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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 18, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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this good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. "set aside hatred" — a plea for tolerance from the family of murdered mp sir david amess. his former colleagues will hold a minute's silence today, before paying their tributes to sir david in the house of commons. solutions for saving the planet — the first million pound winners of prince william's earthshot prize have been announced. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now, and over the next years. good morning. a big rise in the number of people falling victim to online recruitment fraud. seven out of ten job seekers came across a fake advert in the first six
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months of this year — some lost thousands of pounds. how did it happen? how do you spot a scam? britain has a new men's number one — cameron norrie wins the title in indian wells, the first british player to do so. good morning. the weather this week is fairly topsy—turvy. the first half is going topsy—turvy. the first half is going to be unseasonably warm with highs in the high teens, low 20s, but the second half will be much colder. details later in the programme. good morning. it's monday, 18th of october. our main story. mps will gather in westminster today, to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at westminster abbey. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are "shattered" by his death. aru na iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amis, attacked and killed
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while doing hisjob as an mp. he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our time. he brought a lot of good. in a statement sir david's family gave this plea. "we ask people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all. this is the only way forward. set aside hatred and work towards togetherness. please let some good come from this tragedy." this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status
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for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. there are now calls to increase security for mps. the home secretary, priti patel, is considering police guards at constituency meetings. we must not let the terrorists alter our way of lives, but we also need to, as we move forward and push back against this, do this in a responsible way. for now, southend is in mourning for a man who dedicated his life to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news. we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason.
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morning to you. it is going to be a very difficult day in westminster today, isn't it?— very difficult day in westminster today, isn't it? yes, good morning. it really is — today, isn't it? yes, good morning. it really is because _ today, isn't it? yes, good morning. it really is because away _ today, isn't it? yes, good morning. it really is because away from - today, isn't it? yes, good morning. it really is because away from the l it really is because away from the ritual _ it really is because away from the ritual to _ it really is because away from the ritual to write and the cameras is a ritual_ ritual to write and the cameras is a ritual so _ ritual to write and the cameras is a ritual so sacrosanct to mps that they— ritual so sacrosanct to mps that they treasure it. that racial is the surgery. — they treasure it. that racial is the surgery, the constituency surgery where _ surgery, the constituency surgery where they meet constituents one—on—one, face—to—face, sometimes with an _ one—on—one, face—to—face, sometimes with an appointment, sometimes not, a range _ with an appointment, sometimes not, a range of— with an appointment, sometimes not, a range of venues around their constituencies to make themselves available _ constituencies to make themselves available and open. the british model— available and open. the british model is— available and open. the british model is all about mps not just being _ model is all about mps not just being legislators and lawmakers, but also working within their communities. mps will tell you that is the _ communities. mps will tell you that is the most — communities. mps will tell you that is the most important element of their— is the most important element of theirioh — is the most important element of theirjob. and yet we saw the other day the _ theirjob. and yet we saw the other day the killing of sir david amess in one _ day the killing of sir david amess in one of— day the killing of sir david amess in one of those constituency surgeries. and so all mps today and staff will— surgeries. and so all mps today and
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staff will be profoundly moved, i suspect, — staff will be profoundly moved, i suspect, by the ritual they will go through— suspect, by the ritual they will go through today to try to sir david's passing — through today to try to sir david's passing. there will be special prayers — passing. there will be special prayers written and delivered when the commons seats later this afternoon. a couple of hours of tribute — afternoon. a couple of hours of tribute led _ afternoon. a couple of hours of tribute led by the prime minister. and then — tribute led by the prime minister. and then a — tribute led by the prime minister. and then a church service across the way from _ and then a church service across the way from parliament at six o'clock this evening, as well as books of condolence being opened at several locations _ condolence being opened at several locations around the palace of westminster. there is a broader conversation going on, as you might expect, _ conversation going on, as you might expect, around mp security. mps feel safely— expect, around mp security. mps feel safely at _ expect, around mp security. mps feel safely at westminster. it is when they're _ safely at westminster. it is when they're back at their constituencies and where — they're back at their constituencies and where their staff are based at the real— and where their staff are based at the real fear lies. some will think that whole — the real fear lies. some will think that whole ritual does need to change — that whole ritual does need to chance. ., ~ that whole ritual does need to chance. ., ,, i. that whole ritual does need to chance. ., ~' ,, , that whole ritual does need to chance. ., ~ ,, , . change. thank you very much indeed. chris mason — change. thank you very much indeed. chris mason live _ change. thank you very much indeed. chris mason live in _ change. thank you very much indeed. chris mason live in westminster. - throughout the morning we'll be speaking to friends and colleagues of sir david, including lord jeffrey archer who will be on after eight. police are continuing to investigate the murder of a 14—year—old boy in glasgow.
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justin mclaughlin was was found seriously injured at high street station on saturday afternoon, before being taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead a short time later. our scotland reporter connor gillies has the latest. high street station in the centre of glasgow, one of the city's busiest. now a crime scene, the centre of a murder investigation. the victim, a schoolboy, 14—year—old justin mclaughlin, stabbed to death in broad daylight on saturday afternoon. eye witnesses described seeing emergency services giving him cpr inside this station. the 14—year—old was taken to the queen elizabeth university hospital, where he died a short time later. it's very difficult to comment on whether it was a targeted attack or not, given the early stages of the investigation. but it's something that, as with these type of inquiries, we will keep an open mind. part of the incident was captured on cctv, which is a huge advantage for what we are trying to achieve.
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tributes are building on social media from friends and family. one said, "words can't explain how much we miss you. sleep tight, angel." another described justin as the most sweetest, loving and caring boy ever. "i can't explain how heartbroken i am," they said, "you were one in a million." it's heartbreaking to read the thoughts of some of the family and friends ofjustin in the wake of this tragic murder. and i'm just stunned that this could have taken place in the heart of our city in broad daylight. justin was a pupil at this school in coatbridge in north lanarkshire. his teacher said st ambrose is shocked and saddened byjustin's death. james mcparland said he was a valued member of the community and his loss will be felt by staff and pupils alike. as a family mourns, detectives continue to hunt this morning for the person, or people, responsible for murdering this young boy.
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connor gillies, bbc news, glasgow. the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today — a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events — including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. ford has announced a major transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 202a. it's part of plans for it's entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe to be electric by 2030. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change. the winners have been awarded £1 million. science editor david
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shukman has more. each year we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances of repairing our planet. inspired by the missions to the moon, the aim is to heal planet earth, to try to tackle the most serious environmental problems. at the ceremony to hand out the awards, a call to action from sir david attenborough. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and if we can put our minds to it, i believe we can do that. congratulations. the winning teams are mostly small but with big potential. a project to grow coral in the bahamas, using special tanks to speed up the process of restoring reefs. a portable machine developed in india to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser, so that farmers don't burn their
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fields and cause air pollution. and a clever design in thailand, using renewable energy to make hydrogen. winning this prize is recognition that we are going in the right direction. it will support us to go into mass production and it will boost us towards our goal of accelerating the acess of green hydrogen for everyone. the earthshot for build a waste—free world goes to... ..the city of milan! another global challenge is waste. and the city of milan wins a prize for collecting unused food and giving it to people who need it most. the final prize, for restoring nature, went to costa rica, a country that once cleared most of its forests but has now doubled the number of trees.
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the plan now is for the winning projects to be scaled up so they can make a real difference globally. we will have to see how well that works out in practice. but in any event they will offer something badly needed in the run—up to the climate summit in glasgow next month, a sense of optimism. david shukman, bbc news. it was a great show last night. did ou see it was a great show last night. did you see it? yes, some serious stars. mo salah giving out a price. he looked rather magnificent. lots of money giving —— given out. we will talk to the organisers later. thea;r talk to the organisers later. they are. but talk to the organisers later. they are- but now _ talk to the organisers later. they are. but now we _ talk to the organisers later. they are. but now we go _ talk to the organisers later. they are. but now we go to _ talk to the organisers later. tie: are. but now we go to carol, who talk to the organisers later. tie:1. are. but now we go to carol, who has are. but now we go to carol, who has a beautiful autumnal picture for us. good morning. a beautiful autumnal picture for us. good morning-— good morning. good morning. the weather this _ good morning. good morning. the weather this week _ good morning. good morning. the weather this week is _ good morning. good morning. the weather this week is really - weather this week is really topsy—turvy. the first half of the week is going to be unseasonably mild. temperatures for some could get up to 21 degrees. by the end of the week it is going to be much colder. it will drop to about 10
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degrees with the wind chill. gales across the far north and heavy rain at times. we have got some fog this morning across parts of southern england into the south—west. parts of northern england and eastern scotland. we have also got a weather front moving from the west towards the east, bringing some rain. not getting into the far south—east onto later in the day. pushing towards the northern isles, where we are looking at gusty winds, a0 to a5 mph. for most it will be a cloudy day. after a bright start in the south—east, the rain comes in. they will be drizzly bits and pieces around the coast. temperatures ranging from ten in lerwick to 16 in glasgow, 18 as we push down towards london. through this evening and overnight eventually this big band of rain in the south—east and the fat north—east will be dry for a time. it will be fairly cloudy. the wind will strengthen by the end of the night and more rain will come the night and more rain will come the south—west through south—west england, wales and northern ireland. it is a very mild night for the time
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of the year. talking of mild, by the time we get to tomorrow, it is going to be very mild for the time of the year. we could get a temperatures up to 20, 21 in any sunshine. but there will be rain, or there will be some showers around, once again a fair bit of cloud. it will also be breezy. a lot going on this week with the weather. thank you, carol. nice to see you. i like that. nice to see, carol. is thank you, carol. nice to see you. i like that. nice to see, carol. as i i like that. nice to see, carol. as i was nice to _ like that. nice to see, carol. as i was nice to see _ like that. nice to see, carol. as i was nice to see carol. _ if you've applied for a newjob recently, you probably found out about it online, but there's growing concern about the number of adverts turning out to be a scam. nina's here with the details. nice to see you as well, nina. nice to see everyone- — nice to see you as well, nina. nice to see everyone. you _ nice to see you as well, nina. nice to see everyone. you felt - nice to see you as well, nina. nice to see everyone. you felt compelled to see everyone. you felt compelled to add _ to see everyone. you felt compelled to add that — to see everyone. you felt compelled to add that. it is lovely to see you — to add that. it is lovely to see you let's _ to add that. it is lovely to see you. let's talk about what is happening. fraudsters are posting adverts _ happening. fraudsters are posting adverts forjobs that don't exist in
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the hope — adverts forjobs that don't exist in the hope of scamming us out of our nroney_ the hope of scamming us out of our money and — the hope of scamming us out of our money and personal details. it has become _ money and personal details. it has become a — money and personal details. it has become a real problem over the past year or— become a real problem over the past year or so _ become a real problem over the past year or so. overthat become a real problem over the past year or so. over that time 70% of job-seekers— year or so. over that time 70% of job—seekers interacted with a fake advert— job—seekers interacted with a fake advert in— job—seekers interacted with a fake advert in the first six months of the year~ — advert in the first six months of the year. compare that to just four years— the year. compare that to just four years ago— the year. compare that to just four years ago whenjust10% the year. compare that to just four years ago when just 10% of people reported _ years ago when just 10% of people reported a — years ago when just 10% of people reported a fake advert. what do criminals — reported a fake advert. what do criminals get out of luring you into your fake — criminals get out of luring you into your fake job ad? well, criminals get out of luring you into yourfakejob ad? well, it criminals get out of luring you into your fake job ad? well, it is all about— your fake job ad? well, it is all about getting money up front for fees _ about getting money up front for fees for— about getting money up front for fees. for example, they might charge you £150 _ fees. for example, they might charge you £150 for— fees. for example, they might charge you £150 for a crb check, or tell you £150 for a crb check, or tell you that — you £150 for a crb check, or tell you that you need to complete a course _ you that you need to complete a course before offering you a job. then _ course before offering you a job. then of— course before offering you a job. then of course that job doesn't exist — then of course that job doesn't exist and _ then of course that job doesn't exist. and its young people who are most _ exist. and its young people who are most at _ exist. and its young people who are most at risk — exist. and its young people who are most at risk. action fraud says victims — most at risk. action fraud says victims aged 18 to 25 lose on average _ victims aged 18 to 25 lose on average £4000 each. we spoke with jack, who— average £4000 each. we spoke with jack, who is— average £4000 each. we spoke with jack, who is 21. he has lost thousands of pounds of savings. he signed _ thousands of pounds of savings. he signed to— thousands of pounds of savings. he signed to a — thousands of pounds of savings. he signed to a bogus online training course _ signed to a bogus online training course which he hoped would get him a 'ob course which he hoped would get him a job as _ course which he hoped would get him a job as a _ course which he hoped would get him
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a job as a plumber. me— a job as a plumber. me and my friends signed up to this course and we were told it would be for a certain amount of months and you for a certain amount of months and wu pay for a certain amount of months and you pay a certain amount for it. at first i was able to do this. then a couple of months than the line it started spiralling and i got suspicious about the course itself. the documents were very professional. everything about it was very professional. i was just grasping anything i could possibly get my hands on because i was struggling to find a job. and when someone says there is a cause here for you and it is this much, and i was able to afford it, ijumped at it. was able to afford it, i “umped at it. ., , was able to afford it, i “umped at it. horrible forjack. thanks for talkin: it. horrible forjack. thanks for talking to _ it. horrible forjack. thanks for talking to us _ it. horrible forjack. thanks for talking to us about _ it. horrible forjack. thanks for talking to us about that. - it. horrible forjack. thanks for talking to us about that. he i it. horrible forjack. thanks for| talking to us about that. he did reported — talking to us about that. he did reported to action fraud. but it is unlikely— reported to action fraud. but it is unlikely that he will get his hard earned — unlikely that he will get his hard earned money back. how can you protect _ earned money back. how can you protect yourself when you are job hunting _ protect yourself when you are job hunting online? the advice is to look— hunting online? the advice is to look for— hunting online? the advice is to look for grammatical errors. if there — look for grammatical errors. if there are _ look for grammatical errors. if there are spelling mistakes that is a clue _ there are spelling mistakes that is a clue it— there are spelling mistakes that is a clue it may not be a genuine adverts — a clue it may not be a genuine
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adverts. also, do an intranet search for the _ adverts. also, do an intranet search for the company. does it actually exist? _ for the company. does it actually exist? does their website look legitimate? if you were offered a 'ob legitimate? if you were offered a job out— legitimate? if you were offered a job out of— legitimate? if you were offered a job out of the blue, if it is too good — job out of the blue, if it is too good to— job out of the blue, if it is too good to be _ job out of the blue, if it is too good to be true, it always is. if in doubt, _ good to be true, it always is. if in doubt, don't— good to be true, it always is. if in doubt, don't send any money or personal— doubt, don't send any money or personal details. report it to action — personal details. report it to action fraud and allow them to investigate. as ever, we would love to hear— investigate. as ever, we would love to hear from — investigate. as ever, we would love to hear from you if you have been looking _ to hear from you if you have been looking for— to hear from you if you have been looking for a job and ended up being scammed _ looking for a job and ended up being scammed. do get in touch. we will have _ scammed. do get in touch. we will have an _ scammed. do get in touch. we will have an expert on later who will .ive have an expert on later who will give us — have an expert on later who will give us more ideas of what to look out for. and as we heard _ what to look out for. and as we heard from _ what to look out for. and as we heard from jack, what is particularly horrible about this is it is playing on people's emotions, it is playing on people's emotions, it has— it is playing on people's emotions, it has been— it is playing on people's emotions, it has been an anxious period for job—seekers, and people like jack now find — job—seekers, and people like jack now find themselves without a job ad without— now find themselves without a job ad without thousands of pounds of savings — without thousands of pounds of savings. really important to follow that up _ savings. really important to follow that up if— savings. really important to follow that up. if things don't seem right, they are _ that up. if things don't seem right, they are usually not.— they are usually not. nina, thank ou. nina will be back in about half an hourfor a big interview with the boss of ford on those plans to secure
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hundreds ofjobs in the uk. nina will be looking at that throughout the morning. 16 minutes ast eiaht. let's take a look at some of today's papers. and the murder of sir david amess continues to dominate coverage. the express has a picture of sir david with his wife, ladyjulia. the headline is from the family's joint statement, in which ladyjulia and the couple's five children said: "nobody should die in that way, nobody." the mirror has a poignant family photograph, which was taken at the wedding of sir david's daughter, flo, just a few weeks ago. the telegraph reports that intelligence agencies are concerned about a potential increase in terror plots developed by so—called "lone wolves" during lockdown. and britain had some good sports news overnight. cameron norries' victory at indian wells — one of the biggest tournaments in tennis outside the majors — leads the bbc sport website
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so we just have a look at the inside pages? you will know about this. really dramatic scenes at st james's park yesterday. dramatic enough because newcastle had a big game against spurs. but this is the moment that, gosh, it was a horrible moment. a fan in the crowd fell ill. you can see spurs player eric dier calling for help. lots of the players went over to try to get medical help for the fun, who received cpr in the stands. they got a defibrillator to him. the prompt action of the fans around him and the players on the page certainly helped. the fan was taken to hospital and was in a stable condition overnight. it really dramatic few minutes at st james's park because the match was halted. not the result newcastle wanted. they are so much more tuned into how you can help somebody in that situation. �* p, you can help somebody in that situation. �* ., ., ., ., situation. and learning how to do cpr. we situation. and learning how to do cpr- we had _ situation. and learning how to do cpr. we had that _ situation. and learning how to do cpr. we had that amazing - situation. and learning how to do cpr. we had that amazing lad . situation. and learning how to do cpr. we had that amazing lad onj situation. and learning how to do - cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week, cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week. harry. — cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week. harry. who _ cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week, harry, who saved _ cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week, harry, who saved his - cpr. we had that amazing lad on last week, harry, who saved his dad's - week, harry, who saved his dad's
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life. it week, harry, who saved his dad's life. ., , �* ., i. week, harry, who saved his dad's life. ., , �* ., ., ., life. it doesn't matter, you are not auoin to life. it doesn't matter, you are not going to hurt _ life. it doesn't matter, you are not going to hurt anyone, _ life. it doesn't matter, you are not going to hurt anyone, you - life. it doesn't matter, you are not going to hurt anyone, you can't . life. it doesn't matter, you are not going to hurt anyone, you can't do j going to hurt anyone, you can't do any damage. going to hurt anyone, you can't do any damage-— any damage. have you ever been sa ed b any damage. have you ever been sapped by a _ any damage. have you ever been sapped by a bus _ any damage. have you ever been sapped by a bus lane _ any damage. have you ever been sapped by a bus lane camera? i. any damage. have you ever been - sapped by a bus lane camera? i never break the rules. _ sapped by a bus lane camera? i never break the rules. how _ sapped by a bus lane camera? i never break the rules. how driving - sapped by a bus lane camera? i never break the rules. how driving a - sapped by a bus lane camera? i never break the rules. how driving a bus - break the rules. how driving a bus lane? i break the rules. how driving a bus lane? ., �* , break the rules. how driving a bus lane? ., �* _ break the rules. how driving a bus lane? .,�* _ ., ., lane? i don't, by the way. have a look here- _ lane? i don't, by the way. have a look here. can _ lane? i don't, by the way. have a look here. can you _ lane? i don't, by the way. have a look here. can you see _ lane? i don't, by the way. have a look here. can you see this - look here. can you see this numberplate? these are the people that own it. this is david knight and paula. they got a ticket saying, your car has appeared in a bus lane, please pay the fine. what happened was, he lives in dorking in surrey. the bus lane camera was from bath. he is scratching his head thinking, what is going on? this is why. you have to come in close for this one. this is a woman with a t—shirt on walking in a bus lane in bath. and the t—shirt says nature. the number plate recognition technology thought this was his number and sent him a fine. this woman walking in a bus
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lane in bath. he got away with it, and rightly so. lane in bath. he got away with it, and rightly so— and rightly so. what is he doing walkin: in and rightly so. what is he doing walking in a _ and rightly so. what is he doing walking in a bus _ and rightly so. what is he doing walking in a bus lane? - and rightly so. what is he doing walking in a bus lane? it- and rightly so. what is he doing walking in a bus lane? it is- walking in a bus lane? it is terrible. . walking in a bus lane? it is terrible-— walking in a bus lane? it is terrible. ,, ., , terrible. she might have been ni -|n~ terrible. she might have been nipping out — terrible. she might have been nipping out to _ terrible. she might have been nipping out to get _ terrible. she might have been nipping out to get there. - terrible. she might have been nipping out to get there. i - terrible. she might have been. nipping out to get there. i have uuite a nipping out to get there. i have quite a lot _ nipping out to get there. i have quite a lot of— nipping out to get there. i have quite a lot of questions - nipping out to get there. i have quite a lot of questions to - nipping out to get there. i have quite a lot of questions to ask i nipping out to get there. i have i quite a lot of questions to ask you about your weekend. how was it? you were brilliant. i about your weekend. how was it? you were brilliant-— were brilliant. i really en'oyed it. you could tell! * were brilliant. i really en'oyed it. you could tell! i h were brilliant. i really en'oyed it. you could tell! i did _ were brilliant. i really en'oyed it. you could tell! i did a _ were brilliant. i really enjoyed it. you could tell! i did a bit - were brilliant. i really enjoyed it. you could tell! i did a bit of - were brilliant. i really enjoyed it. you could tell! i did a bit of mc. you could tell! i did a bit of mc hammer- _ you could tell! i did a bit of mc hammer. cha-cha-cha. - you could tell! i did a bit of mc hammer. cha-cha-cha. this. you could tell! i did a bit of mc hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is| hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is strictl . hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is strictly. yes. _ hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is strictly. yes. it— hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is strictly. yes. it exercised - hammer. cha-cha-cha. this is| strictly. yes. it exercised some school disco — strictly. yes. it exercised some school disco demons _ strictly. yes. it exercised some school disco demons for - strictly. yes. it exercised some school disco demons for me. i strictly. yes. it exercised some school disco demons for me. a | strictly. yes. it exercised some - school disco demons for me. a sniff of my armpit. i was always the school disco goon, really. didn't really want to get involved. ijust was a bit of an idiot round the corners and drank diet coke and skips. it was a good opportunity. we went to my old school this week, that my old primary school in
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crawley, and some of the kids were so confident and got up and dance. i thought, if they can do it, i can do it. so ijust went thought, if they can do it, i can do it. so i just went for thought, if they can do it, i can do it. so ijust went for it. this it. so i 'ust went for it. this outfit it. so i just went for it. this outfit is _ it. so i just went for it. this outfit is my _ it. so i just went for it. this outfit is my favourite - it. so i just went for it. this outfit is my favourite so - it. so i just went for it. this| outfit is my favourite so far. it. so i just went for it. this i outfit is my favourite so far. i have never worn brown trousers before in my life and i probably won't again. but you have to coordinate with your partner. nadiya wanted to wear the gold dress. i don't blame her. it is outstanding. did you feel, i suppose, a bit uplifted by the comments of the judges? everybody was very kind. they said, right, dunne is back. just the whole thing, after my little foxtrot fumble last week, where i missed a step, ijust needed to come out and give it the big one. and i really enjoyed it. there was a neck drop in here. wait for it. i was very proud of it. oh, hello. oh! i was terrified of putting my finger through... i was terrified of putting my finger throu~h... ., u,
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i was terrified of putting my finger throu~h... ., , ., through... you can see the relief on our through... you can see the relief on your face! — through... you can see the relief on your face! i — through... you can see the relief on your face! i was _ through... you can see the relief on your face! i was terrified _ through... you can see the relief on your face! i was terrified of - your face! i was terrified of -auttin your face! i was terrified of putting my _ your face! i was terrified of putting my finger - your face! i was terrified of putting my finger through l your face! i was terrified of i putting my finger through her earring and it all going horribly wrong. earring and it all going horribly wronu. ., �* ., y earring and it all going horribly wronu. ., �* ., , ., wrong. you weren't the only good one on saturday — wrong. you weren't the only good one on saturday night. _ wrong. you weren't the only good one on saturday night. adam _ wrong. you weren't the only good one on saturday night. adam peaty's - on saturday night. adam peaty's upper body strength. it on saturday night. adam peaty's upper body strength.— on saturday night. adam peaty's upper body strength. it was really im ortant upper body strength. it was really important for _ upper body strength. it was really important for adam _ upper body strength. it was really important for adam as _ upper body strength. it was really important for adam as well - upper body strength. it was really l important for adam as well because he had been bottom of the leaderboard of the week before. he wanted to come out and sort of show what he is capable of. i mean, that is ridiculous, isn't it? the strength of katya to go down there and hold herself in that position. it was left after lift after lift. i spoke to him immediately afterwards. it was amazing to be set in the studio watching it. the roar when he did the left. the reaction of the judges. and the crowd. it must be really hard to maintain that level and not let the adrenaline take over. , p, p, and not let the adrenaline take over, , p, p, ., and not let the adrenaline take over. , ., ., ., over. he is good at that though. he is really good _ over. he is good at that though. he is really good at — over. he is good at that though. he is really good at not _ over. he is good at that though. he is really good at not getting - is really good at not getting distracted. he literally stays in his lane. . ,, ., , ., his lane. yeah. i know there is a lot of stuff _ his lane. yeah. i know there is a lot of stuff written _ his lane. yeah. i know there is a lot of stuff written about - his lane. yeah. i know there is a lot of stuff written about the - his lane. yeah. i know there is a l lot of stuff written about the thing at the end. ~ . p,
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lot of stuff written about the thing at the end. ~ . . ., lot of stuff written about the thing at the end. . . . ., at the end. what a thing at the end? the 're in at the end. what a thing at the end? they're in character. _ at the end. what a thing at the end? they're in character. they _ at the end. what a thing at the end? they're in character. they are - at the end. what a thing at the end? they're in character. they are in - they're in character. they are in the dance. they are totally involved in it. katya's arms are still there. then they popped back out of character. he then they popped back out of character-— then they popped back out of character. , ., ., character. he commented on it yesterday _ character. he commented on it yesterday and _ character. he commented on it yesterday and said, _ character. he commented on it yesterday and said, i _ character. he commented on it yesterday and said, i will- character. he commented on it yesterday and said, i will not i character. he commented on it| yesterday and said, i will not be overcome or lowered by your gossip. he was so keen to make an impression. i think you finished second on the leaderboard at the end. and good on him because i think he was the first one who made it through to next week. i know he can't wait to dance next week. mr; can't wait to dance next week. my particular favourite has been greg wise. he has been so nice. emma thompson. _ wise. he has been so nice. emma thompson. his— wise. he has been so nice. emma thompson, his wife, _ wise. he has been so nice. emma thompson, his wife, comes - wise. he has been so nice. emma thompson, his wife, comes every| thompson, his wife, comes every week. the thing about greg, right? i have a few enduring images of him. he has been a lovely bloke to spend time with. he has madejam for everybody. he makes his own jam. he made damsonjam everybody. he makes his own jam. he made damson jam the first week and brought in ajar ofjam made damson jam the first week and brought in a jar ofjam for everybody. when i had a bit of, when
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i missed my steps last week, he came and sort me out and said some lovely and sort me out and said some lovely and encouraging things. the image i will always have of him, we are sad to hear what they are doing is —— their dance—off, he did his dance first and thenjudi did hers, and i watched greg watching her and he was watching her really carefully with a massive smile on his face. obviously he wants to stay in the competition but he was so happy that she was dancing well and doing well. and i think that for me is a sign of what a true gentleman is. if you can lift other people up around you and not be worried about other people, that was such a lovely sentiment. that must be quite _ was such a lovely sentiment. that must be quite difficult to do in that strictly my bubble. i would imagine it gets competitive. yeah, it does. imagine it gets competitive. yeah, it does- that _ imagine it gets competitive. yeah, it does. that is _ imagine it gets competitive. yeah, it does. that is how _ imagine it gets competitive. yeah, it does. that is how the _ imagine it gets competitive. yeah, | it does. that is how the competition is. he is a lovely bloke. we will all miss him. it is a game show. it isjust a game. looking _
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all miss him. it is a game show. it isjust a game. looking forward i all miss him. it is a game show. it isjust a game. looking forward toj isjust a game. looking forward to another week. _ isjust a game. looking forward to another week. can't _ isjust a game. looking forward to another week. can't tell _ isjust a game. looking forward to another week. can't tell you - isjust a game. looking forward to another week. can't tell you what | isjust a game. looking forward to| another week. can't tell you what i am doing. otherwise the strictly mafia would attract me.- am doing. otherwise the strictly mafia would attract me. when will bea find mafia would attract me. when will itea find out? _ mafia would attract me. when will bea find out? tomorrow? - mafia would attract me. when will bea find out? tomorrow? i - mafia would attract me. when will bea find out? tomorrow? i don't i bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know. bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know- start _ bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know. start working _ bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know. start working on - bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know. start working on it - bea find out? tomorrow? i don't know. start working on it today. | bea find out? tomorrow? i don't i know. start working on it today. no more mc hammer? no, he is gone. we are best mates now. he now follows me on twitter. i have had a private message. i me on twitter. i have had a private messaue. ., �* ., ., ., ~ ., message. i don't want to talk about it. let's message. i don't want to talk about it- let's move _ message. i don't want to talk about it. let's move on. _ coming up on breakfast this morning... as car companies move away from manufacturing petrol and diesel vehicles, the boss of ford europe will be here to talk about their plans to adapt in a changing industry. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. if good morning, i'm sonja jessup.
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a morning of prayers and silence will be held in parliament today in memory of sir david amess. the mp for southend west who was murdered on friday. a 25 year old man has been detained under the terrorism act. yesterday, as colleagues and well wishers continued to lay flowers for him, sir david's family called on people to "set aside hatred". we are going to have a mass, we'll announce a date for a mass in the nearfuture, where we can in a very fitting way make a memorial to him, where we can gather some of the more representative members of the community together so that we can do this in prayer for his eternal repose. and also above all giving thanks to god for the great achievement of his life. it's feared a shortage of bouncers and door staff could begin to pose a "threat to public safety". the night time industries association says one in five venues have had to close or reduce operating hours as they don't have enough security workers. we are pushing hard to see if we can get a mobility visa that is going to open the doors for many of those people who worked
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within the security sector to come back to the uk, particularly in london, and start to help us bolster the numbers of security available to deal with the hospitality and late—night economy sector. because at the moment, we are struggling to get those numbers. an ancient object, thought to be the world's oldest map of the stars, is to go on display at the british museum. the nebra sky disc dates back to the bronze age, around 3,600 years old, its gold symbols are believed to be the sun, moon and constellations. it's considered one of the most important archaeological finds of the 20th century. let's get the travel now. we have some minor delays on the metropolitan line between moor park and watford. other lines appear to be running normally. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. for the first half of this week, it's going to be feeling very mild for this time of year but it will be unsettled, wet and windy at times, and low pressure will dominate.
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there is a weather front on its way for us today. but it is a dry start to the morning. we have got some brightness around, we have got some long clear spells last night so temperatures for some of us have dropped back to high single figures. there is a bit of mist, but that will lift and clear. the sunshine won't last because it will cloud over from the west and eventually outbreaks of rain will move eastwards. probably not until the late afternoon for many of us so dry for much of the day. that southerly wind will really start to pick up as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. top temperatures all the way up to 17 or 18 celsius so above the average for the time of year. and tonight will be really very mild indeed. we are going to see all of that rain move eastwards as we head through the evening and it will turn a lot drier. there will always be lots of cloud around, overnight lows this time not dropping below the mid teens in celsius. really a very mild start to tuesday. then on tuesday we are expecting a lot of cloud, there could be some rain later on through the day, it stays windy. in the best of any brighter spells,
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temperatures could get as high as 20 or 21 degrees. i'll be back in half an hour. much more on our website. now it's back to dan and sally, bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning. it's been another night of success for british tennis after cameron norrie won the indian wells title in california overnight. we'll speak to former uk number one john lloyd about the victory. last year's runner up for the glitterball trophy, jamie laing, will bejoining us to talk about his new book and hosting a new hybrid dancing and dating show. and we'll hear from one of the winners of last night's earthshot awards, a ceremony created to honour people trying to save the planet.
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it has been a pretty busy sporting weekend but even the last few hours, loads of tennis. abs, weekend but even the last few hours, loads of tennis.— loads of tennis. a bumper weekend for british sport. _ loads of tennis. a bumper weekend for british sport. the _ loads of tennis. a bumper weekend for british sport. the gulf, - loads of tennis. a bumper weekend for british sport. the gulf, british l for british sport. the gulf, british aolfers for british sport. the gulf, british golfers are _ for british sport. the gulf, british golfers are winning. _ for british sport. the gulf, british golfers are winning. are - for british sport. the gulf, british golfers are winning. are you - for british sport. the gulf, british| golfers are winning. are you going to mention to max golfers are winning. are you going to max fix patrick and rory mccrory? and charlie hull one as well. cameron norrie has become the first british player to win the prestigious indian wells title after he beat nikoloz basilashvili in a dramatic final last night. the tournament is called the fifth grand slam by some and it's the biggest prize of norrie's career but he needed a turnaround to get there, as patrick gearey reports. cameron norrie has spent his life on the move. he's lived in south africa, new zealand, london and texas. now, though, is he finally arriving? here he was on his biggest match, in the best year of his career. but this wasn't in the plan. nicoloz basilashvili, above him on your screen, below him in the rankings,
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smashed his way to the first set. then to a break up in the second as well. norrie was nowjust trying to survive, waiting for a chance, a moment when the energy changed. you know it when you feel it. oh, brilliant! norrie took the second and with it, the control. the new british number one had the lungs of an endurance athlete and the instinct of a fighter. basilashvili had no ropes to lean on. it all ended with one last wild swing. norrie was indian wells' first british champion. this autumn, emma raducanu has cracked america and now it's norrie. still don't really know what i'm experiencing. it was an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big matches. so i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. this autumn, emma raducanu has cracked america
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and now it's norrie. british tennis is rising in the fall. patrick geary, bbc news. our tennis correspondent, russell fuller, is there. commentating on the match as well, six finals and a7 matches for cameron norrie, what is it about him that means he has hit his purple patch? it that means he has hit his purple atch? , p, , that means he has hit his purple atch? , . , , , patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankinus, patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings. from — patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings, from 74 _ patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings, from 74 in _ patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings, from 74 in the - patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings, from 74 in the start - patch? it is a stunning rise up the rankings, from 74 in the start of. rankings, from 74 in the start of the year. one of those players who is hugely respected by other professionals on the atp tour but not somebody who would necessarily likely to content for the big titles and then he wins one of the biggest of them all at the end of the season in california. confidence is a big part of it, increasing experience, he has been professionalforfour years, he has played the likes of ravel the dell and roger federer in the third round of grand —— rafael nadal. he is very fit, he has a
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natural endurance but he works very hard on his fitness. his serve has improved and he has more power in his game and all that has come together magnificently well where he can now claim to be eight series champion. —— a masters series champion. -- a masters series champion-— champion. and what is it with british players _ champion. and what is it with british players and _ champion. and what is it with british players and shoe - champion. and what is it with i british players and shoe dramas, he lost his shoes just like andy murray? lost his shoes 'ust like andy murra ? , p, �* , lost his shoes 'ust like andy murra? ~ , ~ lost his shoes 'ust like andy murra ? ,. �* , ~ murray? yes, after andy murray was reunited with — murray? yes, after andy murray was reunited with his _ murray? yes, after andy murray was reunited with his shoes _ murray? yes, after andy murray was reunited with his shoes after- murray? yes, after andy murray was reunited with his shoes after filing i reunited with his shoes after filing a police report, he left them underneath his car because they were horribly sweaty and smelly and he did not have a balcony and he didn't fancy leaving them in the room. he had his wedding ring attached to the shoelaces, they were later returned. cameron norrie is not yet married so there was no wedding ring involved but he left two pairs of shoes are top of his locker in the locker room overnight and he got back today and they had disappeared. they had been taken by somebody and never
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returned. so he had to wear in a brand—new parachute in the biggest tennis match in his life. he brand-new parachute in the biggest tennis match in his life.— tennis match in his life. he said he was thinking _ tennis match in his life. he said he was thinking about _ tennis match in his life. he said he was thinking about the _ tennis match in his life. he said he was thinking about the shoes i tennis match in his life. he said he. was thinking about the shoes during the final as well. we saw emma raducanu winning in new york, didn't do so well in indian wells but her season continues, an incredible star of the future. now cameron norrie. should we be getting excited about british tennis again? people were saying at wimbledon, where is the next generation? and they are here. there is a lot to be excited about. british players have had phenomenal success at winning big titles this year. there are others you can mention, dan evans won at the start of the year in melbourne, and he is just outside the world top 20. cameron norrie and emma raducanu, johanna konta has had enormous success in recent years although her fortunes have dropped in the last 18
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months. the british men's doubles, the wheelchair athletes, regularly winning medals and titles at the grand slams. so in terms at the standout performances, britain performed very well. what is still lacking is the strength and depth. britain should be looking to have half a dozen men and women in the top 100 in the world and we are still some way away from that. but we take what we can get. thank you so much, russell fuller, out there in indian wells after that incredible winner for cameron laurie. —— cameron norrie. the new era at newcastle united started in the same way as the last one ended, with a defeat. but it had started so well against spurs too. ahead inside two minutes much to the delight of their new owners. but tottenham replied with three of their own. harry kane scored one and set up son hueng min in first half stoppage time. 3—2 it finished, leaving more questions for manager steve bruce to face about his future under the new regime at st james park.
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i'll carry on as best i can until i hear otherwise. and the owners have been very, very respectful, i have to say that. the way they've conducted themselves in the last week or so. and unless i hear different, i will go to work again tomorrow and prepare for next week. the game was stopped for about 25 minutes in the first half after a medical emergency in the crowd. players and fans quickly drew the referee's and medic�*s attention to the incident, and helped the supporter get urgent treatment. newcastle have since confirmed that the fan is "stable and responsive" in hospital. david moyes praised west ham's "resilience" as they ground—out a hard fought 1—0 win over his former club everton. angelo ogbonna's second half header was the difference. scotland pulled off a big shock to boost their hopes of making the next stage of the men's t20 world cup. they beat bangladesh in their opening game, thanks to a man of the match, all—round performance from chris greaves.
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he struck as with the bat and took two wickets in his first t20 international. england have a warm up match against india this afternoon. rory mcilroy has claimed the 20th pga tour title of his career, after a final round six—under par 66 helped him win the cj cup at the summit club in las vegas. he trailed by nine shots after 36 holes but a superb 62 on saturday put him in contention and on sunday, he made five birdies and this eagle to claim his second win of 2021. and after a disappointing ryder cup, matt fitzpatrick has rebounded by winning the andalucia masters, his seventh win in as many years. great britain are world champions for the first time since 1989 in speedway. they beat poland in the grand final in manchester. robert lambert and dan bewley capitalised on a first lap crash from the poles to take the title.
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a massive tribute was paid to rob burrow at the jacksonville jaguars v miami dolphins nfl game in london yesterday. the former leeds rhinos player is a known nfl fan and was at tottenham hotspur s new ground for the game when the announcer described him as one of the greatest rugby league players in history and went on to say how he s inspired millions over the last two years in his ambitions to raise money and awareness in the fight against motor neurone disease. he had a good match, a win for the jaguars. finishing on two of your specialisms, rob burrow and the nfl. some of the finishes in the nfl this season have been amazing. talking to jason and been on the nfl show, the kickers have not ever been so important. a bumper sport today. let's return to our top story now and the killing of the conservative mp
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sir david amess, just five years after the murder of the labour mpjo cox, has raised further questions over whether more needs to be done to protect politicians. we're joined now by the shadow home secretary, nick thomas—symonds. thank you for being with us this morning. what a strange weekend it has been for notjust mps, fellow mps of david amess, but so many people looking at this and thinking how could this happen? how do you react to all of that on this monday morning? react to all of that on this monday mornin: ? ~ ., ., ~' react to all of that on this monday mornin: ? ~ ., ., ~ , ., ., morning? well, look, it is to 'oin i still have a — morning? well, look, it is to 'oin i still have a sense i morning? well, look, it is to 'oin i still have a sense -- i morning? well, look, it is to 'oin i still have a sense -- it i morning? well, look, it is to 'oin i still have a sense -- it is i morning? well, look, it is to join i still have a sense -- it is good i morning? well, look, it is to join i still have a sense -- it is good to l still have a sense —— it is good to join you. i still have a sense of disbelief of what has happened, and it hasn't really sunk in. i first met sir david when i came into parliament in 2015, and i hadn't previously worked in parliament. i was finding my way around the place, and david approached me to ask how i was, howeversettling and david approached me to ask how i was, however settling in. and david approached me to ask how i was, howeversettling in. in and david approached me to ask how i was, however settling in. in that
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conversation, it captured the essence of david. he was a very kind, very generous man. and i came to greatly admire his campaigning and his work in parliament, he wanted to make southend city, of course. it also on a range of other issues, particularly on the issue of fire safety in our homes in recent years. ifind it extraordinarily difficult to understand how he has been taken away as a consequence of this heinous crime that happened. sorry to interrupt you. and now there are huge debates, i know he will be remembered in parliament today, there is a discussion about how to keep mps like yourself safe. do you think that changes need to be made, and what sort of situations have you yourself been in that have made you think about it now how you should be taken care of your own security and how you should be looked after?— security and how you should be looked after? ., ., , .,
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looked after? unfortunately i have had incidents, _ looked after? unfortunately i have had incidents, since _ looked after? unfortunately i have had incidents, since i— looked after? unfortunately i have had incidents, since i became i looked after? unfortunately i have had incidents, since i became a i had incidents, since i became a member of parliament, whether it is intimidation in the streets, death threats, terrible letters, awful emails, but i am in no sense alone in that. i don't know a member of parliament who hasn't been suffering in that way. so it is clear that something now has to change. i made changes since the terrible murder of jo cox back in 2016, things like appointments for surgeries, jo cox back in 2016, things like appointments forsurgeries, being appointments for surgeries, being very appointments forsurgeries, being very careful advertising where i go in advance, i know other members of parliament do that as well. i think it is right now that local police forces are speaking to members of parliament about measures, but i also think it is right that a wider review of mps apostrophes security takes place and i hope it can report speedily. takes place and i hope it can report
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seedil . , . takes place and i hope it can report seedil. ,., ~ takes place and i hope it can report seedil. ~ , takes place and i hope it can report seedil. ,, , speedily. diane abbott is suggesting that surgeries _ speedily. diane abbott is suggesting that surgeries take _ speedily. diane abbott is suggesting that surgeries take place _ speedily. diane abbott is suggesting that surgeries take place behind i that surgeries take place behind screens, would you support that, do you think that is too much or have you think that is too much or have you been thinking about it? i think diane speaks _ you been thinking about it? i think diane speaks from _ you been thinking about it? i think diane speaks from the _ you been thinking about it? i think| diane speaks from the experience, you been thinking about it? i think i diane speaks from the experience, i know that in recent years there was a survey that showed she received around of the abuse —— around a half of all of the abuse that is subjected to mps. there are a range of options, there is the screen option, others talking about police presence at surgeries. we do have to look at it and we need to get the balance right. access to mps is the lifeblood of our democracy, it is something we are rightly proud of and we have got to get the balance right between preserving access for the public and mps and their security and its vital it is so. what about the broader debate this
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morning about the government's prevent scheme? the individual accused of carrying out this attack had been referred to that scheme previously. is that something that needs to be looked at now? yes. previously. is that something that needs to be looked at now? yes, and indeed, it is — needs to be looked at now? yes, and indeed, it is being _ needs to be looked at now? yes, and indeed, it is being looked _ needs to be looked at now? yes, and indeed, it is being looked out - needs to be looked at now? yes, and indeed, it is being looked out at i indeed, it is being looked out at the moment. there is a review under way. in my previous role as the shadow security minister, i pressed for an independent review of prevent which the government accepted back in january which the government accepted back injanuary 2019. which the government accepted back in january 2019. there was which the government accepted back injanuary 2019. there was a review and it is under way. we don't of course know all of the details at the moment. but it is absolutely vital that whether it is in terms of the prevent programme, or indeed whether it is about the sharing of information between different agencies, which is another aspect we need to look at when for example there are red flags or warning
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signs, is information being appropriately shared? these are just some of the questions that arise. of course we are at a very early stage at the moment. we have to leave no stone unturned in looking at this heinous crime, and doing all we can to prevent something like this happening again. if to prevent something like this happening again-— to prevent something like this hauenina aaain. happening again. if you could make one change — happening again. if you could make one change to _ happening again. if you could make one change to it, _ happening again. if you could make one change to it, what _ happening again. if you could make one change to it, what could - happening again. if you could make one change to it, what could you i one change to it, what could you make if you were home secretary? what i want to see is the fullest possible investigation into the awful events of recent days. clearly, when i envisaged a review backin clearly, when i envisaged a review back injanuary clearly, when i envisaged a review back in january 2019, clearly, when i envisaged a review back injanuary 2019, to ensure that a programme that we have in place to prevent people falling into a life of extremism has the confidence of all communities, nobody could have envisaged these terrible events of recent days and the heinous crime that happened. so that there has to
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be considered. we also have to look and be careful and cautious, and recognise that of course there have been reports in the newspapers about the events leading up to this, but this is an ongoing investigation. so we'll have to keep an open mind as to precisely what has happened here, why it has happened and be prepared to look extremely comprehensively at this to do all we can to prevent something like this happening again. thank you for your time is money, shadow home secretary, good to talk to you. shadow home secretary, good to talk to ou. . ~ shadow home secretary, good to talk to ou. ., ,, i. let's see how the weather is looking. morning carol. there is rain coming in, coming in from the west this morning, and this week is looking very changeable. for starters, the first half of the week, it will be unseasonably mild, the second half will be much colder with some hills know. there are some gales possible and heavy rain at times. the amber and yellow
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represents milder air, this is the first half of the week. the blues eventually overtake as we head towards the second part of the week with . there is some fog to watch out for this morning. as rain comes across from the west to the east, heaviest across the north of scotland. brightening up a touch in northern ireland but for much of england and wales we are hanging onto a lot of cloud and drizzle on the hills. a band of rain will be pushing towards the south—east and the channel islands for the rush hour. temperatures, ten in the north to 18 in the south. the average is 12 to
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15 for this time of year. through this evening and overnight, we will eventually say goodbye to rain in the south—east and north—east, we will be left with dry weather and cloud until the next band of rain sweeps in from the west. these overnight lows would represent what we would normally see during the day at this time of the year rather than by night so we are looking at a mild night ahead. tomorrow a band of rain continues to push north and east, followed by some showers, there will be some dry spells, particularly across the south—east and quarter of england. we should see some sunny spells as well. so we could hit 21 degrees. even in the cloud and rain, mid to high teens. unseasonably mild. on wednesday we have rain across england and wales. it eases a little bit through the course of the day. some sunshine around, then
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another weather front coming in across the north west introducing some rain and another one coming into the south—west. temperatures are starting to cool down in the north but hanging on in the south. on thursday, this will be a shock to the system. a system sinking south hill snow in it, a northerly wind and sunshine, clearer skies but look at the temperature, they drop like a rock. 10 degrees for some and adding on the wind—chill on the east coast, it will feel like four or five. keep anything ready to wear this weekend! intermediate and big coat on standby. intermediate and big coat on standb . ~ ._ , intermediate and big coat on i standby._ always standby. with the layers. always have to layer _ standby. with the layers. always have to layer op _ standby. with the layers. always have to layer up at _ standby. with the layers. always have to layer up at this - standby. with the layers. always have to layer up at this time i standby. with the layers. always have to layer up at this time of. have to layer up at this time of year. there's big news from the car manufacturer ford this morning. nina's here with all the details. yes, ford has promised that by 2030, all passenger cars they sell
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in europe will be electric. all passenger cars they sell but to do that, they need places to build the parts. today they're announcing plans to invest £230 million to transform their plant in halewood in the north west of england to build electric power units. it's a move they say will safeguard hundreds ofjobs. i'm joined now by the president of ford of europe, stuart rowley. good to see you. £230 million, what is it is being spent on exactly and when you say secured jobs, does that mean any additionaljob above the 500 that are already there? this is our first investment _ 500 that are already there? this is our first investment in _ 500 that are already there? this is our first investment in electrified l our first investment in electrified components in europe, these power units are the components that take the energy from the battery and turn it into traction to drive the wheels, so it is like an electric motor and a transition combined. 500 people we have in halewood today and this will secure those jobs for the foreseeable future.
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this will secure those 'obs for the foreseeable future._ this will secure those 'obs for the foreseeable future. presumably a very competitive _ foreseeable future. presumably a very competitive process, - foreseeable future. presumably a very competitive process, you i foreseeable future. presumably a i very competitive process, you have a production line in cologne, why was halewood chosen, how much was this to do with government support? first of all we have — to do with government support? first of all we have a _ to do with government support? f "st of all we have a great workforce in halewood, we have a very productive plant, good quality. we did get support from the uk government from the automotive transformation fund and we are very pleased about that. but we also have the technology in halewood, precision geared machining and the skills we need to produce these components. so we are happy to make that choice. haifa these components. so we are happy to make that choice.— make that choice. how big was the su ort make that choice. how big was the sopport from _ make that choice. how big was the sopport from the — make that choice. how big was the support from the government i make that choice. how big was the j support from the government from make that choice. how big was the i support from the government from the translation fund? igate support from the government from the translation fund?— translation fund? we aren't sharing exact numbers _ translation fund? we aren't sharing exact numbers but _ translation fund? we aren't sharing exact numbers but it _ translation fund? we aren't sharing exact numbers but it was _ translation fund? we aren't sharing exact numbers but it was an - exact numbers but it was an important part of the process. flan important part of the process. can we talk about _ important part of the process. can we talk about the semiconductor shortage? earlier in the year, the fiesta production was slowed down. these other little chips that messages between different bits of the cars. do you think that consumers will see a reduction in
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choice next year?— choice next year? yes, we are unfortunately _ choice next year? yes, we are unfortunately still _ choice next year? yes, we are unfortunately still in - choice next year? yes, we are unfortunately still in the i choice next year? yes, we are i unfortunately still in the middle of the semiconductor supply situation, which has impacted us in europe and globally. we are not out of that. i see that continuing into next year and unfortunately, choice is going to be limited and supply is going to be limited. , p, to be limited and supply is going to be limited-_ i- to be limited and supply is going to be limited._ i think| be limited. until next year? ithink so. there be limited. until next year? ithink so- there has _ be limited. until next year? ithink so. there has been _ be limited. until next year? ithink so. there has been some - be limited. until next year? ithink so. there has been some criticism| be limited. until next year? i think l so. there has been some criticism of the government _ so. there has been some criticism of the government hear— so. there has been some criticism of the government hear that _ so. there has been some criticism of the government hear that their i the government hear that their support schemes have wrapped up too quickly particularly when you have a lag in parts in industries like the automotive, should they have carried on supporting some industries? the most on supporting some industries? tue most important thing for the uk government is they support the transition to electrified vehicles. the scheme was very important but also putting in place of charging infrastructure which will be key as people adopt electric vehicles, they have confidence that there is somewhere they will be able to charge their vehicles and we had a big job ahead of us in that space. it is monumental, there was an
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increase of a3% of electric car sales but that is still only 5% of the global market. what the government need to do to hit the 2030 target and the 2050 target of being carbon neutral?— being carbon neutral? incentivising atches of being carbon neutral? incentivising patches of the _ being carbon neutral? incentivising patches of the vehicles _ being carbon neutral? incentivising patches of the vehicles but - being carbon neutral? incentivising patches of the vehicles but also i patches of the vehicles but also putting in the charging infrastructure, at people's homes, infrastructure, at people's homes, in public or at works, they need to be one charge point per vehicle so thatis be one charge point per vehicle so that is an enormous target ahead of us. do that is an enormous target ahead of us. y ., ~ , that is an enormous target ahead of us. ~ , ., that is an enormous target ahead of us. do you think they are doing enou~h? us. do you think they are doing enough? we — us. do you think they are doing enough? we are _ us. do you think they are doing enough? we are now— us. do you think they are doing enough? we are now all- us. do you think they are doing | enough? we are now all moving us. do you think they are doing i enough? we are now all moving on this journey — enough? we are now all moving on this journey together _ enough? we are now all moving on this journey together but _ enough? we are now all moving on this journey together but we i enough? we are now all moving on this journey together but we need i enough? we are now all moving on. this journey together but we need to realise that the scale of the challenge we have, if we are going to be 100% electric vehicles, which we will be at ford by 2030, that is a lot of infrastructure to put in place. a lot of infrastructure to put in lace. ., ., ., a lot of infrastructure to put in lace. . ., ., , ., a lot of infrastructure to put in lace, ., ., ., , ., , place. so a lot more needs to be done, basically. _ place. so a lot more needs to be done, basically. the _ place. so a lot more needs to be done, basically. the society i place. so a lot more needs to be done, basically. the society of i done, basically. the society of motor manufacturers and traders have said that brexit has dented the car industry's competitive advantage, nine out of ten fans they spoke to
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said things like border issues, importing parts means they are making less money. do you think that will be an impact on investment? the eu uk free will be an impact on investment? tue eu uk free trade agreement understands that investment and since that was in place at the beginning of the year, we have been operating normally. it's important that that stays in place and we don't get any future disruption. many thanks forjoining us, president of ford in europe. on the news of £230 million invested at the halewood plant on the north—west here in england. securing 500 jobs. thank you very much, nina. from politicians to reality tv stars, for people in the public eye hate on social media has become a fact of life and its particularly bad for women. companies say they re trying to tackle online hate but a panorama investigation has revealed that facebook and instagram
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are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. our specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring, has more. kaz was a contestant on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into your office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent
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and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content.
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some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram, says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all. marianna spring, bbc news. the headlines are coming up. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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hello, i'm sonja jessup. a morning of prayers and silence will be held in parliament today, in memory of sir david amess, the mp for southend west, who was murdered on friday. a 25—year—old man has been detained under the terrorism act. yesterday, as colleagues and well wishers continued to lay flowers for him, sir david's family called on people to "set aside hatred". we are going to have a mass, we'll announce a date for a mass in the nearfuture, where we can in a very fitting way make a memorial to him, where we can gather some of the more representative members of the community together so that we can do this in prayer for his eternal repose. and also above all giving thanks to god for the great achievement of his life. it's feared a shortage of bouncers and door staff could begin to pose a "threat to public safety". the night time industries association says one in five venues have had to close or reduce operating hours, as they don't have
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enough security workers. we are pushing hard to see if we can get a mobility visa that is going to open the doors for many of those people who worked within the security sector to come back to the uk, particularly in london, and start to help us bolster the numbers of security available to deal with the hospitality and late—night economy sector. because at the moment, we are struggling to get those numbers. a bronze disc, believed to be the world's oldest map of the stars, will go on display at the british museum next year. the nebra sky disc, which was found in germany in 1999, is thought to date back 3,600 years, although a small number of experts have questioned its authenticity. let's get the travel now. we have some minor delays on the metropolitan line between moor park and watford. other lines appear to be running normally. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. for the first half of this week, it's going to be feeling very mild for this time of year but it will be
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unsettled, wet and windy at times, and low pressure will dominate. there is a weather front on its way for us today. but it is a dry start to the morning. we have got some brightness around, we have got some long clear spells last night so temperatures for some of us have dropped back to high single figures. there is a bit of mist, but that will lift and clear. the sunshine won't last because it will cloud over from the west and eventually outbreaks of rain will move eastwards. probably not until the late afternoon for many of us so dry for much of the day. that southerly wind will really start to pick up as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. top temperatures all the way up to 17 or 18 celsius so above the average for the time of year. and tonight will be really very mild indeed. we are going to see all of that rain move eastwards as we head through the evening and it will turn a lot drier. there will always be lots of cloud around, overnight lows this time not dropping below the mid teens in celsius. really a very mild start to tuesday. then on tuesday we are expecting a lot of cloud, there could be some rain later on through the day,
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it stays windy. in the best of any brighter spells, temperatures could get as high as 20 or 21 degrees. i'll be back in half an hour. much more on tributes to sir david amess, and the latest on the investigation into his death, over on our website. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. "set aside hatred" — a plea for tolerance from the family of murdered mp sir david amess. his former colleagues will hold a minute's silence today, before paying their tributes to sir david in the house of commons. solutions for saving the planet — the first million pound winners of prince william's earthshot prize have been announced. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now, and over the next years. good morning.
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britain has a new men's number one — cameron norrie wins the title in indian wells, the first british player to do so. it player to do so. was an amazin- couple of weeks and it was an amazing couple of weeks and i_ it was an amazing couple of weeks and i am— it was an amazing couple of weeks and i am so— it was an amazing couple of weeks and i am so happy with howl it was an amazing couple of weeks and i am so happy with how i traded all the _ and i am so happy with how i traded all the occasions, all the big moments, all the big matches, and yeah. _ moments, all the big matches, and yeah. i'm _ moments, all the big matches, and yeah. i'm so — moments, all the big matches, and yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my— yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. good morning. a foggy start, also cloudy. details later in the programme. good morning. it's monday, 18th of october. mps will gather in westminster today, to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at westminster abbey. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are "shattered" by his death. aru na iyengar reports.
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church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp. he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement sir david's family gave this plea. "we ask people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all. this is the only way forward. set aside hatred and work towards togetherness. please let some good come from this tragedy." this afternoon, mps will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on
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approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. there are now calls to increase security for mps. the home secretary, priti patel, is considering police guards at constituency meetings. we must not let the terrorists alter our way of lives, but we also need to, as we move forward and push back against this, do this in a responsible way. for now, southend is in mourning for a man who dedicated his life to the service of his community. arun iyengar, bbc news.
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we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. thank you for being with us today. what else are we going to see and what do we expect to hear in westminster today?- what do we expect to hear in westminster today? good morning. there will be _ westminster today? good morning. there will be a _ westminster today? good morning. there will be a profound _ westminster today? good morning. there will be a profound sense i westminster today? good morning. there will be a profound sense of. there will be a profound sense of loss here — there will be a profound sense of loss here at westminster, a profound sense _ loss here at westminster, a profound sense of— loss here at westminster, a profound sense of loss of a colleague, much loved. _ sense of loss of a colleague, much loved. been — sense of loss of a colleague, much loved, been an mp since 1983. he had friendships _ loved, been an mp since 1983. he had friendships that stretched across political — friendships that stretched across political divides. but also, a bigger— political divides. but also, a bigger thought that many mps will be pondering is around one of these sacred _ pondering is around one of these sacred rituals of being a member of parliament — sacred rituals of being a member of parliament. away from the cameras, away— parliament. away from the cameras, away from _ parliament. away from the cameras, away from the rituals of westminster, the sanctity of a constituency, a chunk of the uk that they represent directly and so often have conversations with constituents, with voters, in surgeries, _ constituents, with voters, in surgeries, as sir david amess was doing _ surgeries, as sir david amess was doing in— surgeries, as sir david amess was
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doing in leigh—on—sea on friday. where _ doing in leigh—on—sea on friday. where people can come along and meet one-on-one _ where people can come along and meet one—on—one and face—to—face. and that is— one—on—one and face—to—face. and that is seen— one—on—one and face—to—face. and that is seen as so important within the british— that is seen as so important within the british parliamentary system. and yet. — the british parliamentary system. and yet, so many mps once again having _ and yet, so many mps once again having to — and yet, so many mps once again having to ask questions about just how safe — having to ask questions about just how safe that is. the shadow home secretary— how safe that is. the shadow home secretary has been here on breakfast in the _ secretary has been here on breakfast in the last— secretary has been here on breakfast in the last half an hour. it is clear that something now has to change. i've made changes since the terrible murder ofjo cox back in 2016, things like appointments for it surgeries, things like being very careful advertising where i go in advance. i know other members of parliament do that too. but i think it is right now both of that local police forces are speaking to members of parliament about measures. and i also think it is right that a wider review of mps security now takes place. and nobody do hope it can report speedily.
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after the murder ofjo cox scheme was set _ after the murder ofjo cox scheme was set up — after the murder ofjo cox scheme was set up to try to improve security— was set up to try to improve security for mps while they were away _ security for mps while they were away from westminster, also the safety _ away from westminster, also the safety of — away from westminster, also the safety of their staff and their families. that they'd make a significant difference for many, but many— significant difference for many, but many now— significant difference for many, but many now asking what else needs to be done _ many now asking what else needs to be done while attempting to strike the balance between the security of mps and _ the balance between the security of mps and theirfamily the balance between the security of mps and their family and their staff, — mps and their family and their staff, and ensuring they can maintain _ staff, and ensuring they can maintain that a direct connection with the — maintain that a direct connection with the people that send them there? — there? -- - there? —— here. there? - —— here. thank there? — —— here. thank you, chris. throughout the morning we'll be speaking to friends and colleagues of sir david, including lord jeffrey archer who will be on after eight. dominic raab willjoin us at half past seven. police are continuing to investigate the murder of a 14—year—old boy in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was was found seriously injured at high street station on saturday afternoon, before being taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead a short time later. our scotland reporter connor gillies has the latest. high street station in the centre of glasgow, one of the city's busiest.
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now a crime scene, the centre of a murder investigation. the victim, a schoolboy, 1a—year—old justin mclaughlin, stabbed to death in broad daylight on saturday afternoon. eye witnesses described seeing emergency services giving him cpr inside this station. the 14—year—old was taken to the queen elizabeth university hospital, where he died a short time later. it's very difficult to comment on whether it was a targeted attack or not, given the early stages of the investigation. but it's something that, as with these type of inquiries, we will keep an open mind. part of the incident was captured on cctv, which is a huge advantage for what we are trying to achieve. tributes are building on social media from friends and family. one said, "words can't explain how much we miss you. sleep tight, angel." another described justin as the most sweetest, loving and caring boy ever. "i can't explain how heartbroken i am," they said, "you were one in a million." it's heartbreaking to read
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the thoughts of some of the family and friends ofjustin in the wake of this tragic murder. and i'm just stunned that this could have taken place in the heart of our city in broad daylight. justin was a pupil at this school in coatbridge in north lanarkshire. his teacher said st ambrose is shocked and saddened byjustin's death. james mcparland said he was a valued member of the community and his loss will be felt by staff and pupils alike. as a family mourns, detectives continue the hunt this morning for the person, or people, responsible for murdering this young boy. connor gillies, bbc news, glasgow. the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today, a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events — including concerts and football matches.
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a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. ford has announced a major transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 2024. it's part of plans for its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe to be electric by 2030. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change. the winners have been awarded one—million pounds. science editor david shukman has more. each year we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances of repairing our planet. inspired by the missions to the moon, the aim
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is to heal planet earth, to try to tackle the most serious environmental problems. at the ceremony to hand out the awards, a call to action from sir david attenborough. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and if we can put our minds to it, i believe we can do that. congratulations. the winning teams are mostly small but with big potential. a project to grow coral in the bahamas, using special tanks to speed up the process of restoring reefs. a portable machine developed in india to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser, so that farmers don't burn their fields and cause air pollution. and a clever design in thailand, using renewable energy to make hydrogen. winning this prize is recognition that we are going in the right direction.
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it will support us to go into mass production and it will boost us towards our goal of accelerating the access of green hydrogen for everyone. the earthshot for build a waste—free world goes to... ..the city of milan! another global challenge is waste. and the city of milan wins a prize for collecting unused food and giving it to people who need it most. the final prize, for restoring nature, went to costa rica, a country that once cleared most of its forests but has now doubled the number of trees. the plan now is for the winning projects to be scaled up so they can make a real difference globally. we will have to see how well that works out in practice. but in any event they will offer something badly needed in the run—up to the climate summit in glasgow next month, a sense of optimism. david shukman, bbc news.
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i think carol has been inspired by some of that footage. she has got a lovely picture behind her this morning. good morning. good morning. it is gorgeous. we have seen some lovely sunrises this morning, not everywhere because there is a lot of cloud, but this one was taken by one of our weather watchers in norfolk. some fog in southern england first thing, northern england and parts of scotland. through the day the cloud will build and we have rain coming in from the west, heading east. turning heavy as we go through the rush—hour across the south—east and the channel islands. you can see the other end of the weather front producing the rain across north—east scotland. behind it a lot of cloud with some drizzle, especially on the coasts and hills. temperatures ranging from ten in lerwick, 17 in belfast, to 18 in london. this evening and overnight and eventually we lose the rain from the south—east and the north—east. a dry spell.
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variable cloud. and then the wind picks up towards the west and the next band of rain moves in. temperature wise it is going to be a mild night. these temperatures are more likely during the day in october, not during the night. tomorrow we start off with rain. some were like, for example, the south—east and quarter of the uk can stay dry and there will be some sunshine. if that happens the temperature is going to soar. temperatures soaring up to 20, 20 one degree. but across the board, evenif one degree. but across the board, even if you are somewhere that has cloud, rain or showers, even if you are somewhere that has cloud, rain orshowers, it even if you are somewhere that has cloud, rain or showers, it will still be unseasonably mild. at this time of year it is about 12 to 15 degrees north to south. wednesday looking unsubtle. as we head into thursday it is going to turn it sunnier but much colder with wind chill in force.
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carol, getting colder. thank you. the death of sir david amess has deeply affected his fellow mps and friends, who having been paying moving tributes to him all weekend. but it's also, once again, raised the issue of safety for politicians who say they are routinely abused by some members of the public. we can speak now to conservative mp robert halfon and labour's tulip siddiq. thank you to the pair of you for being with us to day. robert halfon, let's come to you first. i know that you knew sir david well. we have been hearing from the shadow home secretary this morning about his first day in parliament, where sir david spoke to him about the job, about how he was finding things. give us an idea of what kind of man he was? ~ ., , ., ., he was? well, he was a wonderful man, he he was? well, he was a wonderful man. he was _ he was? well, he was a wonderful man, he was very _ he was? well, he was a wonderful man, he was very funny, - he was? well, he was a wonderful man, he was very funny, he i he was? well, he was a wonderful man, he was very funny, he was l he was? well, he was a wonderful. man, he was very funny, he was very kind _ man, he was very funny, he was very kind i_ man, he was very funny, he was very kind i was _ man, he was very funny, he was very kind i was a — man, he was very funny, he was very kind. i was a parliamentary candidate, i followed two elections in halle _ candidate, i followed two elections in halle before i finally got elected in 22 and that's what my
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2010, _ elected in 22 and that's what my 2010, and — elected in 22 and that's what my 2010, and he came to harlow as a parliamentary candidate to support me. parliamentary candidate to support me when — parliamentary candidate to support me. when i was in parliament he was very kind _ me. when i was in parliament he was very kind to— me. when i was in parliament he was very kind to me and gave me a lot of good _ very kind to me and gave me a lot of good advice — very kind to me and gave me a lot of good advice. especially in difficult times _ good advice. especially in difficult times i_ good advice. especially in difficult times. i travelled to israel with him once _ times. i travelled to israel with him once. we had a very funny time in the _ him once. we had a very funny time in the galilee because i am from the jewish— in the galilee because i am from the jewish faith, he was a very christian— jewish faith, he was a very christian person. he bought a seed from _ christian person. he bought a seed from the _ christian person. he bought a seed from the hotel, which he wore when we were _ from the hotel, which he wore when we were in— from the hotel, which he wore when we were in the galilee to explain the sermon on the mount to me. and some _ the sermon on the mount to me. and some japanese tourists came past in complete _ some japanese tourists came past in complete shock thinking they were seeing _ complete shock thinking they were seeing a _ complete shock thinking they were seeing a biblical figure. and so he was larger— seeing a biblical figure. and so he was larger than life. ijust feel incredibly— was larger than life. ijust feel incredibly sad. just, you can't e>
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good, good person can die in this wa. ., ., ~ ., good, good person can die in this wa. ., ., a, , good, good person can die in this wa. ., ., «a, way. robert halfon, i know is you have been — way. robert halfon, i know is you have been describing, _ way. robert halfon, i know is you have been describing, he - way. robert halfon, i know is you have been describing, he was i way. robert halfon, i know is you have been describing, he was a i have been describing, he was a great, great friend of yours. in another weekend has been incredibly difficult for you. just looking ahead to today, how important is it that you can gather today and everyone be together and reflect on what has happened?— everyone be together and reflect on what has happened? well, i think the seaker of what has happened? well, i think the speaker of the _ what has happened? well, i think the speaker of the house _ what has happened? well, i think the speaker of the house of _ what has happened? well, i think the speaker of the house of commons i what has happened? well, i think the | speaker of the house of commons for all that— speaker of the house of commons for all that he _ speaker of the house of commons for all that he has done. and there will be tributes— all that he has done. and there will be tributes this afternoon. i have put in _ be tributes this afternoon. i have put in to— be tributes this afternoon. i have put in to speak. obviously there will be _ put in to speak. obviously there will be a — put in to speak. obviously there will be a lot of people who want to speak _ will be a lot of people who want to speak but — will be a lot of people who want to speak. but it's so important that we do this— speak. but it's so important that we do this because we have to remember one of— do this because we have to remember one of the _ do this because we have to remember one of the great people in parliament. people often look at the cabinet _ parliament. people often look at the cabinet of— parliament. people often look at the cabinet of ministers and look at what _ cabinet of ministers and look at what they— cabinet of ministers and look at what they do. but actually, it is backbenchers like sir david amess who often — backbenchers like sir david amess who often make a huge difference. he was a _ who often make a huge difference. he was a genuine tory. he came from a working—class background, campaigned to cut _ working—class background, campaigned to cut the _ working—class background, campaigned to cut the cost of living, especially on issues like fuel
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poverty _ especially on issues like fuel poverty. it's so important he is remembered today.— poverty. it's so important he is remembered today. tulip siddique, a - reciate remembered today. tulip siddique, appreciate your _ remembered today. tulip siddique, appreciate your time _ remembered today. tulip siddique, appreciate your time this _ remembered today. tulip siddique, appreciate your time this morning. | appreciate your time this morning. there have been wider questions. we have been speaking to nick thomas—symonds this morning about some of the threats, some of the e—mails, some of the conversations he has had as an mp. i would be really interested for you to give us an idea of some of the things that you get through either electronically, through the post, or conversations, some of the threats you have had. how do you look at that in the light of what has happened to sir david amess on friday? happened to sir david amess on frida ? p, g , happened to sir david amess on frida ? . . , ., happened to sir david amess on frida ? . «1,1 , ., friday? thanks. just to say, i was actually doing _ friday? thanks. just to say, i was actually doing my _ friday? thanks. just to say, i was actually doing my surgery - friday? thanks. just to say, i was actually doing my surgery as i friday? thanks. just to say, i was actually doing my surgery as well| friday? thanks. just to say, i was i actually doing my surgery as well on friday— actually doing my surgery as well on friday morning. _ actually doing my surgery as well on friday morning, like _ actually doing my surgery as well on friday morning, like lots _ actually doing my surgery as well on friday morning, like lots of - actually doing my surgery as well on friday morning, like lots of mps, i friday morning, like lots of mps, when _ friday morning, like lots of mps, when the — friday morning, like lots of mps, when the news _ friday morning, like lots of mps, when the news came _ friday morning, like lots of mps, when the news came through i friday morning, like lots of mps, i when the news came through about david _ when the news came through about david amess. — when the news came through about david amess, just _ when the news came through about david amess, just after— when the news came through about david amess, just after i— when the news came through about david amess, just after i had - david amess, just after i had finished _ david amess, just after i had finished my— david amess, just after i had finished my surgery. - david amess, just after i had finished my surgery. and i. david amess, just after i had i finished my surgery. and i was david amess, just after i had - finished my surgery. and i wasjust in profound — finished my surgery. and i wasjust in profound shock— finished my surgery. and i wasjust in profound shock thinking, - finished my surgery. and i wasjust in profound shock thinking, he - finished my surgery. and i wasjust in profound shock thinking, he had| in profound shock thinking, he had been _ in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying _ in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying out _ in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying out his— in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying out his duties - in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying out his duties as- in profound shock thinking, he had been carrying out his duties as a l been carrying out his duties as a public— been carrying out his duties as a public servant, _ been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like _ been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like all _ been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like all of - been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like all of us, - been carrying out his duties as ai public servant, like all of us, and this is_ public servant, like all of us, and this is how— public servant, like all of us, and this is how his— public servant, like all of us, and this is how his life _ public servant, like all of us, and this is how his life ended. - public servant, like all of us, and | this is how his life ended. there's lots of— this is how his life ended. there's tots of things _ this is how his life ended. there's lots of things david _ this is how his life ended. there's lots of things david and _ this is how his life ended. there's lots of things david and i- this is how his life ended. there's. lots of things david and i disagreed and politically, _ lots of things david and i disagreed and politically, but— lots of things david and i disagreed and politically, but actually, - lots of things david and i disagreed and politically, but actually, our. and politically, but actually, our paths— and politically, but actually, our paths crossed _ and politically, but actually, our paths crossed a _
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and politically, but actually, our paths crossed a lot. _ and politically, but actually, our paths crossed a lot. we - and politically, but actually, our paths crossed a lot. we talked i and politically, but actually, our- paths crossed a lot. we talked about early intervention _ paths crossed a lot. we talked about early intervention and _ paths crossed a lot. we talked about early intervention and child - paths crossed a lot. we talked about early intervention and child care - early intervention and child care nurseries — early intervention and child care nurseries he— early intervention and child care nurseries. he said _ early intervention and child care nurseries. he said to— early intervention and child care nurseries. he said to me - early intervention and child care nurseries. he said to me his- nurseries. he said to me his interest— nurseries. he said to me his interest stemmed _ nurseries. he said to me his interest stemmed from - nurseries. he said to me his interest stemmed from the| nurseries. he said to me his. interest stemmed from the fact nurseries. he said to me his- interest stemmed from the fact he had five _ interest stemmed from the fact he had five children _ interest stemmed from the fact he had five children who _ interest stemmed from the fact he had five children who he _ interest stemmed from the fact he had five children who he was - interest stemmed from the fact he j had five children who he was really proud _ had five children who he was really proud of _ had five children who he was really proud of and — had five children who he was really proud of and he _ had five children who he was really proud of and he spoke _ had five children who he was really proud of and he spoke about- had five children who he was really proud of and he spoke about them| had five children who he was really . proud of and he spoke about them all the time _ proud of and he spoke about them all the time att— proud of and he spoke about them all the time all my— proud of and he spoke about them all the time. all my interactions - proud of and he spoke about them all the time. all my interactions with - the time. all my interactions with him were — the time. all my interactions with him were so— the time. all my interactions with him were so thoughtful, - the time. all my interactions with him were so thoughtful, jovial - the time. all my interactions withi him were so thoughtful, jovial and he was _ him were so thoughtful, jovial and he wasjust— him were so thoughtful, jovial and he was just such _ him were so thoughtful, jovial and he was just such a _ him were so thoughtful, jovial and he was just such a lovely - him were so thoughtful, jovial and he was just such a lovely person, i he was just such a lovely person, that it's — he was just such a lovely person, that it's realty— he was just such a lovely person, that it's really hard _ he was just such a lovely person, that it's really hard to _ he was just such a lovely person, that it's really hard to think - he was just such a lovely person, j that it's really hard to think about the fact— that it's really hard to think about the fact that _ that it's really hard to think about the fact that he _ that it's really hard to think about the fact that he is _ that it's really hard to think about the fact that he is not _ that it's really hard to think about the fact that he is not going - that it's really hard to think about the fact that he is not going to i that it's really hard to think about the fact that he is not going to be in partiament— the fact that he is not going to be in parliament when _ the fact that he is not going to be in parliament when we _ the fact that he is not going to be in parliament when we go - the fact that he is not going to be in parliament when we go there l in parliament when we go there today — in parliament when we go there today as — in parliament when we go there today as for _ in parliament when we go there today. as for me, _ in parliament when we go there today. as for me, the _ in parliament when we go there today. as for me, the threats . in parliament when we go there l today. as for me, the threats and abuse _ today. as for me, the threats and abuse that— today. as for me, the threats and abuse that i— today. as for me, the threats and abuse that i get— today. as for me, the threats and abuse that i get range _ today. as for me, the threats and abuse that i get range from - today. as for me, the threats and abuse that i get range from very. abuse that i get range from very trivial— abuse that i get range from very triviat things _ abuse that i get range from very trivial things about— abuse that i get range from very trivial things about commenting | abuse that i get range from very. trivial things about commenting on my appearance, _ trivial things about commenting on my appearance, commenting - trivial things about commenting on my appearance, commenting on i trivial things about commenting onl my appearance, commenting on my name, _ my appearance, commenting on my nanre. about— my appearance, commenting on my nanre. about my— my appearance, commenting on my name, about my height, _ my appearance, commenting on my name, about my height, then - my appearance, commenting on my name, about my height, then to- name, about my height, then to becoming — name, about my height, then to becoming more _ name, about my height, then to becoming more sinister- name, about my height, then to becoming more sinister about. becoming more sinister about advocating _ becoming more sinister about advocating violence _ becoming more sinister about advocating violence against. becoming more sinister about. advocating violence against me becoming more sinister about- advocating violence against me or my family. _ advocating violence against me or my family. or— advocating violence against me or my family. or sexual— advocating violence against me or my family, or sexual violence, _ advocating violence against me or my family, or sexualviolence, so- advocating violence against me or my family, or sexual violence, so it's - family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide _ family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, _ family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, but— family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, but i— family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, but i what- family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, but i what i- family, or sexualviolence, so it's a wide range, but i what i will- family, or sexualviolence, so it's| a wide range, but i what i will tell you is— a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that — a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that i — a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that i am _ a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that i am not _ a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that i am not unique - a wide range, but i what i will tell you is that i am not unique in - a wide range, but i what i will telli you is that i am not unique in this. this happens— you is that i am not unique in this. this happens to _ you is that i am not unique in this. this happens to all _ you is that i am not unique in this. this happens to all mps, - you is that i am not unique in this. | this happens to all mps, especially to women, — this happens to all mps, especially to women, whichever— this happens to all mps, especially to women, whichever political - this happens to all mps, especiallyl to women, whichever political stripe they might _ to women, whichever political stripe they might be — to women, whichever political stripe they might be from. _ to women, whichever political stripe they might be from. so— to women, whichever political stripe they might be from. so it's - to women, whichever political stripe they might be from. so it's not - they might be from. so it's not unusual— they might be from. so it's not unusual to _ they might be from. so it's not unusual to open _ they might be from. so it's not unusual to open your— they might be from. so it's not unusual to open your twitter . they might be from. so it's not l unusual to open your twitter and they might be from. so it's not - unusual to open your twitter and see a whole _ unusual to open your twitter and see a whole toad — unusual to open your twitter and see a whole toad of — unusual to open your twitter and see a whole load of abuse _ unusual to open your twitter and see a whole load of abuse directed - unusual to open your twitter and see a whole load of abuse directed at - a whole load of abuse directed at you. _ a whole load of abuse directed at you. whether— a whole load of abuse directed at you. whether it _ a whole load of abuse directed at you, whether it is— a whole load of abuse directed at you, whether it is about - a whole load of abuse directed at you, whether it is about your- a whole load of abuse directed at i you, whether it is about your looks, whether— you, whether it is about your looks, whether it _ you, whether it is about your looks, whether it is — you, whether it is about your looks, whether it is about _ you, whether it is about your looks, whether it is about how _ you, whether it is about your looks,
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whether it is about how you - you, whether it is about your looks, whether it is about how you dress . you, whether it is about your looks, | whether it is about how you dress or whether— whether it is about how you dress or whether it _ whether it is about how you dress or whether it is — whether it is about how you dress or whether it is about _ whether it is about how you dress or whether it is about some _ whether it is about how you dress or whether it is about some policy - whether it is about how you dress or whether it is about some policy youi whether it is about some policy you voted _ whether it is about some policy you voted on _ whether it is about some policy you voted on i— whether it is about some policy you voted on. i would _ whether it is about some policy you voted on. i would say— whether it is about some policy you voted on. i would say is— whether it is about some policy you voted on. i would say is that - whether it is about some policy you voted on. i would say is that of - voted on. i would say is that of course — voted on. i would say is that of course peopte _ voted on. i would say is that of course people will— voted on. i would say is that of course people will have - course people will have disagreements- course people will have disagreements with - course people will have - disagreements with politicians. course people will have _ disagreements with politicians. but they have _ disagreements with politicians. but they have got — disagreements with politicians. but they have got to _ disagreements with politicians. but they have got to be _ disagreements with politicians. but they have got to be resolved - disagreements with politicians. but they have got to be resolved at - disagreements with politicians. but they have got to be resolved at the| they have got to be resolved at the ballot _ they have got to be resolved at the ballot box — they have got to be resolved at the ballot box we _ they have got to be resolved at the ballot box. we can't— they have got to be resolved at the ballot box. we can't resolve - ballot box. we can't resolve disagreements— ballot box. we can't resolve disagreements with - ballot box. we can't resolve . disagreements with politicians through— disagreements with politicians through violence, _ disagreements with politicians through violence, intimidationj disagreements with politicians - through violence, intimidation and death _ through violence, intimidation and death. ., . ~' through violence, intimidation and death. ., . ,, . , through violence, intimidation and death. ., . ,, . . , , . death. you talk about the abuse that ou death. you talk about the abuse that you receive — death. you talk about the abuse that you receive online. _ death. you talk about the abuse that you receive online. i _ death. you talk about the abuse that you receive online. ijust— death. you talk about the abuse that you receive online. ijust wonder, . you receive online. ijust wonder, for a woman working in the job that you do at the moment, what is that like? does it ever get to the point where you think, i can't continue to do thisjob? i can't where you think, i can't continue to do this job? i can't continue to put myself through this? i do this job? i can't continue to put myself through this?— do this job? i can't continue to put myself through this? i think what i would say is _ myself through this? i think what i would say is l _ myself through this? i think what i would say is i reported _ myself through this? i think what i would say is i reported the - myself through this? i think what i would say is i reported the abuse i j would say is i reported the abuse i .et would say is i reported the abuse i get and _ would say is i reported the abuse i get and i_ would say is i reported the abuse i get and i didn't— would say is i reported the abuse i get and i didn't report _ would say is i reported the abuse i get and i didn't report everything. get and i didn't report everything diligently— get and i didn't report everything diligently after— get and i didn't report everything diligently after what— get and i didn't report everything diligently after what happened i get and i didn't report everything diligently after what happened to get and i didn't report everything - diligently after what happened to my friend _ diligently after what happened to my friend jo _ diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox — diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in— diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in 2016. _ diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in 2016. but _ diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in 2016. but |_ diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in 2016. but i will- diligently after what happened to my friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be i friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest— friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and — friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and say— friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and say i— friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and say i have _ friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and say i have become - friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be honest and say i have become a l friend jo cox in 2016. but i will be. honest and say i have become a bit blase _ honest and say i have become a bit blase to _ honest and say i have become a bit blase to it — honest and say i have become a bit blase to it the _ honest and say i have become a bit blase to it. the murder— honest and say i have become a bit blase to it. the murder of- honest and say i have become a bit blase to it. the murder of david - blase to it. the murder of david amess — blase to it. the murder of david amess really— blase to it. the murder of david amess really woke _ blase to it. the murder of david amess really woke me - blase to it. the murder of david amess really woke me up - blase to it. the murder of david amess really woke me up and l blase to it. the murder of david - amess really woke me up and made me realise _ amess really woke me up and made me realise i_ amess really woke me up and made me realise i can't _ amess really woke me up and made me realise i can't treat _ amess really woke me up and made me
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realise i can't treat this _ amess really woke me up and made me realise i can't treat this likely. - realise i can't treat this likely. and _ realise i can't treat this likely. and if— realise i can't treat this likely. and if i— realise i can't treat this likely. and if i do— realise i can't treat this likely. and if i do get— realise i can't treat this likely. and if i do get something - realise i can't treat this likely. i and if i do get something online, which _ and if i do get something online, which i _ and if i do get something online, which i should _ and if i do get something online, which i should be _ and if i do get something online, which i should be reporting, - and if i do get something online, which i should be reporting, i- and if i do get something online, i which i should be reporting, i need to make _ which i should be reporting, i need to make it— which i should be reporting, i need to make it a — which i should be reporting, i need to make it a priority. _ which i should be reporting, i need to make it a priority. but— which i should be reporting, i need to make it a priority. but the - which i should be reporting, i need to make it a priority. but the truth| to make it a priority. but the truth is i to make it a priority. but the truth is i have _ to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a — to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a day— to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a dayjob, _ to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a dayjob, i— to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a dayjob, i am _ to make it a priority. but the truth is i have a dayjob, i am solving i is i have a dayjob, i am solving lots _ is i have a dayjob, i am solving lots of— is i have a dayjob, i am solving lots of things _ is i have a dayjob, i am solving lots of things for— is i have a dayjob, i am solving lots of things for my _ is i have a dayjob, i am solving. lots of things for my constituents, i'm lots of things for my constituents, i'm trying — lots of things for my constituents, i'm trying to — lots of things for my constituents, i'm trying to make _ lots of things for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, - i'm trying to make legislation, speaking — i'm trying to make legislation, speaking debate _ i'm trying to make legislation, speaking debate and - i'm trying to make legislation, | speaking debate and represent i'm trying to make legislation, - speaking debate and represent my constituents — speaking debate and represent my constituents. it— speaking debate and represent my constituents. it is— speaking debate and represent my constituents. it is very _ speaking debate and represent my constituents. it is very hard - speaking debate and represent my constituents. it is very hard day. constituents. it is very hard day today— constituents. it is very hard day today to — constituents. it is very hard day today to constantly _ constituents. it is very hard day today to constantly think - constituents. it is very hard day today to constantly think about| today to constantly think about reporting — today to constantly think about reporting abuse _ today to constantly think about reporting abuse and _ today to constantly think about i reporting abuse and intimidation today to constantly think about - reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment — reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment. but _ reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment. but i _ reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment. but i have _ reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment. but i have to _ reporting abuse and intimidation and harassment. but i have to say, - harassment. but i have to say, something _ harassment. but i have to say, something has— harassment. but i have to say, something has got _ harassment. but i have to say, something has got to - harassment. but i have to say, something has got to be - harassment. but i have to say, something has got to be done. j harassment. but i have to say, - something has got to be done. two deaths _ something has got to be done. two deaths in _ something has got to be done. two deaths in five — something has got to be done. two deaths in five years. _ something has got to be done. two deaths in five years. in _ something has got to be done. two deaths in five years. in any- something has got to be done. two deaths in five years. in any other. deaths in five years. in any other sector— deaths in five years. in any other sector they— deaths in five years. in any other sector they would _ deaths in five years. in any other sector they would be _ deaths in five years. in any other sector they would be a _ deaths in five years. in any other sector they would be a root - deaths in five years. in any other sector they would be a root and i sector they would be a root and branch — sector they would be a root and branch review _ sector they would be a root and branch review of _ sector they would be a root and branch review of our _ sector they would be a root and branch review of our security. branch review of our security arrangements. _ branch review of our security arrangements, and - branch review of our security arrangements, and that- branch review of our security arrangements, and that has| branch review of our security. arrangements, and that has got branch review of our security- arrangements, and that has got to happen _ arrangements, and that has got to happen. but — arrangements, and that has got to happen. but in— arrangements, and that has got to happen. but in answer— arrangements, and that has got to happen. but in answer to- arrangements, and that has got to happen. but in answer to your- happen. but in answer to your question. _ happen. but in answer to your question. i_ happen. but in answer to your question, i stood _ happen. but in answer to your question, i stood for- happen. but in answer to your question, i stood for office - happen. but in answer to your- question, i stood for office because i am question, i stood for office because i am a _ question, i stood for office because i am a public— question, i stood for office because i am a public servant _ question, i stood for office because i am a public servant and _ question, i stood for office because i am a public servant and this- question, i stood for office because i am a public servant and this is- question, i stood for office because i am a public servant and this is my 'ob i am a public servant and this is my job and _ i am a public servant and this is my joband i_ i am a public servant and this is my job and i want— i am a public servant and this is my job and i want to— i am a public servant and this is my job and i want to continue - i am a public servant and this is my job and i want to continue doing - i am a public servant and this is my job and i want to continue doing it. | job and i want to continue doing it. robert _ job and i want to continue doing it. robert halfon, _ job and i want to continue doing it. robert halfon, to _ job and i want to continue doing it. robert halfon, to come _ job and i want to continue doing it. robert halfon, to come back- job and i want to continue doing it. robert halfon, to come back to - job and i want to continue doing it. i robert halfon, to come back to you, those changes that may need to happen, what would you like to see change? there have been suggestions about some of these surgeries taking place behind screens, security for mp5. what will happen and what you mps. what will happen and what you think should happen?— think should happen? firstly, i would say _ think should happen? firstly, i
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would say the _ think should happen? firstly, i would say the majority - think should happen? firstly, i would say the majority of - think should happen? firstly, i would say the majority of my i would say the majority of my constituents of harlow are very kind and decent — constituents of harlow are very kind and decent people, but the levels of abuse _ and decent people, but the levels of abuse are _ and decent people, but the levels of abuse are significant. i've had people — abuse are significant. i've had people come up and scream at my face, _ people come up and scream at my face, call— people come up and scream at my face, call my caseworkers names, who were standing with me. because i am from a _ were standing with me. because i am from a jewish background, people have been— from a jewish background, people have been screaming at me, go back to israel~ _ have been screaming at me, go back to israel~ i_ have been screaming at me, go back to israel. i have had people sending emails _ to israel. i have had people sending e—mails every day with obscene language — e—mails every day with obscene language and abusive e—mails. i have had death— language and abusive e—mails. i have had death threats from somebody who was subsequently arrested, he was sending _ was subsequently arrested, he was sending out a message on twitter saying _ sending out a message on twitter saying he — sending out a message on twitter saying he was going to shoot me in the head _ saying he was going to shoot me in the head i— saying he was going to shoot me in the head. i have had things are said to my— the head. i have had things are said to my home — the head. i have had things are said to my home. and of course, as juniper— to my home. and of course, as juniper said, you do get used to it. -- tulip— juniper said, you do get used to it. -- tulip said — juniper said, you do get used to it. —— tulip said. it is wrong that you .et —— tulip said. it is wrong that you get used — —— tulip said. it is wrong that you get used to— —— tulip said. it is wrong that you get used to it. we should have rhinoceros _ get used to it. we should have rhinoceros gains. why should we have rhinoceros _ rhinoceros gains. why should we have rhinoceros skins? why should we have to put _ rhinoceros skins? why should we have to put up _ rhinoceros skins? why should we have to put up with this kind of thing? there _ to put up with this kind of thing? there is— to put up with this kind of thing? there is no— to put up with this kind of thing? there is no easy answers to this. just saying —
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there is no easy answers to this. just saying you are going to have police _ just saying you are going to have police or— just saying you are going to have police or security people at surgeries, i think will actually make — surgeries, i think will actually make very little difference because i am make very little difference because i am an _ make very little difference because i am an mp in my town. i love harlow — i am an mp in my town. i love harlow i_ i am an mp in my town. i love harlow. i walk through my town almost — harlow. i walk through my town almost every weekend. i go and visits, _ almost every weekend. i go and visits, i— almost every weekend. i go and visits, i do— almost every weekend. i go and visits, i do stalls... i visits, i do stalls... ithink— visits, i do stalls... i think we may have a problem with robert's line. tulip siddique, i am fascinated by what you said that you have almost become a little bit immune to the abuse that you have been receiving. but ijust wonder, how does that then affect your family? do yourfamily, yourfamily able to distance themselves from that, and do they not feel very protective of you?— that, and do they not feel very protective of you? well, my mother has 'ust protective of you? well, my mother has just been _ protective of you? well, my mother hasjust been absolutely _ protective of you? well, my mother hasjust been absolutely devastated has just been absolutely devastated ever since _ has just been absolutely devastated ever since she — has just been absolutely devastated ever since she heard _ has just been absolutely devastated ever since she heard about - has just been absolutely devastated ever since she heard about sir- has just been absolutely devastated| ever since she heard about sir david amess's _ ever since she heard about sir david amess's murder~ _ ever since she heard about sir david amess's murder. it _ ever since she heard about sir david amess's murder. it does _ ever since she heard about sir david amess's murder. it does have - ever since she heard about sir david amess's murder. it does have a - ever since she heard about sir david i amess's murder. it does have a huge impact _ amess's murder. it does have a huge impact on _ amess's murder. it does have a huge impact on our— amess's murder. it does have a huge impact on our families, _ amess's murder. it does have a huge impact on our families, especially- impact on our families, especially parents~ — impact on our families, especially parents. my— impact on our families, especially parents. my mother— impact on our families, especially parents. my mother called - impact on our families, especially parents. my mother called me - parents. my mother called me immediately— parents. my mother called me immediately when _ parents. my mother called me immediately when she - parents. my mother called me immediately when she saw- parents. my mother called me. immediately when she saw that parents. my mother called me - immediately when she saw that an mp,
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in 2016. _ immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016. all— immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016. all it— immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016, all it said— immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016, all it said when— immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016, all it said whenjo _ immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016, all it said whenjo cox- immediately when she saw that an mp, in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was- in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was murdered — in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was murdered was, _ in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was murdered was, labour— in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was murdered was, labour mp - in 2016, all it said whenjo cox was murdered was, labour mp is - in 2016, all it said whenjo cox wasi murdered was, labour mp is killed, or labour— murdered was, labour mp is killed, or labour mp — murdered was, labour mp is killed, or labour mp was _ murdered was, labour mp is killed, or labour mp was attacked. - murdered was, labour mp is killed, or labour mp was attacked. she - or labour mp was attacked. she called _ or labour mp was attacked. she called me — or labour mp was attacked. she called me immediately- or labour mp was attacked. she called me immediately because| or labour mp was attacked. she . called me immediately because her first thought — called me immediately because her first thought was, _ called me immediately because her first thought was, it _ called me immediately because her first thought was, it must _ called me immediately because her first thought was, it must have - called me immediately because herl first thought was, it must have been me. first thought was, it must have been me it _ first thought was, it must have been me it is _ first thought was, it must have been me it isjust— first thought was, it must have been me it isjust this— first thought was, it must have been me. it isjust this constant _ first thought was, it must have been me. it is just this constant effect - me. it isjust this constant effect on her— me. it isjust this constant effect on her of— me. it isjust this constant effect on her of hearing _ me. it isjust this constant effect on her of hearing that _ me. it isjust this constant effect on her of hearing that there - me. it isjust this constant effect on her of hearing that there hasi on her of hearing that there has been _ on her of hearing that there has been abuse _ on her of hearing that there has been abuse directed _ on her of hearing that there has been abuse directed at - on her of hearing that there has been abuse directed at us, - on her of hearing that there has been abuse directed at us, that| on her of hearing that there has. been abuse directed at us, that we are getting — been abuse directed at us, that we are getting death— been abuse directed at us, that we are getting death threats, - been abuse directed at us, that we are getting death threats, that- been abuse directed at us, that we are getting death threats, that alli are getting death threats, that all of us _ are getting death threats, that all of us mps — are getting death threats, that all of us mps are _ are getting death threats, that all of us mps are constantly - are getting death threats, that all of us mps are constantly racially i of us mps are constantly racially abused, — of us mps are constantly racially abused, whether— of us mps are constantly racially abused, whether you _ of us mps are constantly racially abused, whether you are - of us mps are constantly racially abused, whether you are from l of us mps are constantly racially abused, whether you are from a j abused, whether you are from a jewish— abused, whether you are from a jewish faith, _ abused, whether you are from a jewish faith, whether— abused, whether you are from a jewish faith, whether you - abused, whether you are from a jewish faith, whether you have i abused, whether you are from a | jewish faith, whether you have a muslim — jewish faith, whether you have a muslim last— jewish faith, whether you have a muslim last name, _ jewish faith, whether you have a muslim last name, whatever- jewish faith, whether you have a muslim last name, whatever it. jewish faith, whether you have a| muslim last name, whatever it is people _ muslim last name, whatever it is people will— muslim last name, whatever it is people will pick— muslim last name, whatever it is people will pick on _ muslim last name, whatever it is people will pick on you. - muslim last name, whatever it is people will pick on you. these i people will pick on you. these keyboard _ people will pick on you. these keyboard warriors, _ people will pick on you. these keyboard warriors, at - people will pick on you. these keyboard warriors, at some i people will pick on you. these i keyboard warriors, at some point people will pick on you. these - keyboard warriors, at some point you do think. _ keyboard warriors, at some point you do think. i_ keyboard warriors, at some point you do think. ijust— keyboard warriors, at some point you do think, ijust needed _ keyboard warriors, at some point you do think, ijust needed to— do think, ijust needed to ignore them _ do think, ijust needed to ignore them and — do think, ijust needed to ignore them and get _ do think, ijust needed to ignore them and get on _ do think, ijust needed to ignore them and get on with— do think, ijust needed to ignore them and get on with my- do think, ijust needed to ignore them and get on with myjob. i do think, ijust needed to ignore . them and get on with myjob. that do think, ijust needed to ignore - them and get on with myjob. that is echoing _ them and get on with myjob. that is echoing what — them and get on with myjob. that is echoing what robert _ them and get on with myjob. that is echoing what robert just _ them and get on with myjob. that is echoing what robertjust said. - them and get on with myjob. that is echoing what robertjust said. you . echoing what robertjust said. you do develop — echoing what robertjust said. you do develop very— echoing what robertjust said. you do develop very thick— echoing what robertjust said. you do develop very thick skin. - echoing what robertjust said. you do develop very thick skin. but - do develop very thick skin. but maybe — do develop very thick skin. but maybe that's _ do develop very thick skin. but maybe that's the _ do develop very thick skin. but maybe that's the wrong - do develop very thick skin. but maybe that's the wrong way i do develop very thick skin. but maybe that's the wrong way toj do develop very thick skin. but i maybe that's the wrong way to go about _ maybe that's the wrong way to go about it — maybe that's the wrong way to go about it maybe _ maybe that's the wrong way to go about it. maybe we _ maybe that's the wrong way to go about it. maybe we do— maybe that's the wrong way to go about it. maybe we do need - maybe that's the wrong way to go about it. maybe we do need to i maybe that's the wrong way to go i about it. maybe we do need to take these _ about it. maybe we do need to take these threats — about it. maybe we do need to take these threats seriously. _ about it. maybe we do need to take these threats seriously. and - about it. maybe we do need to take these threats seriously. and one i about it. maybe we do need to take these threats seriously. and one of| these threats seriously. and one of these threats seriously. and one of the things— these threats seriously. and one of the things we — these threats seriously. and one of the things we need _ these threats seriously. and one of the things we need to _ these threats seriously. and one of the things we need to do _ these threats seriously. and one of the things we need to do is - these threats seriously. and one of the things we need to do is get - the things we need to do is get social— the things we need to do is get social media _ the things we need to do is get social media platforms - the things we need to do is get social media platforms to - the things we need to do is get social media platforms to treatj the things we need to do is get i social media platforms to treat us and to _ social media platforms to treat us and to take — social media platforms to treat us and to take us— social media platforms to treat us and to take us a _ social media platforms to treat us and to take us a bit _ social media platforms to treat us and to take us a bit more - social media platforms to treat us i and to take us a bit more seriously. they— and to take us a bit more seriously. they have _ and to take us a bit more seriously. they have been _ and to take us a bit more seriously. they have been times _ and to take us a bit more seriously. they have been times when - and to take us a bit more seriously. they have been times when i- and to take us a bit more seriously. they have been times when i have i they have been times when i have reported _ they have been times when i have reported something _ they have been times when i have reported something and _ they have been times when i have reported something and it- they have been times when i have reported something and it has- they have been times when i have l reported something and it has taken two weeks _ reported something and it has taken two weeks for — reported something and it has taken two weeks for a _ reported something and it has taken two weeks for a social— reported something and it has taken two weeks for a social media - two weeks for a social media platform _ two weeks for a social media platform to _ two weeks for a social media platform to come _ two weeks for a social media
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platform to come back- two weeks for a social media platform to come back to - two weeks for a social media | platform to come back to be. two weeks for a social media - platform to come back to be. that is 'ust platform to come back to be. that is just not _ platform to come back to be. that is just not acceptable. _ platform to come back to be. that is just not acceptable. if— platform to come back to be. that is just not acceptable. if i— platform to come back to be. that is just not acceptable. if i report - just not acceptable. if i report something. _ just not acceptable. if i report something. as _ just not acceptable. if i report something, as a _ just not acceptable. if i report something, as a member- just not acceptable. if i report something, as a member of. just not acceptable. if i report - something, as a member of parliament oras something, as a member of parliament or as anyone, _ something, as a member of parliament or as anyone. really. _ something, as a member of parliament or as anyone, really, using _ something, as a member of parliament or as anyone, really, using twitter- or as anyone, really, using twitter or as anyone, really, using twitter or facebook. — or as anyone, really, using twitter or facebook, they _ or as anyone, really, using twitter or facebook, they should - or as anyone, really, using twitter or facebook, they should come i or as anyone, really, using twitter. or facebook, they should come back and say. _ or facebook, they should come back and say. ok. — or facebook, they should come back and say. ok. let— or facebook, they should come back and say, ok, let us _ or facebook, they should come back and say, ok, let us take _ or facebook, they should come back and say, ok, let us take this - and say, ok, let us take this seriously. _ and say, ok, let us take this seriously, let's _ and say, ok, let us take this seriously, let's block- and say, ok, let us take this seriously, let's block the - and say, ok, let us take this seriously, let's block the ipi seriously, let's block the ip address. _ seriously, let's block the ip address, let's _ seriously, let's block the ip address, let's find - seriously, let's block the ip address, let's find out - seriously, let's block the ip address, let's find out who| seriously, let's block the ip i address, let's find out who is behind — address, let's find out who is behind this, _ address, let's find out who is behind this, but— address, let's find out who is behind this, but i— address, let's find out who is behind this, but i do- address, let's find out who is behind this, but i do feel- address, let's find out who is| behind this, but i do feel they address, let's find out who is - behind this, but i do feel they are very slow— behind this, but i do feel they are very slow to— behind this, but i do feel they are very slow to act _ behind this, but i do feel they are very slow to act sometimes. - behind this, but i do feel they are very slow to act sometimes. can. behind this, but i do feel they are very slow to act sometimes. canl very slow to act sometimes. can i ask this question _ very slow to act sometimes. can i ask this question to _ very slow to act sometimes. can i ask this question to both - very slow to act sometimes. can i ask this question to both of- very slow to act sometimesm ask this question to both of you? you have both been honest about some of the threats you have received and how you deal with that. tulip siddique, to you first of all, have you come in the light of what happened over the weekend, have you thought about cancelling something? have you thought about not going somewhere? have you thought about maybe changing the way that you do things? orare maybe changing the way that you do things? or are you trying to maintain thejob that things? or are you trying to maintain the job that you do as an mp and those interactions with your constituents and with others? it’s constituents and with others? it's really important for me that i do maintain — really important for me that i do maintain interaction. _ really important for me that i do maintain interaction. but- really important for me that i do maintain interaction. but what . really important for me that i do maintain interaction. but what ii maintain interaction. but what i have _ maintain interaction. but what i have started _ maintain interaction. but what i have started doing _ maintain interaction. but what i have started doing is— maintain interaction. but what i have started doing is thinking . maintain interaction. but what i have started doing is thinking a| maintain interaction. but what i. have started doing is thinking a bit more _ have started doing is thinking a bit more carefully— have started doing is thinking a bit more carefully about _ have started doing is thinking a bit more carefully about events - have started doing is thinking a bit more carefully about events that l have started doing is thinking a bit more carefully about events that i| more carefully about events that i do attend — more carefully about events that i do attend and _ more carefully about events that i do attend and buy _ more carefully about events that i do attend and buy surgeries. - more carefully about events that i. do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown _ do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown i— do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown i did — do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown i did my— do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown i did my surgery- do attend and buy surgeries. during lockdown i did my surgery over- lockdown i did my surgery over zouma — lockdown i did my surgery over zouma. whereas _ lockdown i did my surgery over zouma. whereas i _
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lockdown i did my surgery over zouma. whereas i want - lockdown i did my surgery over zouma. whereas i want to - lockdown i did my surgery over zouma. whereas i want to go. lockdown i did my surgery over- zouma. whereas i want to go back to face-to-face — zouma. whereas i want to go back to face-to-face at — zouma. whereas i want to go back to face—to—face at some _ zouma. whereas i want to go back to face—to—face at some point, - zouma. whereas i want to go back to face—to—face at some point, i- face—to—face at some point, i started — face—to—face at some point, i started thinking _ face—to—face at some point, i started thinking very - face—to—face at some point, i| started thinking very carefully about — started thinking very carefully about what _ started thinking very carefully about what venue _ started thinking very carefully about what venue i _ started thinking very carefully about what venue i should - started thinking very carefully. about what venue i should use. started thinking very carefully i about what venue i should use. i started thinking very carefully - about what venue i should use. i am very lucky— about what venue i should use. i am very lucky in — about what venue i should use. i am very lucky in my— about what venue i should use. i am very lucky in my constituency - about what venue i should use. i am very lucky in my constituency i - about what venue i should use. i am very lucky in my constituency i do i very lucky in my constituency i do have _ very lucky in my constituency i do have a _ very lucky in my constituency i do have a venue _ very lucky in my constituency i do have a venue that _ very lucky in my constituency i do have a venue that has _ very lucky in my constituency i do have a venue that has security . have a venue that has security anyway — have a venue that has security anyway. and _ have a venue that has security anyway. and they— have a venue that has security anyway. and they have - have a venue that has security anyway. and they have said i have a venue that has security anyway. and they have said to have a venue that has security - anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly. — anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly. that _ anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly. that l _ anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly, that i can— anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly, that i can use - anyway. and they have said to me, very kindly, that i can use a - anyway. and they have said to me, j very kindly, that i can use a venue. i very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know— very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know that — very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know that all _ very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know that all mps _ very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know that all mps have _ very kindly, that i can use a venue. i know that all mps have that - i know that all mps have that option — i know that all mps have that option i_ i know that all mps have that option i do _ i know that all mps have that option. i do have _ i know that all mps have that option. i do have that - i know that all mps have that option. i do have that option| i know that all mps have that i option. i do have that option in harlesden— option. i do have that option in harlesden and _ option. i do have that option in harlesden and kilburn. - option. i do have that option in harlesden and kilburn. that. option. i do have that option in harlesden and kilburn. that is| option. i do have that option inl harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue _ harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i— harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i will— harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i will be _ harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i will be using. _ harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i will be using. i- harlesden and kilburn. that is a venue i will be using. i don't- harlesden and kilburn. that is a i venue i will be using. i don't have people _ venue i will be using. i don't have people walking _ venue i will be using. i don't have people walking in— venue i will be using. idon't have people walking in any— venue i will be using. i don't have people walking in any more - venue i will be using. i don't have - people walking in any more randomly. i people walking in any more randomly. i have _ people walking in any more randomly. i have booked — people walking in any more randomly. i have booked appointments. - people walking in any more randomly. i have booked appointments. i- people walking in any more randomly. i have booked appointments. i have i i have booked appointments. i have people's— i have booked appointments. i have people's names _ i have booked appointments. i have people's names and _ i have booked appointments. i have people's names and addresses. - i have booked appointments. i have people's names and addresses. asi i have booked appointments. i have . people's names and addresses. as for events. _ people's names and addresses. as for events. this _ people's names and addresses. as for events, this happened _ people's names and addresses. as for events, this happened in— people's names and addresses. as for events, this happened in 2016 - people's names and addresses. as for events, this happened in 2016 after. events, this happened in 2016 after what happened _ events, this happened in 2016 after what happened to _ events, this happened in 2016 after what happened to jo _ events, this happened in 2016 after what happened tojo cox, _ events, this happened in 2016 after what happened tojo cox, i- events, this happened in 2016 after what happened to jo cox, i actually| what happened to jo cox, i actually stopped _ what happened to jo cox, i actually stopped advertising _ what happened to jo cox, i actually stopped advertising the _ what happened to jo cox, i actually stopped advertising the event - what happened to jo cox, i actually stopped advertising the event i - what happened to jo cox, i actually| stopped advertising the event i was going _ stopped advertising the event i was going to _ stopped advertising the event i was going to be — stopped advertising the event i was going to be out _ stopped advertising the event i was going to be out on _ stopped advertising the event i was going to be out on twitter. - stopped advertising the event i was going to be out on twitter. i- stopped advertising the event i was going to be out on twitter. i would i going to be out on twitter. i would tweet _ going to be out on twitter. i would tweet afterwards _ going to be out on twitter. i would tweet afterwards with _ going to be out on twitter. i would tweet afterwards with a _ going to be out on twitter. i would tweet afterwards with a picture - going to be out on twitter. i would | tweet afterwards with a picture and say, tweet afterwards with a picture and say. i— tweet afterwards with a picture and say. i really— tweet afterwards with a picture and say, i really enjoyed _ tweet afterwards with a picture and say, i really enjoyed the _ tweet afterwards with a picture and say, i really enjoyed the event, - tweet afterwards with a picture and say, i really enjoyed the event, ori say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well— say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well it — say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well it went, _ say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well it went, but _ say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well it went, but i— say, i really enjoyed the event, or how well it went, but i didn't - how well it went, but i didn't advertise _ how well it went, but i didn't advertise beforehand - how well it went, but i didn't advertise beforehand and - how well it went, but i didn't| advertise beforehand and say how well it went, but i didn't i advertise beforehand and say i how well it went, but i didn't - advertise beforehand and say i was going _ advertise beforehand and say i was going to _ advertise beforehand and say i was going to be — advertise beforehand and say i was going to be there. _ advertise beforehand and say i was going to be there. you _ advertise beforehand and say i was going to be there. you are - advertise beforehand and say i was going to be there. you are right. advertise beforehand and say i was going to be there. you are right to| going to be there. you are right to say i _ going to be there. you are right to say i am _ going to be there. you are right to say i am changing _ going to be there. you are right to say i am changing some _ going to be there. you are right to say i am changing some of- going to be there. you are right to say i am changing some of the - going to be there. you are right to. say i am changing some of the things i do say i am changing some of the things i do and _ say i am changing some of the things i do and the — say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways— say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways i— say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways i work. _ say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways i work. but - say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways i work. but at - say i am changing some of the things i do and the ways i work. but at the i i do and the ways i work. but at the end of— i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the _ i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day— i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day what _ i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day what i— i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day what i would - i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day what i would say- i do and the ways i work. but at the end of the day what i would say to i end of the day what i would say to you is _ end of the day what i would say to you is that — end of the day what i would say to you is that i — end of the day what i would say to you is that i am _ end of the day what i would say to you is that i am a _ end of the day what i would say to you is that i am a public— end of the day what i would say to you is that i am a public servant. ij you is that i am a public servant. i worked _ you is that i am a public servant. i worked hard — you is that i am a public servant. i worked hard to _ you is that i am a public servant. i worked hard to get _ you is that i am a public servant. i worked hard to get elected. - you is that i am a public servant. i worked hard to get elected. it - you is that i am a public servant. i| worked hard to get elected. it was the most — worked hard to get elected. it was the most marginal— worked hard to get elected. it was the most marginal seat— worked hard to get elected. it was the most marginal seat in- worked hard to get elected. it was the most marginal seat in the - the most marginal seat in the country — the most marginal seat in the country it— the most marginal seat in the
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country it is— the most marginal seat in the country. it is because - the most marginal seat in the country. it is because i- the most marginal seat in the country. it is because i want i the most marginal seat in the| country. it is because i want to represent _ country. it is because i want to represent my— country. it is because i want to represent my constituents. - country. it is because i want to represent my constituents. i. country. it is because i want to. represent my constituents. i can't stop doing _ represent my constituents. i can't stop doing my— represent my constituents. i can't stop doing myjob. _ represent my constituents. ican't stop doing myjob. t— represent my constituents. ican't stop doing myjob. i can't- represent my constituents. i can't stop doing myjob. i can't stop - stop doing myjob. i can't stop going — stop doing myjob. i can't stop going to — stop doing myjob. i can't stop going to events, _ stop doing myjob. i can't stop going to events, supporting i going to events, supporting charities, _ going to events, supporting charities, seeing _ going to events, supporting charities, seeing people - going to events, supportingi charities, seeing people face going to events, supporting - charities, seeing people face to face if— charities, seeing people face to face if they— charities, seeing people face to face if they had _ charities, seeing people face to face if they had a _ charities, seeing people face to face if they had a very - charities, seeing people face to face if they had a very difficult. face if they had a very difficult piece — face if they had a very difficult piece of— face if they had a very difficult piece of casework, _ face if they had a very difficult piece of casework, whether. face if they had a very difficult . piece of casework, whether they face if they had a very difficult - piece of casework, whether they have become _ piece of casework, whether they have become homeless, _ piece of casework, whether they have become homeless, or— piece of casework, whether they have become homeless, or suffered - become homeless, or suffered domestic— become homeless, or suffered domestic violence, _ become homeless, or suffered domestic violence, i— become homeless, or suffered domestic violence, i have - become homeless, or suffered domestic violence, i have got. become homeless, or suffered. domestic violence, i have got to become homeless, or suffered - domestic violence, i have got to see my constituents _ domestic violence, i have got to see my constituents. [— domestic violence, i have got to see my constituents.— domestic violence, i have got to see my constituents. i cannot stop doing that. and robert — my constituents. i cannot stop doing that. and robert halfon, _ my constituents. i cannot stop doing that. and robert halfon, glad - my constituents. i cannot stop doing that. and robert halfon, glad we . that. and robert halfon, glad we have got you back. hopefully you can hear what tulip said it was saying. do you feel the same way about your own itinerary? i do you feel the same way about your own itinerary?— do you feel the same way about your own itinerary? i am more careful now in terms of— own itinerary? i am more careful now in terms of what _ own itinerary? i am more careful now in terms of what i _ own itinerary? i am more careful now in terms of what i advertised - own itinerary? i am more careful now in terms of what i advertised in - in terms of what i advertised in advance — in terms of what i advertised in advance. at the whole job is a people — advance. at the whole job is a people job and you are in public. i do walk_ people job and you are in public. i do walk about in town. i do stalls. i visit _ do walk about in town. i do stalls. i visit schools, visit businesses. most_ i visit schools, visit businesses. most people in harlow will now me. they will_ most people in harlow will now me. they will probably even know roughly where _ they will probably even know roughly where i _ they will probably even know roughly where i live in the town. it is an impossible _ where i live in the town. it is an impossible circumstance because i want to— impossible circumstance because i want to continue to do myjob. i love _ want to continue to do myjob. i love my— want to continue to do myjob. i love myjob. it is a privilege to be a member— love myjob. it is a privilege to be a member of parliament. but if i'm being— a member of parliament. but if i'm being honest, given what has happened, it is scary, because you
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'ust happened, it is scary, because you just don't— happened, it is scary, because you just don't know, even if you have security— just don't know, even if you have security guards at surgeries, if you're — security guards at surgeries, if you're walking about the town, just going _ you're walking about the town, just going shopping, even, even if you are not— going shopping, even, even if you are not doing yourjob as an mp, this could — are not doing yourjob as an mp, this could happen. people can follow you and _ this could happen. people can follow you and target you. so, i don't know the answer— you and target you. so, i don't know the answer to — you and target you. so, i don't know the answer to solving this problem but i the answer to solving this problem but i will— the answer to solving this problem but i will try and keep a public profile — but i will try and keep a public profile as _ but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is centrai— profile as much as possible because it is central to what we do. we can't _ it is central to what we do. we can'tiust— it is central to what we do. we can'tjust lock it is central to what we do. we can't just lock ourselves away. robert — can't just lock ourselves away. robert halfon mp, and tulip siddique mp, thank you very much indeed for your honesty this morning. i know it is a difficult subject to talk about. thank you. thank you for all your comments and questions and suggestions you have been sending in on that issue throughout the morning. we will continue to have that debate today. we will be talking to dominic raab, thejustice secretary and deputy prime minister and a couple of minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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hello, i'm sonja jessup. a morning of prayers and silence will be held in parliament today in memory of sir david amess, the mp for southend west who was murdered on friday. a 25 year old man has been detained under the terrorism act. yesterday as colleagues and well wishers continued to lay flowers for him, sir david's family called on people to "set aside hatred". we are going to have a mass, we'll announce a date for a mass in the nearfuture, where we can in a very fitting way make a memorial to him, where we can gather some of the more representative members of the community together so that we can do this in prayer for his eternal repose. and also above all giving thanks to god for the great achievement of his life. nightclubs say a shortage of bouncers and door staff could begin to pose a "threat to public safety". the night time industries association warn one in five venues have had to close or reduce operating hours as they don't have enough security workers. we are pushing hard to see
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if we can get a mobility visa that is going to open the doors for many of those people who worked within the security sector to come back to the uk, particularly in london, and start to help us bolster the numbers of security available to deal with the hospitality and late—night economy sector. because at the moment, we are struggling to get those numbers. a bronze disc — believed to be the world's oldest map of the stars — will go on display at the british museum next year. the nebra sky disc, which was found in germany in 1999, is thought to date back 3,600 years although a small number of experts have questioned its authenticity. let's get the travel now. we have some minor delays on the metropolitan line between moor park and watford. other lines appear to be running normally. and for regular travel updates tune into your bbc local radio station. time for the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. for the first half of this week, it's going to be feeling very mild
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for this time of year but it will be unsettled, wet and windy at times, and low pressure will dominate. there is a weather front on its way for us today. but it is a dry start to the morning. we have got some brightness around, we have got some long clear spells last night so temperatures for some of us have dropped back to high single figures. there is a bit of mist, but that will lift and clear. the sunshine won't last because it will cloud over from the west and eventually outbreaks of rain will move eastwards. probably not until the late afternoon for many of us so dry for much of the day. that southerly wind will really start to pick up as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. top temperatures all the way up to 17 or 18 celsius so above the average for the time of year. and tonight will be really very mild indeed. we are going to see all of that rain move eastwards as we head through the evening and it will turn a lot drier. there will always be lots of cloud around, overnight lows this time not dropping below the mid teens in celsius. really a very mild start to tuesday. then on tuesday we are expecting a lot of cloud, there could be some
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rain later on through the day, it stays windy. in the best of any brighter spells, temperatures could get as high as 20 or 21 degrees. i'll be back in an hour, much more on our website. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. the wait for a heart transplant can be an agonising one, and for children, it tends to be much longer than it is for adults. but now a team at great ormond street hospital have helped develop a new technique, which has doubled the number of children able to receive a new heart and give them hope of a longer and healthier life, as alistair fee reports. at the age of eight, it was thought lucy was the oldest child in the world to receive a donor heart that didn't match her blood type. she is able to do everything that other children can,
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whereas we've never had that, she's never been able to do everything that other children can do. so this is the heart—lung bypass machine. you've got the artificial heart, the artificial lung, and if we come back up here, this is the new addition which is allowing us to do mismatched heart transplants in more patients than ever before. more transplants, thanks to new research here at great ormond street hospital, means more lives saved. traditionally what we used to do is drain the patient's blood and throw it away and replace it with three times their circulating volume with donated blood and blood products, which can go into litres. what this technology does is allow us to target the particular antibodies which then can cause rejection and not use that amount of blood. for children like lucy, that's ending years of waiting for a donor. she was born with a congenital heart defect, diagnosed atjust 18 months. after her fourth birthday, she was told she needed a transplant. finally performed thanks to this new research three and half years later.
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it meant that lucy wasn't waiting as long as she had to. i mean, the thought of having to wait any more years, if we were still waiting now, i don't know what the effect on our mental health and ourfamily life... the fact that this research, this new development means that they can do more transplants on children is just amazing and it's going to make such a difference. until now, the wait for a donor has been twice as long among children and babies. what this means is we can double the age range of the patients we can offer it to so we have expanded that donor pool that is available to them. so they've got a chance of getting a heart quicker and not laying on a waiting list for so long. great ormond street hospital have now performed heart transplants using this device on ten children. all have survived with no need for re—transplantation or any additional time spent in hospital. lucy has made a good recovery
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and for the first time is able to have a normal, happy childhood. she is doing fantastically. her new heart is working fantastically. all of the scans and tests in everything she has had has shown that everything is brilliant. so we have got a future now. you just can't put into words how amazing it is that we have got another chance at life. right now, around 50 children in the uk are waiting for heart transplants. this technique will help to bring that number down. as for lucy, she now wants to climb a mountain and is looking forward to going on holiday to italy next summer. alistair fee, bbc news. it is monday morning, the time is fast approaching 35 minutes past seven. more tributes will be
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to sir david amess today, as mp5 return to the house of commons. his killing during a constituency surgery on friday has raised further questions over the safety of politicians. we're joined now by the justice secretary, dominic raab. good morning. thank you very much for talking to us this morning, mr raab, a very difficult circumstances. tell us that of all how you and your fellow mps will be paying tribute to sir david today. there will be speeches in the house of commons. i'm sure everyone will have a different story to tell. i knew david in particular, i spoke with him at the party conference in manchesterjust with him at the party conference in manchester just a few weeks ago, about animal welfare. he had been passing private members bills to look at the welfare of animals since the 19805. he was still today fm edible campaign. a conviction politician, mo —— a formidable campaigner. he was a conviction partition, and throughout the
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content, he knew how to catch the terms of debate in a respectful and bighearted way. he had a great empathy a5 a man. i knew him and i still feel the friendship empathy as a man. i knew him and i still feel the friendship that he gave to me when i first became an mp. a lot of people talk to us across the political aisles and perhaps one of the real things given the abuse and the polarisation of politics is the example he set in being able to break bread across the political divide, even, or perhaps especially, when he disagreed with them. taste especially, when he disagreed with them. ~ . . especially, when he disagreed with them. . ., , , , ., ~' ., especially, when he disagreed with them. . . , ,, .,~ ., ., them. we have been speaking to other mps about them. we have been speaking to other mp5 about how — them. we have been speaking to other mps about how they _ them. we have been speaking to other mps about how they feel _ them. we have been speaking to other mps about how they feel about - them. we have been speaking to other mps about how they feel about going l mp5 about how they feel about going about theirjobs since the events of friday, and i wonder over the weekend, have you reviewed how you will be doing yourjob and your own personal safety? will be doing your 'ob and your own personal safety?_ will be doing your 'ob and your own personal safem_ will be doing your “oh and your own personal safety? yes, of course, and eve one personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is— personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is in _ personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is in a _ personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is in a different _ personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is in a different set - personal safety? yes, of course, and everyone is in a different set of - everyone is in a different set of circumstances. the police, the local forces have been in touch with me as
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they will be, and will have been with mp5 across the country to talk about practical things like constituency surgeons —— surgeries and any particular concerns that we have. then there will be a second phase review to look at the consistency of the offers made and yvonne will feel differently. from my own point of view, i want to be smart and cavil about it —— everyone will feel differently. i want to be smart and careful about it but we do not want alleged to be placed between us and the communities that elect us to serve them. == between us and the communities that elect us to serve them.— elect us to serve them. -- are wedred elect us to serve them. -- are wedged to _ elect us to serve them. -- are wedged to be _ elect us to serve them. -- are wedged to be placed. - elect us to serve them. -- are wedged to be placed. so - elect us to serve them. -- are wedged to be placed. so howl elect us to serve them. -- are l wedged to be placed. so how do elect us to serve them. -- are - wedged to be placed. so how do you feel about the possibility of police guards are constituency meetings, or perhaps working behind a screen when you meet members of the public? everyone will feel different but we need to look at the proportion of the steps that we take to deal with
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the steps that we take to deal with the risk that we face as politicians on the front line in our communities, without, if you like, undermining or corroding the connection that we need to have with our communities. that will be different for different people given the risks they face, and different depending on what we are doing. are we out and about in a town centre, which is what we want to be doing, is it the surgeries which can take place in an office and perhaps there are security measures that we will want to be thinking about? i'm not going to prescribe for each and every mp, it's really important for those who are feeling fearful and anxious right now that they get the reassurance so that they are safe and they have the confidence to do the job and that is what we all want to be able to do.— to be able to do. talking about herself for— to be able to do. talking about herself for a _ to be able to do. talking about herself for a moment, - to be able to do. talking about herself for a moment, how - to be able to do. talking about l herself for a moment, how much obesity you receive, —— talking about yourself, how much abuse do you receive and does any of that make you feel like your personal safety is under threat?— make you feel like your personal safety is under threat? there will be n-eole safety is under threat? there will
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be people who — safety is under threat? there will be people who have _ safety is under threat? there will be people who have had - safety is under threat? there will be people who have had worse i safety is under threat? there will- be people who have had worse abuse than me and i particularly feel for the female mp5, and i know colleagues of mine have come off twitter, for example, because it is just so vile. i have had three threats to life and limb over the last two years so i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it and make sure we do everything we can, make sure we do that due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day, my personal feeling is that we must not allow those who attack our democracy, who wants to threaten us and stop us talking to our constituents and serving our community, we cannot allow them to win. to take in proportion mitigation from the risks that we face but not getting terrorists or other people who want to paralyse our democracy, we cannot allow them to, in this tragic case. you
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our democracy, we cannot allow them to, in this tragic case.— to, in this tragic case. you have had three _ to, in this tragic case. you have had three serious _ to, in this tragic case. you have had three serious threats - to, in this tragic case. you have had three serious threats to - to, in this tragic case. you have had three serious threats to life and limb, how do you respond to that, what are the mechanics and what do you do in practical terms as an mp? let what do you do in practical terms as an mp? . ., what do you do in practical terms as an mp? , ., , .., an mp? let me be a bit careful about talkinr an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about — an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about it. _ an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about it. some _ an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about it. some of— an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about it. some of it _ an mp? let me be a bit careful about talking about it. some of it is - talking about it. some of it is security sensitive. i have had close protection as foreign secretary, so those, it is almost like an automatic way that those things are dealt with. even before then, i had a good relationship with my local police force, if i had a concern, if i did now, i would police force, if i had a concern, if i did now, iwould be police force, if i had a concern, if i did now, i would be in contact with them. the incidents that i mentioned all resulted in an intervention, i'm going to leave it at that. i'm just saying it because i think a lot of people will be surprised at how widespread it is, and notjust abuse, but serious concerted threat. and we see the constant vilification of politicians
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and mp5, particularly online, but the culture as well frankly. it is incumbent on all of us, as as mp5 to measure the language we use in debates particularly strong ones, and on social media. the polarisation since i became an mp has led to much more personal attacks on the individual rather than passionate debates on the issue. i think that is partly where we have seen something go wrong over the last 11 years. taste we have seen something go wrong over the last 11 years-— the last 11 years. we know the man who has been _ the last 11 years. we know the man who has been accused _ the last 11 years. we know the man who has been accused of— the last 11 years. we know the man who has been accused of sir- the last 11 years. we know the man who has been accused of sir davidl who has been accused of sir david amess's killing had been previously referred to the prevent programme, how worried does that make you, do you think the system is fit for purpose? i you think the system is fit for n-urose? a. ., you think the system is fit for purpose?— purpose? i cannot talk about individual — purpose? i cannot talk about individual cases, _ purpose? i cannot talk about individual cases, it _ purpose? i cannot talk about individual cases, it has - purpose? i cannot talk about individual cases, it has a - individual cases, it has a disruptive effect on the police investigation, let alone the further prosecution. what i would say more generally is the prevent strategy is precisely there to try and pick up cases of concern, make sure that the
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radicalisation efforts can be put in place. there is a —— that the de—radicalisation can take place. there is a local and central security apparatus to assess the risks and take proportional measures. the prevent strategy is currently under review. we are always looking to learn the lessons and strengthen and reinforce the interagency process is to deal with it. there is no risk—free silver bullet that can be put in place and no one measure that can stop this. i am confident with our police and security agencies we have the very best system but we are always looking to learn lessons. with the type of a lone wolf attacks that you see which are less coordinated and more done on someone's individual initiative, that becomes harder because there is less of a trail of connections that can be flagged and signalled and sent up the warning signs. as the threat evolves, we
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have to adjust and that is what we do. have to ad'ust and that is what we do. ., ,., ., ., ., do. you said that the language surrounding — do. you said that the language surrounding politicians - do. you said that the language surrounding politicians in - do. you said that the language i surrounding politicians in person and online has worsened significantly over the last several years. what can you do about that, would you perhaps look at removing the option of anonymity for people online? how will you handle that? the home secretary has already said that in relation and the context of the online harm's bill which is going through pre—legislative scrutiny, we will go through those measures. we want to take a proportionate approach but i do think there is a problem online. that is incumbent on the social media companies and us as legislators. i think there is a real at politicians for all of us to measure the language we use. as i —— there as a role for us. the amount of attacks on individuals rather than passionate facts on the argument has increased and there has been a widespread vilification of politicians in the media. let me be very clear about it, we deserve
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maximum scrutiny, i am a free—speech man, i want to see that upheld. but i do think that it is something which is incumbent on all of us as a society to look at and just check the way we approach these things. yes to a maximum scrutiny on the issues and maximum scrutiny and those who hold public office, but the constant sometime surreptitious and sometimes ostentatious vilification of politicians creates the kinds of climates in which these episodes take place, and which the abuse particularly female mp5 receive take place. abuse particularly female mps receive take place.— abuse particularly female mps receive take place. when you say vilification in _ receive take place. when you say vilification in the _ receive take place. when you say vilification in the media, - receive take place. when you say vilification in the media, what - receive take place. when you say vilification in the media, what do| vilification in the media, what do you mean by that? can you give me an example? i’m you mean by that? can you give me an exam-le? �* ., , ., example? i'm not pointing fingers at an one example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual— example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual but _ example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual but i _ example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual but i think - example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual but i think it - example? i'm not pointing fingers at anyone individual but i think it is - anyone individual but i think it is incumbent on all of us to look at the way we hold public debate. we ought to be absolutely robust and rigorous in debating the issues, but i think the sort of personal
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attacks, or the identification and the, if you like, the character assassination against individuals, i think certainly since 2010, i think you see far more of that across the board then resell before then. and maybe that's just my observation because that's —— than we saw before that. maybe that's just my observation because that is when i came but i hear it from that mp5. i'm not calling for self—censorship but i do think the terms of debate have coarsened over the last few years, people can point to brexit and the polarisation that had many other factors influence it. and the polarisation that had many otherfactors influence it. i think it is incumbent on all of us who engage in public debate to think about the way we can do so. engage in public debate to think about the way we can do 50. d0 engage in public debate to think about the way we can do so. do you think i about the way we can do so. do you think i have — about the way we can do so. do you think i have and _ about the way we can do so. do you think i have and over— about the way we can do so. do you think i have and over the _ about the way we can do so. do you think i have and over the last - about the way we can do so. do you think i have and over the last 18 - think i have and over the last 18 months, online radicalisation has worsened —— do you think over lockdown and the last 18 months? i lockdown and the last 18 months? i could not say, many great things have been done with the online
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offering we have, people to work remotely and the ability for schooling to continue online. but i think for the vulnerable and the mentally unwell and those at risk for radicalisation, that time cooped up for radicalisation, that time cooped up at home and spent online, there are risks related to that. as the threat and the kind of risks that we see morph and evolve and change, we have to adjust to that. that's what the police and intelligence agencies are doing. the police and intelligence agencies are doinr. . .,, the police and intelligence agencies are doinr. . ., ,, the police and intelligence agencies aredoinr. . ., are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much- — are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much. good _ are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much. good to _ are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much. good to talk— are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much. good to talk to - are doing. dominic rob, thank you very much. good to talk to you. i are doing. dominic rob, thank you | very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting _ very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting on _ very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting on a _ very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting on a busy _ very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting on a busy weekend i very much. good to talk to you. we are reflecting on a busy weekend of sport. even in the last few hours, great news for british tennis. {line great news for british tennis. one of those mornings _ great news for british tennis. qua: of those mornings where we cannot fit everything in! matt fitzpatrick and rory mcilroy winning, scotland beating bangladesh in the cricket, it has been bonkers! and the tennis...
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cameron norrie has become the first british player to win the prestigious indian wells title after he beat nikoloz basilashvili in a dramatic final last night. the tournament is called the fifth grand slam by some and it's the biggest prize of norrie's career but he needed a turnaround to get there as patrick gearey reports. cameron norrie has spent his life on the move. he's lived in south africa, new zealand, london and texas. now, though, is he finally arriving? here he was in his biggest match, in the best year of his career. but this wasn't in the plan. nicoloz basilashvili, above him on your screen, below him in the rankings, smashed his way to the first set. then to a break up in the second as well. norrie was nowjust trying to survive, waiting for a chance, a moment when the energy changed. you know it when you feel it. 0h, brilliant! norrie took the second and with it, the control. the new british number one has the lungs of an endurance athlete and the instinct of a fighter. basilashvili had no ropes to lean on.
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it all ended with one last wild swing. norrie was indian wells' first british champion. still don't really know what i'm experiencing. it was an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big matches. so i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. this autumn, emma raducanu has cracked america and now it's norrie. british tennis is rising in the fall. patrick geary, bbc news. bit of a struggle letting that massive trophy as well! congratulations to cameron murray. —— cameron norrie. newcastle manager steve bruce says he'll go to work "as normal" this morning, despite his newcastle side losing the first game under their new ownership. it had started so well against spurs too.
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ahead inside two minutes much to the delight of their new owners. but tottenham replied with three of their own. harry kane scored one and set up son hueng min in first half stoppage time. 3—2 it finished in steve bruce's one thousandth game in management, but it left more questions for him to face about his future. i'll carry on as best i can until i hear otherwise. and the owners have been very, very respectful, i have to say that. the way they've conducted themselves in the last week or so. and unless i hear different, i will go to work again tomorrow and prepare for next week. david moyes praised west ham's "resilience" as they ground—out a hard fought 1—0 win over his former club everton. angelo 0gbonna's second half header was the difference. great britain are world champions for the first time since 1989 in speedway. they beat poland in the grand final in manchester. robert lambert and dan bewley capitalised on a first lap crash from the poles to take the title.
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so much sport out there, check it out on the bbc sport website if you need to catch up with anything of the weekend. i need to catch up with anything of the weekend.— need to catch up with anything of the weekend. ,, ., .. ., , the weekend. i know we cannot see outside this — the weekend. i know we cannot see outside this morning, _ the weekend. i know we cannot see outside this morning, but _ the weekend. i know we cannot see outside this morning, but several . outside this morning, but several people are posting beautiful pictures of the sunrise. lbs, people are posting beautiful pictures of the sunrise. a pink sky, what does that _ pictures of the sunrise. a pink sky, what does that mean, _ pictures of the sunrise. a pink sky, what does that mean, tell - pictures of the sunrise. a pink sky, what does that mean, tell us! - it is cloudy for many of us and we have rain on the way as well. this week the weather will be changeable, heavy rain and gales possible in the north, very mild at first in the first couple of days, the middle of the week the temperature is full back to average and then it turns colder with a wind chill. rain from the west is heading east, drizzle advert, we also have some fog. hill park in northern england fog eastern scotland. that will be usurped by the band of rain coming across,
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heaviest in the northern and southern flank, in the middle it will be lighter. as it clears, we will be lighter. as it clears, we will have a return to the cloud. it will have a return to the cloud. it will be a breezy day, gusty winds in the northern and western isles but a look at the temperatures, ten to 18 degrees. the arc of rain will be clearing overnight leaving us with a dry slot for the next band of rain and strengthening winds come in from the west. it will be a mild night, these temperatures are what would expect during the day at the stage in october. we have rain piling in tomorrow followed by showers which could be heavy and thundery in parts of scotland and northern ireland, another breezy day but in the south—east it should stay dry. we should see some sunshine and temperatures could get up to 21 degrees. wherever you are regardless whether it is cloudy or rainy, it will be mild for the time of year.
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don't forget, on thursday, a shock to the system is coming. thank you, carol. it's been ten years since jamie laing first found fame in the reality series made in chelsea, which followed the lavish lives of socialites in london. ten years! you must have been a child at a time! since then he's hosted podcasts, appeared in soaps and even finished runner up on last year's strictly come dancing. i need some tips! now he's fronting a brand new series, and written an autobiography. good morning. he that you will enjoy this comedy want to look back at your career so far?! ihla! is this all for me? it's all for you. surprise! i'm ok, actually, how are you guys? i don't think you are, mate, that's why you're here. we are meant to cheer him up not make it a therapy session. let's talk about fun things.
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a fun, light—hearted dinner. what fun things can you do to get over relationship? you can go horse riding, that's what he made me do. i hate horses. you put me on a horses. but you like horses. so this is the kitchen. the best thing about the kitchen, this is so important, you've got to have a good fridge, when you can do this, right? this is where you come and relax, you just sit back and think about things. it's like living in a really comfy greenhouse. i love that, a the greenhouse, good morning _ i love that, a the greenhouse, good morning. lets say hello properly. was that — morning. lets say hello properly. was that night to watch? | morning. lets say hello properly. was that night to watch? i watched so much of — was that night to watch? i watched so much of myself _ was that night to watch? i watched so much of myself in _ was that night to watch? i watched so much of myself in my _ was that night to watch? i watched so much of myself in my 20s, - was that night to watch? i watched so much of myself in my 20s, in i was that night to watch? i watched | so much of myself in my 20s, in my so much of myself in my 205, in my 305 i don't want to watch myself. i did a reality show for ten years and
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thatis did a reality show for ten years and that is a long time to do a show. when you are in that for a decade, what is normal life like after that? do you miss the cameras, or is it nice? . do you miss the cameras, or is it nice? , ., , nice? yes, where the cameras? i put u . nice? yes, where the cameras? i put u- a little nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras _ nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras in _ nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras in my _ nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras in my room - nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras in my room so - nice? yes, where the cameras? i put up a little cameras in my room so i i up a little cameras in my room so i feel comfortable! it is weird and strange but it was such an amazing time. i did to chelsea, it was ten years ago when i started and now i get to do these sorts of things and host a show. without it, i wouldn't be sitting here. so i thank my blessings for doing it, it was incredible but after ten years, probably late after people do it rather than we keep doing it. taste probably late after people do it rather than we keep doing it. we are rroin to rather than we keep doing it. we are going to keep _ rather than we keep doing it. we are going to keep showing _ rather than we keep doing it. we are going to keep showing pictures - rather than we keep doing it. we are going to keep showing pictures of. going to keep showing pictures of you now— going to keep showing pictures of you nowjust to completely talk to you! you — you nowjust to completely talk to you! you mentioned your latest project — you! you mentioned your latest project which is the best company —— torture _ project which is the best company —— torture you! — project which is the best company —— torture you! your latest project is the best— torture you! your latest project is the best combination accommodating and dances. you the best combination accommodating and dances. ., , ., ., the best combination accommodating anddances. ., , ., ., ., and dances. you can stream it now on ipla er, it and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer. it is — and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer. it is a — and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer. it is a bbc — and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer, it is a bbc three _ and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer, it is a bbc three show. -
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and dances. you can stream it now on iplayer, it is a bbc three show. we i iplayer, it is a bbc three show. we get five incredible professional dancers who move into a house together and they partner up with rookies, and they learn to dance and through dance and dating, do they fall in love? it is the most incredible show i have ever done. what happens on this is incredible, it isn'tjust what happens on this is incredible, it isn't just a what happens on this is incredible, it isn'tjust a normal reality show when they sit around a pool and talk about themselves. they have to learn something and learn these dances in 48 hours. ., . ., something and learn these dances in 48 hours. . , ., , something and learn these dances in 48 hours-— the - 48 hours. that is hard. yes! the dance is then _ 48 hours. that is hard. yes! the dance is then about _ 48 hours. that is hard. yes! the dance is then about the - 48 hours. that is hard. yes! the | dance is then about the chemistry and connection on the dance i know. it is like a pick and mix of happiness. it is a really amazing show, and my co—host is an incredible dancer from america, show, and my co—host is an incredible dancerfrom america, kk. it's a feel—good amazing show. i love the fact that you are
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enthusiastic, you came on to strictly and talked about it and you said it was the best programme that has ever been on tv and i love that enthusiasm. you get to present it is so do you feel pride at being the front man for that, have you always wanted to do that?— front man for that, have you always wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid. — wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid. i — wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid, i used _ wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid, i used to _ wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid, i used to line _ wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid, i used to line my - wanted to do that? yes, ever since i was a kid, i used to line my teddy i was a kid, i used to line my teddy bears up, this is bizarre, and i would host to them. as if they were real people. and so ever since i was a kid i wanted to be a host and a presenter and i wanted to do that. now the fact that i get to do this, and the programme is a risk because it is dating and dancing and has never been done before. it's incredible that the bbc did this so to be part of it is a complete dream come true. to be part of it is a complete dream come true-— come true. talk about lining the teddy bears _ come true. talk about lining the teddy bears op _ come true. talk about lining the teddy bears up and _ come true. talk about lining the teddy bears up and presenting l come true. talk about lining the teddy bears up and presenting a come true. talk about lining the - teddy bears up and presenting a show to them, _ teddy bears up and presenting a show to them, you have also written a book— to them, you have also written a book and — to them, you have also written a book and you talk quite serious terms — book and you talk quite serious terms about some tough times when you were _ terms about some tough times when you were a _ terms about some tough times when you were a kid. it wasn't all wonderful. you were a kid. it wasn't all
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wonderful-— you were a kid. it wasn't all wonderful. ., ., ,, you were a kid. it wasn't all wonderful. ., . ,, . wonderful. lockdown happened, and i ke-t wonderful. lockdown happened, and i kept realising — wonderful. lockdown happened, and i kept realising that _ wonderful. lockdown happened, and i kept realising that lots _ wonderful. lockdown happened, and i kept realising that lots of _ wonderful. lockdown happened, and i kept realising that lots of my - kept realising that lots of my friends were talking about their anxieties and all these different things. i had been quite open about anxiety in my 205, we are all insecure and i had a various anxieties. someone said to me, we have got to get over the stigma of mental health, and he said, it's very different to say, i have anxiety and depression and ocd. i thought, this is right. it's time for me to come out and say what i experienced in my 205. i wrote a book which is lots of funny stories. i was edited on a tv show throughout my 205 so this is time to edit myself. and also be honest about the way i felt particularly from a male point of view. we know the scary statistics about guys not talking about things, hopefully someone will pick this up and read it and it helps them but also makes them love at the same time. iii} helps them but also makes them love at the same time.—
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at the same time. 70 people -- so many people _ at the same time. 70 people -- so many people enjoyed _ at the same time. 70 people -- so many people enjoyed you - at the same time. 70 people -- so many people enjoyed you on - at the same time. 70 people -- so. many people enjoyed you on strictly this year. flan many people en'oyed you on strictly this ear. ., many people en'oyed you on strictly this ear. . , ._ ,., many people en'oyed you on strictly this ear. . , ., this year. can i 'ust say, you are unbelievable, — this year. can ijust say, you are unbelievable, you _ this year. can ijust say, you are unbelievable, you are _ this year. can ijust say, you are unbelievable, you are so - this year. can ijust say, you are unbelievable, you are so good i this year. can ijust say, you are | unbelievable, you are so good on this year. can ijust say, you are - unbelievable, you are so good on it! don't tell him that! you unbelievable, you are so good on it! don't tell him that!— don't tell him that! you are so tall. 0h. _ don't tell him that! you are so tall. 0h. be — don't tell him that! you are so tall. oh, be quiet! _ don't tell him that! you are so tall. oh, be quiet! your- don't tell him that! you are so tall. oh, be quiet! your head i don't tell him that! you are so | tall. oh, be quiet! your head is don't tell him that! you are so - tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from _ tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from your _ tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from your feet. _ tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from your feet. i'm - tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from your feet. i'm a - tall. oh, be quiet! your head is so far away from your feet. i'm a lot | far away from your feet. i'm a lot smaller so i could move around easier. . smaller so i could move around easier. , ., smaller so i could move around easier. , . ,, ,, easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me, ou easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me. you have — easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me, you have so _ easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me, you have so much _ easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me, you have so much leg - easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling me, you have so much leg and i easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling i me, you have so much leg and arm! easier. yes, nadiya keeps telling - me, you have so much leg and arm! do me, you have so much leg and arm! dr? you need to go to the bathroom before you go on? lbs]!!! you need to go to the bathroom before you go on?— you need to go to the bathroom before you go on? all the time, when ou are before you go on? all the time, when you are strapped _ before you go on? all the time, when you are strapped into _ before you go on? all the time, when you are strapped into everything, - you are strapped into everything, it's embarrassing!— it's embarrassing! yes, the semifinal. _ it's embarrassing! yes, the semifinal, i _ it's embarrassing! yes, the semifinal, i thought, - it's embarrassing! yes, the - semifinal, ithought, something terrible was going to happen on the dance floor! braids terrible was going to happen on the dance floor! . ., , terrible was going to happen on the dance floor!— terrible was going to happen on the dance floor!_ i - terrible was going to happen on the dance floor!_ i think | dance floor! was it nerves? i think someone slipped _ dance floor! was it nerves? i think someone slipped me _ dance floor! was it nerves? i think someone slipped me a _ dance floor! was it nerves? i think someone slipped me a laxative. i dance floor! was it nerves? i think someone slipped me a laxative. a| someone slipped me a laxative. a fellow competitor! you danced with
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karen, if you didn't watch yesterday, karen was partnered with greg, she sadly left this weekend. there are so many amazing people on the programme, he was one of the people who never danced before and enjoyed dancing with your old pal karen. ! enjoyed dancing with your old pal karen. ., ~ enjoyed dancing with your old pal karen. . ,, ., ,, . karen. i talk about i like the way you move. _ karen. i talk about i like the way you move, there _ karen. i talk about i like the way you move, there is _ karen. i talk about i like the way you move, there is my _ karen. i talk about i like the way you move, there is my summer, | you move, there is my summer, stretch their legs! —— my samba! but strictly is a glorious, wonderful show. karen is a legend. she is so lovely. i have so much respect, as you say, we get all of the joy and how great. the professional dancers are the ones who run it and make it happen. i don't know what i'm doing there! ., ~' happen. i don't know what i'm doing there! ., ,, ., happen. i don't know what i'm doing there! ., ~' .,| happen. i don't know what i'm doing there!_ i have i there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when _ there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when i _ there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when i was _ there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when i was about - there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when i was about to - there! you look like you do! i have no clue! when i was about to walk| there! you look like you do! i have i no clue! when i was about to walk on the dance floor, i was like, that's how you do it! now i get it, as i
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was walking on! it's an incredible show. , ., was walking on! it's an incredible show. , . . , ., ,, show. they are incredible. thank you for tellinr show. they are incredible. thank you for telling us — show. they are incredible. thank you for telling us about _ show. they are incredible. thank you for telling us about your _ show. they are incredible. thank you for telling us about your incredibly i for telling us about your incredibly busy life. jamie's book is out soon. jamie's book 'i can explain' is out now and 'i like the way you move' is on bbc iplayer. trust me, you will binge it. good luck to you, win!i trust me, you will binge it. good luck to you, win!— luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying _ luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying it — luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying it as _ luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying it as long _ luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying it as long as - luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i am enjoying it as long as it - luck to you, win! i don't exhibit i | am enjoying it as long as it lasts. —— | am enjoying it as long as it lasts. —— i don't think so! am enjoying it as long as it lasts. -- i don't think so!— -- i don't think so! behave! the headlines _ -- i don't think so! behave! the headlines are _ -- i don't think so! behave! the headlines are coming _ -- i don't think so! behave! the headlines are coming up. -
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. "set aside hatred" — a plea for tolerance from the family of murdered mp sir david amess. his former colleagues will hold a minute's silence today, before paying their tributes to sir david in the house of commons. solutions for saving the planet — the first million pound winners of prince william's earthshot prize have been announced. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now, and over the next years. good morning. a big rise in the number of people falling victim to online recruitment fraud. seven out of 10 job seekers came across a fake advert in the first six months of this year — some lost thousands of pounds. how did it happen? how do you spot a scam? good morning. britain has a new men's number one. cameron norrie wins the title in indian wells — the first british player to do so. it was an amazing couple of weeks,
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and i am so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big moments, all the big matches, and yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. good morning. some beautiful sunrises around this morning but for many it is a cloudy start. summerfog, with rain coming from the west moving eastwards accompanied by breezy conditions. the strongest winds in the far north. details coming up later. good morning. it's monday, 18th of october. our main story. mp5 will gather in westminster today to pay tribute to sir david amess. it's the first time they have met in parliament since he was killed on friday. a service will also be held at westminster abbey. last night sir david's family released a statement saying they are shattered by his death. aruna iyengar reports. church services in leigh—on—sea to remember the life of sir david amess, attacked and killed while doing hisjob as an mp.
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he was committed to the people. he was a servant of our town. he brought a lot of good. in a statement sir david's family gave this plea. "we ask people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all. this is the only way forward. set aside hatred and work towards togetherness. please let some good come from this tragedy." this afternoon, mp5 will pay tribute in the house of commons. there will be a minute's silence ahead of a church service in his memory at westminster abbey. mp5 have been speaking about the abuse they face. i’m mps have been speaking about the abuse they face.— mps have been speaking about the abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my _ abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, - abuse they face. i'm solving lots of cases for my constituents, i'm - cases for my constituents, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to make legislation, i'm trying to speak in debate and representing my constituents. it is hard today today to constantly think
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about reporting every abuse and intimidation and harassment, but i have to say, something has got to be done. i have to say, something has got to be done. ., �* ~' ., have to say, something has got to be done. ., �* ,, ., ., , ., done. i don't know the answer to solvinr done. i don't know the answer to solving this _ done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem _ done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem but - done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem but i - done. i don't know the answer to solving this problem but i will. done. i don't know the answer toj solving this problem but i will try and keep— solving this problem but i will try and keep a public profile as much as possible _ and keep a public profile as much as possible because it is central to what _ possible because it is central to what we — possible because it is central to what we do. we can'tjust lock ourselves— what we do. we can'tjust lock ourselves away. the politician was married with five children. a conservative mp since 1983, first in basildon and later in southend west, he was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters. one of his many campaigns was to get city status for southend. police have arrested a man on suspicion of murder, and over the weekend they have been searching three properties in london. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25 years old and a british national of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. there are now calls
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to increase security for mp5. for now, southend is in mourning to a man who dedicated his life to the service of the community. arun iyengar, bbc news. we're joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. a really difficult day for mp5 travelling to westminster today? yes. it really is. there will be profound _ yes. it really is. there will be profound reflections later on the loss of— profound reflections later on the loss of a — profound reflections later on the loss of a colleague, a friend, who had been — loss of a colleague, a friend, who had been an— loss of a colleague, a friend, who had been an mp since 1983 presenting a couple _ had been an mp since 1983 presenting a couple of— had been an mp since 1983 presenting a couple of constituencies, not least _ a couple of constituencies, not least southend and ever since 1997. then as _ least southend and ever since 1997. then as well, reflections from mps then as well, reflections from mp5 on the _ then as well, reflections from mp5 on the reality of doing theirjob. the safety— on the reality of doing theirjob. the safety questions that they constantly have to ask themselves, particularly around a ritual that lies at— particularly around a ritual that lies at the _ particularly around a ritual that lies at the very heart of being an mp, lies at the very heart of being an mp. a— lies at the very heart of being an mp. a long — lies at the very heart of being an mp, a long way from here at westminster, that is the constituency and on top of that the surgery. _ constituency and on top of that the surgery, there was meetings that they have — surgery, there was meetings that they have with voters pretty much
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every _ they have with voters pretty much every week. how do you go about doing _ every week. how do you go about doing that — every week. how do you go about doing that and ensuring that you are safe in— doing that and ensuring that you are safe in an _ doing that and ensuring that you are safe in an era where politics and the conversation around politics has _ the conversation around politics has, for— the conversation around politics has, for many, got particularly toxic? — has, for many, got particularly toxic? chris bryant, labour mp, who you are _ toxic? chris bryant, labour mp, who you are speaking to one breakfast in 15 minutes, — you are speaking to one breakfast in 15 minutes, he said he faced a death threat _ 15 minutes, he said he faced a death threat over— 15 minutes, he said he faced a death threat over the weekend having posted — threat over the weekend having posted his own tribute to sir david amy's _ posted his own tribute to sir david amy's. there has now been an arrest. in amy's. there has now been an arrest. in the _ amy's. there has now been an arrest. in the last _ amy's. there has now been an arrest. in the last half an hour, the deputy prime _ in the last half an hour, the deputy prime minister with these reflections on his experience. i've reflections on his experience. we had — reflections on his experience. i've had three threats to life and limb _ i've had three threats to life and limb over— i've had three threats to life and limb over the _ i've had three threats to life and limb over the last _ i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two _ i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years. - i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years. so| i've had three threats to life and i limb over the last two years. so of course _ limb over the last two years. so of course i_ limb over the last two years. so of course i take — limb over the last two years. so of course i take it _ limb over the last two years. so of course i take it very— limb over the last two years. so of course i take it very seriously. - limb over the last two years. so of course i take it very seriously. we| course i take it very seriously. we need _ course i take it very seriously. we need to _ course i take it very seriously. we need to respond _ course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to _ course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it. _ course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it. we - course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it. we need i course i take it very seriously. we need to respond to it. we need to make _ need to respond to it. we need to make sure — need to respond to it. we need to make sure we _ need to respond to it. we need to make sure we are _ need to respond to it. we need to make sure we are doing _ need to respond to it. we need toi make sure we are doing everything need to respond to it. we need to- make sure we are doing everything we can. make sure we are doing everything we can we _ make sure we are doing everything we can we need — make sure we are doing everything we can we need to— make sure we are doing everything we can. we need to make _ make sure we are doing everything we can. we need to make sure _ make sure we are doing everything we can. we need to make sure we - make sure we are doing everything we can. we need to make sure we do- make sure we are doing everything wej can. we need to make sure we do that due diligence — can. we need to make sure we do that due diligence on — can. we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. _ can. we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. but- can. we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. but at- due diligence on everything. but at the end _ due diligence on everything. but at the end of— due diligence on everything. but at the end of the _ due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day— due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day my— due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day my feeling - due diligence on everything. but at the end of the day my feeling is, i the end of the day my feeling is, it's a _ the end of the day my feeling is, it's a personal— the end of the day my feeling is, it's a personal one, _ the end of the day my feeling is, it's a personal one, we _ the end of the day my feeling is, it's a personal one, we mustn't. it's a personal one, we mustn't allow— it's a personal one, we mustn't allow those _ it's a personal one, we mustn't allow those who _ it's a personal one, we mustn't allow those who want - it's a personal one, we mustn't allow those who want to - it's a personal one, we mustn'ti allow those who want to threaten it's a personal one, we mustn't- allow those who want to threaten us, who want _ allow those who want to threaten us, who want to — allow those who want to threaten us, who want to stop _ allow those who want to threaten us, who want to stop us, _ allow those who want to threaten us, who want to stop us, talking - allow those who want to threaten us, who want to stop us, talking to - allow those who want to threaten us,
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who want to stop us, talking to a - who want to stop us, talking to a constituency. _ who want to stop us, talking to a constituency, serving _ who want to stop us, talking to a constituency, serving our- constituency, serving our communities, _ constituency, serving our communities, we - constituency, serving our communities, we can't. constituency, serving our. communities, we can't allow constituency, serving our- communities, we can't allow them constituency, serving our— communities, we can't allow them to win. communities, we can't allow them to win yes. _ communities, we can't allow them to win yes. take— communities, we can't allow them to win. yes, take proportion _ communities, we can't allow them to win. yes, take proportion and - win. yes, take proportion and mitigation _ win. yes, take proportion and mitigation from _ win. yes, take proportion and mitigation from the _ win. yes, take proportion and mitigation from the risks - win. yes, take proportion and mitigation from the risks we i win. yes, take proportion and - mitigation from the risks we face, but no _ mitigation from the risks we face, but no to— mitigation from the risks we face, but no to gifting _ mitigation from the risks we face, but no to gifting terrorists - mitigation from the risks we face, but no to gifting terrorists or- but no to gifting terrorists or other— but no to gifting terrorists or other people _ but no to gifting terrorists or other people who _ but no to gifting terrorists or other people who want - but no to gifting terrorists or other people who want to i but no to gifting terrorists or- other people who want to paralyse our democracy _ our democracy. the _ our democracy. the tribute - our democracy. the tribute to l our democracy. i the tribute to sir our democracy. - the tribute to sir david our democracy. _ the tribute to sir david amess democracy. — the tribute to sir david amess will start with — the tribute to sir david amess will start with specially written prayers of the _ start with specially written prayers of the house of commons this afternoon, followed by a couple of hours _ afternoon, followed by a couple of hours of _ afternoon, followed by a couple of hours of tributes led by the prime minister— hours of tributes led by the prime minister and hours of tributes led by the prime ministerand then a hours of tributes led by the prime minister and then a memorial service at saint— minister and then a memorial service at saint margaret because my church near -- _ at saint margaret because my church near -- in _ at saint margaret because my church near —— in westminster abbey at 6pm. chris mason— near —— in westminster abbey at 6pm. chris mason live in westminster. a man has been arrested in connection with a death threat that was sent to a labour mp. chris bryant, the mp for rhondda, said he received the death threat after calling for people to be kinder in the wake of sir david amess' death. south wales police confirmed a 76—year—old from bridgend county was arrested on suspicion of malicious communications. we will hopefully be speaking to mr bryant in the next 15 minutes on the
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programme. police are continuing to investigate the murder of a 14—year—old school boy in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was attacked on the platform of high street railway station on saturday afternoon. he was taken to hospital but was pronounced dead a short time later. police scotland are also appealing for any witnesses to come forward. the enforcement of scotland's covid passport scheme begins today, a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events, including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. ford has announced a major transformation of its plant at halewood, on merseyside, in a move that will secure hundreds of jobs. the car maker is spending more than £200 million converting the factory to produce components for electric vehicles from 2024. it's part of plans for its entire passenger vehicle line—up in europe to be electric by 2030. we have a great workforce in halewood, we have
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excellent labour relations, a very productive plant, good quality. we did get support from the uk government, from the automotive transformation fund, and we're really, really pleased about that. but we also have the technology in halewood, precision gear machining, the skills that we need to produce these components, so we're really happy to make that choice. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change. two best friends who grow coral in the bahamas and the country of costa rica were among the winners who received £1 million. it's approaching ten minutes past eight, monday morning, and we can find out what is happening with the weather. that is a beautiful picture behind you. good morning.
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behind you. good morninr. . �* . behind you. good morninr. , �* , good morning. isn't it 'ust? good morninr. good morning. isn't it 'ust? good morning. wish good morning. isn't it 'ust? good morning. this is h good morning. isn't it 'ust? good morning. this is from h good morning. isn't itjust? good morning. this is from one - good morning. isn't itjust? good morning. this is from one of - good morning. isn't itjust? good morning. this is from one of our| morning. this is from one of our weather watchers encounter. fabulous colours. clear skies in the south—east. a chillier start here compared to everywhere else. where it is very cloudy and breezy. that is the forecast today for most. the rain coming in from the west heading east. as go through this week after a wet start today, milder tomorrow. and wednesday temperatures go back to about average. on thursday and friday we go into the blues. it will turn much colder but it will be sunnier. this morning there is some most and fog. that will lift. we have some cloud coming in from the west. heading eastwards, eradicating the bright start. and all this rain. we have got a slice in the middle of the country where the weather front bringing the rain as we go. for you come across northern england, what you will find as they will be a lot of cloud and light rain. scotland and the south—east later on, where the rain does arrive, it will be
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happier. temperatures ten in the north to 18 in the south, breezy but windy in the northern and western isles. this evening and overnight here is the art of rain. it eventually clears away. a drier interlude before the winds pick up. and then the next band of wind comes our way. these temperatures would be pretty good by day at this time of the year, they are closer to average, ratherthan the year, they are closer to average, rather than by night. tomorrow we have rain putting northward and eastward, followed by some showers. some heavy and thundery in parts of scotland and northern ireland. the rain not getting into the far south—east. it is here we could see hows 21. across the board it will be a mild day. thank you, carol. as one of parliament's longest serving mp5, sir david amess was all too aware of the dangers he and his fellow colleagues faced. in a book about his time as a politician, he wrote about how attacks could happen to any of us . lord jeffrey archer was a close friend and wrote an endorsement
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on the back of the book. hejoins us now. morning to you. good to see you. i know in very difficult circumstances. tell me about your friend, sir david?— friend, sir david? well, of course, the tributes _ friend, sir david? well, of course, the tributes over _ friend, sir david? well, of course, the tributes over the _ friend, sir david? well, of course, the tributes over the weekend, i friend, sir david? well, of course, i the tributes over the weekend, quite rightly. _ the tributes over the weekend, quite rightly, have been about his amazing constituency work. in fact, whenever young _ constituency work. in fact, whenever young people came to see me and said, _ young people came to see me and said. i_ young people came to see me and said. iwant— young people came to see me and said, i want to be a member of parliament, what do you advise? one of the _ parliament, what do you advise? one of the first— parliament, what do you advise? one of the first things i said was, spent — of the first things i said was, spent a _ of the first things i said was, spent a day with david amess and you will discover _ spent a day with david amess and you will discover what your first responsibility is. but amazingly, there _ responsibility is. but amazingly, there hasn't been a lot of mention of the _ there hasn't been a lot of mention of the fact— there hasn't been a lot of mention of the fact that he was quintessentially a house of commons man~ _ quintessentially a house of commons man he _ quintessentially a house of commons man. he loved the house of commons. he loved _ man. he loved the house of commons. he loved to _ man. he loved the house of commons. he loved to use it for his constituents. and he was quite cunning — constituents. and he was quite cunning in _ constituents. and he was quite cunning in that. i am sure you have seen _ cunning in that. i am sure you have seen members of parliament are saying _ seen members of parliament are saying at— seen members of parliament are saying at question time, does the prime _ saying at question time, does the prime minister agree with me
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that? — prime minister agree with me that...? not david. he would get up and say. _ that...? not david. he would get up and say, does the prime minister realise _ and say, does the prime minister realise that my wife, sylvia, suggested at breakfast that what the government should do,...? and that way. _ government should do,...? and that way. he _ government should do,...? and that way, he captured the whole house. what _ way, he captured the whole house. what he _ way, he captured the whole house. what he did it with a purpose. when he got _ what he did it with a purpose. when he got silenced he hammered home whatever— he got silenced he hammered home whatever because he believed in. and he was _ whatever because he believed in. and he was a _ whatever because he believed in. and he was a passionate man about causes and the _ he was a passionate man about causes and the problems of his constituencies —— constituents. we constituencies -- constituents. we have constituencies —— constituents. have spoken constituencies —— constituents. , have spoken to mp5 across the house this morning. what appears clear is that whatever your political persuasion, sir david seemed to take time to welcome new members to the house, to explain the work of an mp. and as you mentioned, he diligently spent time in his own constituency and loved meeting the people that he was representing? yes. and loved meeting the people that he was representing?—
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was representing? yes, and that of course is going _ was representing? yes, and that of course is going to _ was representing? yes, and that of course is going to be _ was representing? yes, and that of course is going to be a _ was representing? yes, and that of course is going to be a problem - was representing? yes, and that of course is going to be a problem in l course is going to be a problem in the future. — course is going to be a problem in the future, particularly when you have _ the future, particularly when you have what — the future, particularly when you have what used to be, remember your words _ have what used to be, remember your words at _ have what used to be, remember your words at the _ have what used to be, remember your words at the beginning of this, a one—on—one with a constituent. that's— one—on—one with a constituent. that's very— one—on—one with a constituent. that's very important. but i fear in the future — that's very important. but i fear in the future we may have to have other people _ the future we may have to have other people in _ the future we may have to have other people in the room at the same time. and david _ people in the room at the same time. and david wouldn't have liked that because _ and david wouldn't have liked that because he wanted everyone to realise — because he wanted everyone to realise he — because he wanted everyone to realise he had no interest in colour. _ realise he had no interest in colour, creed, oryour political interest — colour, creed, oryour political interest. he was interested in the u as a constituent. do interest. he was interested in the u as a constituent.— as a constituent. do you think that he ever felt _ as a constituent. do you think that he ever felt that _ as a constituent. do you think that he ever felt that his _ as a constituent. do you think that he ever felt that his own _ as a constituent. do you think that he ever felt that his own safety i as a constituent. do you think that | he ever felt that his own safety was ever at risk?— ever at risk? well, he did write about it in _ ever at risk? well, he did write about it in his _ ever at risk? well, he did write about it in his book _ ever at risk? well, he did write about it in his book but - ever at risk? well, he did write about it in his book but it - ever at risk? well, he did write| about it in his book but it wasn't something — about it in his book but it wasn't something that would have crossed his mind _ something that would have crossed his mind. but i fear in future, having— his mind. but i fear in future, having listened to the home secretary and the leader of the opposition over the weekend, that we're _ opposition over the weekend, that we're going to have to consider things— we're going to have to consider things that will have to be done
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that david wouldn't have enjoyed. for example, i suspect one—on—one meetings — for example, i suspect one—on—one meetings will have to have other people _ meetings will have to have other people in— meetings will have to have other people in the room at the same time. perhaps _ people in the room at the same time. perhaps the _ people in the room at the same time. perhaps the agent, or a local councillor— perhaps the agent, or a local councillor who can advise. and secondly. _ councillor who can advise. and secondly. i_ councillor who can advise. and secondly, i feel you will probably have _ secondly, i feel you will probably have to _ secondly, i feel you will probably have to read through the list of people — have to read through the list of people who you are seeing very carefully — people who you are seeing very carefully indeed. frankly, if david was seeing say 15 people in leigh—on—sea on saturday, he would have known— leigh—on—sea on saturday, he would have known 12 of them. i would have already— have known 12 of them. i would have already worked out what their problem — already worked out what their problem was. but there appears now that we _ problem was. but there appears now that we have to look at those people who don't _ that we have to look at those people who don't know when you are a member of parliament, and may indeed have to inform _ of parliament, and may indeed have to inform the local police force and 'ust to inform the local police force and just triple — to inform the local police force and just triple check that there is no danger~ — just triple check that there is no dan . er. ., just triple check that there is no danrer. ., ., just triple check that there is no danter, ., ., ,., just triple check that there is no danter, ., ., y., “ just triple check that there is no danter, ., ., 4' just triple check that there is no danrer. ., ., y., ,, y., ., danger. how do you think you would have felt about _ danger. how do you think you would have felt about some _ danger. how do you think you would have felt about some of— danger. how do you think you would have felt about some of the - have felt about some of the suggestions being made about
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potentially meeting constituents behind screens, about having permanent security for mp5, about maybe even a police presence? he’d maybe even a police presence? he'd have hated it- _ maybe even a police presence? he'd have hated it. he _ maybe even a police presence? he'd have hated it. he was _ maybe even a police presence? he'd have hated it. he was a _ maybe even a police presence? he'd have hated it. he was a one—on—one person _ have hated it. he was a one—on—one person if— have hated it. he was a one—on—one person. if you — have hated it. he was a one—on—one person. if you walked down the street— person. if you walked down the street with him, and during elections i walk down the street with many members of parliament, sometimes — with many members of parliament, sometimes they knew the member's namer _ sometimes they knew the member's name, sometimes they recognise that the member, with david theyjust warmed _ the member, with david theyjust warmed up and said, thank you for helping _ warmed up and said, thank you for helping my— warmed up and said, thank you for helping my grandmother with her operation, oh, thank you for coming to the _ operation, oh, thank you for coming to the local— operation, oh, thank you for coming to the local school. they knew him and loved — to the local school. they knew him and loved him. he had what is known in the _ and loved him. he had what is known in the trade _ and loved him. he had what is known in the trade as a strong personal vote _ in the trade as a strong personal vote i— in the trade as a strong personal vote. . ., in the trade as a strong personal vote. , ., ,., ., vote. i understand the point that ou are vote. i understand the point that you are making _ vote. i understand the point that you are making this _ vote. i understand the point that you are making this morning, i vote. i understand the point that i you are making this morning, which is that this is not something that, i think, mp5 want to make changes to, they want to feel that connection with their constituents, but in the light of what has happened, what changes could be made to make mp5 safer? lpilpl’eiiii.
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happened, what changes could be made to make mps safer?— to make mps safer? well, i would say that they have — to make mps safer? well, i would say that they have to _ to make mps safer? well, i would say that they have to inform _ to make mps safer? well, i would say that they have to inform the - to make mps safer? well, i would say that they have to inform the police i that they have to inform the police when _ that they have to inform the police when and — that they have to inform the police when and where the constituency meeting — when and where the constituency meeting is being held. if you are doing _ meeting is being held. if you are doing a — meeting is being held. if you are doing a surgery, you should let the police _ doing a surgery, you should let the police now — doing a surgery, you should let the police now. i suspect most members are doing _ police now. i suspect most members are doing this already. and as i said. _ are doing this already. and as i said. you — are doing this already. and as i said, you have to check the names carefully _ said, you have to check the names carefully and possibly have someone in the _ carefully and possibly have someone in the room. i mean, look at last weekend — in the room. i mean, look at last weekend. typical of david. he was having _ weekend. typical of david. he was having his — weekend. typical of david. he was having his meeting in a methodist hall. having his meeting in a methodist hall~ here — having his meeting in a methodist hall. here was a devout roman catholic. — hall. here was a devout roman catholic, who had no interest in colour. — catholic, who had no interest in colour, creed or politics. he was holding — colour, creed or politics. he was holding his— colour, creed or politics. he was holding his meeting in a methodist hall. typical of the man. canl holding his meeting in a methodist hall. typical of the man.— hall. typical of the man. can i ask ou as hall. typical of the man. can i ask you as well. _ hall. typical of the man. can i ask you as well, because _ hall. typical of the man. can i ask you as well, because some - hall. typical of the man. can i ask you as well, because some of - hall. typical of the man. can i ask you as well, because some of the | hall. typical of the man. can i ask - you as well, because some of the mps you as well, because some of the mp5 we have spoken to today have talked about the threats they have received. we will be speaking to
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chris bryant in the next couple of minutes on this programme, someone has been arrested for a death threat they sent him over the weekend, do you think things are very different to when you were an mp, for example? what sort of correspondence did you get back then, and have things been accelerated by the likes of social media? ~ accelerated by the likes of social media? . . ., , accelerated by the likes of social media? . . . , ., , ., media? well, certainly when i was a member of— media? well, certainly when i was a member of parliament _ media? well, certainly when i was a member of parliament 50 _ media? well, certainly when i was a member of parliament 50 years - media? well, certainly when i was a | member of parliament 50 years ago, no one _ member of parliament 50 years ago, no one would have believed this conversation was even possible. you talked _ conversation was even possible. you talked to _ conversation was even possible. you talked to your constituent one—on—one, you listened to their problems. — one—on—one, you listened to their problems, you then got in touch if it was— problems, you then got in touch if it was appropriate with a local councillor _ it was appropriate with a local councillor or someone at the hospital. _ councillor or someone at the hospital, where ever it affected. it would _ hospital, where ever it affected. it would never have crossed my mind. one of— would never have crossed my mind. one of the — would never have crossed my mind. one of the things that i felt overnight, who would want to harm david _ overnight, who would want to harm david amess? he was a jolly, happy, nice fellow _
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david amess? he was a jolly, happy, nice fellow i— david amess? he was a jolly, happy, nice fellow. i never met anyone on any side _ nice fellow. i never met anyone on any side of— nice fellow. i never met anyone on any side of the house, and one of the good — any side of the house, and one of the good things that has come out of this terrible business is how you have _ this terrible business is how you have seen— this terrible business is how you have seen the labour party, the liberal— have seen the labour party, the liberal party, independent councillors in southend—on—sea, saying _ councillors in southend—on—sea, saying how — councillors in southend—on—sea, saying how much they admired him. one of— saying how much they admired him. one of the _ saying how much they admired him. one of the saddest things of all is he isn't _ one of the saddest things of all is he isn't alive to see how much he was respected and how much he was loved _ loved. sir jeffrey loved. — sirjeffrey archer, loved. — sir jeffrey archer, thank you loved. — sirjeffrey archer, thank you very much indeed for your time this morning. sirjeffrey archertalking to us from central london. he morning. sirjeffrey archer talking to us from central london.- to us from central london. he has liven us to us from central london. he has given us a — to us from central london. he has given us a real— to us from central london. he has given us a real measure _ to us from central london. he has given us a real measure of - to us from central london. he has given us a real measure of the - to us from central london. he has. given us a real measure of the man missed by so many people, so many glowing tributes to sir david amess over the weekend. the story continues to develop. this morning we have also learned that a man has been arrested, after the labour mp chris bryant received a death threat after mr bryant had called for people to
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be kinder after the attack. hejoins us now. obviously it has been a difficult weekend for mp5 in many ways. tell me what has happened to you this weekend? i’m ways. tell me what has happened to you this weekend?— you this weekend? i'm not sure i can ro you this weekend? i'm not sure i can no into you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many — you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many details. _ you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many details. but _ you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many details. but i _ you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many details. but i got - you this weekend? i'm not sure i can go into many details. but i got backl go into many details. but i got back from qatar. — go into many details. but i got back from qatar, which incidentally was where _ from qatar, which incidentally was where sir— from qatar, which incidentally was where sir david amess was last week, and we _ where sir david amess was last week, and we have _ where sir david amess was last week, and we have been looking at what has been happening to afghan refugees who have _ been happening to afghan refugees who have been flying through doha and other— who have been flying through doha and other countries following the collapse — and other countries following the collapse of campbell mike. i got back on— collapse of campbell mike. i got back on a — collapse of campbell mike. i got back on a saturday morning to a death— back on a saturday morning to a death threat in an e—mail. i passed it the _ death threat in an e—mail. i passed it the police — you've just said somebody has been arrested _ you've just said somebody has been arrested l— you've just said somebody has been arrested. , ., , ., �* you've just said somebody has been arrested. , ., �* ., arrested. i understand you can't go into the details. _ arrested. i understand you can't go into the details. can _ arrested. i understand you can't go into the details. can i _ arrested. i understand you can't go into the details. can i ask - arrested. i understand you can't go into the details. can i ask you - arrested. i understand you can't go| into the details. can i ask you more generally about your safety? out regular an occurrence is that? do you feel safe as an mp?- regular an occurrence is that? do you feel safe as an mp? yes, i do feel safe- — you feel safe as an mp? yes, i do feel safe. weirdly, _ you feel safe as an mp? yes, i do feel safe. weirdly, we _ you feel safe as an mp? yes, i do feel safe. weirdly, we have - you feel safe as an mp? yes, i do | feel safe. weirdly, we have turned parliament— feel safe. weirdly, we have turned parliament into a bit of a fortress now _ parliament into a bit of a fortress now and — parliament into a bit of a fortress now and i— parliament into a bit of a fortress now. and i have been saying this for
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more _ now. and i have been saying this for more than _ now. and i have been saying this for more than ten years now, the place where _ more than ten years now, the place where we _ more than ten years now, the place where we are most vulnerable is in our constituency to because it is one of— our constituency to because it is one of the — our constituency to because it is one of the special things about being — one of the special things about being a — one of the special things about being a british mp, i get on the bus _ being a british mp, i get on the bus. get— being a british mp, i get on the bus, get on the train, i go to morrisons— bus, get on the train, i go to morrisons and people stop me at the fish counter. so _ fish counter. so i - fish counter. so i think that's one of the great things — so i think that's one of the great things. most british mps are very accessible. unfortunately over the last few _ accessible. unfortunately over the last few years we have seen this terrible — last few years we have seen this terrible ratcheting up of nastiness, of horrific— terrible ratcheting up of nastiness, of horrific language, repeated death threats _ of horrific language, repeated death threats in— of horrific language, repeated death threats. in the last two years i have _ threats. in the last two years i have had — threats. in the last two years i have had several people making threats— have had several people making threats to me. sometimes they are on the borderline of whether i should report— the borderline of whether i should report them to the police or not. on the whole _ report them to the police or not. on the whole i— report them to the police or not. on the whole i think police would probably report less than they should — probably report less than they should because we are painfully aware _ should because we are painfully aware of — should because we are painfully aware of how overstretched the police _ aware of how overstretched the police are — aware of how overstretched the police are anyway. we don't want to be such _ police are anyway. we don't want to be such shrinking violets that we
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run to— be such shrinking violets that we run to the — be such shrinking violets that we run to the police for every single little _ run to the police for every single little thing. but in the last year, anti—vaxxers came and attacked my office _ anti—vaxxers came and attacked my office and — anti—vaxxers came and attacked my office. and the year before it was brexit _ office. and the year before it was brexit supporters who painted the word _ brexit supporters who painted the word a _ brexit supporters who painted the word a traitor all over the office doors~ _ word a traitor all over the office doors we — word a traitor all over the office doors. we have had to have things installed _ doors. we have had to have things installed at — doors. we have had to have things installed at the office and my home. every— installed at the office and my home. every single mp that i know has had all of— every single mp that i know has had all of this _ every single mp that i know has had all of this. in particular women mpsr _ all of this. in particular women mps, black and ethnic minority mps, .ay mps, black and ethnic minority mps, gay mps. _ mps, black and ethnic minority mps, gay mps. i_ mps, black and ethnic minority mps, gay mp5, i think we have had mps, black and ethnic minority mps, gay mps, ithink we have had perhaps a bit more _ gay mps, ithink we have had perhaps a bit more than i was going to share -- say— a bit more than i was going to share -- say our— a bit more than i was going to share -- say ourfair— a bit more than i was going to share —— say ourfair share, but a bit more than i was going to share —— say our fair share, but there a bit more than i was going to share —— say ourfair share, but there is no fair— —— say ourfair share, but there is no fairshare. _ —— say ourfair share, but there is no fairshare, is —— say ourfair share, but there is no fair share, is there? we need to stop spitting venom in each other's face _ stop spitting venom in each other's face every— stop spitting venom in each other's face. every time we add to that venom — face. every time we add to that venom there is more venom around. everybody— venom there is more venom around. everybody has been rightly nice about _ everybody has been rightly nice about sir— everybody has been rightly nice about sir david amess and i found him to— about sir david amess and i found him to be — about sir david amess and i found him to be a — about sir david amess and i found him to be a wonderful man. i disagreed _ him to be a wonderful man. i disagreed with him passionately about— disagreed with him passionately about lots of different things, including different —— gay marriage.
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what _ including different —— gay marriage. what he _ including different —— gay marriage. what he always had a twinkle in his eye, what he always had a twinkle in his eye. he _ what he always had a twinkle in his eye. he was— what he always had a twinkle in his eye, he was always very kind and gentle _ eye, he was always very kind and gentle and — eye, he was always very kind and gentle and asked after my husband. but i gentle and asked after my husband. but i don't _ gentle and asked after my husband. but i don't want people to get the impression that david was wonderful and all— impression that david was wonderful and all the _ impression that david was wonderful and all the rest of mps are terrible _ and all the rest of mps are terrible. because that is sort of where — terrible. because that is sort of where the _ terrible. because that is sort of where the death threat to me sprang from _ where the death threat to me sprang from the _ where the death threat to me sprang from. the truth is that we are all simply— from. the truth is that we are all simply trying to do ourjob. we believe — simply trying to do ourjob. we believe in _ simply trying to do ourjob. we believe in changing the world to make _ believe in changing the world to make a — believe in changing the world to make a better place. and we have different _ make a better place. and we have different visions of how that should happen _ different visions of how that should happen. sometimes that, there is quite _ happen. sometimes that, there is quite a _ happen. sometimes that, there is quite a battle, but we should be able to— quite a battle, but we should be able to respect one another. chris— able to respect one another. chris bryant, we have just been chris bryant, we havejust been seeing those pictures you have been talking about, the graffiti on your own office, we have been showing those pictures right now. one thing strikes me, how do you continue to want to do yourjob when you receive threats like this, and when these sort of attacks happened does it ever make you question about
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continuing to do the job that you do? filth continuing to do the “oh that you do? . ., ., , , ., do? oh come all the time, yes, i do ruestion do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it- — do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it- it— do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it. it is _ do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it. it is not _ do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it. it is notjust _ do? oh come all the time, yes, i do question it. it is notjust about - question it. it is notjust about men _ question it. it is notjust about me. it — question it. it is notjust about me. it is — question it. it is notjust about me, it is about my staff and it's about— me, it is about my staff and it's about my— me, it is about my staff and it's about my family as well. but... i don't _ about my family as well. but... i don't believe that poverty is necessary. poverty doesn't come from heaven _ necessary. poverty doesn't come from heaven like _ necessary. poverty doesn't come from heaven like some mysterious dispensation. it has human causes and it— dispensation. it has human causes and it has— dispensation. it has human causes and it has human remedies. i believe that we _ and it has human remedies. i believe that we can't— and it has human remedies. i believe that we can't tackle climate change. i that we can't tackle climate change. i believe _ that we can't tackle climate change. i believe that any man's death diminishes me so i must care about human— diminishes me so i must care about human rights in every country in the world _ human rights in every country in the world i_ human rights in every country in the world icare— human rights in every country in the world. i care passionately that people — world. i care passionately that people in— world. i care passionately that people in the rhondda valley are using _ people in the rhondda valley are using food banks more than they ever have done _ using food banks more than they ever have done in— using food banks more than they ever have done in the past. so i am passionate _ have done in the past. so i am passionate about wanting to change the world _ passionate about wanting to change the world. and nobody is going to stop me — the world. and nobody is going to stop me. just the world. and nobody is going to sto- me. , . . the world. and nobody is going to sto- me. , , , ., the world. and nobody is going to sto-me. , , stop me. just listening to you there, i understand _ stop me. just listening to you there, i understand this - stop me. just listening to you
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there, i understand this is - stop me. just listening to you there, i understand this is a i stop me. just listening to you - there, i understand this is a really emotional subject for a lot of mp5, to think about losing one of your own, as you did on friday, to reconsider how you go about the processes that you go through every day, to think about taking care of yourfamily but also day, to think about taking care of your family but also protect your own safety as well. do you think all mp5 are going through this same process? mps are going through this same nrocess? ~ , ,., , mps are going through this same nrocess? ~ ,,., , ., �* ., process? absolutely. i don't have children but _ process? absolutely. i don't have children but if _ process? absolutely. i don't have children but if i _ process? absolutely. i don't have children but if i had _ process? absolutely. i don't have children but if i had children - process? absolutely. i don't have children but if i had children i - children but if i had children i would — children but if i had children i would be _ children but if i had children i would be fretting all the time about what they— would be fretting all the time about what they see is said about their father— what they see is said about their father or— what they see is said about their father or their mother. you know, we have lost— father or their mother. you know, we have lost two — father or their mother. you know, we have lost two colleagues to murder in the _ have lost two colleagues to murder in the last— have lost two colleagues to murder in the last five years. there can't be many— in the last five years. there can't be many people in the armed forces and our— be many people in the armed forces and our emergency services who put themselves— and our emergency services who put themselves at risk every single day of the _ themselves at risk every single day of the year~ — themselves at risk every single day of the year. i'm not saying we are anything — of the year. i'm not saying we are anything special. there can't be many— anything special. there can't be many workplaces in britain who have had two _ many workplaces in britain who have had two colleagues murdered in the last five _ had two colleagues murdered in the last five years. i hope people will maybe _ last five years. i hope people will maybe think twice before they add
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the abuse — maybe think twice before they add the abuse to the e—mail. 0r maybe think twice before they add the abuse to the e—mail. or the text message _ the abuse to the e—mail. or the text message 0r— the abuse to the e—mail. or the text message. orthe the abuse to the e—mail. or the text message. or the tweet or whatever, or the _ message. or the tweet or whatever, or the facebook message. i hope that politicians— or the facebook message. i hope that politicians will get better at this as well — politicians will get better at this as well i— politicians will get better at this as well. i dearly wish that some of the price _ as well. i dearly wish that some of the price would stop, you know, having _ the price would stop, you know, having headlines or front—page articles— having headlines or front—page articles about kill this person, or this person — articles about kill this person, or this person is a traitor or an enemy of the _ this person is a traitor or an enemy of the people. stop putting, you know. _ of the people. stop putting, you know, target marks on our, up here, and help— know, target marks on our, up here, and help us— know, target marks on our, up here, and help us do ourjobs. we could all do _ and help us do ourjobs. we could all do our— and help us do ourjobs. we could all do ourjob is much better, i'm sure _ all do ourjob is much better, i'm sure maybe _ all do ourjob is much better, i'm sure. maybe mps need to show more of the cross—party work we do all the time _ the cross—party work we do all the time but— the cross—party work we do all the time but in— the cross—party work we do all the time. but in the end being a politician _ time. but in the end being a politician is a vocation. it's something that you believe in because — something that you believe in because you think that through your
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own personal weaknesses and failings. — own personal weaknesses and failings, nonetheless you might be able to— failings, nonetheless you might be able to make a significant difference, even if it isjust one of the — difference, even if it isjust one of the 5000 people you ring your office _ of the 5000 people you ring your office and — of the 5000 people you ring your office and want help in getting better— office and want help in getting better accommodation, office and want help in getting betteraccommodation, or office and want help in getting better accommodation, or it's putting — better accommodation, or it's putting in— better accommodation, or it's putting in place a piece of legislation that will transform people's lives. we are all struggling with his. and alsor _ we are all struggling with his. and also, incidentally, we have lost james — also, incidentally, we have lost james brokenshire. for me, i had cancer— james brokenshire. for me, i had cancer three — james brokenshire. for me, i had cancer three years ago, quite advanced _ cancer three years ago, quite advanced stage can —— skin cancer, so i'm _ advanced stage can —— skin cancer, so im always — advanced stage can —— skin cancer, so i'm always painfully aware of the misery— so i'm always painfully aware of the misery for— so i'm always painfully aware of the misery for families when cancer strikes. — misery for families when cancer strikes, especially when you kind of hope it— strikes, especially when you kind of hope it has— strikes, especially when you kind of hope it has gone away and it comes back _ hope it has gone away and it comes back we _ hope it has gone away and it comes back. we will be a very sad community today. and i know sometimes people think we live in a bubble _ sometimes people think we live in a bubble we — sometimes people think we live in a bubble. we are exactly the same as anyone _ bubble. we are exactly the same as anyone else. thank you for spending time with us
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today. we speak to a lot of mp5 on this programme, but we don't often speak to them in the way that you have spoken to us in the last few minutes. appreciate your openness and honesty. thank you. it is an insight into thejob. and honesty. thank you. it is an insight into the job. absolutely. clearly very moved by the events of the last few days. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm sonja jessup. prayers and a minute's silence will be held in parliament today in memory of sir david amess, the mp for southend west who was murdered on friday. a 25 year old man has been detained under the terrorism act. fellow mp5 and friends have been paying tribute to him all weekend but it's once again raised the issue of safety for politicians. i'm very lucky in my constituency, i do actually have a venue that has security anyway. and they have said to me very kindly that i can use their venue. i know that not all mp5 have that option but i do have that option in hampstead and kilburn.
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so that's the venue i'll be using. i don't have people walking in any more just randomly when they know my surgery is. i have actually booked appointments, i have people's names and addresses. nightclubs say a shortage of bouncers and door staff could begin to pose a "threat to public safety". the night time industries association warns one in five venues have had to close or reduce operating hours, as they don't have enough security workers. we are pushing hard to see if we can get a mobility visa that is going to open the doors for many of those people who worked within the security sector to come back to the uk, particularly in london, and start to help us bolster the numbers of security available to deal with the hospitality and late—night economy sector. because at the moment, we are struggling to get those numbers. a bronze disc — believed to be the world's oldest map of the stars — will go on display at the british museum next year. the nebra sky disc, which was found in germany in 1999, is thought to date back 3,600 years, although a small number of experts
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have questioned its authenticity. let's get the travel now. minor delays on the metropolitan line and severe delays on the overground as well. hello, good morning. for the first half of this week, it's going to be feeling very mild for this time of year but it will be unsettled, wet and windy at times, and low pressure will dominate. there is a weather front on its way for us today. but it is a dry start to the morning. we have got some brightness around, we have got some long clear spells last night so temperatures for some of us have dropped back to high single figures. there is a bit of mist, but that will lift and clear. the sunshine won't last because it will cloud over from the west and eventually outbreaks of rain will move eastwards. probably not until the late afternoon for many of us so dry for much of the day. that southerly wind will really start to pick up as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. top temperatures all the way
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up to 17 or 18 celsius so above the average for the time of year. and tonight will be really very mild indeed. we are going to see all of that rain move eastwards as we head through the evening and it will turn a lot drier. there will always be lots of cloud around, overnight lows this time not dropping below the mid teens in celsius. really a very mild start to tuesday. then on tuesday we are expecting a lot of cloud, there could be some rain later on through the day, it stays windy. in the best of any brighter spells, temperatures could get as high as 20 or 21 degrees. i'll be back in half an hour. much more on our website. now it's back to dan and sally. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. we're on bbc one until 9.15am, after which the rip off britain team are back with a special week of live programmes. gloria, angela and julia can tell us more.
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thanks, dan and sally. you are our favourite, i have to say that festival! first of all, dan! yes, we're so excited to be here after breakfast every morning this week live. and what an important time it is for us to be back, with so many people really worried about bread and butter issues like rising energy prices, the cost of food and whether they'll be able to get the deliveries they've ordered. but never fear, because that's why we're here, to guide you through some of those pitfalls and, where we can, stop you losing out. and first up this morning, is something you definitely need to watch out for — the scammers hijacking celebrities' identities to try and get you to part with your cash. you see, my name is esther rantzen and i don't know anything about your company. and i want you to stop using my name. and there's something else you're
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fed up to the back teeth _ with, subscriptions that are oh - so easy to take out, but which seem impossible to get out of. we'll have everything - you need to know to help you make a clean break. we're also talking about contactless payments. the limit for touch and pay went up to £100 on friday. but, could that be putting you at risk? tech expert david mcclelland is here with tips to keep you safe. so, if you've got a question for him, or want to ask us about anything else, then please, do email — ripoffbritain@bbc. co. uk. see you at 9.15! let's return to our main story. on friday sir david amess became the second politician to be killed in the uk in recent years following the murder of the labour mpjo cox in 2016. following her death, her husband brendan helped to set up the support group 'survivors against terror�*. brendan joins us now.
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thank you so much for being with us today. i'm sure for you, it brought back some really painful memories. what did you think when you first heard about sir david amess on friday and how do you feel the monday after a terrible weekend? i monday after a terrible weekend? i thinkjust when you get that, when i got the call on friday, ijust had a very immediate and very physical reaction to it. i was back in that moment five years ago when i got the call aboutj. moment five years ago when i got the callaboutj. ifind it moment five years ago when i got the call aboutj. ifind it very hard moment five years ago when i got the call aboutj. i find it very hard to function. i pick the kids up for school and i went over the weekend to try and get from it all. i scarce the other emotion was just the sort of the terrible sadness for the family, knowing what they are going through knowing those moments of
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hope when you know there has been as an attack and you hope it isn't too bad committed in the realisation that the worst possible thing that you can ever imagine in your life has happened to you and you have to tell your loved ones about it. brendan, when the worst possible thing in your life happened, whenjo was murdered, did you think then and in the intervening years that it could happen again?— in the intervening years that it could happen again? yes, i mean, i know that there _ could happen again? yes, i mean, i know that there have _ could happen again? yes, i mean, i know that there have been - could happen again? yes, i mean, i know that there have been plots i could happen again? yes, i mean, i know that there have been plots to | know that there have been plots to kill other mp5. there have been attacks on other mp5 sincejo was killed. but of course i did hope that nothing like that would ever happen again. but i guess, it is not possible to make our mp5 entirely safe, absolutely in the aftermath of this we should be asking ourselves the question of how we improve
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security and how we can make them safer, but as chris bryant was saying a few minutes ago, if you are a constituency mp and you live in your constituency, of course you should approve your security but that's never going to be a panacea, that's never going to be a panacea, that's not going to solve it. i think the other thing we need to talk about and think about is, how do we respond to terrorism in a way that makes it less likely to happen in the future? we don't know for definite that this is a terror attack yet but whether or not it is, we should change our response to attacks like this. and secondly, how do we create a culture in our democracy which means that violence is less acceptable? whether that is violence of language or violence on the streets. there is a think that —— those are both things that we at the public and have an impact on. chris bryant spoke very powerfully about his personal expense and what him and his family are going through, and your sister kim who is
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going through her own fears and her partner asked her to stand down as an mp. there is a reality about what mp5 are going to in terms of what has happened to. mps are going to in terms of what has happened to.— mps are going to in terms of what has happened to. absolutely, and i think we often _ has happened to. absolutely, and i think we often forget, _ has happened to. absolutely, and i think we often forget, and - has happened to. absolutely, and i think we often forget, and i - has happened to. absolutely, and i think we often forget, and i think i think we often forget, and i think lots of us are sometimes guilty of this, not of sending threats on it like that, but i think too many of us are responsible for dehumanising our opponents. the people we disagree with we suddenly decide are racist or evil or fascist, or we decide they are stupid. that dehumanisation which happens in social media and in real life, that is an area we can all make a difference in. by actually getting to know people who have different views than you. one of the things happening at the moment is there are too many people who are only friends with people who are like them, who have the same views, who had the
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same backgrounds. and if you live in a community like that, it's much easier to dehumanise and say horrible things about people. one of the things we can all do, and you heard this in the amazingly dignified statement of the family, their reaction is that we should respond with togetherness. that links to the point about terrorism. it cannot defeat us militarily, its aim is to divide communities and if we pull together, terrorism becomes less effective. there are practical things we can do but it also all adds up to a different rate of responding to some of the bigger threats that face us as a democracy. i'm interested in what you say about the response to attacks of a terrorist nature and changing the way that we respond to these attacks. what does that mean in practical terms? attacks. what does that mean in practicalterms? how attacks. what does that mean in practical terms? how should that change? irate practical terms? how should that chanre? , , ,, ., ., practical terms? how should that chanre? ., ., ., change? we broadly know, and of course it differs _ change? we broadly know, and of course it differs from _ change? we broadly know, and of
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course it differs from attack - change? we broadly know, and of course it differs from attack to i course it differs from attack to attacks, we broadly know what terrorists want. the first thing they want is to divide our communities. they cannot defeat us militarily say their aim is to try and sow division. you can see this in the way drownings of the white supremacist or the islamists who support these kind of attacks, their aims is to turn community against community. their second there is a spread panic, to make us fearful and anxious and ready to sell on each other. and the third is to get some degree of notoriety or status within their group, for the attacker. if we respond by turning against each other by being panicked and spreading fear and putting them on ourfront pages of spreading fear and putting them on our front pages of the newspapers and reciting their names every five minutes, then we are playing into their hands. if we don't do those things, if we focus on the survivors, the families, the stories of the individuals, if we keep the focus on bringing our communities
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together, we make every act of terrorism less effective. in each of our responses and the things that we share on social media, we can all ask ourselves, are we doing the bidding of the terrorists? are we doing the things that they want us to do by amplifying the pier and the set and the division and their notoriety, —— amplifying the fear in the division, or can we be together and do the things the family talked about? i think one of the things we feel in response to attacks as we fear powerless. it's about trying to change the way that we behave and interact with each other. we don't give into that, we can be part of defeating terrorism. fin give into that, we can be part of defeating terrorism.— give into that, we can be part of defeating terrorism. on the issue of social media. _ defeating terrorism. on the issue of social media, it _ defeating terrorism. on the issue of social media, it is _ defeating terrorism. on the issue of social media, it is an _ defeating terrorism. on the issue of social media, it is an incredibly - social media, it is an incredibly powerful tool lending can be very positive. i attended a seminar a few weeks ago when one of the points is the encouragement for, particularly for students who we were addressing, to make sure that you follow people
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that he vehemently disagree with on social media. if you get caught in the bubble that everyone looks like and sounds like and thinks like you, you forget that tolerance is the most important thing as chris bryant was talking about. he disagreed with david amess on the subject of gay marriage, but when they met, the first thing he would say is, how is your husband?— your husband? social media is an im nortant your husband? social media is an important debate _ your husband? social media is an important debate but _ your husband? social media is an important debate but if _ your husband? social media is an important debate but if we - your husband? social media is an | important debate but if we turned off facebook and twitter tomorrow, we would still have this problem. we should address it on social media. but it is as chris talks about, about knowing people who are different than you. there are too many communities and places now where we only know people who are like us, who have the same level of education, who have the same political views. education, who have the same politicalviews. it's education, who have the same political views. it's very easy to
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hate people abstract, very hard to hate people abstract, very hard to hate to someone when you know them, when your kids go to the same school and you hang out and talk. one of the things that we can do on the democratic culture piece of this is to reach out to people who disagree with each other notjust follow them on social media, but find people that you like that disagree with you. talk to them about it. politics isn't about posturing and lambasting people and telling people that you are the enemy of this or the traitor of that. it's about the art of persuasion, tried to convince people that the things you believe then other things they should believe in. he will not always succeed in convincing people that you will learn to those conversations. it's something we can all practically do which creates a culture and it won't necessarily stop these kinds of attacks, there will always be extremists in the community, but it will create a democratic culture which is better which means that more mp5 are more likely to stay, we
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get the types of mp5 we deserve as opposed to the people who just aren't scared of the culture and the attacks. i think if we do these things and we change the way we respond to terrorism and we all take personal responsibility for our democratic culture, i think these kind of attacks might not disappear but i hope they will become more rare. �* ., ., but i hope they will become more rare. a ., ., ., but i hope they will become more rare. �* ., ., ., ., ~ but i hope they will become more rare. �* ., ., ., ., but i hope they will become more rare. �* ., ., ., . . rare. brandon cox, thank you so much for our rare. brandon cox, thank you so much for your time — rare. brandon cox, thank you so much for your time this _ rare. brandon cox, thank you so much for your time this morning. _ rare. brandon cox, thank you so much for your time this morning. -- - for your time this morning. —— brendan. it isa it is a slightly different programme this morning because we are speaking to lots of people on the same subject. if you haven't heard the interview with the labour mp chris bryant, we have put some of it on our social media and you can watch it again on the iplayer. essentially he was talking about why he is passionate about doing the job of an mp and why he still wants to change things in the world that he thinks are wrong even though he knows that there are safety issues and death threats, he had won over the weekend
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and someone has been arrested. go and someone has been arrested. go and have arisen because —— he had a death threat over the weekend. go and have a listen because it is an honest assessment of balancing the fears of safety with the desire to do the job. irate fears of safety with the desire to do the job-— fears of safety with the desire to do the 'ob. . ., ,~ do the 'ob. we asked him if it ever makes do the job. we asked him if it ever makes him — do the job. we asked him if it ever makes him think— do the job. we asked him if it ever makes him think about _ do the job. we asked him if it ever makes him think about whether i do the job. we asked him if it everj makes him think about whether he wants to do the job and he said, absolutely. and nice bit of light relief now with cameron norrie. britain tennis resurgence continues as cameron norrie became the first british tennis player to win the masters series title at indian wells in california overnight. the british men's number one came back from one set down to beat georgia's nikoloz basilashvili, in the biggest win of his career so far. afterwards, norrie said it was "absolutely massive" for him and his team. former uk number one, john lloyd was watching from california. thank you so much, i imagine it is late at night or early in the
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morning where you are. what an exciting night for british tennis fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, and he has — fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, and he has looked _ fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, and he has looked so _ fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, and he has looked so good - fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, and he has looked so good during i fans, cameron norrie did it. he did, i and he has looked so good during the ten days of the tournament. the conditions suited him absolutely perfectly. the courts were playing a little bit slow. and the players, his opponents tried to overpower him but they couldn't do it. what a player he has become, this is the sixth final of the year and he's playing with full confidence as he should be. there is such a difference between his two ground strokes, he has a big whipped forehand and a very heavy shot that gets up high, and his backhand is very short and flat and a punch shot that creates angles. i tell you, he looked, well, he was unbeatable this week but he has gone up a couple of levels this year. it's remarkable,
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really. is levels this year. it's remarkable, reall . . ., levels this year. it's remarkable, reall . , ., ., ., ., really. is that down to the word you 'ust really. is that down to the word you just mentioned, _ really. is that down to the word you just mentioned, confidence? - really. is that down to the word you just mentioned, confidence? is - really. is that down to the word you j just mentioned, confidence? is that what it is for cameron? because he has always had the talent. he’s has always had the talent. he's alwa s has always had the talent. he's always had _ has always had the talent. he's always had the _ has always had the talent. he's always had the ability, - has always had the talent. he�*s always had the ability, and i think his confidence now is obviously sky—high. he has worked so hard, he is one of the fittest players on the tour, he has a we had a lot of confidence in himself but when you start winning these matches and get to the finals and finally he broke his duck and he won a lot of confidence in himself but when you start winning these matches and get to the finals and finally he broke his duck and he won the tournament early on this year, now he has just added to that. i did go up —— and to go added to that. i did go up —— and to 9° up. added to that. i did go up —— and to go up, he is now chasing the atp tour finals at the end of the year, i believe he is in 10th position. it's a remarkable turnaround for someone, i think he was ranked in the 705 at the beginning of the year. quite extraordinary. he is the 70s at the beginning of the year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number— year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number 16 _ year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number 16 in _ year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number 16 in the _ year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number 16 in the world. - year. quite extraordinary. he is now ranked number 16 in the world. we l ranked number 16 in the world. we also have dan evans, the world number 23, two british men in the
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top 25. emma raducanu, the grand slam champion in new york last month. what do you think this purple patch is down to in british tennis? is it because we have been building strong foundations, or is itjust a flash in the pan? i strong foundations, or is it 'ust a flash in the pan?�* flash in the pan? i think we have been building — flash in the pan? i think we have been building very _ flash in the pan? i think we have been building very solid - been building very solid foundations. i think the system is a lot better now in british tennis, and i think having andy murray, i think a lot of players have had someone that has inspired them. it's just really this year, it's really exploded. who would have thought that emma raducanu would win a grand slam? it's quite remarkable. joe salisbury won the us open doubles, don't forget about him as well. it is extraordinary, and we have got to build on this. for the players who have done so well, they had to keep aiming high and i think they will. we have got such a strong bunch in the country, it's a very exciting time to be a british tennis fan.
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good to hear, even though you are watching from los angeles, you are backing the brits! john lloyd, former british number one on the cameron norrie when. joe salisbury in the doubles, the wheelchair doubles gordon hewitt —— gordon reid and alfie hewett are also winning a lot. it is fantastic. while newcastle fans were in full force cheering on their heroes at stjames' park yesterday afternoon — there was another hero in the crowd. this is dr tom prichard, after he had just performed cpr on a man who went into cardiac arrest — saving his life. his dayjob is as an a&e doctor at north tees and hartlepool nhs foundation trust and hejoins us now. good morning. morning, hello there. talk us through what happened yesterday. it
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talk us through what happened esterda . ., talk us through what happened esterda . . ., ,, yesterday. it all happened so ruickl yesterday. it all happened so quickly to _ yesterday. it all happened so quickly to be _ yesterday. it all happened so quickly to be honest. - yesterday. it all happened so quickly to be honest. i- yesterday. it all happened so quickly to be honest. i was. yesterday. it all happened so i quickly to be honest. i was sat yesterday. it all happened so - quickly to be honest. i was sat in the gallagher end, i could see that there was something going on with there was something going on with the fans, they were calling over the stewards and the first adas and i saw a lady doing cpr on someone. so as an a&e doctor, i thought i better go and offer a hand if i can. and see what help i can gather. so i got up see what help i can gather. so i got up and went over to help, really. you say you went over to help, what happens when you got there? there was an elderly gentleman having a cardiac arrest?— was an elderly gentleman having a cardiac arrest? yes, it's something ou see cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at — cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at work — cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at work fairly _ cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at work fairly often - cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at work fairly often but - cardiac arrest? yes, it's something you see at work fairly often but i i you see at work fairly often but i really haven't had this outside of a hospital before. there was an elderly gentleman lying on the seats, laid out on the seat in cardiac arrest, cpr was ongoing. luckily, stjohn's were fairly quick, they got the pads on quickly, took over cpr, another friend who sits next to me, he came over as
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well. we gave the guy a shock through the defibrillator. he was quite fortunate, this guy, because very quickly, and intensive care doctor arrived, a cardiologist arrived and we were able to bring him back again. i arrived and we were able to bring him back again.— arrived and we were able to bring him back again. i was watching this at home and _ him back again. i was watching this at home and it _ him back again. i was watching this at home and it was _ him back again. i was watching this at home and it was a _ him back again. i was watching this at home and it was a horrible - him back again. i was watching this at home and it was a horrible few i at home and it was a horrible few minutes while this is happening. you could really sense the fear and the tension in the ground. how aware of what was going on where you are where you entirely focused on the job? j where you entirely focused on the 'ob? ., ., ., ., ., ., job? i had no idea what was going on behind me- — job? i had no idea what was going on behind me- no _ job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea _ job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea at— job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea at all. _ job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea at all. i - job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea at all. i kind - job? i had no idea what was going on behind me. no idea at all. i kind of. behind me. no idea at all. i kind of went into overdrive and focused on the matter in hand. when i got back to my seat, i had no idea that the game had been stopped. in the first half are still going on. that was a bit bizarre. ijust focused on what was happening and i had no idea that quite a few people were looking over and what was happening. i lose quite a few people were looking over and what was happening.— and what was happening. i love the wa ou and what was happening. i love the way you are — and what was happening. i love the way you are talking _ and what was happening. i love the way you are talking so _ way you are talking so matter—of—factly about this amazing thing you did yesterday. when you
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walk away from that, you saw the footage of some guy patting you on the back and then going up and celebrating like a goal had been scored. what was it like to have, i would imagine, may10,000 fans scored. what was it like to have, i would imagine, may 10,000 fans all chanting your name and salivating? i chanting your name and salivating? i do want to say, this wasn't —— and celebrating? i do want to say, it wasn'tjust me, i had my friend helping, stjohn's was there, two other doctors were there, the club doctor as well. it wasn'tjust me. when i was walking back to my seat and 10,000 fans were chanting a hero at me, that was one of the best moment of my life. lbs, at me, that was one of the best moment of my life.— moment of my life. a really important _ moment of my life. a really important question, - moment of my life. a really important question, the - moment of my life. a really - important question, the gentleman was really lucky to have you there but as the general public, what do we need to do when this is happening?— we need to do when this is ha-neninr? ., happening? the most important thing is that this man _ happening? the most important thing is that this man got _ happening? the most important thing is that this man got a _ happening? the most important thing is that this man got a hospital - happening? the most important thing is that this man got a hospital and - is that this man got a hospital and as far as i know, he is still alive which is great. i want to say it is
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important to have an early cpr and test —— chest compressions and early defibrillation, it saved his life. chest compressions and cpr needs to happen and get a defibrillator there as as soon as possible.— as as soon as possible. thank you for beinr as as soon as possible. thank you for being with _ as as soon as possible. thank you for being with us _ as as soon as possible. thank you for being with us this _ as as soon as possible. thank you for being with us this morning, i for being with us this morning, brilliantjob at the weekend. i'm sure you don't even know what the score was, even. filth. sure you don't even know what the score was, even.— score was, even. oh, it doesn't matter! well— score was, even. oh, it doesn't matter! well done _ score was, even. oh, it doesn't matter! well done on _ score was, even. oh, it doesn't matter! well done on a - score was, even. oh, it doesn't matter! well done on a good i score was, even. oh, it doesn't| matter! well done on a good job score was, even. oh, it doesn't - matter! well done on a good job well matter! well done on a good “oh well done by you — matter! well done on a good “oh well done loy you and i matter! well done on a good “oh well done by you and many h matter! well done on a good job well done by you and many others - done by you and many others yesterday. what a legend. lbs, yesterday. whatalerend. . , yesterday. whatalerend. �* , ., yesterday. whatalerend. �* . ., . what a legend. a proper hero. that is a proper — what a legend. a proper hero. that is a properjob- _ what a legend. a proper hero. that is a properjob. yeah, _ what a legend. a proper hero. that is a properjob. yeah, that - what a legend. a proper hero. that is a properjob. yeah, that is - what a legend. a proper hero. that is a properjob. yeah, that is a - is a proper 'ob. yeah, that is a realjolo. — is a properjob. yeah, that is a realjob- on — is a properjob. yeah, that is a realjob. on to _ is a properjob. yeah, that is a realjob. on to other— is a properjob. yeah, that is a realjob. on to other things! i it's been another weekend of sambas and tangos on the strictly dance floor with greg wise and his dancing partner karen hauer becoming the latest couple to be voted out. meanwhile cbbc presenter rhys stephenson and nancy xu have made it through for another week. let's take a look back at their performance.
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cbbc presenter rhys stevenson and his partner, nancy xu! - just thinking the whole time, what a talent, what a dancing talent. look at those hips! rhys and nancyjoin us now from their training studio in north london. good morning, lovely to see, are you? _ good morning, lovely to see, are ou? good morning, lovely to see, are you?- what _ good morning, lovely to see, are you?- what was _ good morning, lovely to see, are you?- what was it - good morning, lovely to see, are you?- what was it like - good morning, lovely to see, are you?- what was it like for i good morning, lovely to see, are you? good! what was it like for you, what we are —
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you? good! what was it like for you, what we are in. _ you? good! what was it like for you, what we are in, week _ you? good! what was it like for you, what we are in, week five? - you? good! what was it like for you, what we are in, week five? i - you? good! what was it like for you, what we are in, week five? i found i what we are in, week five? i found that one this _ what we are in, week five? i found that one this week, _ what we are in, week five? i found that one this week, only _ what we are in, week five? i found that one this week, only one - what we are in, week five? i found that one this week, only one of. what we are in, week five? i found| that one this week, only one of the houses today because i like to a bit too much so it was always trying to bring it in. then even when i was doing it, 90%, bringing in! iwas trying to! —— nancy was saying, bring it in! trying to! -- nancy was saying, bring it in!— trying to! -- nancy was saying, brinr it in! ., , ., , bring it in! you seem to en'oy every dance that you i bring it in! you seem to en'oy every dance that you do. h bring it in! you seem to en'oy every dance that you do. was _ bring it in! you seem to en'oy every dance that you do. was it h bring it in! you seem to enjoy every dance that you do. was it the - bring it in! you seem to enjoy every dance that you do. was it the hip i dance that you do. was it the hip shimmies — dance that you do. was it the hip shimmies on this one, maybe? i did en'o the shimmies on this one, maybe? i did enjoy the hip _ shimmies on this one, maybe? i c c enjoy the hip shimmies, it was very freeing. i thought it was quite free with my hips and i bet nancy was saying, you need to go five levels further. i enjoyed that, i enjoyed the left as well, the one where we spin, that is really good. i the left as well, the one where we spin, that is really good.— spin, that is really good. i was doinr spin, that is really good. i was doing that! — spin, that is really good. i was doing that! you _ spin, that is really good. i was doing that! you are _ spin, that is really good. i was doing that! you are doing - doing that! you are doing everything. _ doing that! you are doing everything. i _ doing that! you are doing everything, ijust - doing that! you are doing| everything, i just standing doing that! you are doing - everything, ijust standing you support!
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everything, i 'ust standing you su- nort! ., everything, i 'ust standing you su- aort! ., . ., everything, i 'ust standing you suaaort! ., ., ., ., everything, i 'ust standing you suaaort! ., ., ., ., ., , support! you have got a lovely partnership- — support! you have got a lovely partnership. speaking - support! you have got a lovely partnership. speaking for - support! you have got a lovely partnership. speaking for my i support! you have got a lovely i partnership. speaking for my own expense, nadiya always wants more from me, more this, turning, hips, feet, rhys has so much energy and he is so naturally talented, you have to go, a little bit less, is that right? to go, a little bit less, is that rirht? , ., , ., right? sometimes i really need to calm him down. _ right? sometimes i really need to calm him down. i— right? sometimes i really need to calm him down. i would _ right? sometimes i really need to calm him down. i would say- right? sometimes i really need to calm him down. i would say to i right? sometimes i really need to l calm him down. i would say to him, slowr _ calm him down. i would say to him, slow. slow. — calm him down. i would say to him, slow, slow, slow. sometime it's really— slow, slow, slow. sometime it's really hard — slow, slow, slow. sometime it's really hard to calm him down. the hard thing is. _ really hard to calm him down. the hard thing is. i— really hard to calm him down. iie: hard thing is, i used really hard to calm him down. tie: hard thing is, i used to sprint when i was younger so everything i do has always been on speed. someone asks me to go slow, even something, i feel like i'm standing still and i feel like i'm standing still and i feel like i'm standing still and i feel like it's wrong so i have to fight that mentality. i feel like it's wrong so i have to fight that mentality.— feel like it's wrong so i have to fight that mentality. i don't want to aanic fight that mentality. i don't want to panic dan _ fight that mentality. i don't want to panic dan but _ fight that mentality. i don't want to panic dan but you _ fight that mentality. i don't want to panic dan but you are - fight that mentality. i don't want to panic dan but you are already| fight that mentality. i don't want i to panic dan but you are already in your rehearsal— to panic dan but you are already in your rehearsal room _ to panic dan but you are already in your rehearsal room this _ to panic dan but you are already in your rehearsal room this morning. j your rehearsal room this morning. i'm your rehearsal room this morning. i'm late! _ your rehearsal room this morning. i'm late! ., your rehearsal room this morning. i'm late! . , , i'm late! feeling a little bit edgy! what have you — i'm late! feeling a little bit edgy! what have you got _ i'm late! feeling a little bit edgy! what have you got planned - i'm late! feeling a little bit edgy! what have you got planned for. i'm late! feeling a little bit edgy! i what have you got planned for this weekr _ what have you got planned for this week. what—
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what have you got planned for this week. what do— what have you got planned for this week, what do you _ what have you got planned for this week, what do you have _ what have you got planned for this week, what do you have in- what have you got planned for this week, what do you have in store i what have you got planned for thisl week, what do you have in store for us? go _ week, what do you have in store for us? , ., ., ., ., week, what do you have in store for us? ., ., ., ., ., us? go ahead, what are we doing? this week we _ us? go ahead, what are we doing? this week we are _ us? go ahead, what are we doing? this week we are doing _ us? go ahead, what are we doing? this week we are doing american i this week we are doing american smooth _ this week we are doing american smooth foxtrot.— this week we are doing american smooth foxtrot._ howj this week we are doing american - smooth foxtrot._ how are smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are ou rroin smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are you going to — smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are you going to manage _ smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are you going to manage that! _ smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are you going to manage that! i - smooth foxtrot. slow, slow! how are you going to manage that! i really i you going to manage that! i really don't know- _ you going to manage that! i really don't know- l _ you going to manage that! i really don't know. i am _ you going to manage that! i really don't know. i am avoiding - you going to manage that! i really don't know. i am avoiding all- you going to manage that! i really i don't know. i am avoiding all sugar, i will be only listening to relaxing music! , ., , . i will be only listening to relaxing music!_ and i music! just need to be chill. and storytelling- _ music! just need to be chill. and storytelling. i'm _ music! just need to be chill. and storytelling. i'm going _ music! just need to be chill. and storytelling. i'm going to - music! just need to be chill. and storytelling. i'm going to walk i storytelling. i'm going to walk everywhere, i'm going to force myself, i'm trying to do everything slow, talking slow, moving slow. i don't know how long it will last, it will probably drive me crazy. it’s will probably drive me crazy. it's areat to will probably drive me crazy. it's great to have you guys, we are at different ends of the spectrum. i get asked a lot, all of the speculation that you are definitely going to go out and that you are rubbish, you are at the other end where from week one people are saying, rhys is going to be in the final, such a brilliant answer. how do you cope with that end of things?
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you know, dan, i'm really, i'm the same, though. ithink, i hope to make it through this week. because honestly everyone is so brilliant. and i really can't be taking it for granted. the energy i have, while it is wonderful, sometimes it is a double—edged sword for me. i know that if i don't handle it well, the audience will get bored of that. and 90. audience will get bored of that. and go, i really wish he would learn to control that. and they will think like i am not trying enough which i am, i like i am not trying enough which i am, lam really like i am not trying enough which i am, i am really trying. like i am not trying enough which i am, lam really trying. i know like i am not trying enough which i am, i am really trying. i know there is pressure there to master myself a little bit. in no way do i think i have got a guaranteed place in the final, absolutely not, the many to believe that if the minute you go. you always have to know that it could be you —— the minute you start to believe that is the minute you go. you always have to think that it could be you in the dance off. lats could be you in the dance off. lots of eaoale
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could be you in the dance off. lots of people will _ could be you in the dance off. lots of people will have _ could be you in the dance off. lots of people will have seen that strictly were live from your church on saturday night, did you manage to go yesterday? how have they been reacting? i go yesterday? how have they been reactinr ? ., . ,, ., go yesterday? how have they been reactinr? ., ., ., reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and _ reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and l _ reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and i said, _ reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and i said, i— reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and i said, i am _ reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and i said, i am going - reacting? i did, i got back at about 1:30am and i said, i am going to l reacting? i did, i got back at aboutl 1:30am and i said, i am going to try and make—upfor it. i 1:30am and i said, i am going to try and make—up for it. i woke up and thought, i'm not going to go. and then something nagged me and i thought, i'm going to go. i'll ate breakfast really quickly and then walked in and the church went, oh, our celebrity is here! everyone was coming up and asking about what happened. there were some kids that weren't there, but someone messaged them that i was there and they ran and said, you are amazing! they all made mejump suit by, just and said, you are amazing! they all made me jump suit by, just to see if i could really do it. —— jump super high. it was really lovely, really refreshing. high. it was really lovely, really refreshing-— high. it was really lovely, really refreshing. high. it was really lovely, really refreshinr. . , , ., ., refreshing. that must be one of the areat refreshing. that must be one of the great things. _ refreshing. that must be one of the great things. the — refreshing. that must be one of the great things, the reaction _ refreshing. that must be one of the great things, the reaction that - refreshing. that must be one of the great things, the reaction that you | great things, the reaction that you .et great things, the reaction that you get from _ great things, the reaction that you get from people _ great things, the reaction that you get from people on _ great things, the reaction that you get from people on the _ great things, the reaction that you get from people on the street. - great things, the reaction that you get from people on the street. yeah, ou forr et get from people on the street. yeah, you forget that _ get from people on the street. yeah, you forget that people _ get from people on the street. yeah, you forget that people are _ get from people on the streetm you forget that people are watching, really. iforget
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you forget that people are watching, really. i forget the show is as big as it is. because it feels like you're doing a school performance because most of the people in the audience of family members anyway. so people are all saying well done, greatjob. then you go home and relax and suddenly you have a bunch of messages on your phone and you think, oh, that was broadcast to the nation! ., think, oh, that was broadcast to the nation! he! shocking! all the best nation! no! shocking! all the best for our nation! no! shocking! allthe best for your first day of rehearsal today, i'm sure it will be bullied, see you later in the week. can't wait to see —— i'm sure it will be brilliant. see you later in the week. i can't give you any details about my dance! strictly continues next saturday on bbc one at 7pm. you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: borisjohnson will lead mp5 in a minute's silence in parliament today before tributes are paid to sir david amess, who was killed during a constituency surgery on friday. politicians are continuing to add to the debate around their security and possible future changes to their safety arrangements. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years, so of course i take it very seriously. but we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we are doing everything we can, we need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything. a man is arrested after labour mp chris bryant said he was subjected to "another death threat" after tweeting that people should be kinder to those they disagree with.

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