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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 16, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. tributes are paid to the tory mp, sir david amess, who was killed yesterday at his constituency surgery. police say they're treating the killing as a �*terrorist incident�*. in leigh—on—sea, residents held a candlelit vigil, in memory of their mp. as the investigation continues — officials say the 25—year—old man in custody was not on a database of terror suspects. russia records more than one thousand deaths from coronavirus in a single day for the first time since the start of the pandemic. the united states offers compensation to relatives of ten people mistakenly killed by a drone strike in kabul. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created.
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. as we come on air, whitehall officials have confirmed to the bbc the name of a 25—year old man held in custody for the alleged murder of sir david amess mp. he is ali harbi ali of somali heritage. earlier, the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, laid flowers together at the site of the fatal stabbing, which happened during a constituency surgery yesterday.
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a candle lit vigil for sir david has been held in leigh—on—sea. the police say they are treating the attack as a terrorist incident which is potentially "linked to islamist extremism". our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. a united front in the face of a suspected terrorist attack. the prime minister, the leader of the opposition, the speaker of the house of commons and the home secretary. four of the most senior politicians in the land at the church today where sir david amess mp was murdered. he was killed doing a job that he loved, serving his own constituents as an elected democratic member. and, of course, acts of this are absolutely wrong and we cannot let that get in the way of our functioning democracy. it was formally declared a terrorist incident late last night,
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with forensic specialists poring over the crime scene, counter terrorism detectives are leading the investigation. the early enquiries suggesting the motive was islamist extremism. through friends, eyewitnesses have suggested that the attacker waited in the queue at sir david's constituency surgery yesterday, before stabbing the mp several times with a knife and then waiting for police to arrive. sir david was known and loved for his hands—on approach with voters and those who have campaigned with him had warned him of the risks. i used to go out on the doorsteps on the cold, dark nights in the rain and i used to be a bodyguard, many years ago. i said, "david, you should have somebody with you on these things, it's not safe". southend has two representatives in parliament and the other mp, james duddridge, paid this emotional tribute to his friend. the community hasjust been hit sideways by this. it's notjust a member of parliament, notjust the local member of parliament but he really did touch people's lives in a way that most mps don't manage to do. at southend civic centre this afternoon, a simple ceremony
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to remember an mp that not everyone agreed with but who everyone respected and loved. # amazing grace... #. daniel sandford, bbc news, leigh—on—sea. a review has begun into the security of mps when meeting their constituents — something seen by many as central to their role. one senior mp — tobias ellwood — has suggested that face—to—face meetings should no longer take place. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. around the country today, mps continuing to hold their surgeries. robert largan in the peak district saying he'll "keep doing this all year round." craig williams in montgomeryshire thanking welsh police for being there to give reassurance, and kieran mullan in cheshire saying, "we must not let people force us to do things differently." but already there are changes. here in south wales, a police guard for an mp�*s coffee morning.
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we now have cctv at the front and rear of the building. we had to have new security fitted onto the front and rear doors. we have panic alarms in the constituency office that staff often wear around their necks. we have installed panic alarms at my front door, at the side of my bed. you know, this has become too much of the new normal. mps' security was reviewed afterjo cox was murdered five years ago, shot and stabbed by a violent white supremacist as she left a constituency meeting. in 2010, stephen timms was attacked by women who had watched radical islamic sermons online. she was bundled away. and in 2017, four passers—by and pc keith palmer were all killed outside parliament in what the police called an act of islamist—related terror. the mp who was here that day and tried to save pc palmer's life has said that meeting constituents is vital but they should be paused. the home secretary has announced a review of mps' security and he said that should be completed first. i would recommend that no mp has a direct surgery until...
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you know, you can move to zoom. there's other ways... you can actually achieve an awful lot over the telephone, you can get things moving far faster than having to wait for the surgery date, as well. but for david amess, meeting constituents was a vital part of his job. so the question now is — how much further should security be tightened 7 many believe things have to be reappraised but mps themselves must decide. it's not a question of carrying on with business as usual and just regarding this as an occupational hazard of being an mp. nor of having close security such as the home secretary has, or the prime minister or the foreign secretary needs to have. we need to have a discussion about how we strike the balance. but it will be are hard to find.
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two years ago in the royal albert hall, a fundraiser for people with learning disabilities, championed by sir david amess, a public role loved, but guaranteeing mps' security is a huge challenge. damian grammaticas, bbc news. with me is our political correspondent damian grammaticas. there is a muslim community in southend — what have we heard there? we have his name now. we knew that he was 25. british but of somali heritage and we know police have been searching locations in london and we understand he has been referred to the prevent scheme, the scheme to help prevent people being drawn into virtualisation but we don't know much about the details of that. we know he was not viewed as a person of interest. he is in
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custody?— person of interest. he is in custod ? , . ,, , , custody? yes, and essex. he is being held in essex — custody? yes, and essex. he is being held in essex and _ custody? yes, and essex. he is being held in essex and what _ custody? yes, and essex. he is being held in essex and what is _ held in essex and what is interesting is we have had reaction from the muslim community in southend and bev issued a joint statement and it is quite strong and powerful, actually. let mejust statement and it is quite strong and powerful, actually. let me just read a little bit. they basically said his murder was an indefensible atrocity committed on the grounds of atrocity committed on the grounds of a place of worship and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms. it was committed in the name of blind hatred and we look forward to the perpetrator being brought to justice and the joint secretary of the has described the mp as a tremendous force for good under pillar for support. force for good under pillar for su ort. �* ~' ., force for good under pillar for su ort. �* ~ ., ., , support. and i know he had been talkin: to support. and i know he had been talking to politicians _ support. and i know he had been talking to politicians as _ support. and i know he had been talking to politicians as well. - support. and i know he had been| talking to politicians as well. how did they go forward from here in terms of being able to meet their constituents while feeling secure?
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no answer here but they are being asked to be careful and step back. they have already had many security measures put in place in recent years but also felt very, very vulnerable and this has revised those feelings of vulnerability. what many are waiting to see is the result of this investigation as they work out exactly what happened here so exactly what the thread here was and that will inform the security measures going forward but clearly we have the home secretary say she wants a review, police forces contacting mps now and we have parliament calls for mps to set and in a special conference, quite an unusual thing, to look at these measures but many of them saying this is difficult because they need to be out there meeting people and they are public figures. they enjoy that and that is how they interact with the public but they also feel very threatened and are looking for ways to improve their security. russia has reported a record number of daily covid deaths.
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more than a thousand people have died in a single day for the first time since the start of the pandemic. infections continue to soar as the authorities struggle to persuade people to get vaccinated. steve rosenberg reports from moscow: russia continues to set new records on coronavirus. for the first time since the pandemic began the authorities have reported more than 1000 deaths linked to covid in the last 24—hour race. confirmed new cases also hit a record high for the same period with more than 33,200. translation: i think the lockdown that we had last year will happen again. back then, there are even fewer infections. it is frightening. translation: the number of sick people is scarier in the new lockdown. there seems there are a lot of young people, people like us, who are seriously ill. it is scary.
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russia has developed several covid vaccines but the public has been reluctant to get the jabs. vaccine scepticism is widespread hair. so by the kremlin has avoided imposing tough new restrictions but some russian regions are reproducing a system of qr codes for access to public places. system of qr codes for access to public places. steve rosenberg reporting. new zealand has held a national day of action to encourage all remaining unvaccinated citizens to get a coronavirus shot. the "vaxathon" was streamed live on television for 8 hours — while pop—up clinics opened up across the country, including in the cabin of a dreamliner plane. by late afternoon, more than 120,000 people had received an innoculation. before today, just over half of the population were fully vaccinated. to afghanistan now — where the us government has said it has offered payments to relatives of the ten civilians mistakenly killed by a drone strike in kabul just before the final withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the pentagon also said it was
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working with the state department to help surviving members of the family move to the united states. bbc afghan�*s inaya—tulhaq yasini gave me more details. this deal has been done through a charity so the family aldo was working but there are no further details and we can say that when this incident happened and people were saying that it was a mistake of target now it has been agreed and also the relocation has been agreed. i think in my opinion this relocation should be prioritised because this case has been publicised and there is a fear of criminality. no amount can pay the
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loss of theirfamily criminality. no amount can pay the loss of their family but it is somehow a good thing for the government of america is agreed. uses the security of the family has to be prioritised, tell us about the security situation in cabo now? generally in afghanistan after the 15th of august there we have had some big explosions in the north and in the south, like yesterday there was in kandahar the biggest explosion. we have witnessed a big explosion. we have witnessed a big explosion in cabo in the last two months. generally the situation is calm but fear is that people fear that things might be happening, as we have seen. at least 41 people were killed yesterday. at least 41 people were killed yesterday. myanmar�*s military chief will be excluded from an upcoming
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summit of the association of southeast asian nations — known as asean. the exclusion is a rare rebuke of a member country by the group. asean says it is concerned about the military government's commitment to defusing the crisis which has engulfed the country since the military took power in a coup in february. we arejoined by ko ko aung of the bbc world service. what has been their reaction ? it isa it is a huge blow to the military because they are desperately seeking for international recognition and legitimacy so the coming meeting is the biggest in the region and it is quite disappointing for them and they have responded very angrily. the ministry of foreign affairs for myanmar released a statement saying that they are disappointed and the question of representation should be asked because it is not in the
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charter and the position will only lead to unwanted side effects so it's a huge setback for them. it is uuite a it's a huge setback for them. it is quite a snap- _ it's a huge setback for them. it is quite a snap. will _ it's a huge setback for them. it is quite a snap. will it _ it's a huge setback for them. it is quite a snap. will it make a difference, do you think? it is hard to see because _ difference, do you think? it is hard to see because at _ difference, do you think? it is hard to see because at the _ difference, do you think? it is hard to see because at the same - difference, do you think? it is hard to see because at the same time i difference, do you think? it is hard i to see because at the same time they didn't allow the government formed by the parliamentarian of unity government, they acknowledge that they received a letter that i think they received a letter that i think they are trying their best to find a sort of neutral ground as much as possible so they will invite political representative but we are not clear at this stage with that person will be but presumably it will be a secretary or some government official like an ambassador or official but we still
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are not very clear at this stage. just beat the committee whenever the people are still on the streets in myanmar? whether the resistance continues? , , , continues? yes, indeed, it is very surprising — continues? yes, indeed, it is very surprising that — continues? yes, indeed, it is very surprising that after _ continues? yes, indeed, it is very surprising that after more - continues? yes, indeed, it is very surprising that after more than i continues? yes, indeed, it is very| surprising that after more than six months, almost daily you are seeing a lesser level, fewer people but continuing protests and also they are fighting in many places. the military is actually announced and actually sent out a huge number of troops and there is fighting going on and also in the northern states there is huge fighting of the military using artillery to fight the rebels in that area so the resistance is still going on. thank ou ve resistance is still going on. thank you very much — resistance is still going on. thank you very much for _ resistance is still going on. thank you very much forjoining - resistance is still going on. thank you very much forjoining us. - the british—iranian aid—worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has lost an appeal against her second jail sentence in iran. foreign secretary liz truss has described the decision as an "appalling continuation
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of the cruel ordeal she is going through".mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was convicted in april of involvement in propaganda activity which she denies. her family say that there was no court hearing and now they are concerned she may be sent back to prison. she was first jailed for five—years in 2016 after she was accused of plotting against the iranian regime. the headlines on bbc news... tributes are paid to the tory mp, sir david amess, who was killed yesterday at his constituency surgery. police say they're treating the killing as a �*terrorist incident�*. as the investigation continues — officials say the 25—year—old man in custody was not on a database of terror suspects. sport and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre. grieving. we begin with football. chelsea are top of the premier league table but will feel lucky to have won the match took them them as they finished 1—0 today. the story was the second half pressure whether ijy was the second half pressure whether by chelsea. they had seven shots on target. his man of the match performance. they took a lot of risk and they have nothing to lose. the momentum is on their side and with a lot of confidence, but yes, we were strong 17 minutes. a premier league return to forget as his side were beaten 5—0 and this is the italians
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biggest defeat in the english league as the reds ran riot. one player had his 100th premier league goal. the first brazilian to score multiple hat tricks in the premier league. the second match in a row. a spectacular solo goal. what can we say, he is one of the best players in the world. there is no problem, why they shouldn�*t mention it when it is the case. he is in top shape. he is doing pretty good and it is really nice watching him and there was a top—class performance even without the goal. it is was a top-class performance even without the goal.— without the goal. it is a big 'ob but if my prayers i without the goal. it is a big job but if my players understand i without the goal. it is a big job i but if my players understand me quickly the big job is a little bit less big. quickly the big “0b is a little bit less bi. �* ,, .., quickly the big “0b is a little bit less bi. �* alwa s less big. are you confident? always i am confident. _
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less big. are you confident? always i am confident. i _ less big. are you confident? always i am confident. i was _ less big. are you confident? always i am confident. i was waiting - less big. are you confident? always i am confident. i was waiting today. not so big, but we are ready. we have added your card. manchester united beat _ have added your card. manchester united beat burnley _ have added your card. manchester united beat burnley 2-0. - have added your card. manchester united beat burnley 2-0. they - united beat burnley 2—0. they perhaps feared another heavy defeat coming when city had an early bid. only one more goal. city extended their unbeaten league run to seven matches. how different it is across time of the pressure continuing to mount and the manchester united side. his side last have snatched a point in the four the other side to make it 3—2just point in the four the other side to make it 3—2 just 5a seconds later. there was a fourth in stoppage time. will result in isolation it can,
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that can be looked, margins, but their movement too many games now that we have lost point so need to look at the whole setup of the team, her balance of the team, maybe. maybe something has to give. the final of tennis. she came from a set down and she could become the first three—time singles tournament. the men�*s semifinal takes place later on saturday. that is of from the bbc sport centre now it is back to you. that is of from the bbc sport centre now it is back to you. french leaders have been honouring the teacher samuel paty, a year to the day after a radical islamist beheaded him for showing his class cartoons of the muslim prophet mohammed. the chechen teenager who killed him was reacting to a social media campaign whipped up by some parents. mr paty�*s violent death stunned france�*s educators, who saw it as an attack
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on the country�*s core values. nasa has successfully launched its first mission to study jupiter�*s trojan asteroids — two vast clusters of space rocks that surround the planet. scientists believe they are made up of matter that formed the solar system�*s outer planets. duncan kennedy reports. three, two, one, zero. the start of a 4 billion milejourney. lift off, atlas v takes flight. the atlas v rocket is carrying a craft called lucy, that aims to go into orbit around jupiter and study a group of asteroids called trojans, some of which are the size of a city. so what are the trojan asteroids? they�*re asteroids that orbit withjupiter around the sun that ultimately hold the clues to the formation of our solar system... lucy�*s giant solar panels would only generate enough electricity to power a few light bulbs on earth but around jupiter, it�*s enough to reach the trojan asteroids and ask questions like —
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what they made of and where do come from? by going to visit a large number, eight asteroids in total, over the mission lifetime, we'll really better understand all about the asteroids. so if you only see one, maybe you got a bit of a funny one but by seeing eight, you get to really understand what's going on in this population. scientists want lucy to test their theory that the early solar system was juggled around by gravity, with some objects being thrown in and others out — just like billiard balls. but they�*ll need patience. lucy�*s expected to be operating around asteroids for the next 12 years. duncan kennedy, bbc news. the colombian government has begun sterilising a growing population of hippos left as an unwanted legacy after the death of the notorious drug lord, pablo escobar nearly thirty years ago. local environmentalists say they�*re an invasive species and have pushed away the native fauna. with more, here�*s david campanale.
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they have been dubbed the cocaine hippos. brought from the proceeds of drugs, it�*s a drug of another kind that colombian authorities are using to put a halt to the growing number. at the height of his powers, notorious drug lord pablo escobar illegally imported a number of exotic animals, including a male and female hippo. and nature then did what nature does. with no natural predators, more than 80 hippos have come to roam near his former luxury country estate to the north—west of the country. 2a animals have had to be treated with a chemical that will make them infertile. translation: if the sterilisation can be a way to prevent further breeding, at least we mitigate the problem. it is not the solution but it does go a long way to reducing the number of hippos in the world.
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escobar�*s luxury estate became a theme park and all the other animals, including zebras and giraffes, were sold to zoos, but not the hippos. colombian environmentalists say they have become the biggest hurt outside africa. but as an invasive species, they pushed away the native fauna, and something to deal with escobar�*s and wanted legacy had to be done. david campanale, bbc news. a warrant of further detention has been granted for the 25—year—old man who was arrested in connection with the murder of uk lawmaker david amess. whitehall sources have confirmed for the bbc his name is ali harbi ali of somali heritage. earlier, the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, laid flowers together at the site of the fatal stabbing, which happened during a constituency
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surgery on friday. you�*re watching bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. we had an early patch or two of rain across eastern areas of england. the cloud is well broken across northern scotland and that was one of the sunniest places in the country today and later we saw the cloud base across southern england, wales and the midlands and east anglia to give sunny spells but pretty cloudy for some across northern england and lot of cloud throughout the day in northern ireland whereas over recent hours we have seen rain arrive and that they know make inroads. it will push eastwards over the next few hours so the rain is turning heavier and more persistent. it might
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squeeze out the odd patch of rain, light rain across southern wales and east england but otherwise ten largely dry in the south—east. temperatures overnight are mild. relatively cool row just about clinging on across parts of scotland where it should be a fine start for orkney and shetland with sunny spells and the odd isolated shower. rangers star the day elsewhere and it turns lighter and patchy at the day. perhaps this dinner is over the tops of hills but it should stay damp for some tops of hills but it should stay dampforsome in tops of hills but it should stay damp for some in scotland and northern and even into the afternoon. we were sad to see a few sunny spells breaking through across parts of the south of england. that could boost temperatures as high as 19 degrees. into next week we have got some strengthening south—westerly winds on the way so monday will be a windier kind of day. south—westerly winds bringing layers of cloud in the rain is mostly affecting the west and perhaps the south. the best of any bite or dry weather across eastern areas but there will be a lot of high cloud so any glimpses of
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central and likely to be a hazy side and mild conditions continue with temperatures between 1a and 18 celsius. into tuesday this very long slow moving when a fund will bring a hosepipe of moisture hitting some of our western hills and it could bring significant rainfall totals and perhaps enough to turn local ice surface water flooding. away from the mountains little overall vein. with breaks in the cloud it could become even milder. temperatures might even reach 21. across parts of east anglia in south—east england, 17 in glasgow, a very mild as well. mild weather does seem set to continue on to them in a part of the weekend it becomes cooler the week. that is your latest weather.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a suspect for the alleged murder of sir david amess has been named
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as ali harbi ali of somali heritage. the conservative mp was killed on friday. police say they�*re treating it as a terrorist incident. residents in leigh—on—sea have gathered for a candlelit vigil in memory of their mp. the us government has offered financial compensation to the relatives of ten people mistakenly killed by the american military in a drone strike in the afghan capital, kabul, in august. the strike on a car killed seven children. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. now on bbc news, it�*s time for our world, the battle for the channel. it�*s a game of cat and mouse played in a ribbon of sea between britain and france that pits people smugglers against police patrols and governments against each other.

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