have no complaints about anything. i am very happy and healthy. and
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relationships are all good. so why would ou relationships are all good. so why would you say _ relationships are all good. so why would you say that _ relationships are all good. so why would you say that you _ relationships are all good. so why would you say that you are - relationships are all good. so why would you say that you are living i would you say that you are living your best life right now? t’m would you say that you are living your best life right now?- would you say that you are living your best life right now? i'm not at all embarrassed _ your best life right now? i'm not at all embarrassed about _ your best life right now? i'm not at all embarrassed about my - your best life right now? i'm not at all embarrassed about my age. - your best life right now? i'm not at all embarrassed about my age. i i all embarrassed about my age. i think it is when you are at a certain age but you are earthly life stage you want to be. i have got a happy marriage. my to be. i have got a happy marriage. my business is going really well. my children are healthy and happy. and ijust children are healthy and happy. and i just feel really lucky. children are healthy and happy. and ijust feel really lucky. you know, although i did sufferfrom anxiety last year, i don't sweat the small stuff any more. i only worry about the big things. yeah.— stuff any more. i only worry about the big things. yeah. obviously the are of the big things. yeah. obviously the a . e of the the big things. yeah. obviously the age of the menopause, _ the big things. yeah. obviously the age of the menopause, the - the big things. yeah. obviously the age of the menopause, the aged i the big things. yeah. obviously the i age of the menopause, the aged hits us, i am assuming it's pretty much the same as it is always been, correct me if i'm wrong on that, but i guess more generally what is changing is that we are younger in outlook at this age and going beyond 0utlook at this age and going beyond that than we used to be, and society
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used to be? t that than we used to be, and society used to be?— used to be? i think there is lack of recognition _ used to be? i think there is lack of recognition that _ used to be? i think there is lack of recognition that the _ used to be? i think there is lack of recognition that the average - used to be? i think there is lack of recognition that the average age l used to be? i think there is lack of| recognition that the average age of the menopause is 46. it is younger than people think. we have to remember that than people think. we have to rememberthat group of than people think. we have to remember that group of women who have premature ovarian insufficiency, premature menopause. julie insufficiency, premature menopause. jutie has— insufficiency, premature menopause. julie has made important points. it is not _ julie has made important points. it is notjust— julie has made important points. it is notjust about hrt, it is about looking — is notjust about hrt, it is about looking at— is notjust about hrt, it is about looking at diet, exercise. it is about— looking at diet, exercise. it is about the _ looking at diet, exercise. it is about the whole package. we can't continue _ about the whole package. we can't continue to— about the whole package. we can't continue to eat what we eat any longer— continue to eat what we eat any longer because we are not burning of the same _ longer because we are not burning of the same amount of calories. it is an opportunity to have your blood pressure — an opportunity to have your blood pressure checked, new cholesterol level checked. there are many positive — level checked. there are many positive things that can come out of the menopause which doesn't have to end in— the menopause which doesn't have to end in provision of hrt. another thing _ end in provision of hrt. another thing in — end in provision of hrt. another thing in this survey was that women were afraid — thing in this survey was that women were afraid to take hrt because they were afraid to take hrt because they were worried about the risks associated with it. and so i think there _ associated with it. and so i think there is— associated with it. and so i think there is that element of myth busting — there is that element of myth busting for otherwise healthy women below— busting for otherwise healthy women below the _ busting for otherwise healthy women below the age of 60. and i'm really
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pleased _ below the age of 60. and i'm really pleased thatjulia has below the age of 60. and i'm really pleased that julia has talked about not sweating the small stuff. i love the pearls— not sweating the small stuff. i love the pearls of wisdom in the study about— the pearls of wisdom in the study about a _ the pearls of wisdom in the study about a stop trying to be perfect, doesn't _ about a stop trying to be perfect, doesn't exist. make time for yourself, _ doesn't exist. make time for yourself, stay in touch with your friends — yourself, stay in touch with your friends. trust your gut instinct and don't _ friends. trust your gut instinct and don't stay— friends. trust your gut instinct and don't stay in — friends. trust your gut instinct and don't stay in a job that you hate. there _ don't stay in a job that you hate. there are — don't stay in a job that you hate. there are so _ don't stay in a job that you hate. there are so many things changing. stopping _ there are so many things changing. stopping having periods is a positive _ stopping having periods is a positive thing for most women. can! positive thing for most women. can i ask ou a positive thing for most women. can i ask you a practical _ positive thing for most women. c2'1i ask you a practical question? i was talking to someone the other day, we were talking about hrt command one of her questions was, and neither of us knew the answer to it, she was concerned that if she took something like that it might kind of delay what happens with the menopause. and therefore, she would end up having to be honoured for a considerable period of time. what are the practicalities around hrt and that issue? . , ., practicalities around hrt and that issue? . ,., ,.., issue? once you discontinue hrt venerall issue? once you discontinue hrt generally speaking _ issue? once you discontinue hrt generally speaking the _ issue? once you discontinue hrt| generally speaking the symptoms issue? once you discontinue hrt- generally speaking the symptoms will recur~ _ generally speaking the symptoms will recur~ but— generally speaking the symptoms will recur. but they tend to be less extreme _ recur. but they tend to be less extreme. and rather than stopping dead, _ extreme. and rather than stopping dead. my— extreme. and rather than stopping dead, my recommendation, particularly for women using patches
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or gets, _ particularly for women using patches or gets, is _ particularly for women using patches or gels, is to gradually reduce those — or gels, is to gradually reduce those as— or gels, is to gradually reduce those as they get older. that is backed — those as they get older. that is backed by— those as they get older. that is backed by the national institute for clinical— backed by the national institute for clinical excellence guideline as welt _ clinical excellence guideline as well. ., ~' ., clinical excellence guideline as well. ., ~ ., ., well. you know i said hrt wasn't for me but it has _ well. you know i said hrt wasn't for me but it has been _ well. you know i said hrt wasn't for me but it has been really _ well. you know i said hrt wasn't for me but it has been really helpful- me but it has been really helpful for a lot of my friends? i didn't get any adverse reaction to it at all. itjust didn't really solve the symptoms. it didn't really make any difference. i had a consultation with my doctor and she just said, it's not for everyone. we will try something else. i know that it really can help a lot of people. good to get that clarification. we saw... cathy hasjoined us. also with us to talk about her experience of the menopause. hello, welcome. what has your experience been? t what has your experience been? i have eventually found it to be not
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so good — have eventually found it to be not so good i— have eventually found it to be not so good. i realise _ have eventually found it to be not so good. i realise it _ have eventually found it to be not so good. i realise it can— have eventually found it to be not so good. i realise it can be - so good. i realise it can be horrendous _ so good. i realise it can be horrendous for— so good. i realise it can be horrendous for other- so good. i realise it can be i horrendous for other women. so good. i realise it can be - horrendous for other women. i definitely— horrendous for other women. i definitely found _ horrendous for other women. i definitely found i— horrendous for other women. i definitely found i became - horrendous for other women. i | definitely found i became more absent—minded. _ definitely found i became more absent—minded. i— definitely found i became more absent—minded. i used - definitely found i became more absent—minded. i used to - definitely found i became more absent—minded. i used to be i definitely found i became more absent—minded. i used to be a| definitely found i became more - absent—minded. i used to be a person who had _ absent—minded. i used to be a person who had a _ absent—minded. i used to be a person who had a complete _ absent—minded. ! used to be a person who had a complete diary— absent—minded. i used to be a person who had a complete diary in _ absent—minded. ! used to be a person who had a complete diary in my- absent—minded. i used to be a person who had a complete diary in my headl who had a complete diary in my head for even _ who had a complete diary in my head for even a _ who had a complete diary in my head for even a month. _ who had a complete diary in my head for even a month. now— who had a complete diary in my head for even a month. now wouldn't - who had a complete diary in my headj for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself— for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself for— for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself for something _ for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself for something the _ for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself for something the next - for even a month. now wouldn't trust myself for something the next day. l myself for something the next day. so i myself for something the next day. so i find _ myself for something the next day. so i find i_ myself for something the next day. so i find i have _ myself for something the next day. so i find i have to _ myself for something the next day. so i find i have to write _ myself for something the next day. so i find i have to write things - so i find i have to write things down — so i find i have to write things down and _ so i find i have to write things down and make _ so i find i have to write things down and make a _ so i find i have to write things down and make a list, - so i find i have to write thingsi down and make a list, whereas so i find i have to write things - down and make a list, whereas before that is— down and make a list, whereas before that is not— down and make a list, whereas before that is not the — down and make a list, whereas before that is not the way— down and make a list, whereas before that is not the way i— down and make a list, whereas before that is not the way i operated. - down and make a list, whereas before that is not the way i operated. that. that is not the way i operated. that is a aood that is not the way i operated. that is a good practical _ that is not the way i operated. is a good practical step. that is not the way i operated. tiiilti is a good practical step. have that is not the way i operated. is a good practical step. have you taken hrt or done anything else to help you through the process? trio. taken hrt or done anything else to help you through the process? tia. t help you through the process? no, i haven't. i haven't _ help you through the process? no, i haven't. i haven't found _ help you through the process? no, i haven't. i haven't found i've - help you through the process? no, i haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do— haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it _ haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it i_ haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it i have _ haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it. i have been _ haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it. i have been really- haven't. i haven't found i've needed to do it. i have been really careful. to do it. i have been really careful about _ to do it. i have been really careful about what — to do it. i have been really careful about what i— to do it. i have been really careful about what i need. _ to do it. i have been really careful about what i need. i— to do it. i have been really careful about what i need. i very- to do it. i have been really careful about what i need. i very rarely. about what i need. i very rarely drink— about what i need. i very rarely drink any— about what i need. i very rarely drink any more. _ about what i need. i very rarely drink any more. i _ about what i need. i very rarely drink any more. i find - about what i need. i very rarely drink any more. i find that- about what i need. i very rarely- drink any more. i find that anything that puts _ drink any more. i find that anything that puts me — drink any more. i find that anything that puts me off— drink any more. i find that anything that puts me off balance _ drink any more. i find that anything that puts me off balance i- drink any more. i find that anything that puts me off balance ijust - drink any more. i find that anything that puts me off balance ijust stay| that puts me off balance ijust stay away _ that puts me off balance ijust stay away from. —
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that puts me off balance ijust stay away from, basically. _ that puts me off balance ijust stay away from, basically. so _ that puts me off balance ijust stay away from, basically. so my- that puts me off balance ijust stay away from, basically. so my diet . that puts me off balance ijust stay. away from, basically. so my diet has changed _ away from, basically. so my diet has changed i_ away from, basically. so my diet has changed. i started _ away from, basically. so my diet has changed. i started just _ away from, basically. so my diet has changed. i started just increasing - changed. i started just increasing exercise — changed. i started just increasing exercise to — changed. i started just increasing exercise to combat _ changed. i started just increasing exercise to combat all _ changed. i started just increasing exercise to combat all of - changed. i started just increasing exercise to combat all of these . exercise to combat all of these symptoms, _ exercise to combat all of these symptoms, basically, - exercise to combat all of these symptoms, basically, becausel exercise to combat all of these | symptoms, basically, because i exercise to combat all of these - symptoms, basically, because i could feel i symptoms, basically, because i could feel i was— symptoms, basically, because i could feel i was getting _ symptoms, basically, because i could feel i was getting a _ symptoms, basically, because i could feel i was getting a lot— symptoms, basically, because i could feel i was getting a lot more - feel i was getting a lot more anxious _ feel i was getting a lot more anxious my— feel i was getting a lot more anxious. my temper- feel i was getting a lot more anxious. my temper was - feel i was getting a lot more anxious. my temper was a l feel i was getting a lot more i anxious. my temper was a little feel i was getting a lot more - anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed _ anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed so— anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed so i— anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed. so i took— anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed. so i took up— anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed. so i took up running. - anxious. my temper was a little bit frayed. so i took up running. and i frayed. so i took up running. and from _ frayed. so i took up running. and from there — frayed. so i took up running. and from there it _ frayed. so i took up running. and from there it sort _ frayed. so i took up running. and from there it sort of _ frayed. so i took up running. and from there it sort of escalated. . frayed. so i took up running. and from there it sort of escalated. ii from there it sort of escalated. i started — from there it sort of escalated. i started exercising. _ from there it sort of escalated. i started exercising. that - from there it sort of escalated. i started exercising. that has i from there it sort of escalated. i- started exercising. that has helped. but i started exercising. that has helped. but i realise — started exercising. that has helped. but i realise for— started exercising. that has helped. but i realise for some _ started exercising. that has helped. but i realise for some people - started exercising. that has helped. but i realise for some people that. but i realise for some people that may not _ but i realise for some people that may not be — but i realise for some people that may not be something _ but i realise for some people that may not be something they- but i realise for some people that may not be something they can . but i realise for some people that. may not be something they can bring themselves— may not be something they can bring themselves to — may not be something they can bring themselves to get _ may not be something they can bring themselves to get up _ may not be something they can bring themselves to get up and _ may not be something they can bring themselves to get up and do. - may not be something they can bring themselves to get up and do. it’s i themselves to get up and do. it's been really _ themselves to get up and do. been really great to talk to you all. thank you for sharing your experiences. and do get in touch with me directly on twitter if you want to tell me about your experiences of the menopause. join the conversation. now the weather. here is carol. hello again. today is going to be fairly cloudy. a band of rain moving from the west towards the east. it is also going to be fairly breezy.
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after a bright start in the south—east, the cloud will build. you can see this arc of rain moving steadily eastwards. the heaviest will be in the east and the south—east, and the north—east. light rain through the central swathe of the country but still a lot of cloud. behind it, some drizzle on the coasts and hills. temperatures up to 80 degrees. tonight we lose the rain from the east and the south—east. the wind picks up. we see some more rain piling in from the west. it will be a mild night across the board. temperatures falling away between ten and 15 degrees. tomorrow then we start off with this rain in the north—west pushing northwards and eastwards through the day followed by showers. some could be heavy. dry in the southeast with sunshine. this is where we expect the highest temperatures, potentially up to 21. mild everywhere.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. a number of mps have spoken of the abuse and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps' security arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. we'll have much more on this throughout the morning. and in our other main news...
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it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. prince william's first earthshot award ceremony has taken place — winners included the inventors of a portable machine that turns waste into fertiliser so that farmers don't pollute the air by burning theirfields. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i am so happy with how i treated all the occasions, big moments, the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. mps will gather in westminster later to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. a number of mps have spoken of the abuse and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps security arrangements. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are �*shattered' by his death. aru na iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp. he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement, sir david's
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family gave this plea. this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. mps have been speaking about the abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to speak in debates and representing my constituents. it is hard day to day to constantly think about reporting every abuse and intimidation and harassment, but i have to say, something has got to be done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem, but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is central to what we do. we can't just lock ourselves away.
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the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. for now, southend is in mourning for a man who dedicated his life to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, said it will be a bleak day today
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for mps at westminster. mps returning from the autumn break for the party conferences to express i am sure the tributes to sir david amess in their own words. we will hear about in the house of commons this afternoon. the prime minister will lead tributes around 3:30pm. normal business has been largely suspended, so the day will be devoted to tributes to sir david amess and later this evening a church service as well in saint margaret's church in the grounds of westminster abbey, led by the archbishop of canterbury memory of the conservative mp who was stabbed to death in his constituency on friday. this is the first chance. we have had many tributes since when he was killed across the political spectrum from mps keen to talk about the work that he did and the man that he was. i am sure we will hear
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more on that this afternoon. i am sure there will be smiles as well. he was someone who was well regarded, well liked, and he was character, a big personality and i am sure many mps will record their own interactions and experiences of working with him and knowing him. what we will also hear today and what we have also heard so far i am sure is more discussion, more debate about what needs to be done in the wake of sir david amess's death, about the threats mps face and the risks they face in the course of doing theirjobs day—to—day. we know it happened in a constituency surgery when said game is —— said david amis held appointments were something mps do week in and week out in the course of doing their job. as we have seen in tragic circumstances here, what makes them
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accessible also make them incredibly vulnerable. there is a real debate, a real sense of urgency that something needs to be done, arrangements do need to be made to improve in general the security around constituency mps in the course of doing their work here at westminster. they are well protected, there are armed police at every entrance, patrolling the estate but when they go back to their constituencies, largely lego back on their own. —— they go back on their own with constituency members around them. two suspects in the murder lastjuly of the dutch investigative crime reporter, peter r. de vries are due to appear in the amsterdam district court. de vries, a household name in the netherlands, was shot five times ? including at least once in the head
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after leaving a nearby tv studio. 0ur correspondent anna holligan is following the case. this is the first time we cvs suspects in court. this is not the start of the trial, it is a pro forma hearing which is required to keep them in detention for longer. we are expecting the prosecution probably to give an indication of how the investigation is going. we are likely to hear from the defence any of their wishes. these men had been kept in restricted custody since they were arrested. they were detained within an hour of the man being shot after he came out of the studio in central amsterdam. 0ne being shot after he came out of the studio in central amsterdam. one of the men was 21 years old. he is from rotterdam and another man, who is 35 years old, originally from poland, is suspected of driving the getaway car. they are expecting the court to be packed. it will be a very difficult day for especially friends and family but also the country that
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is having to deal with the kind of surge in gun —related violence linked to the global narcotics trade. the man arrested in connection with sir david's killing is ali harbi ali. the bbc has been told he was referred to the counter—terrorist prevent scheme some years ago, although he was never a formal subject of interest to m15. let's speak to our security correspondent frank gardner. frank, what is known about the man and his referral to prevent stop he was and his referral to prevent stop h2 was born in the district of southwark, raised in croydon, he is a 25—year—old british national. his parents came to this country from somalia in the 1990s. reports that he wanted at one point to become an nhs doctor. he is somebody who quite
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possibly, one at that very many lines of enquiry they are going to hold with very little has been released about this officially, somebody who could have become radicalised during lockdown. that is one of the lines they are looking at because he of somali heritage, another line they are looking at is whether there was a connection with somalia's own subscribed terrorist group, al shabab. nothing has come out about that yet. they have until friday to question him. he was rearrested under section 41 of the terrorism act 2000, being transferred from the essex police station to one in london to give detectives a bit more time to go through forensically all his phone conversations, what at he was on, what his browsing history was, etc stop they are not at the moment looking for anything else. going
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back to the prevent business, the police have been tight—lipped about it but it is widely reported he was referred six years ago, reported by a teacher, when he was still in his teens, to the prevent programme. what does that do? it is part of the government counterterrorism strategy to try to steer people away from the path of extremism. it does not carry any legal weight and you do not get any legal weight and you do not get a criminal record from it. it is not legal and you do not have to attend. this is where possibly a review may look into this. if he attended it, possibly more than once, the fact he was not on any kind of m15 watchlist is perhaps a little troubling. he was known, we are told, to have had radical list with views —— radical use at that point. radical list with views -- radical use at that point.— radical list with views -- radical use at that point. this has shone a liuht use at that point. this has shone a li . ht on use at that point. this has shone a light on the _ use at that point. this has shone a light on the vulnerability _ use at that point. this has shone a light on the vulnerability of- use at that point. this has shone a light on the vulnerability of mps i use at that point. this has shone a light on the vulnerability of mps in j light on the vulnerability of mps in terms of their accessibility with
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constituents. what are the security arrangements for mps question when they are in westminster it is tight when they are in their constituencies, what is the situation and might that potentially change? it situation and might that potentially chance? . . , . ., change? it certainly will change. the answer _ change? it certainly will change. the answer is _ change? it certainly will change. the answer is fairly _ change? it certainly will change. the answer is fairly minimal i change? it certainly will change. i the answer is fairly minimal outside the palaces of westminster. if they ask for extra protection they can get it. most have preferred not to. a fundamental tenet of british democracy is elected members of parliament want to be able to meet them. the response that we are seeing from a number of mps now ranges from in a few cases, we should carry on as normal, we should not let this deter us, we should carry on meeting people too, from now on, there has got to be an armed police guard in every surgery. the trouble is here, if you have got somebody who is a fanatic, who is not necessarily this particular
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suspect that just looking forward into the future. if you have somebody who is determined to do harm to an elected british mp, they will try to find other ways to do it. i am not going to suggest ways but there are lots of different ways it could be done. they will simply choose a softer target. it is no good having a panic button when you have somebody who is possibly suicidal intent on causing harm and is not afraid of either death nor arrest because by the time the police turn up, it is going to be too late. they are going to have to think of some fairly stringent measures, i suspect, think of some fairly stringent measures, isuspect, and think of some fairly stringent measures, i suspect, and a review is already under way about this. thank ou ve already under way about this. thank you very much _ already under way about this. thank you very much indeed, _ already under way about this. thank you very much indeed, frank. i already under way about this. thank you very much indeed, frank. mps are gathering in westminster to pay tribute to sir david amess. they will also be a church service to remember him this afternoon. we will
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continue to have full coverage and reaction to the death of sir david amess. if you are watching us on bbc two, time to say goodbye. thanks for your company and hope you had a good afternoon. from today, the face of nightlife and events in scotland is changing with vaccine passports now mandatory at venues including night clubs, strip clubs and some football stadiums. at any event with more than 500 unseated people, proof of double vaccination will be needed. it also means passport checks for unseated outdoor events with over 4,000 attendees. the measures technically came in from the start of the month, but the government announced an 18—day grace period after a backlash from businesses. how do theirs businesses feel today? joining me now is leon thompson the executive director of uk hospitality, scotland — which represents more
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than 730 companies— covering 85,000 venues. how are businesses feeling? good afternoon. businesses, ithink, are in mixed mood about this. businesses have been treating this as real from the 1st of october and till today is when the new policy is going to be enforced. businesses have been testing their response to this. and have been checking customers for the vaccination certificates as they have entered venues in the last couple of weeks. generally they are in a state of readiness but there are still some challenges, not based around door stewards and staffing issues as well. == around door stewards and staffing issues as well.— issues as well. -- not least. can ou issues as well. -- not least. can you explain _ issues as well. -- not least. can you explain more _ issues as well. -- not least. can you explain more about - issues as well. -- not least. can you explain more about what i issues as well. -- not least. can| you explain more about what the challenges are? late you explain more about what the challenges are?— challenges are? we are facing a staffin: challenges are? we are facing a staffing shortage _ challenges are? we are facing a staffing shortage across - challenges are? we are facing a i staffing shortage across hospitality generally. it is critical when it
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comes to the door stewards as well. there is a shortage of stewards at the moment. this puts more pressure on people who are working on doors and having to check the passports. in terms of whether it might have an impact on the number of people actually going to venues, because there is no alternative to having there is no alternative to having the vaccine, a negative test will not be enough. are there any indications from that race period and how it has been working? tatiana; and how it has been working? many businesses have _ and how it has been working? many businesses have been _ and how it has been working? titan; businesses have been reporting in some instances up to 60% of their customer base had been turning up over the last couple of weekends without any form of certification and they have been able to explain to those customers what they will need to have with and from today onwards. hopefully the message is getting through. this is a key challenge that public awareness on this is still very low. finki
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challenge that public awareness on this is still very low.— this is still very low. anki very much for _ this is still very low. anki very much forjoining _ this is still very low. anki very much forjoining us. _ sport, and for a full round up. cameron norrie has made history by becoming the first british player to win the men's title at indian wells. he fought back and will now rise to a career—high16th in he fought back and will now rise to a career—high 16th in the world and is in the running to reach the season—ending atp finals. is in the running to reach the season-ending atp finals. what an incredible week _ season-ending atp finals. what an incredible week i _ season-ending atp finals. what an incredible week i have _ season-ending atp finals. what an incredible week! have had. - season-ending atp finals. what an incredible week i have had. a i incredible week i have had. a strange match. it was over quite quickly. in the last set i was expecting it to be longer. he made a couple of errors towards the end. i still do not really know what i am experiencing. it was an amazing couple of weeks. i am so happy with
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how i treated the big occasions, the big matches. iam how i treated the big occasions, the big matches. i am so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. 0nly world number one novak djokovic has been in as many finals this year as norrie. former british number 0nejohn lloyd says this title had been coming his way. he has worked so hard he is one of the fittest players on the tour. he has a ways had confidence in himself. when you get to the finals, finally he broke his duck and won a tournament earlier in the year and now he has added to that. to go up to the level he has gone this week and when a masters series event, now he is chasing the atp tour finals at the end of the year. i believe he is in 10th position. it really is a remarkable turnaround for someone who was ranked in the 70s at the beginning of the year. quite extraordinary! steve bruce says he'll
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"carry on as best he can" after seeing his newcastle side lose their first match under new ownership. they were beaten 3—2 at home to tottenham in steve bruce's one thousandth game in management, prompting more questions about his future. after the game bruce said "ever since i have walked into this club it is difficult. i knew how difficult it was going to be with the frustrations." rory mcilroy says europe's heavy ryder cup defeat almost made him take the rest of 2021 off but he changed his mind and has now won the cj cup in las vegas; the 20th pga tour title of his career. he trailed by nine shots after 36 holes — but a superb 62 on saturday put him in contention and — on sunday — he made five birdies and this eagle to claim his second win of 2021. you can stay right across all the action at the t20 world cup on the bbc sport website — ireland are taking on the netherlands at the moment. with netherlands 84—6
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in their innings a short while ago. ireland yet to bat. that's it from me for now. let's go back to the killing of sir david amess. let's speak now to the labour mp chris bryant, who got a death threat over the weekend after calling for people to be kinder following sir david amess's death. this morning a man has been arrested. chris bryant, welcome. thank you forjoining us. we cannot discuss that arrest. in terms of how you feel about your safety, and what the feeling is in westminster, what are your thoughts this morning? everybody will be sad and angry and a little bit guilty as well, i think. both at said david's murder
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and james brokenshire i'a's death. it will feel very sombre in the chamber. 0ne it will feel very sombre in the chamber. one of the great british aspects of the parliamentary system is mps are accessible. sometimes people talk about the westminster bubble and all the rest but i go to the local pub, i go to morrisons, i get on the train with all the other fans down to the rugby match in cardiff and so on. we are very much in our local communities. we have smaller constituencies than most countries in the world and that is a real strength. we are all very reluctant to lose any of that. unfortunately we sort of turned westminster into a fortress but in our constituencies we are much more vulnerable. i worry often for my start in my office because they are more likely to be in my office than i am, i am outand more likely to be in my office than i am, i am out and about. and of course we'll worry for our families. where does that leave individual
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mps? would you ever contemplate getting out of politics because of it? would you like to see things change in terms of improving security? t change in terms of improving securi ? . ., ., , , security? i have thought many times about leaving _ security? i have thought many times about leaving politics. _ security? i have thought many times about leaving politics. it _ security? i have thought many times about leaving politics. it has - security? i have thought many times about leaving politics. it has been i about leaving politics. it has been very rough the last few years, very sour, toxic atmosphere. you know. it is easy to wash some of it off in all the stuff you read on twitter and facebook. the nasty things people say to you. but you absorb some of it. sometimes you go to bed at night anything, maybe i am a horrible person, maybe i have got it all wrong. so it does weigh on your mind quite often. and it is not that i am frightened for my life, it is more my think a lot of mps are frightened for their mental health more because it is so toxic. i think we have got to take more of the toxicity out of the political
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debate. if you are thinking of starting a culture war, please lay down your weapons. if you are going to e—mail... i wish we could get rid of anonymity on social media. sometimes people write things they would never dream of saying something to people's faces or putting their name to. legislation is cominu putting their name to. legislation is coming through _ putting their name to. legislation is coming through on _ putting their name to. legislation is coming through on what - putting their name to. legislation i is coming through on what happens with social media. should that be a part of what is legislated for, ending the anonymity, all accounts have to be verified? t ending the anonymity, all accounts have to be verified?— have to be verified? i would prefer that. you have to be verified? i would prefer that- you had _ have to be verified? i would prefer that. you had to _ have to be verified? i would prefer that. you had to have _ have to be verified? i would prefer that. you had to have some i have to be verified? i would prefer. that. you had to have some measure for that but honestly, i don't like blocking people because on the whole i want to still be able to engage with people with whom i passionately disagree or who passionately disagree or who passionately disagree with me. but at the moment i meet them because they do not know they had been muted. every
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politician i know is in it because they want to change the world. it makes me so angry that so many people in the world, girls don't get to go to school in afghanistan. kids in the rhondda, theirfamilies to go to school in afghanistan. kids in the rhondda, their families are relying on food banks to put food on the table at the end of the week. i have always been a passionate opponent of grinding inequality which leaves so many families struggling to put food on the table or pay the bills while others are living in the lap of luxury. we believe in what we are trying to achieve and sometimes, david amis will instance, he completely disagreed with me about a marriage. i am in a civil partnership. he would always ask me how my husband was. —— a gay marriage. you need that across the political divide. the newspapers running campaigns about traitors and enemies of the
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people in all of that stuff, some of the vitriolic attacks on ed miliband, jeremy corbin and diane abbott, all of that has to stop. we had to become a nicer nation. find had to become a nicer nation. and nice memory _ had to become a nicer nation. and nice memory you _ had to become a nicer nation. and nice memory you have shared of sir david amess. t nice memory you have shared of sir david amess— nice memory you have shared of sir david amess. i wonder how you will remember him. _ david amess. i wonder how you will remember him. he _ david amess. i wonder how you will remember him. he always - david amess. i wonder how you will remember him. he always had i david amess. i wonder how you will remember him. he always had a i remember him. he always had a naughty twinkle in his eye. you could tell he was going to stretch the rules of the has to ask yet another question about southend. —— the house. he pull me a very nice glass of wine last time i met him. thank you. chris bryant. a teenager has been arrested in connection with the death of a 14—year—old boy who was found seriously injured at a railway station in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was attacked on the platform of high street railway station on saturday.
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police scotland launched a murder inquiry and said a 16—year—old boy has been arrested in connection with the incident. 0fficers said inquiries are continuing after the arrest. ford has announced a transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 2024. it's part of plans to make its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe electric by 2030. we can speak now to mika minio—paluello, the policy lead for climate and industry at the tuc. welcome. thank you very much for joining us. how welcome is this news? . ., ., , , news? thanks for having me. this is treat news? thanks for having me. this is great news. — news? thanks for having me. this is great news, really _ news? thanks for having me. this is great news, really good. _ news? thanks for having me. this is great news, really good. to - news? thanks for having me. this is great news, really good. to hear i great news, really good. to hear that forward, together with the government is jointly investing into electric vehicle production in merseyside for them it is future
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proofing 500 jobs. the workers at ford have been pushing for this for years and it shows how the role of government in pushing companies to invest and create good green jobs. we know the government has had some level of financial input that we do not know what the breakdown is. is this the sort of model that could be rolled out? it this the sort of model that could be rolled out? , ~ . this the sort of model that could be rolled out? , . . ., ., , rolled out? it is. we have already seen it similarly _ rolled out? it is. we have already seen it similarly at _ rolled out? it is. we have already seen it similarly at nissan. it i rolled out? it is. we have already seen it similarly at nissan. it also indicates that model needs to be rolled out on a greater scale and rapidly because sadly, despite the good news, the uk wide picture is less rosy. 0nly last year ford closed its plant in bridgend and we lost 1700 jobs. what we are seeing is that other european countries are racing ahead in building battery plants, clean technology, new vehicle production and comparatively it does limited action here in the uk. , ., , ., ., it does limited action here in the
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uk. tell us a bit more about that diversion somewhat _ uk. tell us a bit more about that diversion somewhat the - uk. tell us a bit more about that i diversion somewhat the comparisons are between here and elsewhere. 50 are between here and elsewhere. sr when for example battery plants, there is absolutely key because as we move away from diesel, from petrol, electric batteries play a very large role within the vehicles. at the moment batteries are largely produced in east asia. there are new battery plants coming online. nissan produced batteries in sunderland and the north—east which is good. we are seeing far more being built in france, in germany, in sweden. what we see is the government putting up a significant chunk of the money. both government and the european investment bank in those countries. the government is saying it will support it but we don't actually have the real plans of plants being opened onjobs have the real plans of plants being opened on jobs created. have the real plans of plants being opened onjobs created. it have the real plans of plants being opened on jobs created.— opened on 'obs created. it 'ust is not there opened on jobs created. it 'ust is not there yet. i opened on jobs created. it 'ust is not there yet. what i opened on jobs created. it 'ust is not there yet. what is i opened on jobs created. itjust is not there yet. what is happening elsewhere making investment happening more than than it is
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happening more than than it is happening here? fit, happening more than than it is happening here?— happening more than than it is ha- ttenin here? 2 . , happening here? a large party there is a very active _ happening here? a large party there is a very active government - happening here? a large party there is a very active government role. i is a very active government role. government saying, we will support you now, will provide in—kind financing, kind investment. also providing long—term support and long—term collaboration. if you look at germany, sweden and france can use a government working together with business, with the unions, and saying, how do we transition this industry and grow it over time? in comparison with the uk, we are seeing some car parts manufacturer is threatening to close the birmingham plant. they are planning to close the birmingham plant and offshore production, leaving it to other countries next year. that is despite the workers in the plant developing a very detailed plan on how they can shift to making electric car parts. that planners there. but we don't see as government stepping up to provide the necessary support to push private companies to actually
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transition that plant, to future proof theirjobs. this is the front line of the just claimant transition. it is open to question with greenjobs but transition. it is open to question with green jobs but will we see them in the uk or will they predominantly be in germany, france and italy? a lot of that will come back to what does the uk government do? does it step up and say it is putting significant money on the table to make sure industry stays here and transitions here?— transitions here? thank you for “oinint transitions here? thank you for joining us- _ now the weather. thank you. good afternoon. it is a mild day today but it is also a cloudy day. some rain around. that has been affecting the western side of the uk over the last few hours. heavy rain across scotland and in the far south of england. that rain band will push
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its way even to eastern areas. even behind if there is a lot of low cloud. it is very mild. temperatures around 15 to 17 degrees. breezy and we have got some stronger winds in the north—west of the uk for a while. those will overnight. a lot of that rain tends to move away from a while. we see more breaks in the cloud before more rain arrives in western areas later in the night. misty in places again tonight. very mild. some more wet weather around tomorrow mainly affecting wales and northern ireland. showery rain returns to northern ireland and it gets wetter later. ahead of that rain we are going to find it brightening up eventually across east anglia, the south—east abingdon. temperatures could reach 20 or 21 degrees. a very mild elsewhere. 17 or 18 celsius. hello, this is bbc news
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with joanna gosling. the headlines. borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today, before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. a number of mps have spoken of the abuse and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps' security arrangements. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to another death threat, after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. prince william's first earthshot award ceremony has taken place. winners included the inventors of a portable machine that turns waste into fertiliser, so that farmers don't pollute the air by burning theirfields. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells.
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let's go back to our menus, the memorials today to david amess, killed in his constituency on friday. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered labour mpjo cox, says it brought back terrible memories when he heard of the attack on sir david amess... i thinkjust when you get that, when i thinkjust when you get that, when i got that call on friday, ijust had a very immediate and very sort of physical reaction to it. i was backin of physical reaction to it. i was back in that moment five years ago, when i got the call aboutjoe. i found it very hard to function. i picked the kids up from school and went away from —— for the weekend to try to get away from it all. but i also, i guess the other side of emotion wasjust the also, i guess the other side of emotion was just the sort of, the
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terrible sadness for the family and knowing what they are going through, knowing those moments of hope when you know there's been an attack but you hope it's not too bad. to then the realisation that the worst possible thing that you could ever imagine in your life has just happened to you and then you have to tell your loved ones about it. �* ., ., , have to tell your loved ones about it. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered mp. _ it. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered mp, jo _ it. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered mp, jo cox. _ a mural of sir david amess has appeared at a skatepark he opened 13 years ago. the art is the work of local artist madmanity who called it "why?" and said it was a "thank you from this community". almost 3,600,000 covid booster jabs have been administered in a month, according to the latest nhs england figures. two in five people aged 50 and over who are eligible have come forward. the health secretary says the boosters it will help keep the virus at bay. but there are concerns around
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the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths which remain higher in the uk than elsewhere in western europe. earlier, i spoke to the financial times' chief data reporter, john burn—murdoch, who explained some of the reasons why the figures are higher in the uk. the issue we have got here is probably, well, like anything with this virus, there are multiple factors involved. 0ne this virus, there are multiple factors involved. one is the fact that because the uk has been much lower than the rest of europe to vaccinate children, when children came back to school the virus was circulating quite freely. many of those kids unwittingly passed it on to people of older generations and that has fed through in smaller numbers to the older and more vulnerable population, so many of those again are experiencing waning immunity because they got their second dose, five, six months ago, even more. and so, what you have is the situation where the number of people vulnerable because of their exposure to the virus and the relatively low levels of protection,
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is now probably causing the uk to have these high rates of infections, admissions and deaths, than other countries. it is really critical that we pick up the pace on the booster roll—out as much as possible to make sure that we don't see these elevated numbers stay with us through winter, at which point the nhs will, as usual, come under more pressure for other reasons as well. looking at the trends you have identified, what potentially lies ahead in the coming weeks and months? ., ., ~' ~' ahead in the coming weeks and months? ., ., ~ ~ ., , ahead in the coming weeks and months? ., ., ~ ,, ., , ., months? look, ithink, as we have all learned. _ months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it _ months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it is _ months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it is very _ months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it is very hard - months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it is very hard to i months? look, ithink, as we have all learned, it is very hard to know| all learned, it is very hard to know what is coming around the corner. i certainly haven't seen any indications that we are expecting any kind of rapid surge in hospital admissions or deaths, for example. but equally, we are certainly not seeing any signs of those going down any time soon. what that means, for example, is 15% of critical care, hospital beds in england, are currently occupied by covid patients. in spain the equivalent is
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only 5%. 15% is not an exceptionally high number, but it means there is a lot less slack in our system than what other countries have. as the weather continues to get cooler and perhaps wetter over the winter, there is going to be more time spent indoors, mixing indoors in the uk, and that could all put a little bit more pressure on the system. so i don't think we are talking about a surge, but if we get this sort of low hill of cases admissions and deaths, as it were, prolong over a period of months, that is certainly not a good thing and it could mean additional measures might be needed to make sure things don't get worse. john byrne murdoch of the financial times. dr naomi forrester—soto is a virologist at keele university. welcome. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. tell us more about where we are with the booster programme and what that means potentially for the winter? yes.
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programme and what that means potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort — potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort of _ potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort of kind _ potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort of kind of _ potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort of kind of in _ potentially for the winter? yes, so we are sort of kind of in the i potentially for the winter? yes, so | we are sort of kind of in the middle of the booster roll—out. 2 million doses have been given out so far. that is not covering everybody who is eligible. so i think there are people who potentially have been invited to have not come forward, and people who have not been contacted. both of those will happen in the next few weeks. and it's imperative that if you get offered that boosterjab, not imperative, but it strongly encouraged that that if you get offered that boosterjab, to come and get it because it will give you that added protection going into the winter where we would expect to see a rise in respiratory infections, of which covid is one. the efficacy, as we know, the vaccines does drop after six months. it means that with pfizer severe illness risk is down to protection ? where protection goes down to 74% and with astrazeneca 67%. that
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obviously indicates a risk to people if they are not getting the third dose. why do you think it is that the uptake is quite slow of that third dose? is it because it is not being rolled out, or people not coming forward for it?- coming forward for it? that's a really good _ coming forward for it? that's a really good question. - coming forward for it? that's a really good question. i - coming forward for it? that's a really good question. i mean, | coming forward for it? that's a | really good question. i mean, i coming forward for it? that's a i really good question. i mean, i was asked that question this morning. and actually, some of they went to a vaccine centre this weekend and it was very busy with lots of people there. i think people are being invited. people are coming forward. but again, from the beginning when we first started the vaccine roll—out in december, if we can remember all the way back to then, did take a little while for that momentum to get going and the letters to go out and people to start coming. we will probably see an impact in the next few weeks. it is certainly something that needs to be accomplished sooner rather than later to try to get as many people protected for the onset of really bad weather and the winter season.
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what are the practicalities around it? it seems like with the first vaccine roll—out there was a lot of clarity around who was eligible and when you might actually be due for your own vaccine. can anyone come forward currently over 50 and ask forward currently over 50 and ask for their booster? t forward currently over 50 and ask for their booster?— for their booster? i 'ust checked the government- for their booster? i just checked the government guidance i for their booster? i just checked the government guidance on i for their booster? i just checked i the government guidance on that. everybody invited should come forward for a boosterjab. that is not particularly clear at the moment. but that was the guidance that i saw. i'm not over 58. i'm quite a bit far off. so i'm not in the category that expect a letter. having not had any experience it is hard for me to comment.— having not had any experience it is hard for me to comment. thank you ve much hard for me to comment. thank you very much for— hard for me to comment. thank you very much forjoining _ hard for me to comment. thank you very much forjoining us. _ from politicians to reality tv stars, for people in the public eye hate social media has become a fact of life ? and it s particularly bad for women. companies say they re trying to tackle online hate, but a panorama investigation has revealed that facebook and instagram
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are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. 0ur specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring, has more. kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into your office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted
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with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content.
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some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can find out more about this on panorama this evening at 7.30pm, on bbc one.
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today marks world menopause day, which is held every year on the 18th of october. the aim is to raise awareness of the menopause and the support options available for improving health and wellbeing. let's talk to laura garside. she's a menopause champion for timpson group. the group is introducing new benefits for workers going through the menopause. welcome. what are the benefits? we the menopause. welcome. what are the benefits? ~ ., the menopause. welcome. what are the benefits? . ., ., ., . ., benefits? we have today introduced a new benefit which _ benefits? we have today introduced a new benefit which is _ benefits? we have today introduced a new benefit which is to _ benefits? we have today introduced a new benefit which is to cover - benefits? we have today introduced a new benefit which is to cover the i new benefit which is to cover the costs of any prescription charges that our colleagues might have if they take up hrt. we wanted to make sure that they speak to their gp and seek guidance as to whether that is the right treatment for them, but we are going to cover the cost of colleagues. are going to cover the cost of colleagues— are going to cover the cost of colleatues. �* , , .., , colleagues. and why is the company doint colleagues. and why is the company doing that? —
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colleagues. and why is the company doing that? it's _ colleagues. and why is the company doing that? it's very _ colleagues. and why is the company doing that? it's very much _ colleagues. and why is the company doing that? it's very much part i colleagues. and why is the company doing that? it's very much part of i doing that? it's very much part of our culture. _ doing that? it's very much part of our culture, really. _ doing that? it's very much part of our culture, really. we _ doing that? it's very much part of our culture, really. we have - doing that? it's very much part of our culture, really. we have an i our culture, really. we have an upside down management culture which engenders a very fraternal communication with our colleagues. we want to clear away the problems they may be experiencing so they can offer excellent service to our customers. if one of the problems is something we can help with, we will do our very best. we are not professing to be experts but we want to help where we can. this is one way we feel we could support our colleagues better. is way we feel we could support our colleagues better.— way we feel we could support our colleagues better. is this something that colleagues _ colleagues better. is this something that colleagues have _ colleagues better. is this something that colleagues have been _ colleagues better. is this something that colleagues have been saying i that colleagues have been saying they find an issue and would like support with? they find an issue and would like support with?— support with? they have not specifically _ support with? they have not specifically said _ support with? they have not specifically said that - support with? they have not. specifically said that financially, the barrier to getting hrt as finance, but for us to show that we are billing —— willing to back that means it opens up the conversation a bit more. it is something colleagues feel more comfortable talking about if we are talking about it. we don't want it to be a taboo. it is a natural process. every woman will experience something along the lines of menopause and it may be that we can'tjust be there and be open and
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honest and listen. that is why we are trying to show our support and understanding a little better. is understanding a little better. is this a brand—new benefit? i'm wondering how many people might take it up? i wondering how many people might take it u - ? , , wondering how many people might take it u? , , , ., ., wondering how many people might take itu-? ., ., wondering how many people might take itu? ,, . ., ., it up? i guess you have no idea? not et. it is it up? i guess you have no idea? not yet. it is brand-new _ it up? i guess you have no idea? not yet. it is brand-new today. - it up? i guess you have no idea? not yet. it is brand-new today. but - it up? i guess you have no idea? not yet. it is brand-new today. but i - yet. it is brand—new today. but i hope it will be something that all of our colleagues feel comfortable to take up. even if they are not directly impacted, maybe they will feel more comfortable to talk to their managers, talk to one another. we have had quite a lot of feedback from male colleagues who feel they better understand now what their partners might be going through, or theirfamily members. although it is directly impacting women, we want to educate and support all of our colleagues to help each other. laura garside, menopause _ colleagues to help each other. laura garside, menopause champion for the timpson group, thank you. the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today, before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. a number of mps have spoken of the abuse
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and threats they have received, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps' security arrangements. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to another death threat, after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. the wait for a heart transplant can be an agonising one, and for children, it tends to be much longer than it is for adults. but now a team at great 0rmond street hospital has helped develop a new technique, which has doubled the number of children able to receive a new heart. that gives them hope for a longer and healthier life. alistair fee reports. at the age of eight, it was thought lucy was the oldest child in the world to receive a donor heart that didn't match her blood type. she is able to do everything _ didn't match her blood type. she is able to do everything that - didn't match her blood type. she is able to do everything that other. able to do everything that other children can, whereas we have never
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had that, she's never been able to do everything that other children can do. , , ., can do. this is the heart-lung b ass can do. this is the heart-lung bypass machine. _ can do. this is the heart-lung bypass machine. you - can do. this is the heart-lung bypass machine. you have . can do. this is the heart-lung| bypass machine. you have the unofficial_ bypass machine. you have the unofficial heart, the unofficial long — unofficial heart, the unofficial long~ if— unofficial heart, the unofficial long. if we come back up here, this is the _ long. if we come back up here, this is the new— long. if we come back up here, this is the new addition. it allows us to do mismatched heart transplant in more _ do mismatched heart transplant in more patients than ever before. more translants more patients than ever before. more transplants thanks _ more patients than ever before. more transplants thanks to _ more patients than ever before. me transplants thanks to new research here at great 0rmond street hospital means more lives saved. traditionally we used to drain the patient _ traditionally we used to drain the patient because my blood and throw it away. _ patient because my blood and throw it away, and replace it with three times— it away, and replace it with three times their— it away, and replace it with three times their circulating volume with donated _ times their circulating volume with donated blood and blood products, which _ donated blood and blood products, which can_ donated blood and blood products, which can go into litres. what this technology does is allow us to target — technology does is allow us to target particular antibodies that can cause rejection and not use that amount— can cause rejection and not use that amount of— can cause rejection and not use that amount of blood. for can cause rejection and not use that amount of blood.— amount of blood. for children like lu that amount of blood. for children like lucy that is _ amount of blood. for children like lucy that is ending _ amount of blood. for children like lucy that is ending years - amount of blood. for children like lucy that is ending years of- amount of blood. for children like | lucy that is ending years of waiting for a donor. she was born with a congenital heart defect, diagnosed atjust 18 months. after herfourth birthday, she was told he needed a transplant. finally performed thanks to this new research three and a
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half years later. it to this new research three and a half years later.— half years later. it meant lucy wasn't waiting _ half years later. it meant lucy wasn't waiting as _ half years later. it meant lucy wasn't waiting as long - half years later. it meant lucy wasn't waiting as long as - half years later. it meant lucy wasn't waiting as long as she l half years later. it meant lucy i wasn't waiting as long as she had to. i mean, the thought of having to wait any more years, if we were still waiting now, i don't know what the effect on our mental health and ourfamily the effect on our mental health and our family life. the effect on our mental health and ourfamily life. the the effect on our mental health and our family life. the fact that this new research and this new development means i can do more transplants on children is just amazing and it will make such a difference. amazing and it will make such a difference-— amazing and it will make such a difference. ., ., ., ., difference. until now the wait for a donor has been _ difference. until now the wait for a donor has been twice _ difference. until now the wait for a donor has been twice as _ difference. until now the wait for a donor has been twice as long - difference. until now the wait for a donor has been twice as long on i donor has been twice as long on children and babies.— donor has been twice as long on children and babies. what this means is we can double _ children and babies. what this means is we can double the _ children and babies. what this means is we can double the age _ children and babies. what this means is we can double the age range - children and babies. what this means is we can double the age range of- is we can double the age range of the patients we can offer it to. so we have _ the patients we can offer it to. so we have expanded that donor pool that is_ we have expanded that donor pool that is available to them, so they have _ that is available to them, so they have a _ that is available to them, so they have a chance of getting a heart quicker— have a chance of getting a heart quicker and not lay on a waiting list for— quicker and not lay on a waiting list for so — quicker and not lay on a waiting list for so long. the quicker and not lay on a waiting list for so long.— quicker and not lay on a waiting list for so long. the team here at great 0rmond _ list for so long. the team here at great 0rmond street _ list for so long. the team here at great 0rmond street hospital- list for so long. the team here at i great 0rmond street hospital have now performed heart transplants using this device on ten children. all have survived, with no need for
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re—transplantation or any additional time spent in hospital. lucy has made a good recovery and for the first time is able to have a normal, happy childhood. she first time is able to have a normal, happy childhood-— happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. _ happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her— happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her new - happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her new heart i happy childhood. she is doing j fantastically. her new heart is working fantastically. all of the scan to grant a test to have shown that everything is brilliant. so we have got a future now. we just can't put into words how amazing it is that we have, you know, another chance at life. right now, around 50 children in the uk are waiting for a heart transplant. this technique will help to bring that number down. as for lucy, she now wants to climb a mountain and is looking forward to going on holiday to italy next summer. as we mentioned earlier, the first recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change. the winners have been awarded £1 million each. one of the winners
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was the creator of a small machine called the aem electrolyser, which uses clean hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels, to help power our world. its co—founder, vaitea cowan, spoke to my colleague annita mcveigh earlier, and told her about her reaction to winning the award. still very excited, not much sleep, full of adrenaline and an immense wave of pride for our team and for our accomplishments so far. explain first of all what _ our accomplishments so far. explain first of all what exactly _ our accomplishments so far. explain first of all what exactly is _ our accomplishments so far. explain first of all what exactly is the - our accomplishments so far. explain first of all what exactly is the aem i first of all what exactly is the aem electrolyser? hydrogen is usually produced by burning fossil fuels, and of course we don't want to be doing that?— and of course we don't want to be doinu that? ., ., , , ., ~ doing that? no, absolutely not. we have to stop _ doing that? no, absolutely not. we have to stop burning _ doing that? no, absolutely not. we have to stop burning fossil - doing that? no, absolutely not. we have to stop burning fossil fuels, i have to stop burning fossil fuels, which is why the electrolyser is a key technology to fight climate change. it uses electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. the hydrogen that is produced can either be stored or used directly to make
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synthetic fuels, for example. it is no carbon emissions in production or usage of green hydrogen. find no carbon emissions in production or usage of green hydrogen.— usage of green hydrogen. and the electricity you _ usage of green hydrogen. and the electricity you make _ usage of green hydrogen. and the electricity you make it _ usage of green hydrogen. and the electricity you make it from - usage of green hydrogen. and the electricity you make it from is - electricity you make it from is coming from renewable sources, i believe? ~ , ., believe? absolutely, solar, wind. one of the _ believe? absolutely, solar, wind. one of the advantages _ believe? absolutely, solar, wind. one of the advantages is - believe? absolutely, solar, wind. one of the advantages is that - believe? absolutely, solar, wind. one of the advantages is that ourj one of the advantages is that our electrolyser can use the reliability of the renewables and have a great performance. share of the renewables and have a great performance-— performance. are there any carbon emissions in _ performance. are there any carbon emissions in this _ performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process - performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process at - performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process at all? i emissions in this process at all? when using green electricity there are no carbon emissions. the only omission actually from our electrolyser is oxygen. ok. omission actually from our electrolyser is oxygen. ok. so the machine itself, _ electrolyser is oxygen. ok. so the machine itself, it _ electrolyser is oxygen. ok. so the machine itself, it is _ electrolyser is oxygen. ok. so the machine itself, it is a _ electrolyser is oxygen. ok. so the machine itself, it is a small - machine itself, it is a small machine. what can it power, typically? it machine. what can it power, typically?— machine. what can it power, icall ? ., ., ., typically? it can do a lot. it will aenerate typically? it can do a lot. it will generate green _ typically? it can do a lot. it will generate green hydrogen, - typically? it can do a lot. it will. generate green hydrogen, which typically? it can do a lot. it will- generate green hydrogen, which is an energy carrier. as an energy carrier hydrogen can either hold and store this energy, which can then be used for energy storage, for microgrids,
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for energy storage, for microgrids, for example, to store energy for days or weeks. long—term energy storage solution for homes, communities and neighbourhoods. that is not all. our electrolyser is already replacing fussing fears ? where fossil fuels and transportation, in heating and cooling and also in the power to gas sector, so for industrial use cases. homes are being heated by our electrolyser. some planes are flying with fuel that the electrolyser is generating. green methane is being used in australia, produced by our electrolyser, so hydrogen plus co2 making green methane as in synthetic fuel. . . ., making green methane as in synthetic fuel. , , . , , making green methane as in synthetic fuel. , , , ., making green methane as in synthetic fuel. , , . , , ., ., making green methane as in synthetic fuel. , ,.,, , ., ., fuel. give us a sense of how you have not fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to _ fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to this _ fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to this point? - fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to this point? tell - fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to this point? tell us i fuel. give us a sense of how you have got to this point? tell us a | have got to this point? tell us a little bit about you, how you became interested in this area and the challenges of getting to this point? sure. it is a journey. as one of the key learnings, this is not a race,
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it is a marathon. how did it start for me? well, i grew up spending a lot of time in nature. i was born in new caledonia, an island in the pacific next to australia and new zealand. and sol pacific next to australia and new zealand. and so i had the chance to discover the wonders of the sea and spent a lot of time just outdoors. so after studying business in the john wilson school of business in montreal, i then moved to a northern —— northern thailand. ijust finished my studies, full of curiosity and ambition and i read about some amazing projects, solar hydrogen home, i met the people behind. i had to understand their vision. and together we had the opportunity to promote green hydrogen in southeast asia as an alternative to diesel generators. then have the chance to co—found the company in 2017. it feels like we are in a green rocket ship. that's a
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wonderful description. _ are in a green rocket ship. that's a wonderful description. time - are in a green rocket ship. that's a wonderful description. time is - are in a green rocket ship. that's a wonderful description. time is of i wonderful description. time is of the essence, isn't it, as we try to deal with carbon emissions ahead of cop26, the un climate summit coming ina cop26, the un climate summit coming in a couple of weeks? ijust wonder finally, what winning this prize, and given the profile that it is giving to you, what this will allow you to do next in terms of scaling up you to do next in terms of scaling up the development of this project? simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. it is not only a huge source of motivation for us but also a source of validation that we are going in the right direction, our technology has an immense potential to fight climate change. and the way it affects climate change and green hydrogen is with scale and speed. that is what the price will enable us to do, to go into mass production of our systems. we started building last month. now with this price we can accelerate the development, the
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mass production of the electrolysers and make green hydrogen accessible for all. the family of sir david amess have been visiting the church in his constituency where he was killed on friday to see many of the tributes left in his memory. his widowjulia has been visiting along with their children. they have five children, four daughters and a son. and sir david's widow was comforted by family members as she read messages during the ten minute visit to the methodist church in leigh—on—sea. they have said their hearts are shattered. they have called for people to set aside hatred and to show love. and later today, mps will be paying tribute to sir david amess in parliament. there will be prayers and a minute's silence at half past two this afternoon. we will have coverage as borisjohnson
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leads mps in reading out tributes in the house of commons. the latest news at one with clive myrie. now the weather. by myrie. now the weather. by for me. hello there. over the week ahead we are going to find big temperature fluctuations. we need to look at the upper level wind. this is where the jetstream look at the upper level wind. this is where thejetstream is today. we are on the warmer side of that jetstream, so we are drawing in milder airfrom the jetstream, so we are drawing in milder air from the south. wait a long see track the cloud is bringing a lot of rain. this is where we have most of the rain by the end of the afternoon into the early evening. those temperatures are still 15 to 18 degrees. a very mild. the rain we have across east anglia and the south—east will clear away slowly through the evening. the wetter weather in northern scotland pushes through. there could be some breaks in the cloud, leading to mist and fog patches. then the cloud seconds later. another dose of rain comes into the western side of the uk.
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mild air of course, some minimum temperatures will be 12 to 1a degrees. a lot of cloud tomorrow. summer rain as well. particularly in the morning, wales and northern england pushing northwards into scotland. showery rain in northern ireland. i have that rain it should slowly brighten up through east anglia, the south—east of england. temperatures making 20, 20 one degree. very mild 17 or 18 fairly typical. heading into wednesday, there is more rain in the forecast. that will move north across england and wales. there could be some thunder in there as well. some sunshine on either side of the rain. temperature is not quite as high on wednesday. some rain in northern scotland will be significant because behind that we have got much cooler air coming ourway forthe behind that we have got much cooler air coming our way for the rest of the week. stronger winds as well. it will certainly feel different. if we look at where the jetstream is by the time we get to wednesday and thursday, starting to come in from the north. that means we are going
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to be on the cooler side. that is why the temperatures are not going to be dropping. we still have some wet weather to start the day on thursday, particularly down the eastern side of bingen. that will slowly move away. those showers come chasing on. some could be heavy and wintry over the high ground across northern and western parts of the uk. it is also going to be windy, the winds more from the north, they could touch a force around north sea coast. that will make it feel much colder, around eight degrees in northern scotland. 13 in southern england.
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today at one, the family of sir david amess visit the scene of his killing in essex. they say they're shattered by his death, but are grateful for the public support they've received. other mps have been speaking out, about the abuse and threats they routinely endure. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years so of course i take it very seriously. and we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we're doing everything we can, you need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. borisjohnson will lead the tributes to sir david on the floor of the commons. also this lunchtime... are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, especially towards women?
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good news for hundreds of ford workers on merseyside,

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