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tv   Newsday  BBC News  October 18, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: the family of the british mp david amess, who was stabbed to death on friday, has urged people to be tolerant — regardless of their religious or political beliefs. those responsible for security at parliament, say his death must force change. we have got to make the best come out of this hideous, hideous killing of our colleague and i would say that we will look at all different measures. landslides and flooding in the indian state of kerala have left more than 25 people dead and dozens more missing. also on the programme: what future for afghan women
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and girls under taliban rule? we have a special report. the winners of prince william's million—pound earthshot environmental prize have been revealed at a star—studded event. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc world news. it's newsday. the family of the british mp killed in a knife attack on friday, sir david amess, has issued a statement urging calm, in the aftermath of his death. in it they say: "whatever one's race, religious or political beliefs, be tolerant and try to understand". they added that their hearts have been shattered by his death. the home secretary, priti patel, is considering
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a range of measures to protect mps at constituency surgeries. the man arrested has been named as ali harbi ali. the 25—year—old is being held under the terrorism act, and officers have until friday to question him. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford has the very latest on the investigation. a significant search operation at a large family house in london, as the counter terrorism investigation into the murder of sir david amess mp turned towards the capital today. this is one of three addresses that detectives have visited to gather evidence. yesterday, there was a police guard at this house on a leafy street in north london. today, the search operation intensified. police have also searched a smaller house in croydon, where the suspect grew up. the man in custody is ali harbi ali, 25—years—old, and a british national
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of somali heritage. he went to school in croydon in south london. a few years ago, he was referred to the prevent scheme, which is designed to stop people being drawn into terrorism. he was not an mi5 subject of interest. in leigh—on—sea, the murdered mp was being remembered at a series of church services. our community has been really rocked by the death of sir david amess. in a statement, sir david's family said they were "absolutely broken" and then... and as the town mourned its long—serving member of parliament, we learned more details about how sir david's parliamentary assistant witnessed the attack.
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all of a sudden, there was a scream from her because the person deliberately whipped out a knife and started stabbing david. and, of course, the other lady who was out getting names of people and organising the people outside came running in to find the situation she did, of poor david who had been stabbed. the home secretary priti patel has known sir david for over 30 years. she's encouraging individual mps to discuss the risks they face with the police, to work out what protection they need. there are a range of measures in place. so this isn't aboutjust about saying, "let's go for option a, have bodyguards or security." there's a panoply of measures and we have to be proportionate in terms of the risk individuals are subject to. sir david was allegedly murdered in this church hall by a man who'd apparently booked an appointment to see him, but his killing may change forever how british politics works. daniel sandford, bbc news.
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the speaker of the house of commons, who helps oversee security around mps, says lessons must be learned, after what he called a "hideous killing". mps are warning of increasing hostility towards politicians. our political correspondent, damian grammaticas has more details. in leigh—on—sea today, more tributes for sir david amess. many have come from his constituents but some from neighbouring mps. the killing of one of their number has shaken many. this morning, across the airwaves, they had stories of how they too had faced threats. do you feel safe doing yourjob going around your constituency? not really, no, if i'm honest. mps are treated as if we weren't humans. what we've seen is the - encouragement of a climate often of hostility towards members of parliament. | i've had people writing in my office wall, "andrea, why don't you kill yourself?" my staff are pretty
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scared most of the time. i had a threat to - abduct my children. another essex mp who came to davies andrew rosindell, notjust a parliamentary neighbour but a friend of sir david. now there's obviously a fear that there's bad people out there that want to do harm and david is a victim of that. so i'm afraid it will change...it will change things. some mps have had guards before now. the review of mps safety may consider if this should be offered to all. order, order. the speaker of the commons, who's overseeing the review, says mps have to be protected but democracy and openness too. i don't want to go into a knee—jerk reaction to say what we need to do. tragically, we've lost our friend sir david amess. our thoughts are with his family. and what i want to say is that we've got to do the right thing and that we've got to make the best come out of this
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hideous, hideous killing of our colleague. what i would say is that we will look at all different measures. and those measures may involve more than just protecting physical venues. some say a culture of abuse and threats online has to be tackled too. the mp chairing the committee looking at the online harms bill says people shouldn't be able to hide their identities. if a social media company does allow someone to use a false name when they create their account, that company should hold enough data and information about that individual so that the police can get access to that with a court order as part of an investigation and users should know that even if they're not using their real name when they post, they can and will be identified if they create and cause harm to other people. so the repercussions of this killing may go far. but first, tomorrow, the nation's politicians will meet in parliament to remember sir david amess. damian grammaticas, bbc news. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. reports from the united states say the government does not
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know the location of a group of american christian missionaries and their families, who were kidnapped in haiti on saturday. 16 us citizens and one canadian were visiting an orphanage when an armed gang seized them. opposition parties in hungary have chosen their candidate to take on the right wing prime minister, viktororban, in elections next year. a conservative political outsider with no party affiliation — peter marki—zay — has won the country's first ever opposition primaries. he will lead an alliance of six opposition parties that will bid to oust orban after more than a decade in power. the former us president bill clinton has left hospital where he had been receiving treatment for an infection. he thanked health workers after he walked out. he was accompanied by his wife, hillary.
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officials in the canary islands of spain say there's no end in sight to the volcanic eruption that began a month ago. a regional leader said scientists saw no signs of the lava flows stopping any time soon. the disaster has displaced 7,000 people and destroyed more than a thousand buildings on the island of la palma. landslides and flooding in the indian state of kerala have left more than 25 people dead and dozens missing. heavy rains caused rivers to overflow, cutting off towns and villages. the indian military has joined rescue efforts. mark lobel reports. going through what is left after the landslide caused by two days of heavy rains. washing away everything in its way. with deadly consequences. houses and roads were not
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spared. 0ne family of six died. children as young as four were found buried under debris. translation: the found buried under debris. translation:— found buried under debris. translation: , .,' translation: the hill broke off near us. there _ translation: the hill broke off near us. there has _ translation: the hill broke off near us. there has been - translation: the hill broke off near us. there has been a - translation: the hill broke off near us. there has been a lot. near us. there has been a lot of damage and loss. they moved us. the house is gone, the children have gone. translation: it children have gone. translation: it was my livelihood. _ translation: it was my livelihood. look - translation: it was my livelihood. look around. | livelihood. look around. everything, it is gone. flooding and landslides caused by heavy rain are not uncommon in kerala. increasing urbanisation and construction have diminished wetlands and lakes. 0nce natural safeguards against floods. now hitting the high street. translation: water started rising _ high street. translation: water started rising and _ high street. translation: water started rising and most _ high street. translation: water started rising and most of - high street. translation: water started rising and most of our - started rising and most of our stuff was damaged. we managed to save some vegetables, like onions, but most of our vegetables have been destroyed.
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backin vegetables have been destroyed. back in 2018, kerala experienced its worst flooding in a century. around 400 people died and more than 1 in a century. around 400 people died and more than1 million were displaced. as these rescue efforts continue, the indian military is on hand. india's prime minister spoke with the chief minister of kerala, sending his condolences to families who have lost loved ones and prayers for the safety of everyone. relief camps have been set up for the displaced as the search for survivors continues. mark lobel, bbc news. the north korean leader kim jong—un has recently vowed to build an "invincible military" to combat what he calls the hostile policies of the united states. last month, north korean state media said a new hypersonic missile had been tested, as well as a train—based ballistic missile and a new long—range cruise missile, but how can the north korean
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leader continue to build up his military arsenal during such tough economic times? professor sharon squassoni is from the elliott school of international affairs at george washington university. she explained the north korean regime's attitude to its weapon's programme and the welfare of its people. this is a regime, i think it is fairto this is a regime, i think it is fair to say, that has never put its people first. so it is had a programme to develop nuclear weapons for many decades. this is not the first famine or pandemic that they have gone through and it continues to evade the web of sanctions that all countries have tried to put in place. all countries have tried to put in lace. , , .,
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all countries have tried to put in lace, , ., all countries have tried to put in lace. , ., ,, ., in place. just on the issue of sanctions. — in place. just on the issue of sanctions, as _ in place. just on the issue of sanctions, as you _ in place. just on the issue of sanctions, as you point - in place. just on the issue of sanctions, as you point out i sanctions, as you point out there are some hefty sanctions that are currently in place but in orderfor north korea to get the kind of funding or the expertise to be able to go ahead with this sort of military programme they must be working with some countries, right? who are the nations who are cooperating with them or providing them with assistance? china is the top one. china, first of all they share a border, they havejoint border, they have joint ventures border, they havejoint ventures and many of the companies that have been set up to evade export controls are based in china.— based in china. some of the ber based in china. some of the cyber hacking _ based in china. some of the cyber hacking is _ based in china. some of the cyber hacking is going - based in china. some of the cyber hacking is going on i based in china. some of the cyber hacking is going on in | cyber hacking is going on in china. so you have to think about it in two different levels. 0ne about it in two different levels. one is that china is a source of hard currency because it buys north korean coal. north korea has a lot of coal and un sanctions put in place are supposed to restrict that, to restrict their hard cash.
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but there are some indications, recently, that because china is having its own supply problems that it has gone back to purchasing coal from that it has gone back to purchasing coalfrom north korea. but don't forget, also, russia is another big country and then there are other countries that serve as way stations, vietnam, mongolia, places where north koreans can kind of get a foothold. 0ne kind of get a foothold. one thing not to forget is that north korea is basically a criminal state so where it can do illegal things like print up counterfeit money, produce drugs, that, they will sort of take any avenue that they can, that they can explore.- that they can explore. and, briefl , that they can explore. and, briefly, sharon, _ that they can explore. and, briefly, sharon, how- that they can explore. and, briefly, sharon, how do - that they can explore. and, j briefly, sharon, how do you that they can explore. and, - briefly, sharon, how do you see the future relationship between north korea and the new us administration under president biden panning out?—
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biden panning out? president biden panning out? president biden has a — biden panning out? president biden has a really _ biden panning out? president biden has a really long - biden has a really long pedigree in foreign policy. he has been through the problem with north korea both as vice president and he was chairman of the foreign relations committee for many years. this is on his radar but north korea has been really difficult not to enter into negotiations with but to stay in negotiations and actually get something out of it. if you want to get in touch with me, i'm on twitter @bbckarishma. looking forward to hearing from you. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme:
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a million pounds to save the planet — prince william reveals the five winners of his climate earthshot prize. a historic moment that many of his victims have waited for four decades. the former dictator in the dock, older, slimmer and as he sat down, inaudible. slimmer and as he sat down, inaudible-— slimmer and as he sat down, inaudible. ., ., , inaudible. dawn and does the sun broke through _ inaudible. dawn and does the sun broke through the - inaudible. dawn and does the sun broke through the piercing| sun broke through the piercing chill sun broke through the piercing chili of— sun broke through the piercing chill of night on the plane outside _ chill of night on the plane outside corum, it's a biblical famine~ _ outside corum, it's a biblical famine. now in the 20th the depressing conclusion in argentina _ the depressing conclusion in argentina today, _ the depressing conclusion in argentina today, it - the depressing conclusion in argentina today, it is - the depressing conclusion in| argentina today, it is actually cheaper — argentina today, it is actually cheaper to _ argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper— argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper your- argentina today, it is actually cheaper to paper your balls . cheaper to paper your balls with — cheaper to paper your balls with money _ cheaper to paper your balls with money. we _ cheaper to paper your balls with money-— with money. we had controversies - with money. we had controversies in - with money. we had controversies in the | with money. we had - controversies in the past with great britain is good friends with voice found a good and lasting solution.—
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lasting solution. concorde bou:hs lasting solution. concorde boughs out _ lasting solution. concorde boughs out in _ lasting solution. concorde boughs out in style - lasting solution. concorde boughs out in style after. boughs out in style after almost _ boughs out in style after almost three decades. it takes is home — almost three decades. it takes is home one this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. 0ur headlines: the family of british mp sir david amess, who was killed in a knife attack on friday, call on people to set aside hatred, show kindness and love, and work towards togetherness. landslides and flooding in the indian — landslides and flooding in the indian state of kareela have left more than 25 people dead and dozens more missing. kerala _ it's been a month since the taliban banned girls from secondary schools in most of afghanistan. women, except for those in the public health sector, have not been allowed to return to work yet. the bbc has obtained exclusive access to the former women's
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affairs ministry in kabul, now replaced by the feared taliban vice and virtue ministry, and questioned the group's spokesman on the future of women in afghanistan. from kabul, the bbc�*s south asia correspondent yogita limaye reports. at 17, her life — with all its possibilities — has been shut down. before the taliban took over, she would have been preparing for school, along with her brother, each morning. now afghan girls face the biggest rollback in human rights in recent times.
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at the top of her class, she wanted to be a doctor. the family lives hand—to—mouth and education was their path to a better future. under an all—male taliban regime, women are disappearing from public life. they haven't been allowed to return to work yet. those who march to claim back their rights have been beaten. have been beaten. we met one of the protesters who were slashed with electric cables in kabul. till august, she supported herfamily of six. now, she's out of a job.
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sobs. the taliban are keen to show they're more moderate than their last time in power. their actions so far belie the claims. this used to be the women's affairs ministry, which no longer exists under the taliban government. it's been replaced by the ministry of vice and virtue, which is to be the most feared section —— and virtue, which used to be the most feared section of the previous taliban regime. what future do women have in an afghanistan ruled by the taliban? we are here to ask. it's hard to imagine afghan women journalists would get to question the taliban like this.
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surrounded by their men, i asked a taliban spokesman when girls could go back to school, women to work. your government, your leaders have said that women should not return to work right now because of the security situation. you said the same thing about girls going to secondary schools. so it's not true that you have allowed them and they are not going. how much time? don't you think the women and girls in your country deserve to know when they can go back to their education, when they can go back to theirjobs?
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they are the future of afghanistan, but half of this country's population has no place in it right now. afghan girls are asking if the world will hold the taliban to account. yogita limaye, bbc news, kabul. there's plenty more coverage of afghanistan on our website, including the latest on the us government's offer of financial compensation to the families of those mistakenly killed in a botched drone attack in august. the pentagon says it's working to help surviving members of the family relocate to the us. just head to bbc.com/news or download the bbc news app. the winners of the duke of cambridge's inaugural earthshot prize were announced a short time ago.
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the awards celebrated the five entrants who came up with the most innovative solutions to environmental problems. each received the equivalent of $1.4 million at a ceremony in london. 0ur science editor david shukman was there. each year, we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances of repairing our planet. inspired by the missions to the moon, the aim is to heal planet earth, to try to tackle the most serious environmental problems. cheering and applause. at the ceremony to hand out the awards, a call to action from sir david attenborough. we don't have eternity. we need to do this now and over the next ten years. and if we put our minds to it, i believe we can do that. cheering and applause. congratulations to coral vita. the winning teams are mostly
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small, but with big potential — a project to grow coral in the bahamas using special tanks to speed up the process of restoring reefs, a portable machine developed in india to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser so that farmers don't burn their fields and cause air pollution, and a clever design in thailand using renewable energy to make hydrogen. applause. winning this prize is recognition that we are going in the right direction. it will support us to go into mass production and it will boost us towards our goal of accelerating the access of green hydrogen for everyone. the earthshot to build a waste—free world goes to... —— the earthshot for build a waste—free world goes to... ..the city of milan! another global challenge is waste, and the city of milan wins a prize for collecting unused food and giving it
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to people who need it most. the final prize for restoring nature went to costa rica — a country that once cleared most of its forests but has now doubled the number of trees. the plan now is for the winning projects to be scaled up so that they can make a real difference globally. we'll have to see how well that works out in practice but in any event, they'll offer something badly needed in the run—up to the climate summit in glasgow next month — a sense of optimism. david shukman, bbc news. so wonderful to see these kinds of innovation being celebrated, and so important as well. now, another story for you. a spacecraft carrying a russian film crew has returned safely to earth afterfilming the first movie in space. actress yulia peresild and director klim shipenko landed in kazakhstan, along with a cosmonaut who was also returning to earth. they spent 12 days on board the international space station, where they filmed
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scenes for their movie the challenge, about a doctor who travels to the space station to save a cosmonaut�*s life. that's all for now. stay with bbc world news. hello. i fancy you'll be delving into different sections of your autumn wardrobe through the week ahead. certainly some waterproofs required during the first half — we're going to see spells of wet and windy weather, punctuated by some sunnier moments, but temperatures will be a bit contrast as well. —— will be a big contrast as well. to start the week, with low pressure across the atlantic, we're actually going to drag our air up from the tropics — some unusually mild air coming ourway. but as that low pressure pushes its way eastwards, we may see the return of sunshine more widely, but there will be a brief shot ofarctic air coming in from the north. that's a long way off to begin with, though, and it's the mild air taking hold through monday, beginning on pretty mild notes for many for many in the morning rush hour. coolest with single—figure temperatures across the midlands, east anglia, south—east. best of the sunshine here lasting longest through the day as well. rain through the morning rush hour in northern ireland,
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spreading in across wales, western england and scotland during the morning and into the afternoon. and a bit further eastwards, it's not arriving to the channel islands, east anglia, south—east until later in the afternoon, and for some maybe not even into the evening. brighter conditions to end the day in some western parts but is still fairly cloudy. temperatures, though, above where we'd normally expect this stage in mid october. heavy rain to end the day, then. east anglia and south—east that gradually clears away. some dry conditions for a time overnight. best of the clear weather to the north and east but more wet and increasingly windy weather starting to push in from the south—west. probably one of the mildest nights of the week, then, monday night into tuesday, with temperatures higher in the morning then we'd normally expect during the afternoon! and that's because we have still got that area of low pressure just to the west of us, dragging in southerly winds. the warmest of the airjust ahead of these weather fronts which are going to spread rain more extensively across the country on tuesday. some heavy bursts, fairly erratic, that movement, northwards and eastwards, some seeing higher rainfall totals than others. brightening up across ireland later on, adding some afternoon sunshine potentially in east anglia and the south—east — even if it's on the hazy side. we could see temperatures get up to around 21 degrees. this stage in october, your average temperatures
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are around 10—14 degrees across the country. and we could be probably around those values through night and into thursday morning. low pressure still around across the country through wednesday night, and we're going to see more in the area of low pressure systems spreading their way northwards and eastwards. this one will bring heavy rain at times through the central swathe of the country, brightening up on the southern flank of it before more wet and windy weather arrives. not a bad day through the northern half of scotland, and sunshine and showers later in northern ireland. but whilst we'll see temperatures 17 or 18 in the south and east, it's turning cold across the north and that cooling trend continues into thursday.
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we will have the headlines and all the main news stories for you at the top of the hours straight after this programme.
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there is a phrase that has become rather familiar or so over last year or so — build back better. it is a phrase that says, if you're going to build something to fix today's problems, be really careful you are not going to create
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tomorrow's disaster, and that is why we have come to this place, british mosque

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