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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 17, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. i think it's fair to say we all have to be incredibly self—aware, conscientious, as to how we conduct our business and put safety front and centre of this. issues on social media have been highlighted as part of the discussion around the safety of mps the social media companies could do a lot more. overnight police presence at a house in north london, thought to be related
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to the stabbing of sir david amess a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. and coming up in half an hour — it's the media show. good afternoon. the home secretary, priti patel, says mps may be offered police protection at constituency surgeries following the killing of sir david amess. a security review is already happening. it will consider whether these meetings should only take place with a pre—booked appointment. the man arrested by police following the killing of the mp, sir david amess, has been named as ali harbi ali.
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the 25—year—old is being held under the terrorism act and officers have until friday to question him. our political correspondent peter saul reports. this tight—knit seaside community continues to mourn its member of parliament, stabbed to death while meeting the people he was selected to represent. the tragedy has really hit home for mps, many of whom considered sir david amess a friend, and some are reassessing the way they work. none of us are afraid to walk out of our doors and to attend local events and do surgeries, and meet people, but now there's obviously a fear that there's bad people out there that want to do harm, and david is a victim of that. and so i'm afraid it will change things. do you feel safe doing yourjob, going around your constituency?
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no, not really, if i'm honest. i feel quite fortunate to have a lot| of constituents who are concerned about my safety, wigan is that sort of place. - people look after each other. security was tightened in mps's offices following the murder ofjo cox in 2016 and many believe action is needed now. i do think there is more to be done by parliament working with the venues where we hold our advice sessions with local authorities, otherwise to make us feel physically safe. such is the screening for covid. the home secretary said her world was shattered when she heard about sir david's death and is now considering a range of measures to protect her colleagues. we are doing a lot of practical things right now in terms of advice for mps. but i think it's fair to say we all have to be incredibly self—aware, conscientious as to how we conduct our business. she herself has been subject to online abuse, and also spoke of proportionate action against anonymous social media accounts. speaker: order!
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part of the common speaker so lindsay hoyle's role is to ensure mps are safe and he has acknowledged the need for improvements. but in a newspaper article he stressed the importance of constituency surgeries, describing them as a cornerstone of our democracy. he also said that the political conversation had to be kinder and based on respect. in recent days party politics have been put to one side, and in a further sign of respect labour and the liberal democrats will not contest the by—election that will now need to take place here. peter saull, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford has more details about the suspect and the investigation. while a lot of work is still going on in leigh—on—sea, part of the focus of the investigation has very much moved to london.
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we have been watching today as officers have prepared to search a house in the kentish town area of north london that is believed to being connected to this investigation. counterterrorism detectives are trying to find out more about the suspect ali harbi ali. his father is involved in somali politics and spends most of his time either in kenya or the bounds green area of north london. ali harbi ali was detained at the scene of the attack and is now being held at a london police station. he can be held up until friday because he is now being held under the terrorism act before he is charged or released. it is worth saying at this stage he is still a suspect and has not been charged. the speaker of the house of commons, sir lindsay hoyle says lessons must be learned from what happened to sir david. we regularly update security. we look at security, they put all the measures in place that are the best measures in place that are the best measures to support mps and protect families as well as the staff who work with them so i would say i don't want a knee jerk reaction to say what we need to do. tragically, we have lost our friend david amess and are with his family and what i
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want to say that we've got to do the right thing and that we've got to make the best come out of this hideous, hideous killing of our colleague and what i would say that we will look at all different measures. we will review measures and we will also remind members please take out the measures that are available to you. there's measures to protect you, your staff and family and that is what we have got to do. we've got to know what happened on friday. the tragedy of what happened. the got to learn from that and find out with the measures have worked or not have worked. we've got to make sure we get it right. of course everybody would be expressing different views and opinions of what we need to do. but i would say is we've got to protect democracy, we got to protect members because the people hate our values and what we stand for and they hate the democratic process and that's
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the democratic process and that's the thing that we are fighting. so we cannot give in and must not give in and quite rightly. it was the right thing and i did my surgery on friday night. my constituents needed access to me and i gave them access and quite right but what we have also got to do is make sure they are protected as well when they come to me is a member of parliament serve course we have got to learn from this. we've got to make sure. it is a sad time. people quite right they are very worried and it is about the reassurance that we need but it is also about thinking david's family as well at this moment. joining me now is the leader of the welsh liberal democrats, jane dodds. i wonder what steps you take in the aftermath of friday's incident in order to protect your own safety net of your staff. the other night yes. thank you. i would like by expressing our condolences to temper
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my�*s family and friends. on friday afternoon we were told that we should cancel activities and campaigning. that was as a mark of respect but also for our safety. i had a surgery planned on saturday at lunchtime which we cancelled and at this pointjust waiting to hear what information there is. we are waiting for information about the security team as to the next steps. white maccabeus have encountered any situations in your daily work going about your daily business and you felt unsafe or threatened or failure security was compromised? i felt unsafe or threatened or failure security was compromised? i have, es. in security was compromised? i have, yes. in fact. _ security was compromised? i have, yes- in fact. had — security was compromised? i have, yes. in fact, had incident _ security was compromised? i have, yes. in fact, had incident iran - security was compromised? i have, yes. in fact, had incident iran ten i yes. in fact, had incident iran ten days ago when i was in my car outside the senate following a vote on covert passes. my car was surrounded by people who were protesting as anti— baxters and my
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car was banged and hit and the midhurst bent back and i were shouted out. that lasted about two or three minutes and was caught on cctv. and at that point i felt very anxious and quite frightened, if i'm honest. but i think the general issueis honest. but i think the general issue is that members of parliament, senate members, members of the scottish executive, we can be recognised and identified and that can mean that we are particularly targeted. but it is important obviously that is not taken out of proportion. yeah the speaker talking about constituents having access to ours. and we still need to think about how that can happen. so i'm keen to hearfrom about how that can happen. so i'm keen to hear from the security team when we return this weekend to hear what their suggestions and advices. similarly the security team will be
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looking to members like yourself to our fair looking to members like yourself to ourfair suggestions and looking to members like yourself to our fair suggestions and ideas on what would make you feel safer. how do you see face—to—face constituency surgeries for you resuming away feel safe? it surgeries for you resuming away feel safe? , . . , surgeries for you resuming away feel safe? , . ., , , ., safe? it is a really good question. i think the — safe? it is a really good question. i think the context _ safe? it is a really good question. i think the context for _ safe? it is a really good question. i think the context for as - safe? it is a really good question. i think the context for as has - safe? it is a really good question. | i think the context for as has been covert. so we have had not many direct face—to—face surgeries because covert is meant we have been phoning in speaking people ever zoom for example. i think i would be not in favour of any police presence at any of the surgeries and sessions very meet the public. there are two reasons for that and one which compromises their ability to talk openly to our residents and constituents and also it takes police time as well but i think we have to think about what measures we can all put in place to ensure that we are that may mean that we work with other people and take details
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of people who want to come and see us. that we check people out. and that we really take precautions and make sure we have an escape route etc in place. it is also important for me to note that there are many people who work in the public sector and in public facing those serving the public are also faced similar risks and we must be aware that they be feeling very anxious and frightened at this time. thank you very much- _ thank you very much. a soldier who died during an army training exercise on salisbury plain has been named. private jethro watson—pickering, who was 23, of the 1st yorkshire regiment, was part of a crew operating an armoured vehicle near enford in wiltshire, on friday. the vehicle overturned and hit a tree, trapping several soldiers inside, a source told the bbc. the yorkshire regiment said on facebook that its thoughts and prayers were with private watson—pickering's family.
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she the duke of cambridge will call for society to "unite in repairing our planet", when he appears on stage tonight at the first awards ceremony for his environmental prize. the earthshot prize will celebrate five winners who've come up with the best solutions to tackle the world's environmental problems. james reynolds reports. each year, we will award five £1 million prizes to those who we believe can transform our chances of repairing our planet. prince william's earthshot winners will be announced tonight. the prize takes its inspiration from president kennedy's 1960s moonshot, the desire to unite around a single scientific project. ultimately if we want to tackle this, if we want to get on the front foot, we've got to bring people with us. people have got to feel like there's hope, there's a chance we can fix this. and that's what the earthshot prize
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is about is providing those solutions to some of the world's biggest environmental problems. the project has won praise from his own father. "we need to come together to build the sustainable future we so desperately need," tweets the prince of wales. a less wild world is a less stable world. prince william has also teamed up with david attenborough, who has himself spent many years warning of the dangers posed by climate change. that's why i agreed to join the earthshot prize council. i noticed the ironing vendors in my street using charcoal. | the earthshot finalists include 14—year—old vinisha umashankar from tamil nadu in southern india. she's designed a solar—powered ironing stall. it even has a mobile phone charging point. and earlier this week, buckingham palace and other london landmarks were lit up in green to mark this evening's earthshot awards. james reynolds, bbc news.
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windermere in the lake district could become ecologically dead within years, because of the amount of sewage being pumped into its waters, according to campaigners. an online petition calling for a ban on sewage pollution, has now reached over 99—thousand signatures. but, the situation is complex, as our environment correspondent judy hobson explains. tourists come to the lake district for its outstanding natural beauty, but campaigners say the water quality in windermere is so poor, it is a national scandal. there has just been the biggest blue—green algal bloom, all because of sewage entering the lake. a local conservationist has been filming water pollution in the area. that dark patch is an algal bloom. this is the river rothay that feeds into the lake. it actually prevents invertebrates from being able to breed on the substrate of the river itself and then, because of that,
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invertebrates have died and, subsequent to that, fish are dying. matt has started an online petition calling for a ban on sewage pollution in windermere. he said the waters here are close to ecological collapse. i have seen a decline in fish, invertebrates, freshwater vegetation. i have seen otter spraint completely absent of white—clawed crayfish. i have seen dead fish floating down the river past me. it is in a dire state and it will only get worse. algal blooms come and go, but they are appearing more frequently and they can be very harmful to humans and animals. there are two many main sources of sewage entering windermere. one is at the waste treatment site. that comes in when we have rain. they call it their storm overflow. a system. and the other is from septic tanks. there are over 1500 septic tanks that are around windermere itself and there is no regulation keeping these in check. last year, the sewage treatment plant at ambleside overflowed for weeks after heavy rain. what you can see is the fine filters at the back end.
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the company said it happens to prevent flooding, but a new plant at windermere is now improving water quality. over the past five years we have invested £40 million into assets around windermere both at ambleside, glebe road station and here at windermere waste water treatment works to address some of those challenges. but the sewage problem comes from different sources and the answer will be four different organisations to work together. the nutrients have probably been discharged over decades. it is a case of continual improvements and ongoing work and then looking to the future. it is notjust local people, it is a special part of the world for millions from all around the world. it is a unesco world heritage site. it is known for its natural beauty and now we have to protect that. that was judy hobson reporting from the lake district. the headlines on bbc news. the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. issues on social media have been highlighted as part
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of the discussion around the safety of mps overnight police presence at a house in north london, believed to be related to the stabbing of sir david amess did afternoon. injust did afternoon. in just over an did afternoon. injust over an hour newcastle will start the new era under the watchful eye of their controversial consortium. the new chairman will be in the directors box as they welcome tottenham hotspur to tyneside. after 14 years of frustration the owner's rains come to an end. with the controversial saudi take ever going through in the international break.
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for the manager this will be is ioooth for the manager this will be is 1000th game as a manager and there has been much speculation over his future and changes are likely to be expected in the dugout.— expected in the dugout. bruce was under considerable _ expected in the dugout. bruce was under considerable pressure - expected in the dugout. bruce was| under considerable pressure before this takeover was even confirmed. the team in the relegation zone, without a win all season. and though the hierarchy of wished him well ahead of this game which will be is ioooth in ahead of this game which will be is 1000th in management their statement on friday did not really contain much in the way ofjob security so you would expect there to be changes afoot. they do need to get it right so that they are not looking at a club in the championship there is pressure on them but a win today against spurs for newcastle will lift the pressure considerably in the short term.— lift the pressure considerably in the short term. . ., ~ the short term. that game kicks off at 430 but everton _ the short term. that game kicks off at 430 but everton are _ the short term. that game kicks off at 430 but everton are hosting - the short term. that game kicks off| at 430 but everton are hosting west ham and after 61 minutes it is currently still nil nil. the hosts
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have had the better the chances but it is scurrilous at the moment. in the championship pressure is mounting on the cardiff manager as his side were thrashed 3— zero by local rivals swansea in the south wales derby. jamie paterson was the star man for the home side scoring the opener. and he then set up both of swansea's other girls. that win moves them up to 17th in the league. cardiff are 20th and last six matches in a row. the t20 cricket world cup is under way in scotland have begun their tournament in the last 15 minutes. their app against bangladesh in their opening match. they've elected to bat first in scotland havejust they've elected to bat first in scotland have just lost a wicket. the captain has gone so scotland are 7- the captain has gone so scotland are 7— one. meanwhile the core hosts have begun their campaign with a simple victory. they restricted papua new guinea and the ten wickets
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in hand. 38 balls to spare. to tennis. the british men's number one is expected to break into the world's top 20. he is playing in the final in california after an impressive straight sets win then has this report. for a man who has taken the long road to tennis�*s top table all of a sudden he is in a hurry. from johannesburg, aged 26, he is now accelerating towards his potential. in the masters it was one of the most prestigious tournament outside the majors and he was playing in his first semi at this level. in the first set, 6— two, 32
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minutes. the second took a bit longer but then when has that ever bothered him? not when you can fire so freely and swings serve so sweetly. norrie is into the final. the biggest match of my career again tomorrow so i will go out there and hopefully do more of the same and there is a lot of work to be done and i'm looking forward to the occasion. following the us open last night it is turning into the indian summerfor british night it is turning into the indian summer for british tennis. and you can follow updates on the bbc sport website but that is it for now.
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as we've been hearing, the first five recipients of �*the earthshot prize' will be announced later, during a ceremony hosted by the awards founder — the duke of cambridge. joining me live from the green carpet is our media and culture correspondent david sillito. an exciting evening ahead, then. very much save. normally, when you see red carpets and celebrity it is all about celebrities and the movie world and music. this is somewhere rather different. because this is who are trying to make a difference. the phrase is derived from president kennedy. 60 years ago he said he wanted to give out a challenge to america to put a man on the moon within the next decade. that was his moon shot challenge. this is prince william's challenged the world to come up with solutions. he was asked about this and he said so much of environmental news these days is
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very, very depressing. it is a counsel of despair as we see how much environmental degradation and the effects on the climate, the effects on places around the world and he said people are lost every day going what can you do? and this is all about looking around the world. there are 700 nominations. different projects around the world. that has been whittled down to 15 and there will be five winners at the end of today. all of whom will walk away with £1,000,000 but also probably more importantly the focus on what they are doing. hopefully this will be essentially seed money to go even further. one of those projects, the whole of costa rica for the work it has been doing to help rainforests. there is another project looking at growing coral because of the damage caused by acidification of the waters and one focused on 114 —year—olds who came
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up focused on 114 —year—olds who came up with the idea of a solar powered ironing cart. there are thousands and thousands of ironing carrots. you get your ironing done on the streets of india. they are mostly powered by charcoal. she said, let's do it differently. listed with solar power. maybe even then you could charge a mobile phone at the same time is whole country down 14 —year—olds will be finding out later this evening and on bbc one this evening who has won these prizes. £15,000,000 to offer people trying to come up with some solutions to environmental problems. the grand mosque in the muslim holy
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city of mecca in saudi arabia has begun operating at full capacity again..following the easing of restrictions imposed because of the pandemic. markers on the floor that helped worshippers stay socially distanced have been removed, and they've been allowed to pray as they used to — shoulder—to—shoulder. however all visitors to the mosque must be fully vaccinated and continue to wear face masks. the government has taken over the running of the southeastern rail network — which connects kent and some of east sussex with london. the move was announced last month after govia, which had been running the franchise, failed to declare more than 25 million pounds of taxpayerfunding. passengers have been told they are unlikely to see any immediate changes to services. the musician alan hawkshaw, who composed some of tv�*s most recognisable theme tunes — including grange hill and channel 4 news — has died aged 84. he was admitted to hospital this week with pneumonia and died in the early hours of saturday morning. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at his work. during a career that lasted more than 40 years, alan hawkshaw composed music for some of television's most popular shows.
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grange hill theme. his works could be fun and quirky, like the original grange hill theme... grange hill theme. ..or, like the channel 4 news theme... channel 4 news theme. ..at the more serious end of the scale. he was also a highly sought—after studio musician who could play a variety of instruments, and composed for more than 35 films. but his talent for writing memorable tv themes is what he will be best remembered for. they were heard by millions of viewers each week, on shows like dave allen at large... dave allen at large theme.
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countdown clock music. ..and it's almost impossible to think of channel 4's countdown without hearing his perfectly timed music. i was already fighting a deadline when they rang up and said, "look, we just need to this sort of clock music, a theme that builds, for a proposed quiz show called countdown. can you do it?" i said, "well, not really, i'm busy with other stuff." he said, "well, look, try and get it together." and the story goes on, iforgot all about it, and then they rang me up and said, "have you done it?" and i said, "yeah." and i hadn't. and that's what the story is. i was in the loo, actually, when i got the idea for it. he may never have been a household name, but almost everyone knew alan hawkshaw�*s music. the musician, alan hawkshaw, who has died at the age of 84.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. damp and mild as the best way to describe the weather for most of us today. a little bit of sunshine and the forecast for the afternoon across the south and south—west but for most of us it is going to stay cloudy. little bits and pieces of rain and we got more wet weather heading our way for tomorrow and it is approaching the early hours of monday morning. head of it very mild, double figure temperatures for most of us first and by mid—morning we have gotjermaine living to the south—west across many western areas of the uk and most of that will end “p of the uk and most of that will end up in the north but extremely mild tomorrow. 18 or 19 despite all of the cloud and the rain and take a look at the temperatures which could
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get up to 20 or 21 on tuesday. it turns cooler and a little bit more settled for friday. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. i think it's fair to say we will have to be incredibly self—aware, conscientious as to how we conduct our business and put safety front and centre of this. issues on social media have been highlighted as part of the discussion around the safety of mps. we ta ke we take social media very, very seriously. it is in flames, it inspires and drives others to do things that we quite rightly do not fit in with our values and thoughts. overnight police presence at a house in north london, beleieved to be related
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to the stabbing of sir david amess. a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. now on bbc news, it's time for the media show. hello. the back pages have been dominating the front pages this week with the sale of newcastle united football club. but the premier league and the only part of british public life that the saudis are buying into. the independent and the evening standard can both trace their ownership back to the gulf kingdom. while over in the us, media giants like netflix and disney have had big investment from the saudis. so, does this affect the journalism we read of the television we watch? joining me to discuss that is vivienne walt, a correspondent for time magazine and fortune. areeb ullah is a journalist
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at middle east eye.

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