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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 17, 2021 9:00am-9:31am BST

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this is bbc world news. our top stories... the man arrested by police following the killing of the uk mp sir david amess has been named as ali harbi ali and is being held under the terrorism act. officers have until friday to question him. a candlelit vigil was held last night in tribute to sir david, who was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery on friday. i don't know where we go from here. as a nation, i don't know where we go from here. i really feel sad. one of the closest associates of the venezuelan president nicolas maduro has arrived in the united states to face money laundering charges. hollywood producers and the technicians union strike an eleventh hour deal — avoiding industrial action that
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threatened to stop the cameras. a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. hello and welcome to bbc news. here in the uk, detectives now have until next friday to question a man arrested in connection with the death of the conservative mp sir david amess. he was attacked while holding a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea in essex. it's understood that the 25—year—old suspect — ali harbi ali — was referred to the government's counter—terrorism programme, prevent, several years ago but was never an official "subject of interest" to mi5. he's now being held at a police station in london, while three properties in the city have been searched. frances read has this report.
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lighting candles so he will be remembered. hundreds gathered to pay their respects to david amess, all faiths, young and older. not everyone may have agreed with his politics, but in this community they respected and loved him. he touched everybody�*s lives, and i don't know anybody who had that kind of reach. a truly dedicated soul. he was a genuine, caring and compassionate man, and it's absolutely tragic what has happened to him, and our hearts go out to his loved ones. i feel so sad, i don't know where we go from here. l as a nation, i don't know where we go from here. i i really feel sad. in the light of day, this now formally declared a terrorist incident, with early inquiries suggesting a motive linked to islamist extremism. whitehall officials confirmed the suspect is ali harbi ali,
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a british national of somali heritage who is being held at a london police station under the terrorism act. he was referred to the government's prevent scheme a few years ago, the programme designed to stop people being radicalised. but he's not thought to have been considered a subject of interest by mi5. now, urgent calls to keep mps safe. this weekend, already, changes, such as in south wales, with a police guard for an mp's coffee morning. some say this needs to be the norm. there has not been, to my knowledge, a discreet police presence at most of those events, and i realise that that's an issue that will increase levels of resource for the police, but surely it is something which ought to be on the table. but neither do those in politics want it to impact the way they represent the people they serve.
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even when you canvass, you get various people that are for you and others that are against you, but you take it, you have debates. democracy is action. that is what this is happening. that's the sad thing about what happened on friday. meanwhile, tributes have continued this morning, remembering who sir david amess was. he was so very, very funny. he was wonderful company. he was the life and soul of a party. he literally lit up a room. but, for now, this small seaside town stands together, united by a tragedy that has deeper questions to the safety of those trying to uphold democracy. francis read, bbc news. we can speak now to our correspondent greg mckenzie who is in leigh—on—sea. hundreds gathering last night for
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the vigil but bring us up—to—date on the vigil but bring us up—to—date on the police investigation. in the vigil but bring us up-to-date on the police investigation.— the police investigation. in terms ofthe the police investigation. in terms of the investigation, _ the police investigation. in terms of the investigation, a _ the police investigation. in terms. of the investigation, a 25-year-old of the investigation, a 25—year—old suspect was further detained late last night, that is ali harbi ali. he has been taken to a police station in london. having been at a police station in essex. properties are being searched in the capital, three in total. the police will have until friday to question this suspect. we have now discovered the suspect�*s father who has given an interview with the sunday times newspaper says he is traumatised at learning about the arrest of his son. the father of the suspect was a former adviser to the prime minister in somalia. in terms of today, the town is still in mourning. with many coming to lay flowers just behind me. an active crime scene still here further down, the church where sir
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david was killed on friday. as for today, there will be a church service at lipm. a candlelit vigil last night. many hundreds coming out in support of sir david, to remember him. many of those at that vigil last night new him personally. they said he loved hisjob, was a people person, and they are trying to come to terms with what has happened here. . political correspondent peter saull is here. once again this does throw the spotlight on security, safety of mps, away from westminster. the past 48 hours there — mps, away from westminster. the past 48 hours there have _ mps, away from westminster. the past 48 hours there have been _ 48 hours there have been conversations about that in this morning the house of commons speaker wrote an article picked up by different newspapers with different political leanings, the mail on sunday and the observer and in it he
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asked himself the question whether it is time for him to stop doing his own constituency surgeries. he decides that it is a firm no to that. many mps it seems agree. a lot of them tweeting pictures of recent days of public events they have gone ahead with with very little in the way of security measures. the speaker also acknowledges more needs to be done to protect mps in constituencies. there have been measures being brought in in the wake of the murder ofjo cox. they have access to panic alarms, shutters on constituency offices, they can put in place extra lighting. that is varied up and down the country and as we saw in the case of sir david amess, he held surgeries all over his constituency. different buildings. i think moore will become clear on measures that might be put in place in the next few days. mps return to westminster tomorrow. the home secretary has
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launched a review into it and she is saying all measures are under consideration.— saying all measures are under consideration. ~ ., ., , , consideration. what does this tell us about the _ consideration. what does this tell us about the nature _ consideration. what does this tell us about the nature of _ consideration. what does this tell us about the nature of political i us about the nature of political debate in this country? this us about the nature of political debate in this country?- debate in this country? this is another thing _ debate in this country? this is another thing the _ debate in this country? this is another thing the speaker - debate in this country? this is l another thing the speaker talks about, sir lindsay hoyle, he said we need to move to a kinder, more respectful politics. i think certainly if you go back to the scottish independence and brexit referendums in this country there has been a level of toxicity in the debate exacerbated perhaps by social media. a lot of mps talking about verbal abuse, even death threats they have received in recent years. again, it is a big issue. perhaps there will be pressure on the government to do more to put pressure on social media firms and take down harmful content. a piece of legislation is being prepared on that as we speak. what we have seen in recent days is a sense of political unity, shock and horror at what happened on friday. we have
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seen that again this morning in the sense labour and the liberal democrats have said they will not stand a candidate in the by—election in southend west, similar to what happened in batley and spen following the death ofjo cox. happened in batley and spen following the death of 10 cox. thank ou. the following the death of 10 cox. thank yom the latest _ following the death of 10 cox. thank you. the latest on _ following the death of 10 cox. thank you. the latest on events _ following the death of 10 cox. thank you. the latest on events in - you. the latest on events in leigh—on—sea. we will return to that later but now other stories. one of the venezuelan president nicolas maduro's closest aides has arrived in the united states to face money laundering charges after being extradited from cape verde. the us treasury says alex saab worked as a frontman for mr maduro's regime, using his accounts in american banks to launder the proceeds of corruption. he was detained injune last year as his plane made a stopover in africa to refuel. lucy grey has more details. colombian—born businessman, fugitive — alex saab, one of the venezuelan president's closest aides, is now in the united states facing money—laundering charges.
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he was extradited from cape verde after the us treasury claimed he worked as a frontman for president nicolas maduro, using his accounts in american banks to launder the proceeds of corruption. mr saab was detained injune last year as his plane made a stopover in africa to refuel. he said he was travelling on an official mission to get medical supplies to deal with the coronavirus pandemic. venezuela has reacted angrily to the extradition, accusing the us of abducting diplomatic personnel. shortly after saab's extradition, mr maduro's government suspended talks with the us—backed opposition, ahead of next month's regional elections. negotiations were due to resume this weekend in mexico with the aim of resolving a political crisis that has led to the collapse of the economy and years of chronic shortages of food and medicine. mr saab denies the charges against him and says they are politically motivated.
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officials in haiti say a group of christian missionaries and theirfamilies have been kidnapped by a gang in the capital, port—au—prince. it's thought at least fifteen women, men and children were abducted from a bus, shortly after leaving an orphanage. violence is currently surging across the haitian capital, three months after the president was assassinated. us real estate heir robert durst has been hospitalised with covid, just days after he was sentenced to life in prison. on thursday, he was found guilty of murdering his best friend susan berman, in 2000, to stop her talking to the police about his wife's disappearance. the 78—year—old has other medical issues and is on a ventilator. train services on the rail network that connects kent and parts of east sussex to london come under government control today. last month, it was announced that the operator southeastern would be stripped of its franchise, after failing to declare more than £25 million
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of taxpayerfunding. all previously purchased tickets — including season tickets — remain valid. a union representing about 60,000 behind—the—scenes workers in hollywood has reached a tentative deal with producers, averting a strike that threatened to cause widespread industry disruption. the international alliance of theatrical stage employees union, which includes camera operators, make—up artists, sound technicians and others, had threatened to strike from monday. shutdowns from the covid—i9 pandemic had caused a production backlog that led to crews working up to 14 hours a day to feed programming anousha sakoui is an entertainment reporter at the la times, specialising in hollywood and labour issues. she told us more about the dispute and the possible deal. the deadline was going to be midnight sunday, so first thing monday morning we would have seen
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people picketing along the pavement in front of studios up and down the us. pretty close. they announced it pretty much 24 hours before the deadline, so within good time. these have been issues that crews have been struggling for almost decades with tiredness, long hours, that have been exacerbated in recent months and during the pandemic. also, the confluence of the pandemic where people saw studios spending a lot of money trying to get people back to work, whether it is sick bay, other issues, to get people working again and get production started again when the pandemic shut everything down last year. they saw that yet when it came to improving their pay there was no money. they had an overwhelming, almost unanimous vote in favour of striking. which would have been the
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first time in its 128 year history. the man arrested by police following the killing of the uk mp sir david amess has been named as ali harbi ali and is being held under the terrorism act. officers have until friday to question him. a candlelit vigil was held last night in tribute to sir david, who was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery on friday. one of the closest associates of the venezuelan president nicolas maduro has arrived in the united states to face money laundering charges. windermere in the lake district in north west england could become ecologically dead in a matter of years, because of the amount of sewage being pumped into its waters, according to campaigners. an online petition calling for a ban on sewage pollution has now reached over 99,000 signatures. but, the situation is complex, as our environment correspondent
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judy hobson explains. tourists come to the lake district for its outstanding natural beauty, but campaigners say the water quality in windermere is so poor, it is a national scandal. there has just been the biggest blue—green algal bloom, all because of sewage entering the lake. a local conservationist has been filming water pollution in the area. that dark patch is an algal bloom. this is the river rothay that feeds into the lake. it actually prevents invertebrates from being able to breed on the substrate of the river itself and then, because of that, invertebrates have died and, subsequent to that, fish are dying. matt has started an online petition calling for a ban on sewage pollution in windermere. he said the waters here are close to ecological collapse. i have seen a decline in fish, invertebrates, freshwater vegetation. i have seen otter spraint completely absent of white—clawed crayfish. i have seen dead fish floating down the river past me. it is in a dire state and it
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will only get worse. algal blooms come and go, but they are appearing more frequently and they can be very harmful to humans and animals. there are two many main sources of sewage entering windermere. one is at the waste treatment site. that comes in when we have rain. they call it their storm overflow. a system. and the other is from septic tanks. there are over 1500 septic tanks that are around windermere itself and there is no regulation keeping these in check. last year, the sewage treatment plant at ambleside overflowed for weeks after heavy rain. what you can see is the fine filters at the back end. the company said it happens to prevent flooding, but a new plant at windermere is now improving water quality. over the past five years we have invested £40 million into assets around windermere both at ambleside, glebe road station and here at windermere waste water treatment works to address some of those challenges.
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but the sewage problem comes from different sources and the answer will be four different organisations to work together. the nutrients have probably been discharged over decades. it is a case of continual improvements and ongoing work and then looking to the future. it is notjust local people, it is a special part of the world for millions from all around the world. it is a unesco world heritage site. it is known for its natural beauty and now we have to protect that. that was judy hobson reporting from the lake district. pigs have been deployed by one of europe's busiest airports to keep geese away from the farmland in between the runways. but the team drafted in by amsterdam's schiphol airport won't be using scare tactics. the bbc s correspondent in the netherlands anna holligan has been to see them in action. are pigs the new scarecrows?
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i think pigs are the best scarecrows you can have. they are really big, large, moving, and they are a natural way of keeping the geese away. but their greatest attribute here is their appetite. they really like to eat everything. the idea is they will gobble up leftovers from the sugar beet harvest, removing the crop residue from this freshly turned soil that usually entices the winged trespassers. this is the sugar beet. when they harvest the crop, they take the sugar beet out. they sell the crop and they leave the top of the crop, the harvest residue, over here, and the birds really like it. but the pigs are here first, so they eat it and that is why the birds fly over and search for another place. this pig patrol is being used
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in combination with technological innovations like sound generators and green lasers that spook the geese. they are watching 24/7. we have bird detection radar. birds learn pretty fast. so we have to keep innovating with the measures. when you look around, this land is below sea level. it is fertile farmland. it is very attractive for geese especially. you are battling against nature really here. and the pigs can play a role on this front line. they sure can, yeah. these are sensitive, intelligent creatures, so i am curious about how they feel being so close to the runways. here they have like four soccer fields. they have the same houses, the same water system and feed system.
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so it is really normal to keep them this way. these snuffling swine are part of a six—week pilot project and if they are successful in keeping the birds and geese away from the runway, then similar projects could be trotted out at airports all over the world. anna holligan, bbc news. tens of thousands of italians have demonstrated in rome to call for a ban on the neo—fascist forza nuova party over its involvement in a riot last saturday. protesters carried placards saying "fascism, never again," in reference to the dictator benito mussolini, who ruled italy before and during the second world war. claire sedman reports. balloons and trade union flags filled this square as italians
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called for a ban on the neofascist forza nuova party. yes to vaccination mps say the placards. a direct response to this one week earlier. right—wing forza nuova supporters clashed with police and the headquarters of italy's largest trade union were attacked. they have been protesting against a scheme that makes everyone prove on arrival at work they are fully vaccinated, have recovered from the virus or had a recent negative test. for that, without one you can be fined or suspended without pay. unions have come together to call on government to dissolve neofascist and neo—nazi groups. translation: ., , translation: the union, the rights were attacked. _ translation: the union, the rights were attacked, an _ translation: the union, the rights were attacked, an attack _ translation: the union, the rights were attacked, an attack on - were attacked, an attack on democracy. were attacked, an attack on democracy-— were attacked, an attack on democra . ~ ., �* ., democracy. we came from belgium to show solidarity- _ democracy. we came from belgium to show solidarity. it _ democracy. we came from belgium to show solidarity. it is _ democracy. we came from belgium to show solidarity. it is an _ show solidarity. it is an international problem. the normalisation of far right violence. we have _ normalisation of far right violence. we have to — normalisation of far right violence. we have to fight it. ital}r
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normalisation of far right violence. we have to fight it.— we have to fight it. italy has had 4.7 we have to fight it. italy has had 4-7 million _ we have to fight it. italy has had 4.7 million cases _ we have to fight it. italy has had 4.7 million cases of— we have to fight it. italy has had 4.7 million cases of coronavirusl 4.7 million cases of coronavirus with more than 130,000 deaths. it is estimated 3 million workers have still not been vaccinated. back now to the investigation into the killing of the british mp, sir david amess. we can speak now to our security correspondent, frank gardner. bring it up—to—date with the investigation. bring it up-to-date with the investigation.— bring it up-to-date with the investiuation. ., , ., investigation. more details have emerued. investigation. more details have emerged- in _ investigation. more details have emerged. in the _ investigation. more details have emerged. in the past _ investigation. more details have emerged. in the past 24 - investigation. more details have emerged. in the past 24 hours | investigation. more details have. emerged. in the past 24 hours he investigation. more details have - emerged. in the past 24 hours he has been rearrested under what is called section 41 of the terrorism act and transferred to a london police station where detectives now have until next friday to question him. he has not been charged yet. they are gathering as much evidence as they can. it is fair to assume they will be going forensically through all his data communications, his phone, laptop, his history. the most
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important thing they will have wanted to establish early on is whether there was anyone else involved in the actions on friday. so far there do not seem to be. in other words he was a lone actor. his name is ali harbi ali. he is a 25—year—old british man of somali heritage. that is relevant because his father has been visited in london by counterterrorism police. his father also named as harbi ali kullane has been absolutely traumatised by this. his father was an adviser to the somali government, an adviser to the somali government, a senior member, participant in that government, an upstanding member of the community, and is totally horrified and shocked at what his son is alleged to have done. we know that the suspect was referred some years ago to the counter radicalisation programme in the uk called prevent. it is one of the
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strands of the government counterterrorism strategy that aims to steer people away from the path of radicalisation and extremism. it is not always successful. he did not spend long on it and as of last week, i am told, he was not on mis�*s watch lists. he was not on the list of subjects of interest. it was not a clean skin exactly but there is a suspicion he would have been self radicalised, potentially, by what you saw during lockdown. —— what he saw in lockdown. there is no evidence on this and we have to keep an open mind and not say anything that could be prejudicial to his trial. that could be pre'udicialto his trial. ., ., . ., , trial. you touched on it there but i wonder the _ trial. you touched on it there but i wonder the significance _ trial. you touched on it there but i wonder the significance of - trial. you touched on it there but i wonder the significance of the - trial. you touched on it there but i wonder the significance of the fact he was on the counterterrorism programme prevent, but as you said he was not deemed to be a subject of interest to m15. the he was not deemed to be a sub'ect of interest to m15.— interest to m15. the prevent programme _ interest to m15. the prevent programme is _ interest to m15. the prevent programme is controversiall interest to m15. the prevent -
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programme is controversial because there are plenty of people who considered it to unfairly concentrate on muslims in the past and demonises certain communities. it has not always work. some people have gone on it. it is voluntary and is not kind any —— carry any kind of criminal record. they can move referred to by nhs workers, police, any member of the public. if they say i am concerned about someone wearing nazi memorabilia, joining a weird cult, getting extreme, that would... he would then get a visit from social workers, he or she would get a visit and be encouraged to join the programme. but they do not have to. it carries no criminal record. one of the things people will look into after this probably is where any signs missed, any clues missed? there will be i think an
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internal review among police and mis. this internal review among police and m15. this is the hardest thing. {30 mi5. this is the hardest thing. go ahead. very interesting to have the latest on that investigation. i am sorry to cut you off but time is tight. really good to see you. frank gardner, security correspondent with the latest on the investigation. as frank was telling us detectives have until next friday to question a man who has been arrested in connection with the death of the conservative mp sir david amess. you are with bbc world news. the musician alan hawkshaw who composed tunes for grange hill and other tv programmes was admitted to hospital this week with pneumonia and died in the early hours of saturday.
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during a career that lasted more than 40 years, alan hawkshaw composed music for some of television's most popular shows. grange hill theme. his works could be fun and quirky, like the original grange hill theme... grange hill theme. ..or, like the channel 4 news theme... channel 4 news theme. ..at the more serious end of the scale. he was also a highly sought—after studio musician who could play a variety of instruments, and composed for more than 35 films. but his talent for writing memorable tv themes is what he will be best remembered for. they were heard by millions of viewers each week, on shows like dave allen at large... dave allen at large theme. countdown clock music.
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..and it's almost impossible to think of channel 4's countdown without hearing his perfectly timed music. i was already fighting a deadline when they rang up and said, "look, we just need to this sort of clock music, a theme that builds, for a proposed quiz show called countdown. can you do it?" i said, "well, not really, i'm busy with this stuff." he said, "well, look, try and get it together." and the story goes on, iforgot all about it, and then they rang me up and said, "have you done it?" and i said, "yeah." and i hadn't. and that's what the story is. i was in the loo, actually, when i got the idea for it. he may never have been a household name, but almost everyone knew alan hawkshaw�*s music. the musician alan hawkshaw, whose died aged 84.
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the first five recipients of the earthshot prize of the earthshot prize will be announced later, during a ceremony hosted by the awards founder — the duke of cambridge. it comes after senior royals expressed frustration this week, at world leaders' lack of action on climate change. the award recognises those who have come up with the most innovative solutions to solve the world's environmental problems. each finalist will receive a million pounds to try to bring their idea to life. joining me now is hindou mbororo ibrahim is an environmental activist and earthshot prize council member she is also a member of chad s pastoralist mbororo community. explain if you can the significance of this prize and the prize money thatis of this prize and the prize money that is available will make a huge difference, but talk to me about the importance of the prize and the royal backing that comes with it. right, thank you for having me. i think the prize, it's really very
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important for the world, not only for the individual win it. because we are in a time of crisis when you see the reports coming out, but in the communities you have seen the climate changing by day and impacting the life of the peoples. we can't live wit. —— live with it. we can't live wit. —— live with it. we want to have solutions. those finalists are all carrying a solution that can help recover nature and that is why the prize is important and it is right on time to help us all find the solution. so very proud of all of them and more proud for the prize that is set up. talk to me about what sort of entrants you would be looking for. because these tackle projects big and small. but some may be relatively simple, but they need the funding to be rolled out on a bigger
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scale. talk to me about some of

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