Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 17, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

2:00 am
welcome to bbc news. our top stories: a man suspected of killing the british member of parliament, david amess, has been named as ali harbi ali. it's understood he'd previously been referred to a counter—extremism programme. the prime minister and leader of the opposition paid their respects at the scene of the attack, as a review begins into the threats faced by politicians. we faced by politicians. live in an open society, a democracy. we live in an open society, a democracy. we cannot be cowed by any individual or any motivation, people with motives to stop us from functioning. russia records more than 1,000 deaths from coronavirus in a single day, for the first time since the start of the pandemic.
2:01 am
mass protests in rome as tens of thousands of italians call for a ban on the neo—fascist forza nuova party over its involvement in a riot a week ago. and uncovering the origins of the solar system. the nasa mission aiming to learn more about the creation of the planets. here in the uk, the man arrested by police following the killing of the member of parliament sir david amess has been named as ali harbi ali. the 25—year—old is british, of somali heritage. it's understood he was previously referred to the government's prevent programme, the scheme intended to identify those at risk of radicalisation and stop them being drawn into terrorism.
2:02 am
sir david was stabbed multiple times when he was holding a regular meeting with his constituents in a church hall in leigh—on—sea, in essex in the south east of england. the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, laid flowers together at the scene. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports from leigh—on—sea. a united front in the face of a suspected terrorist attack. the prime minister, the leader of the opposition, the speaker of the house of commons and the home secretary. four of the most senior politicians in the land at the church today where sir david amess mp was murdered. he was killed doing a job that he loved, serving his own constituents as an elected democratic member. and, of course, acts of this are absolutely wrong and we cannot let that get in the way of our functioning democracy. it was formally declared a terrorist incident late last night.
2:03 am
early enquiries suggesting the motive was islamist extremism. the man in custody, ali harbi ali, is understood to have been referred to the government's prevent scheme a few years ago. the scheme�*s designed to stop people being drawn in to terrorism. he was never a formal subject of interest for the security service mi5. through friends, eyewitnesses have suggested the attacker waited in the queue at sir david's constituency surgery yesterday, before stabbing the mp several times with a knife in front of his assistant and then waiting for police to arrive. sir david was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters, and those who've campaigned with him had warned him of the risks. i used to go out on the doorsteps on the cold, dark nights in the rain and i used to be a bodyguard many years ago. and i said, "david, you should have somebody with you on these things, it's not safe". southend has two representatives in parliament and the other mp, james duddridge, paid this emotional tribute
2:04 am
to his friend. i mean, the community hasjust been hit sideways by this. it's notjust a member of parliament, notjust the local member of parliament, but, you know, he really did touch people's lives in a way that most mps don't manage to do. tonight at the local sports field, hundreds of people gathered to remember the mp so many of them knew personally. and he was a very, very decent human being. an mp that not everyone agreed with, but who everyone respected and loved. daniel sandford, bbc news, leigh—on—sea. police forces across the uk have been contacting mps to discuss their personal safety. meeting constituents is seen as central to their role as representatives, but the death of sir david amess has re—opened a debate about the risks they face. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. around the country today, mps continuing to hold their surgeries. robert largan
2:05 am
in the peak district saying he'll "keep doing this all year round." craig williams in montgomeryshire thanking welsh police for being there to give reassurance, and kieran mullan in cheshire saying, "we must not let people force us to do things differently." but today there are changes. in south wales, a police guard for an mp's coffee morning. and he already felt honourable. we now have cctv at the front and rear of the building.
2:06 am
who'd watched radical islamic sermons online. she was bundled away. and in 2017, four passers—by and pc keith palmer were all killed outside parliament in what police called an act of islamist—related terror. the mp who was here that day and tried to save pc palmer's life has said that meeting constituents is vital but they should be paused. the home secretary has announced a review of mps�* security and he says that should be completed first. i would recommend that no mp has a direct surgery until... you know, you can move to zoom, there's other ways... you can actually achieve an awful lot over the telephone, you can get things moving far faster than having to wait for the surgery date, as well. but for sir david amess, meeting constituents was a vital part of his job. so the question now is — how much further should security be tightened? many believe things have to be reappraised but mps themselves must decide. it's not a question of carrying on with business as usual and just regarding this as an occupational
2:07 am
hazard of being an mp. nor of having close security such as the home secretary has, or the prime minister or the foreign secretary needs to have. we need to have a discussion about how we strike the balance. it's a balance that will be hard to find. two years ago in the royal albert hall, a concert for people with learning disabilities. sir david amess championed this cause. he loved his public role. mps are public figures — accessible and therefore vulnerable. damian grammaticas, bbc news. russia has recorded more than 1,000 covid deaths in a day for the first time since the start of the pandemic. the country has had more than 700 coronavirus deaths every single day since mid—july. the figures have grown even further over the past month. infections continue to rise, as authorities struggle to persuade people to get vaccinated. 0ur moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, has this
2:08 am
report. russia continues to set new records on coronavirus. for the first time since the pandemic began, the authorities here have reported more than 1,000 deaths linked to covid in the last 2a hours. confirmed new cases also hit a record high for the same period, more than 33,200. translation: | think - the lockdown that we had last year will happen again. back then there were even fewer infections. it's frightening. translation: the number of sick people is scarier - than a new lockdown. it seems like there's a lot of young people among them, people like us, who are on lung ventilators and seriously ill. it's scary. russia has developed several covid vaccines but the public has been reluctant to get the jabs. vaccine scepticism is widespread here. so far, the kremlin has avoided imposing tough new restrictions
2:09 am
but some russian regions are reintroducing a system of qr codes for access to public places. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. let's get some of the day's other news. president macron has become the first french head of state to attend events marking the killing of dozens of algerian demonstrators by police in paris 60 years ago. he joined a commemoration at a bridge over the river seine, the starting point in 1961 for a march against a night curfew which was imposed only on algerians. french leaders have been honouring the teacher samuel paty, a year to the day after a radical islamist beheaded him for showing his class cartoons of the muslim prophet mohammed. the chechen teenager who killed him was reacting to a social media campaign whipped up by some parents. mr paty�*s violent death stunned france's educators, who saw it as an attack on the country's core values. a spokesman for former us president bill clinton says
2:10 am
he expects the 75—year—old to be discharged on sunday. but they say mr clinton, who was admitted to hospital with an infection on thursday, will reportedly stay another night in hospital in california. new zealand says it's administered a record number of coronavirus vaccines in a so—called "vaxathon." nearly 130,000 people were inoculated at more than 780 sites across the country. in a range of gimmicks to promote the event, boats loaded with vaccine shots were sent to remote areas. air new zealand turned one of its dreamlinerjets into a temporary clinic. tens of thousands of italians have demonstrated in rome to call for a ban on the neo—fascist forza nuova party over its involvement in a riot last saturday. protesters carried placards saying "fascism, never again," in reference to the dictator benito mussolini, who ruled italy before and during the second world war. lucy grey reports.
2:11 am
balloons and trade union flags filled rome's piazza san giovanni as tens of thousands of italians called for a ban on the neofascist forza nuova party. "yes to vaccination", and "peace", said the placards — a direct response to this one week earlier. right—wing forza nuova supporters angry at the government's coronavirus measures, clashing with police at the headquarters of italy's largest trade union, which was attacked. 12 people, including the leaders of forza nuova, were arrested. they had been protesting against the so—called green pass, which makes everyone prove on arrival at work that they are fully vaccinated, have recovered from the virus, or have a recent negative test. for those without one, you can be fined or suspended without pay.
2:12 am
unions have come together to call on the government to dissolve neofascist or neo—nazi groups. translation: a union that defends our rights was attacked. this is an attack on democracy. translation: we came from belgian to show our solidarity, this is an international problem. the normalisation of far right powers — we have to fight it. italy has had 4.7 million cases of coronavirus, with more than 130,000 deaths. it is estimated around 3 million workers still have not been vaccinated. lucy grey, bbc news. the british—iranian aid—worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, has lost an appeal against her second jail sentence in iran. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was given a 1—year sentence when her first 5—year sentence ended in march. the british foreign secretary liz truss has described the latest decision as "an appalling continuation of a cruel ordeal." i've been speaking
2:13 am
to jason rezaian. he was the washington post's tehran correspondent for four years. and spent more than 500 days unjustly imprisoned by iranian authorities until his release in january 2016. he now hosts a podcast about that experience and similar cases called 544 days, and gave me his reaction. as the foreign secretary said i am equally as appalled and disgusted, but i also believe that we should have expected this development. nazanin has been subjected to an abuse of power going on six years now, and essentially she has been held hostage until which time the iranian regime received what it believes it can get from the british government. i expect her detention will be extended in this way until they get what they want. for the last year she has been held under house arrest in her parent's home in tehran. she has been going through the cycle of waiting for an appeal, being rejected, et cetera. what will she be going through right now? for the last year she has been
2:14 am
held under house arrest in her parent's home in tehran. she has been going through the cycle of waiting for an appeal, being rejected, et cetera. what will she be going through right now? it's a constant rollercoaster. you are being told from the very first days of your imprisonment that you will be let out soon or that you will spend the rest of your life there, or that you will face execution, psychological torment and torture throughout, and in her situation, the release into house arrest, forced to wear the ankle tag she has had to wearfor over a year now, being tracked wherever she goes, it's not a life to live, and it really is unfair what they have done to her and continue to do to her. iran says there are some simple things that could help secure her release. the british government reimbursing iranian authorities for tanks they bought several years ago that were never delivered. has the british government
2:15 am
doing enough to secure her release do you think? to paraphrase what my brother said that about my 544 day ordeal in iran, he appreciated what the us government was doing, but apparently it wasn't enough because i was still sitting in prison, so i don't think the british government is doing enough. i can't even, i think we are on the fifth foreign secretary since nazanin�*s original arrest, i have had conversations withjerry hunt over the last several years and there is a growing understanding that the us and uk governments need to take a harder line on state hostage taking, but they haven't done it so far, and they haven't figured out the ways to bring these britons home. these are all british nationals who are languishing in iranian custody and i don't see that the foreign office is doing enough
2:16 am
to bring her home. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: guess who will be at cop26? 0rganisers announced the former us president barack 0bama will attend the opening of the summit to meet youth activists and address the threat of climate change. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life but in the marina area, where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he's gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb .
2:17 am
which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, i ripping a hole in the front of the building. this government will not weaken! democracy will prevail! it fills me with humility and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation - held its breath for the men they called 'the 33'. and then... bells toll. ..bells tolled nationwide . to announce the first rescue and chile let outi an almighty roar. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: a man suspected of killing a uk member of parliament has been named as ali harbi ali. the british national had previously attended an anti—radicalisation programme. russia has recorded more than one thousand deaths
2:18 am
from coronavirus in a single day for the first time since the start of the pandemic. former us president barack 0bama has confirmed he will attend the cop26 climate change summit in glasgow. he willjoin current president joe biden and more than 120 heads of state at the conference, which gets under way on 31 october. cop26 will be the biggest climate change conference since landmark talks in paris in 2015. let's speak to rob jackson, professor of environmental sciences at stanford university. he's also the chair of the global carbon project. good to see you, thank you for being with us. what is the significance view of the former president this conference? there are quite a few things that are significant about it, he is meeting with youth leaders, and that is both
2:19 am
symbolic and genuinely important. 0ur youth have more at stake through climate are now driving climate action throughout the world. president obama throughout the world. president 0bama takes — throughout the world. president obama takes that _ throughout the world. president obama takes that celebrity - throughout the world. president obama takes that celebrity box | 0bama takes that celebrity box in many ways. what is the impact of having that celebrity influence on the conversation, whether it is a former president or a british royal, or a popstar? president or a british royal, or a pepstar?_ president or a british royal, or a popstar? celebrities call attention _ or a popstar? celebrities call attention to _ or a popstar? celebrities call attention to global— or a popstar? celebrities call attention to global causes, l or a popstar? celebrities call l attention to global causes, the president is doing it now with his commitment to climate and his commitment to climate and his efforts on global poverty are another example. leonardo dicaprio and his passion for the environment is another example. the environment is another example-— the environment is another examle. ., ., example. obama was important in the talks in — example. obama was important in the talks in 2015 _ example. obama was important in the talks in 2015 but _ example. obama was important in the talks in 2015 but of— example. obama was important in the talks in 2015 but of course - the talks in 2015 but of course he is no longer president and he is no longer president and he does not hold any official power. will it be a distraction, him being there, from the current presidentjoe biden, being able to do his job? biden, being able to do his “ob? ., biden, being able to do his 'ob? ., ., biden, being able to do his “ob? ., ., ., ., ., job? you would have to ask the resident job? you would have to ask the president that. _ job? you would have to ask the president that. there _ job? you would have to ask the president that. there will - job? you would have to ask the president that. there will be i president that. there will be plenty of important people and celebrities there, so i don't
2:20 am
believe so.— celebrities there, so i don't believe so. ~ . , , believe so. what will president obama believe so. what will president 0bama heping _ believe so. what will president obama hoping to _ believe so. what will president obama hoping to achieve - believe so. what will president obama hoping to achieve from | 0bama hoping to achieve from being there, and his meetings with diesel youth groups? i think like everyone he hopes to achieve action, to galvanise not pledges and goals but real concrete action and financial commitments, and i am struck by how think similar other data when he became president 12 years ago. in the first year of his administration the climate bill passed the house but thousand the senate, and we are in the exact same place. we may not even come up with a vote in the senate this time. it is perched on a knife edge, but there is one big difference. the atmosphere has another 400 billion tons of carbon dioxide pollution in it, warming the earth today and centuries from today. earth today and centuries from toda . ., , ., . today. you will be watching this conference _ today. you will be watching this conference closely, - today. you will be watching i this conference closely, what are your hopes for it? i this conference closely, what are your hopes for it?- are your hopes for it? i hope to see continuing _ are your hopes for it? i hope to see continuing action - are your hopes for it? i hope to see continuing action on l to see continuing action on carbon dioxide, the second most
2:21 am
greenhouse gas, methane has got a little to make a lot of attention but the ipcc report, and the eu us pledge to reduce emissions 20% by 2030, so i'm hoping that methane will have its day in the sun and we will have reductions in emissions for that as well. global finance is also important to help countries transition to clean energy. the united nations has withdrawn its invitation to matt hancock to take up an unpaid role helping africa's economies recover from covid—19. it's understood a decision was taken at senior levels within the un, to rescind the offer after questions were raised about the former health secretary's suitability for the role. 0ur correspondent, mark lobel has been following the story. what led to this embarrassing moment for the former health secretary who was looking to relaunch his political career, came just three days after an
2:22 am
exciting moment for him when he announced on tuesday that he was going to be doing this role, helping africa's economies recover from covid and he was greeted with support from former cabinet colleagues including the foreign secretary, the housing secretary, and including the culture secretary, and this was not an appointment that came through the uk government, it was an internal un appointment, and there were many in the international community who suddenly questioned matt hancock's expertise for doing this role, his knowledge of africa, and also his past mistakes and how that would lead to a good ambassador for this particular role. matt hancock's friend say that obviously the eu must�*ve aware of his history and all these other things beforehand but one thing they did not appear to be aware of comes across in matt hancock's statement. he starts by saying, this is after the role has been withdrawn from
2:23 am
him, i was honoured to be approached by the un and appointed as special representative to the economic commission for africa, to help drive forward an agenda of its strengthening markets and bringing investment africa. by the un have written to me to explain a technical un rule has subsequently come to light... that makes two questions, why did it take the un so long, a month really since they sent that initial letter to him inviting him to this role, to realise that technical rule existed, and secondly what about gordon brown, he was an mp when he was given a similar role in my understanding is he was about to leave parliament, he announced he was standing down, whereas matt hancock seen very clearly he is not intending to do that. nasa has successfully launched its first mission to studyjupiter�*s trojan
2:24 am
asteroids — two vast clusters of space rocks that surround the planet. scientists believe they are made up of matter that formed the solar system's outer planets. duncan kennedy explains three, two, one, zero. the start of a 4 billion—milejourney. lift off, atlas v takes flight. the atlas v rocket is carrying a craft called lucy, that aims to go into orbit around jupiter and study a group of asteroids called trojans, some of which are the size of a city. so what are the trojan asteroids? there asteroids which orbit withjupiter around the sun that ultimately hold the clues to the formation of our solar system... lucy's giant solar panels would only generate enough electricity to power a few light bulbs on earth but around jupiter, it's enough to reach the trojan asteroids and ask questions like what they made of and where do come from? by going to visit a large number, eight asteroids in total, over the mission lifetime, we'll really better understand
2:25 am
all about the asteroids. so if you only see one, maybe you got a bit of a funny one, but by seeing eight, you get to really understand what's going on in this population. scientists want lucy to test their theory that the early solar system was juggled around by gravity with some objects being thrown in and others out, just like billiard balls. but they'll need patience. lucy's expected to be operating around asteroids for the next 12 years. duncan kennedy, bbc news. a reminder of our top story: the bbc has learned that a man detained on suspicion of killing the british mp, david amess, had previously attended a government scheme to prevent radicalisation. the suspect — named as ali harbi ali — is thought not to have been put on a watchlist of subjects, of interest to the security services.
2:26 am
much more on that story on the bbc news website where you can deal download the bbc news app. thanks for watching, goodbye. cloudy and damp weather for the first part of sunday. because we got some decent sunshine through saturday, the best of it across southern england, the midlands, wales and east anglia and the far north of scotland as well. late in the day, we did see some rain start to come down around dunblane, that is the first signs of this band of rain showing up on the radar, pretty extensive and heavy across northern scotland and england, getting into north wales as well and even further southwards, a few patches of rain across the south of wales in south—west england as well, across the midlands, south—east anglia, and some dry weather north of scotland for the next few hours. a mild start to the day on sunday. 11 to 30 degrees widely, a legacy of cool and clinging
2:27 am
on across the parts of northern scotland, but otherwise extensive cloud to start the day on sunday, the rain initially heavyy in scotland, but later and patchy quickly to the morning but across northern ireland, scotland and northern england, these areas will be prone to spots of rain even in the afternoon so for some it will stay on the damp side but at the same time we should start to see some gaps in the cloud opening out in the south with a few sunny spells in southern england, southern wales and the south midlands. for monday, we will start to see some stronger south—westerly winds moving in, so monday will be a windier kind of day, particularly across western areas with layers of crowd and outbreaks of rain spilling in, but if we do see some sunshine, it is likely to be very hazy, and a lot of high cloud in the sky, so bright rather than sunny in those drier moments. temperatures will be mild, 15—18 degrees and it gets even milder still on tuesday.
2:28 am
the winds coming from a long way south, and then we the slow—moving weather front bringing some intense bursts of rain to the west. perhaps across wales, perhaps across cumbria. some of these areas could see localised surface water but eastern areas not seeing much in the way of rain, but we could see some sunny spells breaking through, and if that happens across the south—east we could see temperatures climb to 21 celsius, very viry mild indeed, and that mild weather stays with us for the first half of the week before temperatures gradually get close to normal towards the end of the week.
2:29 am
2:30 am
this is bbc news, the headlines: the bbc has learned that a man detained on suspicion of killing the british mp, david amess, had previously attended a government scheme to prevent radicalisation. the suspect, named as ali harbi ali, is thought not to have been put on a watchlist of subjects, of interest to the security services. russia has recorded more than one thousand deaths from coronavirus in a single day for the first time since the start of the pandemic. the infection rate has also continued to soar as the authorities struggle to persuade people to get vaccinated. tens of thousands of italians have marched througn the centre of rome, calling for a ban on the neo—fascist forza nuova party. it's leaders were among those arrested after the headquarters of the nation's oldest trade union was stormed in a riot, a week ago.
2:31 am
now on bbc news, it's time for newscast.

33 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on