Skip to main content

tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  October 17, 2021 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
the east and south—east. so, maybe down to 8 or 9 degrees here. a little bit fresher, but for many of us, it is into double figures. and whichever way you look at it, it is a very mild night. so here is tomorrow's weather. it starts off quite bright if not sunny in east anglia and the south—east, but quickly the cloud spreads ahead of this weather front. and you can see in the middle of the day, it is raining pretty much north and south not all the time. the rain will come and go. for some of us, it will be a damp, mild, drizzly sort of day, with 16, 17 degrees. for others, it could be quite wet with that rain splashing its way through into monday evening as well. but it is going to remain cloudy. this is a mild south—westerly wind brought by this big area of low pressure across the atlantic. and i think particularly on tuesday, we could have some very heavy rain brought in by this tongue of very warm air all the way from the azores. now this is really going to bump up the temperatures are some of us at least on tuesday. despite all the rain day cloud and the heavy rain, especially heavy here in wales
1:31 pm
and maybe the north west of england, it is going to be exceedingly mild right across the country. high teens even where it is raining, without any sunshine, possibly 21 degrees if the sun does come out for any length of time there in the south—east. and then basically tuesday into wednesday, we have got more weather fronts crossing the country, big low pressure establishes itself across the uk, so spells of wind and rain. i think by the time we get to friday, things are expected to quieten down. it will turn a little bit cooler too, but then the weekend, next weekend is going to turn unsettled again.
1:32 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. i think it is fair to say we all have to be incredibly self—aware, conscientious as to how we conduct our business, and put safety front and centre of this. issues on social media have been highlighted as part of the discussion around the safety of mps. the social media companies could do a lot more. they could take down some of these accounts, and they could end what you might call end—to—end anonymity.
1:33 pm
the man arrested by police following the killing of the uk mp has been named as ali harbi ali and is being held under the terrorism act. officers have until friday to question him. a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. some of the busiest rail routes between london and the south—east of england are being taken over by the government today. now on bbc news, it's the travel show, with lucy hedges. this week on the show: throwing some shakes in berlin. this is the capital of techno. tasting the future in wales. so you've got sweet potato... uh-huh. ..butternut squash, cricket. laughs. this week on the show: throwing some shakes in berlin.
1:34 pm
theme song plays. hello, welcome to the travel show. this week, back in the uk, and getting a few mouthfuls of bugs on the welsh coast. now, let me tell you, some people say it's the future, and it's not as bad as you think. stay tuned for that, but we're going to begin in berlin, a city that's built its modern reputation on its amazing club scene — a scene renowned for its pulsing beats and its flashing lights, which, please be aware, feature throughout. techno music plays. it's community. it's coming together. it's sound. it's light.
1:35 pm
this is the capital of techno. people are coming from other parts of the world who want to party here. they say, "oh, what is this kind of music?" when you go into a club, itjust blows you away. djs here will pay for eight - hours, ten hours, and you can get so lost on the dance floor. the artists that i work with really put a focus on creating a utopia _ on the dance floor, and you get to have this collective moment of bliss and belonging. - berliners, that we — we know what is important — that we find a good balance between working and partying, like, finding a way to free your mind from the sorrows of the day. cheering and applause. i came here four weeks before the wall came down. we had these free spaces
1:36 pm
where no regulations had been. you know, berlin mitte was like empty, because nobody wanted to live here — the people had no warm water, no heating, no — no toilets in their flats, and so there was so much empty spaces and the people from all over the world, they all came here to fill these free spaces. we just occupied rooms and houses and just started doing culture, music. we could establish something very special — what you don't have another cities or in other countries, because of this kind of like chaotic situation. it — it's different here, because it's not about how much money you have, it's like, one example that when you go in the club you can't buy a table to be cool, you know? i think that's related to the history of the city. it was very poor after the fall
1:37 pm
of the wall, the warehouse parties and raves and — when you don't have other stuff, that's what you value. and now it kind of became the trademark of berlin. berlin clubs are very different from other parts of the world because in the other capital cities, people like to dress up nice, you know, nice shirts, nice shoes. yeah. in berlin, it's quite opposite, because people like the trashy. the clubs here look like abandoned houses most of the time — very dark, you can't see much. it's like stickers all over the walls, graffiti, yeah. it's been like that since the �*90s, and people don't want this to change. it was a shocking moment and it — it took a couple of weeks that we realised what had — what it really means. with my staff, how can they get their money?
1:38 pm
and then, of course, your own situation, how can i pay my rent for the club? everybody was very scared that, ok, half of the clubs will be closed now, the berlin nightlife�*s going to die forever, it's never going to be the same. yeah, it was something. i was just so worried for everybody. - i work with artists who music is their entire livelihood. - i'm one of the lucky ones who had a dayjob that i i could fall back upon. we started doing some streaming so — to give a tiny little platform to our artists, to the djs, and to bring some music to the people at home. we just realised that it's really annoying and depressing being in an empty club without the energy of the people, and that was — that really hurt. it really hurt. this two years, almost, showed that people who are working in this scene are very passionate about the club culture, and they want to stay
1:39 pm
there, and they want to do everything they can to continue doing this, you know? it was five months after the — our lockdown we could start doing things outside. so we started doing concerts. just relax in the sun chair, and it's a nice situation with the trees, sometimes you can hear the birds, and then you have the artists at the stage. we're just happy that we see some eyes and that we get some emotions back, and that we see that we are all still alive. it was really great - but i was just saying that sitting down was very hard —| it was like i wanted to get up and dance and, you know, - and feel the people around me as well dancing, and so on, and it was very restrictive. i and it was very good to be out! but there is a little bit. of sadness in it as well. it's incomparable.
1:40 pm
like, what it was before, and you can literally feel, like, the pressure inside of the people that really long for liberating themselves again from these kind of restrictions. cheering and applause. you can only appreciate something once it's gone. and now people really appreciate what they had before. we will fight for, like, i more freedom to party. because it's important. berlin is a city which always stands up again. and whatever is possible, it's possible here in berlin. i think we have to get the party set out! berlin, if you go out, one of the most important things is to bring a hat — that triples your chance of getting in.
1:41 pm
now, let's go. it seems like berlin is back in the game! this is the queue to the most famous club in berlin. alright, we made it to the end of the queue. today is the first day berghain opens again, after one and a half years. and over there is the entrance. the longest queue i've ever seen in berlin. i guess everything's back to normal! after a year's delay, dubai's 2020 world expo finally
1:42 pm
opened its doors with a glitzy ceremony earlier this month. over 190 countries have laid out their stalls with their best cultural offerings. china's pavilion showcases robot pandas and electric cars, while saudi arabia's display boasts the world's largest interactive lighting floor. the organisers hope as many as 25 million people will come for a look around, with visitors having to show proof of vaccination, or a negative pcr test to get in. it's open for six months, ending on march 31st. if your favourite bit of a convention is the food samples, the salon du chocolat in paris promises plenty of treats to satisfy even the sweetest of tooths. beginning on october 28, there's a dazzling confection of chocolate—themed events, including a chocolate fashion show with 100 chocolate dresses, chocolate stalls, chocolate competitions, and a reproduction of pablo picasso's guernica, made from 500 kilograms of —
1:43 pm
well, you get the idea. with halloween looming, new york celebrates the return of its spooky annual village parade after a pandemic postponement in 2020. now in its 48th year, crowds of more than 2 million people are expected, with tens of thousands of costumed party—goers taking part. the parade is always a surprise to me, because i can't plan for every single individual who's coming. i mean, it could be like we threw a party and nobody came! or it could be everybody in the the world was waiting to come and "oh my goodness, here they are, what do we do with all of them?" i expect the energy to be really positive and good. meanwhile, across the pond, the derry halloween event in northern ireland claims to be europe's largest halloween party, with more than 140,000 attending in 2019, more than doubling the city's population. this year, they've cancelled their usual parade,
1:44 pm
but the festivities are going ahead, with a mix of light installations, displays, and performances, spread across five zones — all capped off with a big firework display. fireworks. right, still to come on the travel show: a mouthful of bugs. you're chucking me in at the deep end with this one, aren't you? right, i'm going for it. and in search of the natural light show that will take your breath away. so don't go away. next up, i'm in st davids in wales. with a population ofjust 1,800, it is the uk's smallest designated city. i'm visiting a farm that's cottoned on to a trend which has still to catch
1:45 pm
on in britain, but that's already feeding some 2 billion people around the world. set across 100 acres of pembrokeshire�*s countryside, the bug farm is home to dozens of species of insects, and it's the only one of its kind in the uk. as someone who's scared of bugs, i wasn't sure what to expect and, as always, i was thrown right into the deep end. so, who have you got here? this is one of our giant stick insects, it's a tirachoidea stick insect. tirachoidea. yeah, when it doesn't even have a common name, so little is known about it. yeah. do you want to have a hold? i do, reluctantly, yes! come on, i'm going to do it. so what i'll do is i'll just pop her onto you. so she'lljust grip on a tiny bit. it's like a live twig! but she won't go anywhere. yeah, you'd never notice them if they're in a bush, yeah! yeah, yeah! oh, amazing! as well as offering this unique take on a petting zoo, sarah hopes her farm will help inspire an important shift in the way we view bugs, into seeing them as a potential resource in the battle
1:46 pm
against climate change. so, the bug farm is, first and foremost, a place where you come to see awesome insects or other invertebrates like this. we want people to come here and have an experience where they come in and go, "oh, i don't know about bugs. "ooh, not sure," and then go, "wow!" wow! and if we can get that insight and then allow people to go, "ok, let me learn a little bit more about them, ok, they're quite fascinating. "you know what? "they�* re really useful as well!" then that's the idea. the bug farm's main draw is arguably its grub kitchen. it's the only restaurant in the uk devoted to eating insects. so we don't eat insects like this one. don't worry! we're not going to eat you! she's safe! but what we can do is if we look at including insects in our diet, we can actually get protein very efficiently from a group of animals that we don't usually eat here in the west, so it makes loads of sense because you can get a similar amount of protein to beef from insects, but up to 25% less feed
1:47 pm
going in, a fraction of the land used, because insects can be farmed vertically, and they can feed on side streams of other pla nt—based industries. so it makes lots of sense to be able to farm them for us to eat. yeah, absolutely. it's just getting around our kind of issues with the idea of eating insects. you can say that again. just how palatable are these crunchy critters? sometimes called a �*future food', even the un food and agriculture organization has spoken out, urging people to make more of what they call "an underutilised resource." millions are being invested in insect farms worldwide, and sarah and her husband and chef andy are making the most of this growing industry. right. so, i've got to admit, andy, i've never tried bug—based food before. not to my knowledge, anyway. i'm sure i've obviously eaten a few flies in my time. i'm terrified about what i'm going to find inside. well, i can talk you through it. alright.
1:48 pm
so, what have we got in here? so, you've got sweet potato, butternut squash, cricket, a bit of yellow mealworm and there's a buffalo insect as well, which is the larvae of a lesser mealworm. go ahead... if you want to have a try, go for it. you're chucking me in at the deep end with this one, aren't you? right, i'm going for it, and i love pakora, so... oh, fantastic. alright. quite a lot to live up to then. the buffalo worms are quite a subtle almost like toasted rice flavour, the mealworms have this really sort of nutty sort of different kind of flavour, and the crickets, some people think taste like mushroom, some say white chocolate. mmm, that's really nice. a bit spicy! if i didn't know... no, the spice is amazing. but obviously i know the ingredients and i can see my little bug friends in there, but i wouldn't necessarily know that i'm eating an insect—based thing. yeah, that's the sort of thing we wanted to help people get their heads around is that insects just add this sort of savoury, slightly nutty flavour, and when they're fried as well, they really kind of crisp up a little bit
1:49 pm
as well, so... yeah, i can see a little crispy mealworm there. even the welsh government is behind this bug revolution, recently providing andy and sarah with a grant to develop vexo, an insect—based mince meat designed to help tackle obesity in schools. so, we're not sort of going to say to people not to eat meat, that's not the message we want to get across, but we just say, "look, this is a viable alternative." especially when there's a climate emergency, we really need to look at how we produce food for a growing population. i'm surprised that more chefs haven't tried this really so far. you know, we're still, as far as i'm aware, the uk's only insect restaurant to have insects on the menu full time. i've grown quite attached to my stick insect friend, so i'm not sure i'll be swapping out my courgettes for crickets. but from the sounds of it, here in the uk, a sprinkling of insects on your chips might be more commonplace in the not—too—distant future.
1:50 pm
finally, winter's fast approaching here, by far the best time to go hunting for the northern lights, the arctic phenomenon on so many of our bucket lists. but did you know there's an equally impressive display in the southern hemisphere? the aurora australis. we've been on board a unique flight over the skies of new zealand to seek it out. it's really one of the world's most phenomenal natural light shows. it's very otherworldly, it's very dramatic. since moving to dunedin in 2013, i've become completely and utterly bonkers about this amazing phenomenon, and i spend many dark night chasing around remote parts of southern new zealand where we get to see the australis. but a few years ago i realised that actually if i really wanted to see the aurora australis, i've get to way south of new zealand. so to do that, we need —
1:51 pm
i guess you'd call it an airliner, basically. fly into the active area of the aurora and then start orbiting around till we get fantastic views, and that's what we're doing tonight. we're ten hours, really, chasing auroras across the southern ocean, 41,000 feet, in an amazing aircraft, a boeing 787. we've just seen the numbers and it looks like the aurora is kind of brewing for a bit of a storm, which is good. you can tell there's been a bit of a party here in christchurch. i always like to hold off on the champagne after we've seen the aurora, that's my personal way of doing things, but this is pretty exciting times. this stuff is important, right. tourism is important to our country, and whatever happens tonight, and i hope to god we see an aurora, cos otherwise i'm hiding
1:52 pm
in the toilet...this is really important. ijust want to say, rachel, what an amazing job your company have done. applause. thank you, ian. flights to the light was our pivot project. we came into covid as specialists in travel to latin america and antarctica. obviously, covid put a bit of an end to that, so we knew we had to do something else. as it turned out, there had been an astronomer, dr ian griffin, who, in 2017 and 2018, had done some private charters to see the southern lights. so i reached out to him, isaid, "hi, i'm rachel." what we'd like to do, we'd like to recreate these flights again. he kindly said yes and came on board. we're sold out, so we've got 273 on board tonight. 273 also coming on board tomorrow night. so, you know, it's really...yeah, it's amazing.
1:53 pm
we're excited. so, we're starting to get into the aurora zone, and as you can tell from all the tape, we're trying to see the aurora, but in a minute, the lights are going to go down and we'll hopefully get some good pictures. um...how long till the lights go down? it takes a while. we will turn them down right now. l awesome. thank you. here we go — yay! start looking out the window. oh, look, you're starting to see itjust ahead of us. look, look, look, look! it's starting to come in now. look! oh, man, this is getting good. 0k. can you see it through the windows? yes. are you starting to see it. yep. did you see that? oh, yes!
1:54 pm
woo—hoo! yeah, i enjoyed it a lot. fantastic. it was so exciting and to pray and wish and everything, - i think it was unbelievable. we flew into an aurora storm tonight so we got some lovely images. certainly for me, it was one of the best flights i've ever seen. the aurora tonight was spectacular. now it's time for a quick breakfast, i think, and then processing images for
1:55 pm
the rest of the day. right, that's all for this week. but coming up next time... christa's in iceland at the volcano that became the destination of choice for hundreds of lockdown locals earlier this year. someone asked me if it was sped up — it's not. don't forget, if you want to follow us on some of our recent adventures, you can find us on bbc iplayer. we're on social media too. just search for bbc travel show on all the main platforms and you'll find us there. for now, though, keep planning those next trips and we'll see you back on the road very, very soon.
1:56 pm
goodbye. well, for most of us today, cloudy and damp and the next few days will also be very, very mild for the time of the year. but with that, we will have spells of wind and rain too, so very autumnal, but the temperatures will be quite a story, i think, by the time we get to tuesday. could even be over 20 degrees in some spots in the south. but this is the picture today. an awful lot of cloud, but having said that, thinner cloud in the south and south—west, so i would not be surprised if we get some decent sunny spells there. cornwall, devon, along the southern counties —
1:57 pm
temperatures in the high teens. but despite the cloud across the north, still up to around 15, 16 degrees, but bits and pieces of rain, and they will continue to last through the evening and overnight, while the south clears up a little bit, so there could be some clear spells lasting all through the night across england, particularly the east and south—east. so, maybe down to 8 or 9 degrees here. a little bit fresher, but for many of us, it is into double figures. and whichever way you look at it, it is a very mild night. so here is tomorrow's weather. it starts off quite bright if not sunny in east anglia and the south—east, but quickly the cloud spreads ahead of this weather front. and you can see in the middle of the day, it is raining pretty much north and south not all the time. the rain will come and go. for some of us, it will be a damp, mild, drizzly sort of day, with 16, 17 degrees. for others, it could be quite wet with that rain splashing its way through into monday evening as well. but it is going to remain cloudy. this is a mild south—westerly wind brought by this big area of low pressure across the atlantic. and i think particularly on tuesday,
1:58 pm
we could have some very heavy rain brought in by this tongue of very warm air all the way from the azores. now this is really going to bump up the temperatures are some of us at least on tuesday. despite all the cloud and heavy rain, especially heavy here in wales and maybe the north west of england, it is going to be exceedingly mild right across the country. high teens even where it is raining, without any sunshine, possibly 21 degrees if the sun does come out for any length be of time there in the south—east. and then basically tuesday into wednesday, we have got more weather fronts crossing the country, big low pressure establishes itself across the uk, so spells of wind and rain. i think by the time we get to friday, things are expected to quieten down. it will turn a little bit cooler too, but then the weekend, next weekend is going to turn unsettled again.
1:59 pm
2:00 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines: the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. i think it's fair to say we all have to be incredibly self—aware, conscientious, as to how we conduct our business and put safety front and centre of this. issues on social media have been highlighted as part of the discussion around the safety of mps the social media companies could do a lot more. they could take down some of these accounts. and they could end what you might call end—to—end anonymity.

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on