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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 18, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with.
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we'll have much more on this and in our other main news this morning.... it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and cameron norrie becomes the first british tennis player to win at indian wells.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. mps will gather in westminster today to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are �*shattered' by his death. aru na iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp. he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement sir david's family gave this plea. "we ask people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all.
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this is the only way forward. set aside hatred and work towards togetherness. please let some good come from this tragedy." this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. mps have been speaking about the abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to speak in debates and representing my constituents. it is hard day to day to constantly think about reporting every abuse and intimidation and harassment, but i have to say, something has got to be done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem, but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is central to what we do. we can't just lock ourselves away. the politician was married with five children.
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a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. for now, southend is in mourning for a man who dedicated his life to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news. brendan cox, the husband of the murdered labour mpjo cox, says it brought back terrible memories when he heard of the attack on sir david amess.
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i think when i got that call on friday, ijust had a very immediate and very physical reaction to it. i was back in that moment five years ago when i got the call aboutjo. and ifound it very hard ago when i got the call aboutjo. and i found it very hard to function. i picked the kids up from school and went away for the weekend just to try and get away from it all. but i also, i guess the other emotion wasjust the all. but i also, i guess the other emotion was just the sort of, the terrible sadness for the family, knowing what they are going through, knowing what they are going through, knowing those moments of hope when you know that there has been an attack but you hope it's not too bad. to then, the realisation that the worst possible thing you could imagine in your life hasjust happened to you and you then have to tell your loved ones about it. 0ur political correspondent,
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chris mason, is at westminster. it is going to be the most number of days at westminster as mps, they forget about their political allegiances today, to pay tribute to one of their own, sir david amess. and sadly, the threats keep coming, an individual arrested after a threat against the labour mp, chris bryant? threat against the labour mp, chris b ant? ., �* , threat against the labour mp, chris b ant? . �* , , bryant? that's right, there will be rofound bryant? that's right, there will be profound reflection _ bryant? that's right, there will be profound reflection today, - profound reflection today, reflection on a man so widely loved here, he had served here for almost 40 here, he had served here for almost a0 years serving the south and since 1997, basildon before that. had friendships across the house, as is common at westminster. a deep amount of personal reflection and condolence. in addition to that, there questions that mps are asking themselves, as you mention, around their own safety. right at the heart of the british model of parliamentary democracy is the idea of a constituency, a patch of the country that is solely represented by a single mp. and the constituency
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surgery that happens on a friday, as happened at the methodist church. david amess the other day where mps meet constituents one—on—one and face—to—face. it is seen as a crucial part of the role as mps, it is something they revere. yet again, the questions being asked about the extent to which it is safe. lots of mps asking a bigger question, whether it is right for them to continue as a member of parliament given the potential risk, notjust to them, but to their family and their staff. to them, but to their family and theirstaff. here to them, but to their family and their staff. here is chris bryant who had paid tribute over the weekend to sir david amess, was subject to a death threat after that. there has since been an arrest. he was asked on breakfast in the last hour if he considered packing it all in? all the time, yes, allthe time, yes, i all the time, yes, i do question whethen — all the time, yes, i do question whethen it _
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all the time, yes, i do question whether. it is notjust about me, it is about— whether. it is notjust about me, it is about my— whether. it is notjust about me, it is about my staff and my family as welt _ is about my staff and my family as welt but— is about my staff and my family as welt but i— is about my staff and my family as well. but i do believe that poverty is necessary, poverty doesn't come from _ is necessary, poverty doesn't come from heaven like some mysterious dispensation and land on some pe0ple's— dispensation and land on some people's doorsteps and not on others — people's doorsteps and not on others it_ people's doorsteps and not on others. it has human causes and human_ others. it has human causes and human remedies. i believe we can tackle _ human remedies. i believe we can tackle climate change, i believe any man's _ tackle climate change, i believe any man's death diminishes me so i must care about _ man's death diminishes me so i must care about human rights in every country — care about human rights in every country in — care about human rights in every country in the world. i care passionately that people in the rhondda are using food banks more than they— rhondda are using food banks more than they ever have done in the past _ than they ever have done in the past i— than they ever have done in the past i am — than they ever have done in the past. lam passionate than they ever have done in the past. i am passionate about wanting to change _ past. i am passionate about wanting to change the world and nobody is going _ to change the world and nobody is going to _ to change the world and nobody is going to stop me. the labour mp chris bryant. concerns about safety stretch across the house, so many mps have got their own personal experience of the threats that they have been subjected to. here is the deputy
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prime minister. there would be people who have had worse _ there would be people who have had worse abuse than me and i particularly feel for the female mps and i know colleagues of mine have come _ and i know colleagues of mine have come off— and i know colleagues of mine have come off twitter because it isjust vita _ come off twitter because it isjust vita i_ come off twitter because it isjust vita i have — come off twitter because it isjust vile. i have had three threats to life and — vile. i have had three threats to life and limb over the last two years. — life and limb over the last two years. so— life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously — years, so of course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it, we need _ seriously. we need to respond to it, we need to— seriously. we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything — we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we're _ everything we can, we need to make sure we're doing that due diligence on everything. at the end of the day, _ on everything. at the end of the day, my— on everything. at the end of the day, my feeling is, it's a personal one, _ day, my feeling is, it's a personal one. we _ day, my feeling is, it's a personal one, we must not allow those who attack _ one, we must not allow those who attack our — one, we must not allow those who attack our democracy, who want to threaten _ attack our democracy, who want to threaten us — attack our democracy, who want to threaten us and stop us talking to our constituents in serving our constituents, we cannot allow them to win _ mps will gather as usual this afternoon. there will be specially written prayers of commemoration and about 3.30 tribute. 0n the house of
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commons led by the prime minister. that is expected to last for a couple of hours, at which point there will be a procession from the palace of westminster, across the road to the church next door to westminster abbey where there will be a service of commemoration at six o'clock this evening.— o'clock this evening. chris, thank ou ve o'clock this evening. chris, thank you very much- _ o'clock this evening. chris, thank you very much. chris _ o'clock this evening. chris, thank you very much. chris mason - o'clock this evening. chris, thank you very much. chris mason at i you very much. chris mason at westminster. i'm joing now by nick aldworth, who is a former counter terrorism national co—ordinator and security commentator. thank you forjoining us today on bbc news. the key question is at stake here are, how do we protect mps and by extension, protect democracy? at the same time, how do we effectively identify those individuals who pose a serious risk to those mps?— to those mps? those are two very distinct questions _ to those mps? those are two very distinct questions and _ to those mps? those are two very distinct questions and one - to those mps? those are two very distinct questions and one of - to those mps? those are two very distinct questions and one of the l distinct questions and one of the challenges over the last 2a hours has become conflated. if i can address the first one. at the moment
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there are quite effective measures in place, mechanisms in place by which mps can receive support should they feel they are at home. we need to create the distinction between the threats and the harm who come from those in society are displaced, just angry versus those who are pursuing a terrorist ideology. in terms of the latter, the threat to mps is not as high as it is in some other sectors. that becomes a great challenge is to wear to prioritise the resources. when you listen to things like that interview by dominic rab and the level of abuse held mps, some of that is just unkind trolling, but some of it undoubtedly has a latent malevolent to sitting behind it. it is being able to address those matters, and resolutions around those people, identifying them, arresting them and using the law to such a degree is to make the sort of behaviour
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completely unacceptable. when you talk about a — completely unacceptable. when you talk about a mechanism _ completely unacceptable. when you talk about a mechanism for - completely unacceptable. when you talk about a mechanism for mps - completely unacceptable. when you talk about a mechanism for mps to l talk about a mechanism for mps to access more security, who makes the decision on that? because different individuals will obviously feel differently about the level of threats made against them. some may dismiss them more readily than others, so are mps themselves and their staff in the best position to make a judgment on this, or should there be someone, is there someone making a more neutraljudgment? i making a more neutraljudgment? i agree with that sentiment entirely, currently it is down to the individual mp to decide if they want more support or if they want more advice or infrastructure. they can call upon the counterterrorism security advisers who exist up and down the country he will come and do a survey of the home of their office, the company infrastructure and make an assessment. but it is down to the individual to do that. i
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would provide the parliamentary advisory team working out of parliament to be the focal point but it is demand driven rather than proactive. it is demand driven rather than proactive-— it is demand driven rather than roactive. ., ,, ., , ., proactive. you think that needs to chan . e, proactive. you think that needs to change. the _ proactive. you think that needs to change, the home _ proactive. you think that needs to change, the home secretary - proactive. you think that needs to change, the home secretary has i change, the home secretary has talked about a possible option of bodyguards, is that practical or desirable in your opinion? i think in terms of _ desirable in your opinion? i think in terms of the _ desirable in your opinion? i think in terms of the body _ desirable in your opinion? i think in terms of the body of _ desirable in your opinion? i think in terms of the body of people i in terms of the body of people coming from the public sector, it is impractical and to put into context, 650 mp5 impractical and to put into context, 650 mps would require a team of two, three individuals looking after them. first of all, those officers are highly specialised, they wouldn't be able to upscale to the level of numbers required any time soon, it is completely impractical. i do believe there is a role for the private sector to step forward and fill some of those gaps. i believe it is something the taxpayer could reasonably pay for. i think there is
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a relatively easy solution around creating that construct and i would offer that over to the home secretary here and now, to look at that and say, here is how we can resolve the problem.— resolve the problem. let's talk about the _ resolve the problem. let's talk about the other _ resolve the problem. let's talk about the other aspect - resolve the problem. let's talk about the other aspect of - resolve the problem. let's talk about the other aspect of this, | resolve the problem. let's talk - about the other aspect of this, how do you identify those individuals who will go beyond making threats and that is harmful, but will actually carry out threats as well? talk to us about the prevent programme, what do you see as its strengths and weaknesses, what do you think can and should be done? the prevent programme has been with us for a long time, we hopefully have moved beyond the point where some members of the input is, as it were, have stopped criticising it and suggest it is a government spying mission. it is anything but. the last figures i have got was for 2020 and we put 6200 referrals into the system which about a00 came out
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at the entity engaged with proactively on de—radicalisation programmes or other forms of intervention. but most of the people who went into that programme for people who had complex social needs and were referred to places elsewhere, such as mental health services. when you look at the scale of the output, one could say it is broadly a success. however, the challenge has been, over the last couple of years, many of those who would input referrals such as education have been absent because kids haven't been in school and most of the referral have come from youths. the biggest weakness of the prevent at the moment as friends and family. friends and family are most likely to see the changes in behaviour, the different terminologies they start to use, physical actions. currently only 2% of referrals come from friends, family and work colleagues. hagar of referrals come from friends, family and work colleagues. how do ou chance family and work colleagues. how do you change that? _
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family and work colleagues. how do you change that? what _ family and work colleagues. how do you change that? what is _ family and work colleagues. how do you change that? what is not - family and work colleagues. how do | you change that? what is not helped as the toxic narrative _ you change that? what is not helped as the toxic narrative that _ as the toxic narrative that developed around prevent to start with. we have to conveniently reinforce that this is saving on people from a lifetime of misery and saving them from committing the appalling acts we have seen over the last 2a—hour a8—hour is. we have got to be on the front foot about promoting prevent. liken this to stopping your child being groomed by a paedophile. that exactly what radicalise is doing, they are paedophiles in another form, radicalise is doing, they are paedophiles in anotherform, they take the vulnerable and we can turn them into something for their benefit. . ~ them into something for their benefit. ., ,, , ., , . them into something for their benefit. . ~ , . ., benefit. thank you very much for our time benefit. thank you very much for your time today. _ from politicians to reality tv stars, for people in the public eye hate social media has become a fact of life and its particularly bad for women. companies say they re trying to tackle online hate
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but a panorama investigation has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. 0ur specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring, has more. kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into your office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent
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and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content. some involving sexual violence.
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this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. and you can find out more about this on panorama this evening at 7.30pm, on bbc one.
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the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today — a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events — including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. i'm joined now by stephen montgomery the spokesperson for the scottish hospitality group. good to have you with us today, talk to us how this grace period, if we can call it that, this period of two weeks has gone?— can call it that, this period of two weeks has gone? good morning. first of all can i thank— weeks has gone? good morning. first of all can i thank on _ weeks has gone? good morning. first of all can i thank on our— of all can i thank on our condolences to the family of sir david amess this morning. the last two weeks has been a bedding in period for everybody in hospitality in scotland who is captured by this
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new definition of nightclub. however, the government were not ready, ratherthan however, the government were not ready, rather than a bedding in period for hospitality. qm. ready, rather than a bedding in period for hospitality.— ready, rather than a bedding in period for hospitality. 0k, how has this change — period for hospitality. 0k, how has this change affecting _ period for hospitality. 0k, how has this change affecting the _ period for hospitality. 0k, how has this change affecting the businessl this change affecting the business as you represent, give us the practicalities of this. it is as you represent, give us the practicalities of this.- practicalities of this. it is fair to say that — practicalities of this. it is fair to say that nightclubs - practicalities of this. it is fair to say that nightclubs as - practicalities of this. it is fair| to say that nightclubs as what practicalities of this. it is fair - to say that nightclubs as what most people would know them at, their open post three o'clock in the morning. they would have the provision to have licensed door staff and they would be better prepared than most people wear as the new definition are people who wouldn't normally have had to have dull stuff. at the moment we have a recruitment issue, which is around the uk, notjust scotland. those people that didn't have the availability for doorstep before now require that because these passports have to be checked on the way in. recruitment is a bit of a pandemic on its own. 0ur
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recruitment is a bit of a pandemic on its own. our main priority at the moment is to get people to serve the great scottish whiskies, food and thatis great scottish whiskies, food and that is the last thing we needed was now to try and employ people to check covid passports on the way in. you want to do this safely, so aren't the covid passports designed to keep everyone safe to allow those businesses to stay open? i to keep everyone safe to allow those businesses to stay open?— businesses to stay open? i think it is fair to say _ businesses to stay open? i think it is fair to say hospitality _ businesses to stay open? i think it is fair to say hospitality has - businesses to stay open? i think it is fair to say hospitality has borne | is fair to say hospitality has borne the brunt of restrictions all the way through this. we have had way above our duty of coal from the government and every restriction. we have not welcomed every restriction but we have abided by them. even the music band that we had. when you take people over the age of 18, who have been double jab, and concentrate on the 10% and trying to get those people to be vaccinated and open up pubs and clubs across
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places in scotland like aberdeen and encourage people to have a drop—in center. encourage people to have a drop-in center. .., . ., encourage people to have a drop-in center. .., ., ., ., ., center. encouraging them to have a dro-in center. encouraging them to have a drop-in center. _ center. encouraging them to have a drop-in center, what _ center. encouraging them to have a drop-in center, what do _ center. encouraging them to have a drop-in center, what do you - center. encouraging them to have a drop-in center, what do you mean l center. encouraging them to have a i drop-in center, what do you mean by drop—in center, what do you mean by that? we drop-in center, what do you mean by that? ~ ., . that? we did a recruitment in aberdeen _ that? we did a recruitment in aberdeen a — that? we did a recruitment in aberdeen a couple _ that? we did a recruitment in aberdeen a couple of- that? we did a recruitment in aberdeen a couple of weeks i that? we did a recruitment in i aberdeen a couple of weeks ago that? we did a recruitment in - aberdeen a couple of weeks ago where we had grampian national health down and they had a drop—in centerfor vaccinations. 50 and they had a drop-in center for vaccinations.— vaccinations. so the possibilities of vaccinations _ vaccinations. so the possibilities of vaccinations on _ vaccinations. so the possibilities of vaccinations on site? - vaccinations. so the possibilities i of vaccinations on site? absolutely. what have you heard anecdotally about how customers are responding to this, have there been any confrontations, have people been patient and understanding? fin confrontations, have people been patient and understanding? on the whole, the last _ patient and understanding? on the whole, the last couple _ patient and understanding? on the whole, the last couple of— patient and understanding? on the whole, the last couple of weeks . patient and understanding? on the | whole, the last couple of weeks has been business as normal, but a lot of people have been asking, getting into people's mindsets. it is not something we are wanting but we have to put it in. we are telling our staff that we have to do this, we have been telling customers to get them prepared as well. we have had mixed emotions, predominantly in the night—time economy where people go
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to a nightclub after two o'clock in the morning. the younger crowd have been. but in the older demographic between 30 and may 55, where it is bars and rural bars, they don't go to a nightclub, but on the definition you are. people who have never been asked for identification before, even for proof of age are now being asked for proof of vaccination. it is a big thing for us, probably one of the heaviest restrictions we have had to date. hopefully we can stay in touch with you a bbc news and see how it is all working out in the weeks and months ahead. ford has announced a major transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 202a. it's part of plans to make its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe electric by 2030.
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we can speak to our business correspondent katie prescott. how much does this investment by ford help them to achieve that aim? it is really significant for halewood but also the transformation of the car industry as a whole. it's not long now until 2030, which is when petrol and diesel cars with traditional internal combustion engines will not be sold in the uk. there was a question over what would happen to this plant which made gearboxes for petrol cars. the fact it is going to be part of the electric vehicle market going forward has been seen as a vote of confidence for the uk car industry as a whole, as we move through this strange transitional period. i think we can hearfrom strange transitional period. i think we can hear from stuart rowley, the president of ford europe about this investment.
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this is our first investment in electrified components in europe and these power units, these are the components that take the energy from the battery and turn that into traction to drive the wheels. so it's a lot like an electric motor and a transmission combined. yeah, 500 people we have in halewood today and this will really secure the future of those jobs for the foreseeable future, so great news for the people in halewood. we have a great workforce in halewood, we have excellent labour relations, very productive plant, good quality. we did get support from the uk government, from the automotive transformation fund and we are really, really pleased about that. but we also have the technology in halewood, precision gear machining, the skills that we need to produce these components so we're really happy to make that choice. tell us more about the importance of this for halewood, merseyside because this investment could have gone elsewhere?— gone elsewhere? halewood was in competition _ gone elsewhere? halewood was in competition with _ gone elsewhere? halewood was in competition with another - gone elsewhere? halewood was in
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competition with another ford - competition with another ford factory in cologne for the production of these parts. the fact that it stayed in the uk is a real boost for the car industry here and we had stuart rowley say they have got a contribution from the uk government. we don't know exactly how much that is of the £230 million investment they are making here, but there are reports in newspapers today that it could be in the region of £30 million. he also said it is testament to the relationship ford has for the workers are halewood so there will be a lot of delight that this investment has been made. same this investment has been made. some ve aood this investment has been made. some very good news- _ this investment has been made. some very good news. thank _ this investment has been made. some very good news. thank you _ this investment has been made. some very good news. thank you very much. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize, founded by prince william, have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change — the winners have been awarded £1 million. science editor david shukman has more. each year we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances
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of repairing our planet. inspired by the missions to the moon, the aim is to heal planet earth, to try to tackle the most serious environmental problems. at the ceremony to hand out the awards, a call to action from sir david attenborough. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and if we can put our minds to it, i believe we can do that. congratulations. the winning teams are mostly small but with big potential. a project to grow coral in the bahamas, using special tanks to speed up the process of restoring reefs. a portable machine developed in india to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser, so that farmers don't burn their fields and cause air pollution. and a clever design in thailand, using renewable energy to make hydrogen.
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winning this prize is recognition that we are going in the right direction. it will support us to go into mass production and it will boost us towards our goal of accelerating the access of green hydrogen for everyone. the earthshot for build a waste—free world goes to... ..the city of milan! another global challenge is waste. and the city of milan wins a prize for collecting unused food and giving it to people who need it most. the final prize, for restoring nature, went to costa rica, a country that once cleared most of its forests but has now doubled the number of trees. the plan now is for the winning projects to be scaled up so they can make a real difference globally. we will have to see how well that works out in practice.
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but in any event they will offer something badly needed in the run—up to the climate summit in glasgow next month, a sense of optimism. david shukman, bbc news. and we'll be talking to some of those recipients throughout the day here on bbc news. within the next half hour, we'll be hearing from those behind a project to use clean hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels, to help power our world it is time for a look at the weather. how are things looking? they are looking pretty cloudy. we have a band of rain coming in from the west that is going to be moving east over the course of the day so all of us will see some rain. we still have a little bit of fog to get rid of that will be pushed away as the cloud comes then followed by the rain. you can see this gap across northern england we the rain is not as heavy. you are definitely going to have heavier rain than
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across scotland and it is going to be busy. towards the west behind the band event there will be some drizzle and gusty winds across the very far north of scotland. tonight you can see the arc of rain from the weather front eventually pushes away and we have a drier interlude and then the wind picks up towards the west end we see the rain coming in as well. temperatures ten to 15 degrees so it is going to be a fairly mild night ahead and tomorrow remains unsettled. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements.
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a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with. it is now a legal requirement in scotland to show a covid vaccine passport to attend nightclubs and large events, including some football matches. ford is investing £230 million to convert its halewood plant on merseyside to make parts for electric cars, safeguarding 500 jobs. the first winners of prince william's earthshot awards have been announced at a ceremony in london. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's kathryn. good morning. cameron norrie has made history by becoming the first british player to win the men's
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title at indian wells. he fought back from a set and a break down to beat nikoloz basilashvili. norrie will now rise to a career—high 16th in the world, and is now in the running to reach the season—ending atp finals. patrick gearey reports. cameron norrie has spent his life on the move. he's lived in south africa, new zealand, london and texas. now, though, is he finally arriving? here he was in his biggest match, in the best year of his career. but this wasn't in the plan. nicoloz basilashvili, above him on your screen, below him in the rankings, smashed his way to the first set. then to a break up in the second as well. norrie was nowjust trying to survive, waiting for a chance, a moment when the energy changed. you know it when you feel it. 0h, brilliant! norrie took the second and, with it, the control. the new british number one has the lungs of an endurance athlete and the instinct of a fighter.
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basilashvili had no ropes to lean on. it all ended with one last wild swing. norrie was indian wells' first british champion. still don't really know what i'm experiencing. it was an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big matches. so i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. this autumn, emma raducanu has cracked america and now it's norrie. british tennis is rising in the fall. patrick gearey, bbc news. steve bruce says he'll go to work as normal this morning, despite seeing his newcastle side lose their first match under new ownership. it had started so well against spurs too. ahead inside two minutes — much to the delight of their new owners. but tottenham replied with three of their own. harry kane scored one and set up son hueng min in first half stoppage time. 3—2 it finished — in steve bruce's
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one thousandth game in management — but it left more questions for him to face about his future. i'll carry on as best i can until i hear otherwise. and the owners have been very, very respectful, i have to say that. the way they've conducted themselves in the last week or so. and unless i hear different, i will go to work again tomorrow and prepare for next week. rory mcilroy has claimed the 20th pga tour title of his career, after a final round six—under par 66 helped him win the cj cup at the summit club in las vegas. he trailed by nine shots after 36 holes — but a superb 62 on saturday put him in contention and — on sunday — he made five birdies and that eagle to claim his second win of 2021. and after a disappointing ryder cup, matt fitzpatrick has rebounded by winning the andalucia masters — his seventh win in as many years. he won by three shots
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after a final round 69. there are two more opening round group matches today in the t20 world cup. ireland take on the netherlands, and sri lanka face namibia. both games will be played in abu dhabi. it's after scotland beat bangladesh by six runs in their opening group match thanks to a man of the match all—round performance from chris g reaves. he struck a5 with the bat and took 2 wickets in his first t20 international. england have a warm up match against india this afternoon. eddiejones will name his england squad for the autumn rugby internationals this afternoon. quite a few saracens players may feature after sarries handed bath a record premiership home defeat yesterday, thrashing them 71 points to 17 at the rec. they ran in ten tries with a hat—trick for max maylins. elsewhere london irish drew 25—all with gloucester. that's all the sport for now. a big ofa a big of a bumper weekend of sport
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on the website. back to our top story now and borisjohnson will lead tributes in the commons this afternoon for sir david amess — the mp who was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery in southend last friday, but there have been questions raised about the safety of mps and whether britain could face a new wave of attacks from people who the intelligence services call bedroom radicals whose extremism is bred online. let's speak to peter neumann who's a professor of security studies at king's college london. thank you forjoining us. how difficult is it for the security agencies to find, identify and track people who are becoming radicalised online? it is people who are becoming radicalised oane? . '. . people who are becoming radicalised online? , , . , ., online? it is difficult but not impossible _ online? it is difficult but not impossible because - online? it is difficult but not impossible because even i online? it is difficult but not - impossible because even though they are online it doesn't mean necessarily that they do not interact with people so a lot of
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people that are in messaging forums and chat rooms, they are still talking to people, they are not entirely self radicalised, they interact with people and the fact this particular individual has come to the attention of prevent programme means at some point someone must have noticed something. of course there are a lot of people who need start to look at material online mine who may engage in conversations online but you are not actually a credible threat, he will never go on to carry out a threat. it must be incredibly difficult to figure out how to separate those people out. how do you spot the ones who will actually take action and those who will not?— those who will not? absolutely. security agencies _ those who will not? absolutely. security agencies today - those who will not? absolutely. security agencies today are - those who will not? absolutely. i security agencies today are faced with a different problem from many years ago. many years ago it used to be the case that there was very little information available. today there is too much information on the
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internet. it is full of threats and awful behaviour and it is really difficult, nobody has figured out how to distinguish the dangerous ones from the ones who are just letting off steam and that is the challenge for security agencies. hagar challenge for security agencies. how do ou challenge for security agencies. how do you address _ challenge for security agencies. how do you address that because clearly there are far more possible threats being talked about and there are members of the security agencies and police to deal with those? absolutely. i think it is notjust about the particular threat that these people issued at some point. it is about combining it with other information, so for example if you know somebody is part of a network of extremists and has hung out with extremists in the past and has a record of activity but then that threat comes it is much more serious than someone you have never heard about before but these sorts of calculations are quite new, even to
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security agencies, and there is room for failure security agencies, and there is room forfailure and of security agencies, and there is room for failure and of course there is a risk that people will slip through. 0n risk that people will slip through. on an average year 7000 people or so are referred to the prevent programme which is meant to stop people becoming radicalised. someone i spoke to earlier this morning was saying that the biggest weakness in his opinion in prevent is the lack of input from family and friends of individuals because prevent to many people has a bad name. would you agree with that? i do people has a bad name. would you agree with that?— agree with that? i do agree with that. compared _ agree with that? i do agree with that. compared to _ agree with that? i do agree with that. compared to other - agree with that? i do agree with l that. compared to other european countries referrals that from within the community, from community members, parents, people around these individuals, is very low in britain, only 6% to 7% of reports come from communities and that needs to change, and part of that is to also rebrand prevent to make it less
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about spying on muslim communities, thatis about spying on muslim communities, that is the sort of image it has, but to make it more about taking care of people and helping people and helping people assisting them preventing them from people going into criminality, and i think that is one important thing that has been criticised for a very long time but has not really changed. haifa criticised for a very long time but has not really changed.— criticised for a very long time but has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? _ has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? how— has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? how do _ has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? how do you - has not really changed. how do you rebrand that? how do you begin - has not really changed. how do you. rebrand that? how do you begin that rebranding, begin to give people a different impression of what it is about? ,., ., ., about? one important thing for examle about? one important thing for example for— about? one important thing for example for parents _ about? one important thing for example for parents to - about? one important thing for example for parents to be - about? one important thing for i example for parents to be willing about? one important thing for - example for parents to be willing to report people around them including their own children would be the perception that when you call prevent you are not calling the police. a lot of people are reluctant to report their own kids because they may end up in prison, but to rebrand it in a way that parents understand they are calling people that are going to help them, that are not immediately arresting their kids that are assisting them in preventing their kids from doing
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bad things and this perception that you are calling the police and you are going to get someone arrested is something that has prevented people from using those hotlines. thank something that has prevented people from using those hotlines.— from using those hotlines. thank you ve much from using those hotlines. thank you very much for— from using those hotlines. thank you very much for your _ from using those hotlines. thank you very much for your time. _ police are continuing to investigate the murder of a 1a—year—old boy in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was found seriously injured at high street station on saturday afternoon. he was taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead a short time later. 0ur scotland reporter connor gillies has the latest. high street station in the centre of glasgow, one of the city's busiest. now a crime scene, the centre of a murder investigation. the victim, a schoolboy, 1a—year—old justin mclaughlin, stabbed to death in broad daylight on saturday afternoon. eye witnesses described seeing emergency services giving him cpr inside this station. the 1a—year—old was taken to the queen elizabeth
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university hospital, where he died a short time later. it's very difficult to comment on whether it was a targeted attack or not, given the early stages of the investigation. but it's something that, as with these type of inquiries, we will keep an open mind. part of the incident was captured on cctv, which is a huge advantage for what we are trying to achieve. tributes are building on social media from friends and family. one said, "words can't explain how much we miss you. sleep tight angel. " another described justin as the most sweetest, loving and caring boy ever. "i can't explain how heartbroken i am," they said, "you were one in a million." it's heartbreaking to read the thoughts of some of the family and friends ofjustin in the wake of this tragic murder. and i'm just stunned that this could have taken place in the heart of our city in broad daylight. justin was a pupil at this school in coatbridge in north lanarkshire. his teacher said st ambrose is shocked and saddened
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byjustin's death. james mcparland said he was a valued member of the community and his loss will be felt by staff and pupils alike. as a family mourns, detectives continue the hunt this morning for the person, or people, responsible for murdering this young boy. connor gillies, bbc news, glasgow. more now on the five recipients of the first earthshot prize. the award — founded by prince william — aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change, and the winners have each been awarded one million pounds. one of the recipients was the creator of a small machine which uses clean hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels, to help power our world. here's the moment actor and activist emma watson announced the winner of the category at last night's ceremony. the hearts chart for fixed our
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climate goes to aem electrolyser. let's talk to vaitea cowan, whom we saw briefly in that clip. she's one of the founders of the aem electrolyser. huge congratulations on being one of the inaugural winners. how are you feeling this morning. still the inaugural winners. how are you feeling this morning.— feeling this morning. still very excited, not _ feeling this morning. still very excited, not much _ feeling this morning. still very excited, not much sleep, - feeling this morning. still very excited, not much sleep, fulli feeling this morning. still very. excited, not much sleep, full of adrenaline, and an immense wave of pride for our team and our accomplishments so far. explain exactly what _ accomplishments so far. explain exactly what it _ accomplishments so far. explain exactly what it is _ accomplishments so far. explain exactly what it is because - accomplishments so far. explain i exactly what it is because hydrogen is usually produced by burning fossil fuels and of course we do not
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want to be doing that.— want to be doing that. absolutely not. that want to be doing that. absolutely not- that is _ want to be doing that. absolutely not. that is why _ want to be doing that. absolutely not. that is why the _ want to be doing that. absolutely not. that is why the electrolyserl want to be doing that. absolutelyl not. that is why the electrolyser is a key technology to fight climate change. 0ur electrolyser uses electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen and hydrogen thatis hydrogen and oxygen and hydrogen that is produced can either be stored or used directly synthetic fuels and it is no carbon emissions in production or usage. the electricity _ in production or usage. the electricity you _ in production or usage. the electricity you make - in production or usage. the electricity you make it from is all coming from renewable sources i believe. ~ , , coming from renewable sources i believe. ~ , ., believe. absolutely. solar, wind. one of the _ believe. absolutely. solar, wind. one of the advantages _ believe. absolutely. solar, wind. one of the advantages of- believe. absolutely. solar, wind. one of the advantages of the - one of the advantages of the electrolyser can use the reliability of the renewables and have a great performance. pare of the renewables and have a great performance-— performance. are there any carbon emissions in _ performance. are there any carbon emissions in this _ performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process - performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process at - performance. are there any carbon emissions in this process at all? i emissions in this process at all? when using green electricity there are no carbon emissions. the only omission is oxygen. the are no carbon emissions. the only omission is oxygen.— omission is oxygen. the machine itself is a small—
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omission is oxygen. the machine itself is a small machine. - omission is oxygen. the machine itself is a small machine. what i omission is oxygen. the machine i itself is a small machine. what can itself is a small machine. what can it typically power? it itself is a small machine. what can it typically power?— it typically power? it can do a lot. it will generate _ it typically power? it can do a lot. it will generate green _ it typically power? it can do a lot. it will generate green hydrogen . it will generate green hydrogen which is an energy carrier and as an energy carrier hydrogen can either hold and store this energy which means for energy storage, for microgrids to store energy for days or weeks for example, so long—term energy storage solution, for homes, communities, neighbourhoods, but thatis communities, neighbourhoods, but that is not all. our electrolyser is already replacing fossil fuels and transportation, in heating and cooling and also in the power to gas sector, suffer industrial. homes are being heated by our electrolyser, some planes are filled by it, and in australia we have green method being produced by the electrolyser is an direct air capture technology so hydrogen plus c02 making clean
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methane as a synthetic seal. {elite hydrogen plus c02 making clean methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about _ methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about how _ methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about how you _ methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about how you have - methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about how you have got - methane as a synthetic seal. give us an idea about how you have got to i an idea about how you have got to this point. tell us how you became interested in this area and the challenges of getting to this point. sure, i mean, it is ajourney. 0ne sure, i mean, it is ajourney. one of the key learnings as this is not a race, it is a marathon. in for me i grew up spending a lot of time in nature, iwas i grew up spending a lot of time in nature, i was born in new caledonia which is an island in the pacific next to australia and new zealand and so i had the chance to discover the wonders of the sea and spend a lot of timejust the wonders of the sea and spend a lot of time just outdoors, so after studying business in montr al i moved to a northern thailand province and i had just finished my studies, full of curiosity and ambition, and i read about this amazing project, solar hydrogen, and i had to go and meet the people
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behind it and understand their vision and together we had the opportunity to promote clean hydrogen in southeast asia as an alternative to diesel generators and then i had the chance to go found in november 2017 and it feels like we are in a green rocket ship. that november 2017 and it feels like we are in a green rocket ship.- are in a green rocket ship. that is are in a green rocket ship. that is a wonderful— are in a green rocket ship. that is a wonderful description. - are in a green rocket ship. that is a wonderful description. time - are in a green rocket ship. that is a wonderful description. time is i are in a green rocket ship. that is| a wonderful description. time is of the essence, isn't it, as we try to deal with carbon emissions ahead of cop26, the un climate summit of course capping, coming in a few weeks' time. finally, i wonder what winning this prize in the profile it has given to you, but this will allow you to do next in terms of scaling up the development of this project. scaling up the development of this ro'ect. ,, , , .., ., ., project. simply the recognition of this rize project. simply the recognition of this prize is _ project. simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. _ project. simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. it - project. simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. it is - project. simply the recognition of this prize is incredible. it is not i this prize is incredible. it is not only a huge source of motivation for us but also a great source of validation that we are going in the right direction, our technology has
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immense potential to fight climate change and the way to fight climate change and the way to fight climate change is with scale and speed and thatis change is with scale and speed and that is exactly what the prize will enable us to do, to go into mass production of our systems, to start building and with this prize we can accelerate the development of our electrolyser and to make green hydrogen accessible for all. great to talk to you _ hydrogen accessible for all. great to talk to you and _ hydrogen accessible for all. great to talk to you and very _ hydrogen accessible for all. great to talk to you and very best - hydrogen accessible for all. great to talk to you and very best wishes with whatever is next. it's been a month since the new taliban government in afghanistan banned girls from secondary schools across most of the country. it's also forbidden women, except for those in the public health sector, from returning to work. this has raised fears that women in afghanistan will once again be trested as second class citizens by a hardline taliban regime. the bbc has now obtained exclusive access to the former women's affairs ministry
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in the capital, kabul, that's now been replaced by the feared taliban vice and virtue ministry. our correspondent, yogita limaye, reports. at 17, her life, with all its possibilities, has been shut down. before the taliban took over she would have been preparing for a school along with her brother each morning. now afghan girls face the biggest drawback in human rights in recent times. at the top of her class, she wanted to be a doctor.
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the family lives hand to mouth and education was their path to a better future. underan education was their path to a better future. under an all—male taliban regime women are disappearing from public life. they haven't been allowed to return to work yet. those who have marched to claim back their rights have been beaten. we met one of the protesters who was slashed with electric cables. until august she supported her family of six. now she is out of a job.
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the taliban are keen to show they are more moderate than their last time in power. their actions so far belie the claims. this used to be the women's affairs ministry which no longer exists under the taliban government. it has been replaced by the ministry of vice and virtue which is to be the most feared section of the previous taliban regime. what future do women have an an afghanistan ruled by the taliban? that is what we are here to ask. it is hard to imagine afghan women journalists would get to question the taliban like this. surrounded by their men, i asked a taliban spokesman when cars could go back to school, went to work.
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your government have said that women should not return to work right now because of the security situation. he said the same thing about girls going to secondary schools. so it is not true you have allowed them and they are not going. how much time? don't you think the women and girls in your country deserve to know when they can go back to their education, when they can go back to theirjobs?
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they are the future of afghanistan but half of this country's population has no place in it right now. afghan girls are asking if the world will hold the taliban to account. rescue teams in india have stepped up their efforts to help evacuate survivors in the southern state of kerala, following devastating floods. the authorities have moved hundreds of families from low level areas to safer places. the floods have killed at least twenty six people including five children. but many more people remain missing. the spanish prime minister, pedro sanchez, has pledged to outlaw prostitution in the country. mr sanchez told his socialist paty�*s congress that prostitution "enslaved" women. currently, there is no punishment for those who offer paid sexual services as long as it does not take place in public spaces. a rare waterspout was spotted off the coast of cuba on saturday.
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the residents along the south coast were witness to the spectacular phenomenon looming over the area in the late afternoon. waterspouts are tornadoes that occur over a body of water but never reach land — they're much less dangerous than their land counterparts. despite the drama — no damage was reported. now it's time for a look at the weather. the next few days are certainly going to be changeable in terms of the weather forecast. we have heavy rain at times, girls possible in the north of the country. very mild at first and then turning colder later in the week with hill snow. amber colours indicate the milder conditions we are looking at. by milder conditions we are looking at. by the time we get to wednesday temperatures are closer to average and then thursday into friday we are back into the blues and it turns
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much colder than it is going to be into the next couple of days. we also have rain coming in from the west drifting eastwards and remnants of the fog to lift and as the band of the fog to lift and as the band of rain on the clyde proceeding it moves eastwards any fog will be eradicated. a bright start in the east will go into the afternoon. behind the band of rain a lot of cloud and on the west some showers and drizzle on hills and coasts. when the across the far north of scotland as well. northern ireland you should see some sunshine but for england and wales it is going to be mostly cloudy with a band of rain extending through the channel islands and into the south—east during the rush hour and behind it we are looking at some drizzle. temperatures today 11 to 18 degrees and breezy wherever you are. through this evening and overnight this curve of rain which is a weather front lives away. we have a drier interlude and then the next band of rain sweeps in from the west accompanied by strengthening winds.
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a milder night than we would expect at this time of year. tomorrow the rain continues to pitch northwards and eastwards, breezy around it, behind it some showers that could be heavy and thundering across northern ireland and scotland. in the south—east we could reach 2122 degrees in the sunshine. wherever you are tomorrow it is going to be mild for the time of year. average temperatures range from 12 in northern scotland to about 15 hours be pushed into the south of england. 0n be pushed into the south of england. on wednesday we start off with a fair bit of rain across parts of england and wales that will ease through the course of the day. that will brighten up a touch on the south and north before the next band of rain arrives in north—west scotland and south—east england. during the course of thursday this is when we are going to have a bit of a shock to the system so our weather front will continue to think south with hill snow we have a northerly wind so we are seeing a
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peppering of showers and hideous adjacent to the coastline and it will be wintry and cool and there will be wintry and cool and there will be wintry and cool and there will be a wind—chill.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson will lead mps in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. we'll have much more on this throughout the morning. and in our other main news.
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