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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 16, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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good afternoon. the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, have laid flowers together at the site of the fatal stabbing of the mp sir david amess in essex. sir david was killed during a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea yesterday. the police have said that they are treating the attack as a terrorist incident which is potentially "linked to islamist extremism". a 25—year—old man who was arrested at the scene remains in custody — and searches have been carried out at two addresses in london. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani is at leigh—on—sea. ben, all morning local people here have been coming up to this police cordon surrounding the church where sir david amess was stabbed and died. they have been laying flower, all ages, all backgrounds, have seen the very old to young
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school—children who met him in their schools and it a genuine outpouring of community grief but led by the nation's political leaders who were here first thick this morning. a moment of unity across the divide. two leaders representing a shocked nation. this morning boris johnson nation. this morning borisjohnson and the labour leader keir starmer stood together on a quiet road in leigh—on—sea where sir david amess lost his life. the committed constituency mp who at the age of 69 showed no sign of giving up his work for his community. campaigning on every issue that mattered, climate change, cycling, veterans and even local dogs. less than 24—hours ago, david was in his own constituency doing an advice surgery, which all mps do week in, week out. david as i knew him and we all knew him was a passionate
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advocate and champion for southend, this wonderful town and with that, of course he was a man of the people. of course he was a man of the --eole. . ., , of course he was a man of the --eole. , , people. the community has been hit sidewa s people. the community has been hit sideways by — people. the community has been hit sideways by this. — people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it _ people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it is _ people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it is not _ people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it is notjust - people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it is notjust a - sideways by this, it is notjust a member— sideways by this, it is notjust a member of— sideways by this, it is notjust a member of parliament, notjust the local member of parliament but he did really— local member of parliament but he did really touch people's lives, in a way— did really touch people's lives, in a way that— did really touch people's lives, in a way that most mps doesn't manage to tie _ to do. today the to do. — today the methodist church remains by honed a cordon, detectives still at the scene where a suspected attacker was arrested and a knife recovered. overnight scotland yard said the death was being investigated adds an act of terrorism motivated by islamist extremism. the man remains in custody and security officials have told the bbc that he wasn't on mi5�*s main database of suspects but there have been two searches overnight at addresses in london. signs of the huge operation under way to understand what happened and more about this man's life.
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and nearby, shock at sir david's constituency office, the flag at half—mast. i constituency office, the flag at half-mast— half-mast. i don't think it is completely _ half-mast. i don't think it is completely sunk _ half-mast. i don't think it is completely sunk in - half-mast. i don't think it is completely sunk in yet - half-mast. i don't think it is completely sunk in yet but l half-mast. i don't think it is i completely sunk in yet but you half-mast. i don't think it is - completely sunk in yet but you only have to look at the floral tributes that are outside the constituency office here. by, that are outside the constituency office here-— office here. a man of the people bein: office here. a man of the people being mourned _ office here. a man of the people being mourned by _ office here. a man of the people being mourned by the _ office here. a man of the people being mourned by the people . office here. a man of the people | being mourned by the people and office here. a man of the people i being mourned by the people and a community and nation asking why. a review has begun into the security of mps when meeting their constituents — something seen by many as central to their role. one senior mp — tobias ellwood — has suggested that face—to—face meetings should no longer take place. our political correspondent peter saul reports. hello there. nice to meet you. scenes like this have long been a feature of our politics, it might not look as exciting as the fierce debates we sometimes see in parliament, but it is just as important. a chance for mps to meet
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the very people they are elected to respect. sir david amess was tar from alone in holding a constituency surgery yesterday. and his death has raised questions about whether something so fundmentsal in our democracy can still be safe. semis something so fundmentsal in our democracy can still be safe. acts of this are absolutely _ democracy can still be safe. acts of this are absolutely wrong and - democracy can still be safe. acts of this are absolutely wrong and we i this are absolutely wrong and we cannot let that get in the way of our functioning cannot let that get in the way of ourfunctioning deknock cannot let that get in the way of our functioning deknock psi, cannot let that get in the way of ourfunctioning deknock psi, that is why there are measures under way, i have been to meetings yet yesterday, i have been with the speaker of the house and our police and security services, to make sure all measures are being put in place for the security of mps so they can carry on with their duties as elected democratic members. the home secretary has — democratic members. the home secretary has started _ democratic members. the home secretary has started a - democratic members. the home secretary has started a review i democratic members. the home secretary has started a review of mps' security. police forces across the uk have been contacting mps, to see what support they might be able to provide. there is always a big police presence in westminster, particularly after the terror attack
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of town 18 but it is impossible to provide this level of security for mps, when they are in their constituencies. now the mp who had to perform cpr after a police officer was fatally stabbed hereby says it is time to pause face to face constituency surgeries are. i would recommend no mp has a direct surgery until you know you can move to zoom, there is other way, you can achieve a lot over the telephone, you can get things moving faster rather having to wait for the surgery date as well. the rather having to wait for the surgery date as well. the issue of rotection surgery date as well. the issue of protection for _ surgery date as well. the issue of protection for mps, _ surgery date as well. the issue of protection for mps, and _ surgery date as well. the issue of protection for mps, and those - surgery date as well. the issue of - protection for mps, and those around them has been on the agenda for years and some long serving figures believe now is the time for the parties to come together and take serious action it is parties to come together and take serious actio— serious action it is not a question of carrying _ serious action it is not a question of carrying on _ serious action it is not a question of carrying on with _ serious action it is not a question of carrying on with business - serious action it is not a question of carrying on with business as i of carrying on with business as usual and just regarding this as an occupational hazard of being an mp, nor of having close security such adds the home secretary has or the prime minister or the foreign secretary needs to have. we need to have a discussion about how we
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strike the balance.— have a discussion about how we strike the balance. many mps want to be as accessible _ strike the balance. many mps want to be as accessible as _ strike the balance. many mps want to be as accessible as possible, - be as accessible as possible, especially after the pandemic, but yesterday's tragedy in essex could force them to think twice about the way they work. force them to think twice about the way they work. let's return to leigh on sea now, and speak to our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, who is there. and dominic, as we were hearing there in peter's report, this raises some big questions about the safety, security of mps when they are away from westminster. that security of mps when they are away from westminster.— security of mps when they are away from westminster. that is right ben, and i think from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it — from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it is _ from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it is a _ from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it is a real— from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it is a real issue _ from westminster. that is right ben, and i think it is a real issue here - and i think it is a real issue here and i think it is a real issue here and i think the dilemma is summed up by the home secretary priti patel who said today mps cannot be cowed because an open society requires them to be open and accessible. we spoke to one constituency worker today, who told us that he had urged sir david to have security round him because you never know what may happen and sir david had taken that advice onboard and understood the concerns of the constituency worker but said, if i had security round me
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how can i be approachable? it is that approach built that made him such a well loved figure, this afternoon some that grief will be seenin afternoon some that grief will be seen in two event, there will be a village in the town and later for the community to come together, and remember an mp they dearly loved. thank you very much. an investigation has been launched after a soldier died during a military exercise on salisbury plain. our correspondentjames reynolds is with me now. james, what more do we know? we know the soldier was 23 years old, he has not been named in publish we know he died yesterday at about midday, the wiltshire police are leading a joint investigation, that i say he was part of a crew operating an armoured vehicle and was taking part in a military exercise on salisbury plain training area. the army is taking part in that investigation as well as the health and safety executive. the ministry of defence has said earlier todayit
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ministry of defence has said earlier today it cannot comment further because of that ongoing joint investigationtor, put what happened into context, the mod�*s statistics show there were 150 uk military deaths in training or exercise in total. that includes all causes of death including illness and disease. thank you. the united states has said its offered financial compensation to relatives of ten people who were mistakenly killed by a drone strike in the afghan capital kabul two months ago. an aid worker and nine members of his family, including seven children, were killed in the attack. the boss of britain's fourth—biggest supermarket, morrison's, has said labour shortages are delaying new store openings and products reaching shelves. david potts told the times newspaper that more visas were needed forforeign workers. the warning comes after the government announced a series of measures aimed at reducing pressure on supply chains. our business correspondent katy austin reports.
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the global supply chain is under huge strain as economyings reawaken. once imported products reach the uk, a shortage of lorry drivers means containers are often getting delayed at ports. containers are often getting delayed at orts. ~ , ., containers are often getting delayed at orts. ~ ,, ., ., containers are often getting delayed at orts. ., ., ., at ports. when you have a shortage of labour in — at ports. when you have a shortage of labour in terms _ at ports. when you have a shortage of labour in terms of— at ports. when you have a shortage of labour in terms of driver, - at ports. when you have a shortage of labour in terms of driver, the - of labour in terms of driver, the domestic drivers it means that the goods are sitting round longer at the ports, waiting to be collected. and there is a bit of pressure on that sector at the moment right now. there are labour shortages in other sectors too, including construction, hospitality and food production. now the boss of morrisons is has said that while there are plenty of products on the shelves underlying strain in the supply chain is affecting availability, while a lack of materials is delaying investment in new shops and refurbishle, he called for more visas for foreign
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workers, to ease the pressure in the run—up to christmas the government has offered temporary visas for meat worker and 5,000 for driver. after only 20 applied he is letting overseas drivers do more deliveries on uk soil. but some british hauliers fear their wages will be undercut. , ., ., . ,, hauliers fear their wages will be undercut. , ., ., ., ,, , undercut. they want to make drivers conditions bet, _ undercut. they want to make drivers conditions bet, they _ undercut. they want to make drivers conditions bet, they want _ undercut. they want to make drivers conditions bet, they want to - conditions bet, they want to increase pay. we are going to introduce a free—for—all of foreign howliers to take our work away from us. , ., howliers to take our work away from us. , howliers to take our work away from us. the government says immigration isn't long-term _ us. the government says immigration isn't long-term answer _ us. the government says immigration isn't long-term answer to _ us. the government says immigration isn't long-term answer to filling - isn't long—term answer to filling britain's record number of vacancy, we wanted to developed a high skilled high wage economy. some businesses say they need a better short—term fix. nasa has successfully launched its first mission to study jupiter's trojan asteroids — two vast clusters of space rocks that surround the planet. scientists believe they are made up of matter that formed the solar system's outer planets. aruna iyengar has this report
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three, two, one, zero. the lucy probe is on its way tojupiter. lift off, that was fine, takes flight. sending lucy... it's on a 12—year mission to study asteroids called trojans, left over from at the beginning of the universe. so what are the trojan asteroids? they're asteroids that orbit withjupiter around the sun, that ultimately hold the clues to the formation of our solar system. the lucy probe will visit eight trojans, city sized lumps of rock. we'll really better understand all about the asteroids, so if you only see one maybe you got a bit of a funny one, but by seeing eight you get to really understand what's going on in the population. the probe is named after the fossil lucy, discovered in africa in 1974, which taught us about where our species came from. this new mission takes inspiration from that name. scientists are hoping it will show us proof of a massive reorganisation of matter, shortly after the solar system's formation.
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aruna iyengar, bbc news. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at quarter past five, bye for now. hello. this is the latest from the bbc sport centre. the premier league is back and the action is already underway at vicarage road where claudio ranieri is in charge of watford for the first time. they're up against 2020 champions liverpool. just coming up to half time. liverpool 2—0 up. sadio mane giving liverpool the lead early on. his 100th premier league goal.
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roberto firmino with the second. liverpool hoping to end the day top with a victory, and chelsea failing to win later on. the champions, manchester city, play burnley today, and england forward raheem sterling will be getting restless if he doesn't start. this week sterling said he's open to leaving and moving abroad if he doesn't play more. he has only started one premier league game this season. some players, yeah, want to play all the time. but i cannot assure them, so they know it. i spoke many times about that. i cannot assure how many minutes every player is going to play. what i want from raheem, from everyone as they have to be satisfied to be here, they have to be delighted to be in this club. if it is not the case, they are free to take the decision for the best for him, for the players, for theirfamilies. so, city take on burnley. that's one of five 3 o'clock kick offs. there's a midlands derby between aston villa and wolves, manchester united are at leicester, norwich host brighton, and southampton take on leeds united. brentford, whose great start has seen them move up to seventh in the table after seven games, host chelsea in the late kick off.
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there are six games in the scottish premiership. leaders rangers are at home hearts, while celtic, who lie down in sixth place after eight matches, travel to fourth place moterwell. we're just five games into the new women's super league season, but everton are already looking for a new manager. they've sacked willie kirk after two wins from their opening five games — which sees everton eighth in the table — and the club say they hope to have a new manager appointed in time for their continental cup fixture at leicester on the 3rd of november. it's one of the biggest days ahead in cameron norrie's tennis career. he faces gregor dimitrov tonight in the semi—finals of the indian wells tournament. whatever happens, he's already assured of being the new british number one next week, and could even break into the world's top 20 for the first time. if he wins, norrie will face either unseeded georgian nikoloz basilashvili or american taylor fritz in the final. basilashvili produced a real surprise to beat the greek world number three stefanos tsitsipas in three sets. while home favourite fritz provided a shock of his own, beating the olympic champion
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alexander zverev. fritz saved two match points before winning in three sets. spain's paula badosa beat the in—form ons jabeur in straight sets to set up a meeting with victoria azarenka in the women's final. azarenka came from a set and break down to beatjelena ostapenko. azarenka will aim to become the first woman to win the tournament three times, after victories in 2012 and 2016. england bowlerjames anderson says he would love their talisman ben stokes to come back into the fold, with the team leaving for the ashes in three weeks. but it can't be rushed. stokes has taken an indefinite break from the game to protect his mental health, and has also been recovering from surgery to a finger. but there was great excitement this week when stokes posted a social media video of him batting again in the nets. it's totally in his hands. you know, he has got to be 100% right before he comes back.
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he has got the full support of the team. and, yeah, we willjust play it by ear, really. if he does think he can play some sort of part in the ashes, then great, if not, then that is ok, as well. we just want ben to be back to, you know, where we know he can be because he is such a big player for this team. at the women's big bash in australia, sydney thunder have started the defence of their title — with a humilating defeat — losing by 30 runs to the adelaide strikers. and the match will be remembered for this stunning catch by bridget patterson. with the ball heading for six, patterson was able to not only able to catch it one—handed but also able to make sure she didn't take it over the boundary rope. a stunning bit of fielding. the melbourne renegades have started this season's tournament with a win. they beat the hobart hurricanes by six wickets. set 122 to win from their 20 overs, melbourne chased down their target with four balls to spare.
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that's all the sport for now. there's much more on the website, including all the build up to racing's british champions day at ascot. it is the tenth anniversary of britain's richest raceday, which offers more than £4 million in prize money. all the details on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. let's return to our top story — the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the labour leader, sir keir starmer, have visited the scene where the mp, sir david amess, was killed during a constituency surgery yesterday. police are treating his death as a terror incident. we know they consider it a potential
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group to islamist extremism is one potential line of enquiry. a 25—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of murder yesterday, and two properies in london are being searched. earlier i spoke to the labour mp, harriet harman, who is calling for a speaker's conference on security for mps. it isa it is a question which has been raised once again, as it was in 2016 after the death of the mpjo cox. this the second killing of an going about their daily business within five years. harriet harman is calling for action on this issue. she is asking for a speaker's conference, as it is known. a nonparty political, cross—party political gathering to be convened. she explained to me what she hopes that will achieve. he was one of the most friendly and affable mps in parliament. he was always prepared
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to work with you, whichever political party you were in, if it was a cause that he felt was important. and that is why everybody with their own experience of having worked in common cause with him is feeling shocked, and feeling a sense that this is an attack on democracy. and that is why we have to really think about how we enable us as mps to do our work, to engage with our constituents, but do so in a safe way. and this cannot be just left to the government or left to the police. we have to have that discussion as parliament about what we need to change to make sure that we can keep that engagement with our constituents which is so precious and such a distinctive part of the uk's democracy, but not have a situation where this is the second murder of an mp in five years. we cannot say that as a price worth paying for our democracy. you have called for this speaker's conference to be convened. just explain for our viewers what that means and what that could achieve potentially. a speaker's conference
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is a very rare process. it only has happened about once every ten years in the recent past. it is where parliament meets to discuss and decide on something and report on it on an issue which affects the whole of parliament. and it would be the speaker bringing together all parties, and the agencies like the police and security services, and social media, and actually having a deliberation which allows mps to discuss how we balance this issue in democracy and then issue a report. after the killing ofjo cox, we have had more security in our homes and more security in the house of commons, but we did not fully address the issue of security in the constituency. i think that is what we need to do now. i do not want to pre—empt what other mps would say, but i think that there is a balance between saying we do not need to meet our constituents at all except on zoom
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or on the other hand we carry on with business as usual. it is safer, for example, if you meet your constituents by appointment only. it is safer, for example, if you meet them by appointment only and in the town hall where there is security, but at low level which is unlikely to deter people. but i think all of these things can be discussed. the thing is that mps come in all shapes and sizes now, and that is a strength of our democracy. we have got women mps, we have got pregnant mps, we have got mps with disabilities. we want a system of doing our work which enables all of them, all of them who represent all sorts of different people in this country, to do that engagement, but do it in a safe way. we do not want to become like other countries. other mps when the visit us, they are aghast that we actually meet our constituents face—to—face. i think we want to carry on doing that. and i think we can, but we have got to do it in a way which is safer.
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the labour mp harriet harman on those calls she has put forward for a speaker's conference in the light of what has happened in the past 2a hours. philip grindell runs specialist security firm defuse. he was brought in after the murder of the mpjo cox to advise mps on how to stay safe. earlier he told me what he expects to happen to enhance security for mps. what will be happening right now is that the team that i formally laid in parliament will be reaching out across the country to all of the liaison points in every force. they will then be contacting every mp. and we will then establish what security measures they have
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taken up. because they are all offered a full package of security in terms of the protective security measures, but they do not all take it. they will be reviewing exactly who has what. and where there are obvious gaps, they will seek to encourage those mps to take up those additional measures and enhance their security. but equally they will be looking to reassure mps that if there is additional measures they require or if they have particular concerns about any specific issues, any specific people that are causing them problems, then that will be addressed. of course, once the dust settles and we know more about the methodology behind the attack on sir david, only then can they review whether that methodology and the security measures that are in place are correct and appropriate, or whether additional measures need to be introduced.
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if you have access to mps, there is a degree of vulnerability. it somehow seems that that is unavoidable, that the competing pressures of those two requirements. i am not sure i would term it in unavoidable, if you're making that a connection with an attack. i think one of the challenges is that there has been a huge amount of advice and guidance provided to mps. not all of it has been taken up. interestingly, listening to the section before this interview, with harriet harman, she made a comment around not much focus has been placed on constituency security. that is just not correct. there is a huge amount of work gone on constituency security because we recognised some time ago but that was the place —— recognised some time ago that that was the place where they were most vulnerable. there was a huge amount of advice around where they might
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hold their constituency surgeries, the manner in which they do that, and in fact i personally went and had a number of one—to—one meetings with mps across the country to review their particular settings and see how we might improve it. so, a huge amount of work has been done. the challenge has always been communicating that with every mp. and the fact that every mp operates differently in different environments, whether that is because they live in an urban environment or a rural environment. but, you know, all the options that we provided were guidance and options. none of it was compulsory. if you went to different surgeries next friday, i am sure they would all look different. the entire community here is still struggling to have the sense of what happened sink in and to grasp that the mp that has represented them for all those years, since 1997, a familiarface out and all those years, since 1997, a familiar face out and about on the streets here and elsewhere in the
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constituency is no longer around and has been taken from them in such a brittle, horrific and violent way. one of those who is dealing with all of that, notjust one of those who is dealing with all of that, not just for himself, one of those who is dealing with all of that, notjust for himself, but for the community as the reverend steve tinning. he serves at the nearby baptist church. he told me about how, in his work in the community, and sir david's worked in the community, the two of them became close friends. david is everything that everybody was saying he was. there is little to add to that. he was a true constituent mp who showed great care and wonderful listening skills to his community. he always put the community he serves, the constituency he served in front of his own political ambition. he was accessible to all, whatever their age or political background. on september 11 this year, david was at my church, we held an event raising funds for a community sponsorship
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programme to bring more refugees to the town. and david was there. he won the raffle. i have got a prize just in front of me on the floor that he did not know that he had one, and i had been saving to present to him at the next opportunity that we met, which i knew would not be far away because he was so accessible. and never omitted to replying to an e—mail or a text or a phone call. it is truly heartbreaking.— a text or a phone call. it is truly heartbreaking. a text or a phone call. it is truly heartbreakinu. ., ., , heartbreaking. reverend, i mean, as i seak to heartbreaking. reverend, i mean, as i speak to you. _ heartbreaking. reverend, i mean, as i speak to you, our— heartbreaking. reverend, i mean, as i speak to you, our viewers _ heartbreaking. reverend, i mean, as i speak to you, our viewers cannot i i speak to you, our viewers cannot see, but out of the corner of my eye, a young girl is walking with some flowers to lay. there have been people young and old throughout the day coming here, trying to come to terms, come to understand, make sense of what happened. at times like this, they will look to people like this, they will look to people like yourself, to community readers, two members of the clergy to offer some hope, some comfort. yet at a
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time when you must be struggling to make sense of it all, what can you offer the community here by way of words of reassurance and comfort. thank you. i mean, ifound it hard to explain it to my own children yesterday, he met david on several occasions. a seven—year—old and a nine—year—old child trying to get their head around why this man that had loved their community and met with them had now gone. you know, i spared them the details, but in the way that he had, it is so tragic. to be fair, david had a strong christian faith of his own. it was well spoken about at the vigil, at the catholic church yesterday. and i was able to share my reflections on him and his personalfaith, the way that that interacted with him and the politics he had and shared. i guess for us it is extremely difficult in the immediate aftermath of such a tragedy to speak words of hope, but this morning my inbox is full of church ministers and
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community leaders asking what they can do in solidarity with the community. i know that there are services over the weekend across the whole town paying tribute to david. there will be places where others can light candles. and we can offer sincere and heartfelt prayer. but in the immediate aftermath, it is extremely difficult to express hope. david's cope was on his faith, and we believe that he has hope beyond this life. and as all do who love the lord jesus. so we express some of that, but i appreciate for those who do not share david's faith, this is an extremely difficult time. we will be there in whatever way we can. ~ ., ., ._ will be there in whatever way we can. ~ ., ., can. well, throughout the day so far, can. well, throughout the day so far. minute _ can. well, throughout the day so far. minute by — can. well, throughout the day so far, minute by minute, _ can. well, throughout the day so far, minute by minute, hour- can. well, throughout the day so far, minute by minute, hour by l can. well, throughout the day so i far, minute by minute, hour by hour, the number of flowers being brought has grown. people coming to pay their own tributes, to pause for a moment, to reflect, and to remember sir david amess. after all, he was
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