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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 16, 2021 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

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�*woii won it, and for exeter, a match try won it, and for exeter, a match that began with a talking point ended with a bonus point. patrick gearey, bbc news. and oisin murphy has become champion jockey for a thrid time at flat racing's season finale at ascot. the queen was in attendance on champions day. the feature race, the champion stakes, was won by sealiway. adayar finished fifth and with it went william buick�*s hopes of pipping murphy to the jockey�*s title. and cameron norrie is leading grigor dimitrov in the semifinals at indian wells, coverage on 5 live sports extra now. that, though, is all from me. martine. that's it for now. there's continuing coverage on the bbc news channel of events following the killing of sir david amess. and the home secretary, priti patel, will be appearing on the andrew marr show tomorrow morning at 9am on bbc one.
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we had an early patch of rain of eastern england. scotland was one of the sunniest places. we sought the cloud break across southern england. it stayed pretty cloudy for some across northern england. over recent hours, we had seen rain arrive in the rain is making inroads across scotland and will push southwards and eastwards over the next few hours. the rain will be more persistent over england and wales for a time. light rain across southern wales and south—west england but otherwise staying largely dry in the south—east. temperature is mild but relatively cool temperature is mild but relatively cool. it should be a fine start for orkney and shetland with some sunny
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spells, may be the odd isolated shower. rain elsewhere, turning light and patchy through the day, some mistiness over the tops of the hills. damp in northern england and scotland. we will start to see sunny spells breaking through across parts of the south of england and south midlands. temperatures could be high as 19 degrees. next week, some strengthening winds. monday will be a windier kind of day, the south—westerly winds bringing layers of cloud and rain mostly affecting the west and perhaps the south. the best of any dry or bright weather across eastern areas but they will be a lot of high cloud so any glimpses of sunshine will be on the hazy side. temperatures foremost between 1a and 18 celsius. one tuesday, there will be moisture hitting some of our western hills and it could bring significant rainfall totals, perhaps enough to
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cause localised surface water flooding. away from the mountains, little rain, and with breaks in the cloud, it could become even milder. temperatures might reach 20 or 21 celsius across parts of east anglia in south—east england. 17 in glasgow is very loud as well. mild weather continues into the middle part of the week, eventually turning cooler towards the end of the week. that is your latest weather.
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hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. jo phillips and nigel nelson will bejoining me. first, the headlines. a suspect for the alleged murder of sir david amess has been named as ali harbi ali of somali heritage. the tory mp was killed on friday. police say they're treating it
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as a �*terrorist incident�*. residents in leigh—on—sea have gathered for a candlelit vigil, in memory of their mp. the us government has offered financial compensation to the relatives of ten people mistakenly killed by the american military in a drone strike in the afghan capital, kabul, in august. the strike on a car killed seven children. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the political commentatorjo phillips, and political editor of the sunday mirror and the sunday people, nigel nelson.
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thank you for staying up to watch with us and whatjo and nigel. let's start with the observer, which leads with the commons speaker sir lindsay hoyle calling for a kinderform of political discourse, following the death of sir david amess. the telegraph say the murder suspect, ali harbi, was not known to m15 despite being referred to the counter—terrorism prevent programme. in the wake of the attack, the home secretary priti patel is devising a police protection plan for mp5. that makes the front page of the independent. the sunday express also says the suspect was flagged for deradicalisation. its headline is "we won't let terror win." and the sunday times reports that sir david amess�* last act was to help children understand democracy. the paper details the final phone conversation he had, moments before his death. so, let's begin... jove, do you want to kick us off this evening? shall we start with the sunday times, that is ok with
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you. the sunday times, that is ok with ou. , , , the sunday times, that is ok with 0“. , , , ., the sunday times, that is ok with ou. , , , ., ., the sunday times, that is ok with 0“. , , , ., ., ., , . you. yes, this is a rather graphic detail of a _ you. yes, this is a rather graphic detail of a conversation - you. yes, this is a rather graphic detail of a conversation he - you. yes, this is a rather graphic detail of a conversation he was l detail of a conversation he was having with a chap called richard hill grove whose daughter was going to be paired with sir david amess as part of the children without campaign that the mp was heavily involved with and itjust brings home the suddenness and the shock that this man was having a zoom call or a phone call with sir david amess. they ended a call because he had to go unto his constituency surgery and minutes afterwards, we know what happened, he was attacked and later died. so, just the sort of brings it home, that awfulness, i think, and also underlines what everybody has been saying, that he was a man that was committed, busy, you know, involved with things like the children's parliament. any number of things. the words that have rung out in the last 36 hours
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have rung out in the last 36 hours have been dominated by tiredness and, you know, it is that kindness, that involvement, you know, and again it comes across in this report of the phone call.— of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible _ of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible to _ of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible to the _ of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible to the public, - of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible to the public, as - of the phone call. nigel, he was accessible to the public, as that| accessible to the public, as that demonstrates. and also he was really good at getting publicity for the causes he believed in. presumably, he was somebody in your line of business that you dealt with on a fairly regular basis.— fairly regular basis. yes, that is ri . ht. fairly regular basis. yes, that is riuht. i fairly regular basis. yes, that is right- i have — fairly regular basis. yes, that is right. i have known _ fairly regular basis. yes, that is right. i have known david - fairly regular basis. yes, that is right. i have known david or - fairly regular basis. yes, that is | right. i have known david or new david _ right. i have known david or new david for— right. i have known david or new david for 35— right. i have known david or new david for 35 years. and the one thing _ david for 35 years. and the one thing i— david for 35 years. and the one thing i most rememberabout david for 35 years. and the one thing i most remember about him david for 35 years. and the one thing i most rememberabout him is i don't _ thing i most rememberabout him is i don't think_ thing i most rememberabout him is i don't think i_ thing i most rememberabout him is i don't think i have ever seen him not smile~ _ don't think i have ever seen him not smile~ 50. _ don't think i have ever seen him not smile~ 50. i— don't think i have ever seen him not smile. so, i mean, if you sealthe pictures— smile. so, i mean, if you sealthe pictures of— smile. so, i mean, if you sealthe pictures of him since his tragic death, — pictures of him since his tragic death, all_ pictures of him since his tragic death, all of them have him smiling. so, death, all of them have him smiling. 50. if— death, all of them have him smiling. 50. if you _ death, all of them have him smiling. 50. if you ran— death, all of them have him smiling. so, if you ran in head to him, if you— so, if you ran in head to him, if you are— so, if you ran in head to him, if you are feeling a bit low, just a few minutes with him would immediately sort of lift your spirits _ immediately sort of lift your spirits. and of course he had been a
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fixture _ spirits. and of course he had been a fixture at _ spirits. and of course he had been a fixture at the house of commons for a tong _ fixture at the house of commons for a tong time, — fixture at the house of commons for a long time, he was there three years— a long time, he was there three years before i was and i have been there _ years before i was and i have been there for— years before i was and i have been there for 35— years before i was and i have been there for 35 years. he was as much a fixture _ there for 35 years. he was as much a fixture as_ there for 35 years. he was as much a fixture as big — there for 35 years. he was as much a fixture as big ben, and of course, the house — fixture as big ben, and of course, the house of commons now will feel like parliament without backlog. he really— like parliament without backlog. he really witi— like parliament without backlog. he really will be greatly missed. indeed. _ really will be greatly missed. indeed, he carved out quite a unique role. two things struck me, one was the smile, i mentioned this last night, and almost cheshire cat —like quality to the smile, it was still in the air a couple of moments after he had gone, partly because of the impression left on people. but then listening to one of his colleagues who used to work for iain duncan smith, tim montgomerie, saying about how he is going through a tough time with his mental health and how incredibly supportive david amis was to the point of saying, if it gets darker, you promise me you will call me, and how insistent he was, and
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the effect he made to bring other people up and encourage and support them is quite a tribute to him. nigel, also, iwas them is quite a tribute to him. nigel, also, i was going to mention the people because this sums up the fact that other people are affected by this very, very directly, and of course, notjust as by this very, very directly, and of course, not just as friends and by this very, very directly, and of course, notjust as friends and his colleagues and the people who knew him through his work but above all, his family. him through his work but above all, his famil . , ., ., ., , his family. yes, and our thoughts really should _ his family. yes, and our thoughts really should be _ his family. yes, and our thoughts really should be with _ his family. yes, and our thoughts really should be with them, - his family. yes, and our thoughts really should be with them, his . his family. yes, and our thoughts i really should be with them, his wife and his— really should be with them, his wife and his five — really should be with them, his wife and his five children. this comes from _ and his five children. this comes from a _ and his five children. this comes from a documentary that he made for a sixth— from a documentary that he made for a sixth form _ from a documentary that he made for a sixth form going back ten years, and what — a sixth form going back ten years, and what that is actually talking about _ and what that is actually talking about is — and what that is actually talking about is the fact that he was talking — about is the fact that he was talking about how politics, because it is so _ talking about how politics, because it is so att— talking about how politics, because it is so all embracing and takes up pretty— it is so all embracing and takes up pretty much every minute of your working _ pretty much every minute of your working day, he was talking about the family— working day, he was talking about the family paying a very heavy price for this _ the family paying a very heavy price for this. and i think we sometimes
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forget, _ for this. and i think we sometimes forget, i_ for this. and i think we sometimes forget, i mean, politicians come way 7 come _ forget, i mean, politicians come way ? come somewhere belowjournalists and public— ? come somewhere belowjournalists and public disdain but the amount of hours _ and public disdain but the amount of hours you _ and public disdain but the amount of hours you actually have to put in, the places— hours you actually have to put in, the places you have to be, all these things— the places you have to be, all these things build up to a real sort of, you know. — things build up to a real sort of, you know. a _ things build up to a real sort of, you know, a real burden on your family — you know, a real burden on your family and _ you know, a real burden on your family. and he was somebody, a devout— family. and he was somebody, a devout catholic, a loving father, a toying _ devout catholic, a loving father, a loving husband. i mean, he absolutely adored his family, and it must _ absolutely adored his family, and it must be _ absolutely adored his family, and it must be very painful to him to see the effect — must be very painful to him to see the effect hisjob was having on them — the effect his “ob was having on them. , ., , ., the effect his “ob was having on them. , ., ,, . , the effect his “ob was having on them. , ., i. ., , ., the effect his “ob was having on them. ., , ., them. jo, you have been a political “ournalist them. jo, you have been a political journalist and _ them. jo, you have been a political journalist and a _ them. jo, you have been a political journalist and a little _ them. jo, you have been a political journalist and a little press - journalist and a little press officer and you must have had these conversations in the past with people about the kind of extra pressure that is put on the shoulders of their family. they deal with the flak but also they have to give up the amount of time. yes. with the flak but also they have to give up the amount of time. yes, and ou are give up the amount of time. yes, and you are never — give up the amount of time. yes, and you are never off— give up the amount of time. yes, and you are never off duty. _ give up the amount of time. yes, and you are never off duty. you _ give up the amount of time. yes, and you are never off duty. you know, - you are never off duty. you know, you are never off duty. you know, you can'tjust sort of pop out down
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the road to the newsagents or to the butchers or something because somebody will stop you and say, oh, i've got a problem about this, that of the other. and it is physically difficult, ithink, of the other. and it is physically difficult, i think, for... that lovely picture on the front of the sunday people of david and his wife julie and their daughters. those girls will have been children when he started as an mp so that is all through their growing up, all those parents evenings that he perhaps couldn't get to because there was a vote in the commons, all those of other events, and you do have to share your political partner with the rest of the constituency, and, you know, it is tough, it's a big ask of the family. i you know, it is tough, it's a big ask of the family.— you know, it is tough, it's a big ask of the family. i was looking at his are ask of the family. i was looking at his age and _ ask of the family. i was looking at his age and thinking _ ask of the family. i was looking at his age and thinking well, - ask of the family. i was looking at his age and thinking well, he - ask of the family. i was looking at his age and thinking well, he was| his age and thinking well, he was 69, this might have been his last parliament, who knows, but doubtless, he at his wife were looking forward to what comes after work and perhaps getting back some of that time. take us on, jo, to the
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sunday telegraph which talks a bit more about the suspect in this case. yes, well we now know, or we knew that he was 25. he has been named by sources this evening as ali harbi ali who is british but of somalian heritage, apparently. other reports say his father was quite a senior adviser to the somali government. what is interesting about the sunday telegraph story is that he was not known to m15, the security services, but he had been referred to the prevent programme several years ago but it doesn't seem as though that particular came to anything. the other part of the story that is also quite interesting is that david amess, in common with every mp, had had rights. earlier today, and
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yesterday, we have been hearing catalogues of the number of threats, including yvette cooper's constituency officer, manager, 100 death threats a week. i mean, can you imagine having to deal with that and then dealing with the people that are coming in and really need your help? so, david amess had had a particularly present threat according to the sunday telegraph but it is not apparently linked to what happened on friday. there are a lot of questions to be asked, whether this was a lone wolf, what the background was, we won't really know for a couple of days, i wouldn't have thought. it is know for a couple of days, i wouldn't have thought. it is a very sombre photograph, _ wouldn't have thought. it is a very sombre photograph, nigel, - wouldn't have thought. it is a very sombre photograph, nigel, on - wouldn't have thought. it is a veryj sombre photograph, nigel, on the front of the telegraph, just as on the sunday times, with keir starmer and borisjohnson. this is the terrible aftermath of the incident. who knows whether or not this was linked to any previous threats or whether it comes out of the clear blue sky, that is the problem, isn't
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it? you can have a hundred death threats a week, how do you know if any of them are significant or not or whether they arejust any of them are significant or not or whether they are just angry people saying stupid things? i think that is the problem _ people saying stupid things? i think that is the problem of _ people saying stupid things? i think that is the problem of social - people saying stupid things? i think that is the problem of social media, which _ that is the problem of social media, which we _ that is the problem of social media, which we are still failing to put any controls over. and mps optically vulnerable _ any controls over. and mps optically vulnerable to this. yes, they do get threatened — vulnerable to this. yes, they do get threatened an awful lot, and what they should do and most do do is that when— they should do and most do do is that when a death threat comes in, they reported to the police and the police _ they reported to the police and the police do _ they reported to the police and the police do their best to actually track— police do their best to actually track down the person who is making that thread — track down the person who is making that thread. but we live in this world — that thread. but we live in this world of— that thread. but we live in this world of social media where people, the keyboard warriors can fit in their— the keyboard warriors can fit in their bedrooms and think they can say what _ their bedrooms and think they can say what they like, and to get the effect _ say what they like, and to get the effect it _ say what they like, and to get the effect it has on other people, that is the _ effect it has on other people, that is the problem for politicians. they are right _ is the problem for politicians. they are right in — is the problem for politicians. they are right in the firing line for this— are right in the firing line for this and _ are right in the firing line for this and until we can get a grip of social— this and until we can get a grip of social media and the companies do more _ social media and the companies do more about— social media and the companies do more about it, more of this is going
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to happen — more about it, more of this is going to happen it— more about it, more of this is going to ha en. , , ., to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, b the to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, by the observer, _ to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, by the observer, we _ to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, by the observer, we must - to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, by the observer, we must end - to happen. it is illustrated, nigel, j by the observer, we must end the hatred aimed at our mps says the commons speaker, lindsay hoyle says the conversation has to be kind and based on respect. jo, we were here five years ago whenjo cox was killed. we tried and may be for a time we were being more humane, in terms of the political discourse, but it doesn't seem to have lasted. no, and i think that is the really sad thing. as you say, we have been here before with the terrible murder ofjo cox. going back years, when you and i were knocking around parliament, we know the huge pressure and we know the sort of punch and judy show of prime minister's questions time, we have seen the most appalling things said by mps about mps, in and out of the
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commons chamber. but as nigel says, a lot of it is social media. there was a time when you would look at green ink and capital letters and think, i'll put that on the i'll deal with it later pile, but you don't have any of those flags on social media. something comes through, it is an e—mail, it is too late, ora through, it is an e—mail, it is too late, or a twitter, and you have seen it and it is difficult to know what to do. this is an unusual intervention by the speaker of the house of commons, so lindsay hoyle. it is an article he has written for the observer. he has control over how people behave to each other within the commons, and it is accompanied by that same photograph of keir starmer and borisjohnson of keir starmer and boris johnson together which of keir starmer and borisjohnson together which you don't very often say, apart from the opening of parliament and on remembrance day. but there has got to be a better
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level of respect for everybody in public service because it isn'tjust mps, it is their staff as well, many of whom will be working as volunteers, many of them who will be young, many of them who will live in constituencies and are having to deal with this staff when the westminster ? when the mps at westminster. we cannot go on talking to each other as if there are no consequences. we have heard it from gps, we have heard it from people on the front line emergency staff, this is where it ends. and there has got to be a turning point where everybodyjust to be a turning point where everybody just turned to be a turning point where everybodyjust turned it down, just calm down a bit, don't get so angry. and the example has got to come, i'm afraid, from leaders of the party. just on that point, it is interesting, nigel, at the top of the independent, pointing out columns inside the independent, jess phillips, stop dehumanising people. it is inescapable to think back to a
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few weeks at the labour party conference and the row over the use of the word scam by angela rayner. you use language like that, and i am not saying it has direct consequences, but it does add to that gradual dehumanising of the people involved, doesn't it? yes it does, people involved, doesn't it? yes it does. and — people involved, doesn't it? yes it does. and in _ people involved, doesn't it? yes it does, and in fairness _ people involved, doesn't it? yes it does, and in fairness to _ people involved, doesn't it? yes it does, and in fairness to angela - does, and in fairness to angela rayner. — does, and in fairness to angela rayner, she did withdraw that word, but of— rayner, she did withdraw that word, but of course, she shouldn't have used _ but of course, she shouldn't have used it _ but of course, she shouldn't have used it in— but of course, she shouldn't have used it in the first place. the essentiat— used it in the first place. the essential thing is that in politics, language — essential thing is that in politics, language must be tempered and reasonable, you are putting across an argument and you can do that without— an argument and you can do that without insulting your opponent. what _ without insulting your opponent. what you — without insulting your opponent. what you are trying to do is persuade _ what you are trying to do is persuade them. most politicians, in fairness. _ persuade them. most politicians, in fairness. do— persuade them. most politicians, in fairness, do that, you have the odd case where — fairness, do that, you have the odd case where they don't but i think that the — case where they don't but i think that the speaker's intervention is absolutely right and that lindsay hoyte _ absolutely right and that lindsay hoyle was absolutely right to sail this. everybody must remember when
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they are _ this. everybody must remember when they are in _ this. everybody must remember when they are in public life that every word _ they are in public life that every word they — they are in public life that every word they utter matters and they have _ word they utter matters and they have to _ word they utter matters and they have to watch everyone. let�*s word they utter matters and they have to watch everyone. let's talk about what _ have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is _ have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is on _ have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is on the _ have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is on the front - have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is on the front of - have to watch everyone. let's talk about what is on the front of the l about what is on the front of the independent it is mentioned on a couple of other papers, priti patel draws up protection for mp5. the essence of this appears to be that mps will be offered a police presence at their weekly surgeries. yes. in fact, some mps today had potice _ yes. in fact, some mps today had potice with— yes. in fact, some mps today had police with them. in the way it is assessed — police with them. in the way it is assessed is— police with them. in the way it is assessed is each mp is assessed individually about the threat. most mps would rather not have police there _ mps would rather not have police there. people come in with problems, sometimes _ there. people come in with problems, sometimes with grievances, what they want to— sometimes with grievances, what they want to do— sometimes with grievances, what they want to do is to talk privately to their— want to do is to talk privately to their mp — want to do is to talk privately to their mp and forthe want to do is to talk privately to their mp and for the mp to listen to them, _ their mp and for the mp to listen to them, so— their mp and for the mp to listen to them, so they would rather the potice — them, so they would rather the police weren't around. but of course in some _ police weren't around. but of course in some cases it is a necessity. jo, it miuht
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in some cases it is a necessity. it might make in some cases it is a necessity. jifr, it might make you in some cases it is a necessity. jrr, it might make you think twice about coming in to talk to your mp about the battery when you have had from the battery when you have had from the police, say. the battery when you have had from the police. say-— the police, say. exactly. there are any number— the police, say. exactly. there are any number of _ the police, say. exactly. there are any number of scenarios _ the police, say. exactly. there are any number of scenarios where . the police, say. exactly. there are - any number of scenarios where people would not want to go somewhere where there was a police officer and we have heard tobias ellwood early today saying that mps should suspend for the time being face—to—face meetings until a review is carried out. i mean, it is very difficult because even if you had a police officer at a constituency surgery, you can't have a police officer when an mp is going to open a f te or go toa an mp is going to open a f te or go to a school open event. mps are out and about, quite rightly, in their constituency. we shouldn't have to get on a stage where they have to have police protection because that way lies the end of democracy. and, 0k, way lies the end of democracy. and, ok, there is a little ? awful lot of stuff and a lot of constituency surgery work has been dealt with by the zoom and other online things, as
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indeed has the house of commons on the select committee hearings but people have got to be able to feel they can go in. and don't forget, for many people, when they get to their mp, it is the last resort, whether they have been battling with the council over housing or care issues, you know, sometimes they get there and they are desperate. brute there and they are desperate. we will leave this david amess story, i know it is one we will be returning to certainly tomorrow. two other stories we can look at briefly. jo, it is the sunday telegraph, europe again, but the non—european union bit of europe. dominic rather is to get up the mantle about something needing to be done about the human rights and the european court of human rights. the rights and the european court of human rights-— rights and the european court of human rights. the newly demoted justice secretary. _ human rights. the newly demoted justice secretary. he _ human rights. the newly demoted justice secretary. he is _ human rights. the newly demoted justice secretary. he is well - human rights. the newly demoted| justice secretary. he is well known for not believing in the human rights act he said that many years
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ago. this is an interview with the sunday telegraph repeating what is at the conservative party conference and he is using, you know, the old mantra of it is ridiculous, people can complain human rights to a family life and that means we can't deport dangerous criminal, for incidents. the argument for or against their said that without the human rights act, the hillsborough families, though mid staffs hospital deaths families, and many, many other cases would not have got the justice that they eventually partially got, after many years campaigning. he has been heavily criticised, notjust by groups like liberty but also by the shadow justice secretary david lammy. but this also pays well to a certain group of the tory faithful and it is dominic raab finding something to do, but arguably there are other
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things that he could be doing which would be more useful.— things that he could be doing which would be more useful. nigel, this is the sort of thing _ would be more useful. nigel, this is the sort of thing you _ would be more useful. nigel, this is the sort of thing you throw - would be more useful. nigel, this is the sort of thing you throw to - would be more useful. nigel, this is the sort of thing you throw to the i the sort of thing you throw to the party faithful but even the party faithful must notice by now that after ten years or more of promises about the european human rights act, nothing has actually changed under conservative led government. foretell. conservative led government. well, laru el conservative led government. well, largely because _ conservative led government. well, largely because we _ conservative led government. well, largely because we helped - conservative led government. well, largely because we helped create that european court of human rights and actually does a rather good job for the _ and actually does a rather good job for the most part. i worry about dominic— for the most part. i worry about dominic raab, when i heard it mentioned in the tory conference, i did like _ mentioned in the tory conference, i did like the — mentioned in the tory conference, i did like the sound of it. but i really— did like the sound of it. but i really worry about the idea that they could be overawed by our supreme — they could be overawed by our supreme court. just one judgment to ptucked _ supreme court. just one judgment to plucked out of the air, it was illegal— plucked out of the air, it was illegal to _ plucked out of the air, it was illegal to be a gay man or lesbian woman— illegal to be a gay man or lesbian woman in— illegal to be a gay man or lesbian woman in the armed forces right up until the _ woman in the armed forces right up until the year 2000, and decades before, _
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until the year 2000, and decades before, homosexuality had been legalised, nobody would do anything about that, nobody would stop it, soldiers _ about that, nobody would stop it, soldiers were being jailed for having — soldiers were being jailed for having gay relationships. it was the european _ having gay relationships. it was the european court of human rights that overturned _ european court of human rights that overturned that and lifted the ban. now, _ overturned that and lifted the ban. now. that — overturned that and lifted the ban. now, that is the kind of thing it could _ now, that is the kind of thing it could do. — now, that is the kind of thing it could do, it has done, and i worry that dominic— could do, it has done, and i worry that dominic raab will stop those things— that dominic raab will stop those things happening in future. nigel, ve briefl things happening in future. nigel, very briefly because _ things happening in future. nigel, very briefly because we'll - things happening in future. nigel, very briefly because we'll look - things happening in future. nigel, very briefly because we'll look at l very briefly because we'll look at it later at 11:30pm, treasury league, the chancellor is not sounding quite so keen on zero carbon as the prime minister is. nigel? yes, indeed. chancellors and prime— nigel? yes, indeed. chancellors and prime ministers often have rows on the basis _ prime ministers often have rows on the basis that the prime minister usually— the basis that the prime minister usually wants to spend money and the chancellor _ usually wants to spend money and the chancellor wants to save theirs, and of course _ chancellor wants to save theirs, and of course rishi sunak has got an awful— of course rishi sunak has got an awful lot — of course rishi sunak has got an awful lot to save after what has been _ awful lot to save after what has been spent on covid—macro. but this
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row is _ been spent on covid—macro. but this row is over— been spent on covid—macro. but this row is over cop26, it is about he is worried _ row is over cop26, it is about he is worried that — row is over cop26, it is about he is worried that the economy will go downhill— worried that the economy will go downhilljohnson spends too much money _ downhilljohnson spends too much money. the counterargument of course is that _ money. the counterargument of course is that green — money. the counterargument of course is that greenjobs money. the counterargument of course is that green jobs actually would boost _ is that green jobs actually would boost the economy. and again, plucking — boost the economy. and again, plucking one example, our steel industry— plucking one example, our steel industry still uses fossil fuels, it should _ industry still uses fossil fuels, it should use hydrogen as they do in scandinavia, if it did, they will be many— scandinavia, if it did, they will be many more — scandinavia, if it did, they will be many more global markets who in future _ many more global markets who in future will — many more global markets who in future will be... jo, many more global markets who in future will be. . .— future will be... jo, you've got 30 seconds. well, _ future will be... jo, you've got 30 seconds. well, i'm _ future will be... jo, you've got 30 seconds. well, i'm sure _ future will be. .. jo, you've got 30 seconds. well, i'm sure will- future will be... jo, you've got 30 j seconds. well, i'm sure will come back to this but it does all sounds rather familiar, back to this but it does all sounds ratherfamiliar, the back to this but it does all sounds rather familiar, the treasury, back to this but it does all sounds ratherfamiliar, the treasury, or number ten and number 11 at odds with each other and one wonders whether rishi sunak is in trying to distance himself a little bit because cop26 looks like it might be flop 26 and maybe he just wants to let borisjohnson carry flop 26 and maybe he just wants to let boris johnson carry the flop 26 and maybe he just wants to let borisjohnson carry the can for
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that. let boris johnson carry the can for that. ., ., , , let boris johnson carry the can for that. ., . , ' . that. provocative stuff! we will take that op — that. provocative stuff! we will take that up with _ that. provocative stuff! we will take that up with you - that. provocative stuff! we will take that up with you both - that. provocative stuff! we will| take that up with you both after 11:30pm. go and have a leisurely look through the papers and a glass of something and we will see that about 35 minutes. thank you so much, nigel nelson and jo phillips there. thank you for your company. i will be back at the top of the hour. take a cloud for northern ireland has been bringing rain is ever more recent hours and overnight tonight, the rain will move across from northern ireland into scotland, across northern england into north wales, the north midlands as well. it will be a mild night, 11 to 13 degrees for most but the cool air
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stilljust degrees for most but the cool air still just about clinging degrees for most but the cool air stilljust about clinging on in the final to scotland where it should be a fine start to the day in orkney and shetland, sunny spells, maybe one or two showers. a wet start elsewhere, the rain is patchy through the day, but still damp in scotland and northern england even into the afternoon, but we should see sunny spells develop across parts of the south where it will become very mild, 19 possible in cardiff.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. our top story: the man arrested for killing mp sir david amess is named as ali harbi ali, a british man of somali heritage. the 25 year old was arrested at the scene of the knife attack — detectives are treating it as a terrorist incident, which may be linked to islamist extremism. earlier, the prime minister and leader of the opposition paid their respects where the attack took place. we live in an open society, a democracy. we cannot be cowed by any individual, or any motivation, people with motives, to stop us from functioning.

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