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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 16, 2021 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. our headlines today: tributes to sir david amess, the mp stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. police have declared his killing as a terrorist incident. our offices will continue to work around the clock to ensure that justice is delivered for sir david and his family, and i would like to thank the people of southbound for their understanding as the investigation continues. —— our officers. at a church service last night, sir david's constituents described him as an mp who always listened, and who loved representing
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his local area. he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. he he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for.— could ever wish for. he was at his ha iest could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when — could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he was _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he was helping - could ever wish for. he was at his - happiest when he was helping people. there was_ happiest when he was helping people. there was a _ happiest when he was helping people. there was a true servant and an inspiration _ questions asked about how a covid pcr testing lab that recorded thousands of inaccurate results won a multi—million pound government contract. good morning. it is carry on as you are for now for newcastle boss steve bruce, but one of his rivals, jurgen klopp, is worried about the emergence of the new northeast superpower as the premier league returns this weekend. it wasn't you, or me. one lucky french ticket—holder wins the euromillions record jackpot, £181; million. and after a cooler day yesterday, but with more sunshine, the cloud returns this weekend. temperatures are on the rise. i will have the full forecast for you here on
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breakfast. it's saturday, the 16th of october. our top story: the killing of the conservative mp sir david amess has been declared as a terrorist incident, by police. sir david was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery in essex yesterday. officers say they are investigating a potential link to islamist extremism. a 25—year—old man remains in custody. here's our political correspondent helen catt. in leigh—on—sea, worshippers came together in us to remember their mp. said david amess had been a member of parliament in essex for 35 years. colleagues described him as a kind man devoted to his constituency of southland west. he made everybody feel valued and he listened, he was a good listener.
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you felt it. people felt he represented them into houses of parliament. he represented them into houses of parliament-— represented them into houses of arliament. . , . , ., , , , parliament. he was at his happiest when was helping _ parliament. he was at his happiest when was helping people. - parliament. he was at his happiest when was helping people. he - parliament. he was at his happiest when was helping people. he was| parliament. he was at his happiest| when was helping people. he was a true servant and an inspiration. his heart true servant and an inspiration. heart was in true servant and an inspiration. his heart was in his community, it really— heart was in his community, it really was _ heart was in his community, it really was he _ heart was in his community, it really was. he was _ heart was in his community, it really was. he was the - heart was in his community, it really was. he was the best i really was. he was the best constituency— really was. he was the best constituency mp— really was. he was the best constituency mp you - really was. he was the best constituency mp you could i really was. he was the best - constituency mp you could ever wish for. constituency mp you could ever wish for [h— constituency mp you could ever wish for. . , ., for. it was there in the middle of the day at _ for. it was there in the middle of the day at a _ for. it was there in the middle of the day at a different _ for. it was there in the middle of the day at a different church - for. it was there in the middle of the day at a different church in i the day at a different church in leigh—on—sea that he was stabbed multiple times. he had been holding one of his regular surgeries to meet constituents. police officers and paramedics tried to save him, but he died at the scene. the 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. last night police declared it was a terrorist incident. pt. declared it was a terrorist incident-— declared it was a terrorist incident. . . ., incident. a tragic day for the family and — incident. a tragic day for the family and colleagues - incident. a tragic day for the family and colleagues of- incident. a tragic day for the family and colleagues of sir| incident. a tragic day for the - family and colleagues of sir david, the community of southland and indeed for the whole of greater essex. sir david has dedicated his life to serving the communities of essex and southland. and he was simply dispensing his duties when
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his life was horrifically cut short. it was five years ago that labour mp jo cox was murdered in her constituency. the fatal attack on sir david has raised questions once again about the safety of mps. it is so hard, again about the safety of mps. it 3 so hard, because we have a job to do and ifound myself working so hard, because we have a job to do and i found myself working as a politician and trying to help people and trying to do good things the people and it is really important that we get good people in public life, but this is the risk that we are all taking. so many mps today will be scared by this. the speaker ofthe will be scared by this. the speaker of the house _ will be scared by this. the speaker of the house of _ will be scared by this. the speaker of the house of commons - will be scared by this. the speaker of the house of commons who - will be scared by this. the speaker. of the house of commons who went ahead with his own constituency surgery last night said security measures would need to be looked at. we've got to make sure that politicians are safe, that the people who work for them are safe, theirfamilies, the people of people who work for them are safe, their families, the people of the house of commons stop we have seen the terrorists attack there as well. we won't get into it, though. we will continue to ensure that democracy will be there, we have got to make sure we have that
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relationship with our electors, that is the unique part of british politics, but we've got to make sure that mps are safe. mp5 politics, but we've got to make sure that mps are safe.— politics, but we've got to make sure that mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted _ that mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by _ that mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by their _ that mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by their local- to be contacted by their local police forces today. the home secretary has ordered an immediate review of their security. the flags in westminster are flying at half mast for so david amess is questions are already being asked once again about how to keep his colleagues safe. helen cut, bbc news, westminster. in a moment we will speak to our political correspondent peter saull, who is in downing street, but first to ben boulos who is in leigh—on—sea for us this morning. ben, police have confirmed they are treating the killing as a terrorist incident. yes, as you say, there is a suspect, a 25—year—old man in custody being questioned on suspicion of murder. police say they are treating it as a terrorist incident. they speak of a potential motivation linked to
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islamic extremism. —— is longest. the fact it is being treated as a terrorist incident means the counterterrorism command from the metropolitan police is leading the investigation. that brings with it huge resources and right now they will be scouring digital records, cctv footage, as well, we understand, as two addresses to try to establish the events leading up to establish the events leading up to yesterday's tragic, tragic death of sir david amess, mp. the reality for people here in leigh—on—sea and elsewhere in the constituency is waking up to the reality that the man who has represented them for so long, since 1997, was taken from them in such a brutal way, and the inevitable questions they will have inevitable questions they will have in mind as they come to terms with their loss. �* ., ., in mind as they come to terms with their loss. �* ., ,, , ., our political correspondent peter saull is in downing street peter, sir david's death will no doubt raise concerns for the safety of mps. what has the home
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secretary had to say? well, no doubt this death will be at the forefront of the home secretary's mind, at the forefront of all our elected politicians minds this morning, as we were hearing at leigh—on—sea and for the security services, the intelligence agencies, what was the motivation behind this attack? police believe the attacker was acting alone, but more widely, does it believe mps are still safe to go about their daily duties? a fundamental part of our democracy, to be able to come face—to—face with the people they represent. there would have been hundreds of constituency surgery is going on just yesterday. mps are being contacted by police forces up and down the country as part of what is known as operation bridger, which was set up in the wake of the murder ofjo cox in 2016, so they could put in shutters and alarms, but it is understood the home secretary believes it is too varied up and down the country and she wants it to
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be standardised. find down the country and she wants it to be standardised.— be standardised. and we will have tributes to sir _ be standardised. and we will have tributes to sir david _ be standardised. and we will have tributes to sir david amess - be standardised. and we will have tributes to sir david amess from i tributes to sir david amess from friends, colleagues and constituents throughout the morning. questions are being raised around how a lab that recorded thousands of faulty covid pcr results won a multi—million pound government contract to carry out testing. operations have been suspended at the private lab in wolverhampton and an investigation has been ordered into why it took a month to identify the failures. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. the wolverhampton lab at the centre of the faulty tests enquiry is run by a company cold immensa health clinic limited. it was awarded a government contract with £119 million to carry out pcr tests just a few months after being set up, one of a number of lucrative government contracts companies one. now thousands of people who received a false negative test are living with the knowledge they may have inserted via the —— infected others.
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the knowledge they may have inserted via the -- infected others.— via the -- infected others. really cross with _ via the -- infected others. really cross with the _ via the -- infected others. really cross with the system, _ via the -- infected others. really cross with the system, and - via the -- infected others. really cross with the system, and also, | via the -- infected others. really| cross with the system, and also, i wanted to do the right thing. i wanted to do the right thing. i wanted not to go out into society and spread something, you know, make people poorly. but i was being told thatis people poorly. but i was being told that is what i should do. but also, over the course of the last week, i have had five pcr tests. the expense of the waste of money, as well, that doesn't sit easily with me either. some campaigners say that this episode has exposed a lack of regulation of testing providers. they are outside of the help system and outside of any quality control by health officials. we see this a lot with companies who don't really know what it is that they are doing, but want some form of revenue while they are working it out, and that is what this company started as an during the pandemic, because they could do testing, they started doing covid testing as well and they scaled up very rapidly. immensa is a subsidiary of dante labs, which was also offering pcr tests of foreign travellers. but also offering pcr tests of foreign travellers. �* , .,
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travellers. but it is now under investigation _ travellers. but it is now under investigation by _ travellers. but it is now under investigation by the _ travellers. but it is now under. investigation by the competition travellers. but it is now under- investigation by the competition and markets authority over concerns it has been treating customers unfairly, one of a number of covid testing terms facing similar investigations. dante labs says it is cooperating fully with bcma enquiry, but recognises a small number of customers face challenges. immensa health clinics as it is fully collaborating with health officials and added it has already analysed more than 2.5 million samples the nhs test and trace. but there will be questions over whether millions of taxpayers money has been wisely spent. new zealand is holding a national day of action to encourage all remaining unvaccinated citizens to get a coronavirus jab. the �*vaxathon' is being streamed live on television, while pop—up clinics have opened up across the country, including in the cabin of a dreamliner plane. we will speak to our correspondence shortly to find out how that is
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going to work. if you haven't had the chance to check last night's lottery numbers yet, then i'm afraid we may have some bad news for you — the record £181; million euromillions jackpot has been claimed by a ticket—holder in france. not even worth checking. might have on something. a huge prize, and it was the biggest ever. the huge prize went unclaimed after tuesday's draw, meaning last night's game was expected to attract more entries than usual. did you enter? no, but i did on tuesday- _ the most recent uk euromillions winners to go public after a big win were frances and patrick connolly, from northern ireland, who scooped close to £115 million in 2019. they are sums of money that ijust so enormous, it is really hard to imagine how that works, isn't it? 184 million. it
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imagine how that works, isn't it? 184 million-— 184 million. it is one of those thins 184 million. it is one of those things were _ 184 million. it is one of those things were used _ 184 million. it is one of those things were used to - 184 million. it is one of those things were used to think - 184 million. it is one of those things were used to think to l 184 million. it is one of those - things were used to think to myself, if i want that kind of money, it wouldn't change me, i would still be here. yes it would! half past four in the morning. straight on a plane. it is a crazy amount of money. we will try to reflect this morning, if there is anything you would like to do, if you want $184 million, if you are that french person waking up this morning, let us know how you would spend that cash. i would love to know, how could you spend that cash? ., , x' , to know, how could you spend that cash? ., , , ., to know, how could you spend that cash? ., , ., , ., cash? not very quickly, that is for sure. cash? not very quickly, that is for sure- lots — cash? not very quickly, that is for sure- lots of— cash? not very quickly, that is for sure. lots of coffees. _ cash? not very quickly, that is for sure. lots of coffees. we - cash? not very quickly, that is for sure. lots of coffees. we will - cash? not very quickly, that is for sure. lots of coffees. we will go i sure. lots of coffees. we will go back to that _ sure. lots of coffees. we will go back to that story _ sure. lots of coffees. we will go back to that story now _ sure. lots of coffees. we will go back to that story now about - sure. lots of coffees. we will go | back to that story now about new zealand holding a national day of action to encourage all remaining unvaccinated citizens to get the coronavirus vaccine. it is being called a vaxathon and pop—up clinics have been popping up all over the place. phil mer is in sydney with the latest on it. how is the uptake so far? alignment the government had set a target of 100,000 doses during today's super saturday, vaxathon, and the latest figures show that
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125,000 new zealanders have come forward to roll up their arms and received the covid—19 vaccination. we know the department of conservation boats have been administering —— administering jabs and remote parts of new zealand, also at auckland airport, and a new zealand dreamliner was converted into a temporary vaccination hub as well. we understand patients were given the jab in business class before being allowed to recover in economy class. all these events have been held right across the country. we have had influences, politicians, athletes and all sorts of health professionals urging new zealanders with competitions and prizes to get vaccinated, and new zealand prime minister, jacinda ardern, is hoping that 90% of new zealanders will eventually be vaccinated, and she says that inoculations are the key for a freer, safer, and unrestricted future in new zealand. so the vaxathon has another couple of hours
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to go and new zealanders hoping to administer even more doses. phil. administer even more doses. phil, many thanks- _ a new nasa mission to study asteroids more than a billion miles from earth, gets underway this morning. over the next 12 years, the unmanned probe will examine space rocks around jupiter, in an effort to better understand how planets were formed. our science correspondent jonathan amos reports. this is a mission that will take us backin this is a mission that will take us back in time. nassar�*s lucy probable out old asteroids more than 1 billion miles from earth, circling the sign information with the giant planetjupiter. —— nasa's lucy probe. they call these ancient objects trojans, city —sized lumps of rock that preserve the chemistry from the earliest days of the solar system. lucy will visit seven trojan asteroids over the course of the next 12 years, taking pictures and careful measurements to send back to
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earth. scientists are hoping to gain new insights on the origins of the planets. the expectation is that they will find evidence of the trojans didn't form anywhere near their current locations. proof that there was a great reorganisation of there was a great reorganisation of the planets and other bodies shortly after the solar system got going more than 4.5 billion years ago. jonathan amos, bbc news. we will be talking about that later in trying to understand more about the details of how it works. it is a massive project. it of how it works. it is a massive ro'ect. , . ,. ., ., , project. it is fascinating, i always wonder, project. it is fascinating, i always wonder. why _ project. it is fascinating, i always wonder. why do _ project. it is fascinating, i always wonder, why do we _ project. it is fascinating, i always wonder, why do we want - project. it is fascinating, i always wonder, why do we want to - project. it is fascinating, i always wonder, why do we want to learn about these things? but it is something to do with how the ice is made up out there, it will give us more of an idea about how the solar system was formed. matt is an expert in those kinds of things. i'm better with things closer to earth. parts of northumberland had -3. a earth. parts of northumberland had —3. a chilly start for some. good
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morning to you. cold air across the uk into last night was not this weekend, largely dry but it will be turning mild —— once again. the temperatures we saw yesterday were actually fairly close to what one would expect closer to the mid—october average. temperatures generally in the low— mid teens but as we go through the weekend we can see they are set to lift once again and it is the start of next week we could get warmer still. the cold air, though, is still in place, at least today across far north of england hence the chilly start. the blue colours indicate that. the orange colours and the amber this is where the warm area is. this little beer —— band of cloud, this is a front behind which there is a more active system. the white cloud showing heavy rain willjust liking up showing heavy rain willjust liking up to the west of ireland at the moment. mist and fog across wales and the south—west but it will turn into a sunny day. the front extends to northern ireland, parts of southern scotland, northern england, east anglia. there will be chances
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of showers. greater chance in the far north of scotland where it will stay cool. 15— 17 degrees. worse we stick around the mid—october average through parts of scotland in the far north of england at around 9— 12 celsius. drew tonight, the milder air will take hold. went into the day for northern ireland, western scotland. outbreaks of rain spread east through the night. staying dry through east anglia, some southern counties of england and potentially the very far north of scotland. not as cold tonight, especially across scotland and northern england given the increased amount of cloud and the increased amount of cloud and the outbreaks of rain. it does mean to you up early, tomorrow. could see sunshine. the same between shetland and orkney. most will be cloudy with outbreaks of rain and the most was —— most persistent throughout the north—east of scotland and most of that will fade away. still the odd spots of rain and drizzle with a fairly cloudy afternoon for the vast majority. a bit of sunshine here and
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there and temperatures beginning to creep up day by day. they will creep up creep up day by day. they will creep up further as we go into the start of next week. the big area of low pressure, lots of no across parts of iceland but in doing so it will be dragging in some warm airfor us, going all the way from the mid—atlantic and it is that which will really lift the temperatures into the start of next week. by the time we hit tuesday, we could hit temperatures of18— time we hit tuesday, we could hit temperatures of 18— 20 degrees. the charts, the symbols, so it will be one of those weeks with outbreaks of rain coming and going and wednesday could be particularly wet and windy for some. the end of the week looking colderfor some. that is how it is looking. looking colder for some. that is how it is looking-— it is looking. umbrellas at the read . let's take a look at this morning's papers. the death of sir david amess is on all of the front pages. the paper draws comparisons to the murder of labour mp jo cox in 2016. the daily mail features a picture of him smiling as he gives one
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of his four daughters away at her wedding just weeks ago. meanwhile, "a fine public servant" is the headline for the daily telegraph. the paper says a 25—year—old reddish man of somali origin has been arrested on suspicion of murder. and the times has a picture of sir david with two pugs. it reports that the mp was known as an animal lover and was a keen supporter of animal welfare. we will hear during this morning public programme for some of the people who worked with him on projects like that and can tell us how he devoted his life to all sorts of different... how he devoted his life to all sorts of different. . ._
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how he devoted his life to all sorts of different... constituency mps who sta out of of different... constituency mps who stay out of the _ of different... constituency mps who stay out of the limelight _ of different... constituency mps who stay out of the limelight and - stay out of the limelight and campaign hard for issues in their patch are so important. it seems very much for people who live in his constituency, his friends and his colleagues, that that was a kind of person he was a dedicated to grassroots politics which we don't hear enough about because plenty of mps work hard in those areas, don't they. mps work hard in those areas, don't the . ., , ., , mps work hard in those areas, don't the. ., ,, ., they. lots of his colleagues is that uner they. lots of his colleagues is that unlike most _ they. lots of his colleagues is that unlike most politicians _ they. lots of his colleagues is that unlike most politicians he - they. lots of his colleagues is that unlike most politicians he wasn't l unlike most politicians he wasn't interested in front french ministerial career. he didn't want power, technically, his power came from being in his constituency and bringing up his constituency in parliament in the chamber, any moment that he possibly could. and moment that he possibly could. and holdin: his moment that he possibly could. fific holding his own party moment that he possibly could. fific holding his own party to account which is very important. away from that story this morning, some stories inside. this is getting bigger and bigger. stories inside. this is getting biggerand bigger. i did stories inside. this is getting bigger and bigger. i did a story this week for bbc breakfast and the rise of beginners and because we are eating a third less meat and dairy in our homes now. how do you fancy a vrimp cocktail? this is faux fish.
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new manufacturing techniques are producing plants from jack fruit without using fishing next going near the sea. we had an expert who said the next invention is going to be protein taken from the air... from the air?— be protein taken from the air... from the air? and turned into fake meat. is there _ from the air? and turned into fake meat. is there protein _ from the air? and turned into fake meat. is there protein in _ from the air? and turned into fake meat. is there protein in the - from the air? and turned into fake meat. is there protein in the air? l meat. is there protein in the air? this is in the _ meat. is there protein in the air? this is in the daily _ meat. is there protein in the air? this is in the daily mail _ meat. is there protein in the air? this is in the daily mail this - this is in the daily mail this morning. renderthis in this is in the daily mail this morning. render this in the 60s, joe 90 with his goggles will stop it looks like in 2021 the british army has brought them back. spot the difference between joe has brought them back. spot the difference betweenjoe 90 and his modern—day equivalent. there is this special british goggles which they are using to prove their eyesight and allow them to see things that you can't. apparently it also finds out whether the soldier wearing them is fatigued and disoriented or stressed, so it looks both ways. i wouldn't mind a pair of them this
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morning. it is 6:21am. time now for the latest technology news. spencer kelly and lara lewington have this week's edition of click. now, most of us have had our lives impacted by cancer in some way. i have, i know that you have too. but it can be tricky to support someone you love going through it, because you can't necessarily really understand what they're going through. but one app is hoping to help by creating a community of cancer patients to be able to share theirjourneys. reielle was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer back in 2019, and has since undergone operations,
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chemotherapy and ivf egg collection. sometimes i feel lonely because i am literally one in a million. this spring, reielle started using a new app designed for cancer patients. i knew instantaneously it would be a place where i can message people, we could connect and communicate, and that was what i really needed. the day before i started chemotherapy i was a bag of nerves, and i turned to the app and then i had loads of messages of encouragement, support. i ended up asking a lot of questions to people, has anyone had this happen to them? i've spoken to a lot of girls about getting manicures. sometimes you can lose yourfemininity and help bringing that back is just amazingness, is what i need. alike was launched by two—time cancer survivor brad gudger. over 1,500 people have signed up so far. the problem with relying on pre—existing social media is that you can't find people.
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alike takes the best bits of other social media platforms and repurposes it specifically for the cancer community. you can filter based on age, and in future we want to enable people to filter based on locations, providing something that can be there with you, right at point of diagnosis, through treatment, through recovery, and in some cases, with people at the end of our lives. voiceover: if you or someone you care for is coping _ with illness... many are keen to keep up with the latest research too, but this can be challenging as new findings shared by academics or medics can be hard to decipher. and that's where medivizor comes in — a service that scans the web, translating the latest studies into patient—friendly email updates. when my late mum was diagnosed with cancer, i was amazed that the plain english availability of accurate, timely information was really horrible.
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so how does the process work? i take it you've got a team of people who are actually collecting all this information and then translating it into something people can understand. it's a combination of algorithms that are crawling the internet, prioritising information based on algorithms of what is important, and also people that are assisting the machine to refine this conversion from scientific language into layman, almost layman terms. its basic service is free for patients but the company is funded by paid versions, including one for private doctors. taking matters into your own hands, though, can have its downsides. of course the important thing is recognising that at that time they're at their most vulnerable. so where information is quite empowering, you have to make sure it's the right information, notjust based on an algorithm which could, unfortunately, scare the patient sometimes. �*cause two people could have cancer, and have different concerns about their
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cancer diagnosis. the right music makes things better. it can change our mental state, add emotion to movies and commercials, and even help us move when it's hard to keep putting one step in front of the other. yet, while so many of us consume music, playing an instrument feels out of reach. but you no longer need 10,000 hours to create something beautiful, you just need a different kind of instrument. singing: # this is the harmony enaine, #adding layers of extra vocals # to my voice in real—time. the program first recognises which note i'm singing, and then adds layers based on music theory or even user input. you analyse the formant at the pitch you're singing at, and then you slice off your head, you transpose the pitch
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and then put your head back on. laughter. and so that's, that's kinda, really kinda how it works in, like, a really silly sort of explanation. the new product, auto tune slice, has only been out a week. it automatically cuts a vocal melody into a playable musical keyboard. but is all this tech taking too much skill out of music creation? musicians that have deep knowledge of music theory and recording engineers who understand every aspect of the recording process, and those guys are probably rolling their eyes, laughs, and like, "we had to learn all this stuff, and now companies are trying to make tools so that they don't have to do the hard work that we did, to learn our craft and learn our trade." if you're more of a drummer than a singer, dubler might hit the spot, using al to learn your version of different bits of a drum kit. now you have to train the system by recording a few takes.
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ts—ts—ts—ts — that's my hi—hat. and now dubler knows roughly what i mean with different drum sounds turning my enthusiastic though amateur beatboxing into a full drum kit. she beatboxes. unlike many music plug—ins, dubler also works without needing any external audio software, though it does work with digital audio workstations. lowering the barriers to creativity can help musicians who struggle with mobility. like yurina, an avid pianist who is connected to a respirator and unable to leave her house, so, she's controlling this grand piano at yokohama city hall remotely. it's part of a project between yamaha and the tokyo university of the arts. when yurina presses a key, the daredemo auto—accompanied piano plays along with her. she practised playing her side slightly ahead of time, as it takes about 100 milliseconds for her
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piano signal to reach the concert hall. none of these new creativity tools detract from the massive benefits of learning a physical instrument. in fact, i think they complement each other. technology at its best, giving the gift of music to everyone. i don't know about you, but my kids are having a completely different school experience to the one that i had when i was young. how about you ? i mean, theyjust seem to be able to do teaching so much better these days. mm, maybe there's just more weight being given to the idea that different children learn in different ways. i think you're right. and in fact, some kids, my boy included, learn really well through computer games. and i expect marc cieslak would've done too. dramatic music plays. since 2007, the assassin's creed videogames have allowed players to bump off bad guys throughout periods of history as varied as renaissance italy to ancient greece. the most recent entry in the series, assassin's creed: valhalla,
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transports the action to the ninth century as vikings attempt to settle in britain, something that doesn't go down that well with the locals. valhalla's developers have worked really closely with historians and archaeologists to ensure historical accuracy and real locations like this one, portchester castle on england's south coast, appear in the game. we tried to research the kind of people that we would meet there but also their habits, the way they would talk, the way they would live their daily lives. i tire of raiding, harold. and the idea is not just aesthetic but also philosophical, what are their thoughts of the period, what are they looking for in their daily lives? but what do you do with all of that research and work after it's been put to work
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building a world in the game? the developers have removed the violence from the game, replacing it with quests which are designed to allow the player to gain greater historical insight about the period. valhalla is the third assassin's creed game to feature this element, called discovery tour: viking age. we must exit the fjord, sail right. we've created these quests that are basically around empathy, because videogames have a strong component to make people learn, because we feel what our avatars and what the characters are living through. then i shall observe and hopefully learn some new tricks of my own. one of the most famous viking settlements in the uk was in york, and it's here we find thejorvik viking centre, home to a vast array of period artefacts — some of which provided inspiration for the developers. and it's here we also find writer and broadcaster danny wallace.
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he's had a long association with the assassins creed series, providing the voice of one of the game's characters, historian sean hastings. hello, am i speaking out loud, hello? i think back to my history lessons at school, and a man or a lady would stand up and they would talk to me for a very long time about crop rotation or spinning jennies. and, erm, thanks to kind of getting involved in these games, you find yourself engaging with those worlds much more. so if you suddenly see something and it catches your eye, and you're like, "i wonder how they made shoes," or "i wonder what they ate", you can go over there and you can find out yourself. the discovery tour will find its way into classrooms in 52 schools across the uk, as a result of a collaboration between the game's publishers ubisoft and ukie, the british games industry trade body. ukie�*s educational arm, digital schoolhouse, will see this version
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of the game used as a teaching tool across a wide variety of subjects including history, art, english and computing. most teachers will agree, that when you are teaching children, passive consumption of knowledge has limited retention value long—term. the best way to get children to learn and to develop a deep and full understanding, which they can then apply later on down the line, is by getting them actively involved in doing something that's engaging. do not lose your course through the storm! so in the future, when we want to learn something, as well as consulting a book or research with the help of the internet, some of us mightjust pick up a games controller too. where am i? jotunheim! and i'm afraid that's it for the shortcut of this week's click, the full—length version is waiting for you, as ever, on iplayer. and as ever, you can keep up with the team throughout the week on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching, we'll see you soon. bye— bye.
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good morning. hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. mikejoins us foran mikejoins us for an update on mike joins us for an update on the spot. liverpool, first of all.- spot. liverpool, first of all. well, es. spot. liverpool, first of all. well, yes- liverpool— spot. liverpool, first of all. well, yes. liverpool in _ spot. liverpool, first of all. well, yes. liverpool in a _ spot. liverpool, first of all. well, yes. liverpool in a sense - spot. liverpool, first of all. well, j yes. liverpool in a sense reacting to the weather landscape has changed, because the premier league this weekend, today, at lunchtime liverpool are involved for the first time since the whole landscape has changed because of the takeover of newcastle united, so there is a new superpower, a new big boy in town. nothing will change overnight. the newcastle team doesn't change that a game against tottenham tomorrow, they still have the same battles with relegation, the same players, the same manager, steve bruce is staying, but it is more looking forward. the fact is, only four teams can get into the champions league going forward into the long—term, set puts a few noses out
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ofjoint. it long-term, set puts a few noses out of “oint. ., �* , x' ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enou:h ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enough for _ ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enough for them _ ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enough for them to - ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enough for them to get - ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick enough for them to get into | ofjoint. it wouldn't be quick - enough for them to get into the champions league this season, would it? ., , , , champions league this season, would it? ., ., it? no, because they cannot overspend. _ it? no, because they cannot overspend, because - it? no, because they cannot overspend, because of- it? no, because they cannot. overspend, because of financial it? no, because they cannot - overspend, because of financial fair play rules, so it will be a gradual process. but it has ruffled some feathers. liverpool kick off the weekend with a lunchtime kick off against watford, with claudio ranieiri in charge for his first game there. but it's the new force in the north—east that's on the mind of liverpool managerjurgen klopp. the premier league approved the £305 million pound saudi—led takeover of newcastle last week after it had received legally binding assurances the saudi arabian state would not be in control. and klopp is also keen to make sure newcastle follow the rules of financial fair play. we had a massive argument, not an argument, an issue, the whole football world, with 12 clubs also trying to build a super league. and rightly so. but this is kind of creating a super team, if you want. guaranteed spots in the champions
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league, if not in a few years time, not immediately, or these kinds of things. yeah, with all the things of how financial fair play is used these days, when nobody knows exactly if it is still existing or not, stuff like this, of course, but for the rest of us itjust means there is a new superpower in newcastle. the champions, manchester city, play burnley today, and will england forward raheem sterling make only his second premier league start of the season? this week sterling said he's open to moving abroad if he doesn't play more. his contract runs out in 2023. manager pep guardiola says he cannot guarantee him a more prominent role, and that he must fight for his place like everyone else. some players complain, want to play all the time, but i cannot assure them. they know it, i cannot assure how many minutes every player is going to play. what i want from raheem sterling and from everyone is to be happy. they have to be satisfied to be here. they have to
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be delighted to be in this club. if this is not the case they are free to take the decision for the best for him, for the players, for their families. west bromwich albion are back on top of the championship after beating local rivals birmingham city 1—0. karlan grant scored the only goal with 15 minutes left. that was enough for albion to go top. birmingham are without a win in five games now. sale sharks left it late to beat defending champions harlequins in rugby union's premiership. quins, who were undefeated before this game, led by two points with five minutes to go before a tom curtis penalty put sale in front — and then this last—gasp try from scrum half raffi quirke sealed a 28—22 win and moved sharks up to fourth in the table. it's one of the biggest days ahead in cameron norrie's tennis career. he faces gregor dimitrov tonight in the semi—finals
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of the indian wells tournamentm and whatever happens, he's already assured of being the new british number one next week, and could even break into the world's top 20 for the first time. he's won more atp matches this year than world number one novak djokovic. england bowlerjames anderson says he would love their talisman ben stokes to come back into the fold, with the team leaving for the ashes in three weeks, but it can't be rushed. stokes has taken an indefinite break from the game to protect his mental health, and has also been recovering from surgery to a finger. but there was great excitement this week when stokes posted a social media video of him batting again in the nets. it is totally in his hands, you know. he's got to be 100% right before he comes back. he's got the full support of the team, and, yeah, we willjust play it by ear, really,
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if he doesn't think he can play some part in the ashes, that's great, if not, that's ok as well. we just want ben to be back to where we know he can be because he is such a big player for this can be because he is such a big playerfor this team. england's moeen ali was part of the victorious chennai super kings team in the indian premier league in dubai. ali blasted 37 off 20 balls, to help chennai to 192—3. in reply kolkata knight riders, captained by england t—20 skipper, eoin morgan, collapsed to 165/9. it's a fourth ipl win for the super kings. morgan can now come back and focus on the t20 world cup. of course, molinari has retired from test cricket, but is still active in other formats of the game. —— moeen ali. as, other formats of the game. -- moeen ali. �* , ., ., i. other formats of the game. -- moeen ali. �* , ., ., ~~ ali. a question for you, mike. if ou won ali. a question for you, mike. if you won 184 _ ali. a question for you, mike. if you won 184 million _ ali. a question for you, mike. if you won 184 million euros - ali. a question for you, mike. if| you won 184 million euros would ali. a question for you, mike. if- you won 184 million euros would you still be here this morning? you won184 million euros would you still be here this morning?— still be here this morning? yeah. i would do it — still be here this morning? yeah. i would do it for _ still be here this morning? yeah. i would do it for nothing. _ still be here this morning? yeah. i would do it for nothing. would - still be here this morning? yeah. i l would do it for nothing. would you? it is m would do it for nothing. would you? it is my passion. — would do it for nothing. would you? it is my passion, my _ would do it for nothing. would you? it is my passion, my pride _ would do it for nothing. would you? it is my passion, my pride and - would do it for nothing. would you? it is my passion, my pride and joy! l it is my passion, my pride and joy! it is my passion, my pride and joy! i wouldn't know what to do when i wake up in the morning.—
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i wouldn't know what to do when i wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and champagne — wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and champagne or _ wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and champagne or something? - wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and champagne or something? i - wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and champagne or something? i would l wake up in the morning. jacuzzi and i champagne or something? i would do that when i champagne or something? i would do that when i get _ champagne or something? i would do that when i get home. _ champagne or something? i would do that when i get home. after - champagne or something? i would do that when i get home. after the - that when i get home. after the sofa. or have it installed behind. we could get you a jacuzzi to do the sport over there. but we could get you a jacuzzi to do the sport over there.— sport over there. but wouldn't be leasant sport over there. but wouldn't be pleasant for _ sport over there. but wouldn't be pleasant for the _ sport over there. but wouldn't be pleasant for the people _ sport over there. but wouldn't be pleasant for the people and - sport over there. but wouldn't be pleasant for the people and their| pleasant for the people and their breakfast. ., . ., ., ~ breakfast. you could fall in it like last time- — breakfast. you could fall in it like last time- i _ breakfast. you could fall in it like last time. i am _ breakfast. you could fall in it like last time. i am regularly - breakfast. you could fall in it like last time. i am regularly asked i breakfast. you could fall in it like | last time. i am regularly asked to re eat last time. i am regularly asked to repeat that- _ last time. i am regularly asked to repeat that. john _ last time. i am regularly asked to repeat that. john was _ last time. i am regularly asked to repeat that. john was asking - last time. i am regularly asked to repeat that. john was asking the l repeat that. john was asking the viewers, what _ repeat that. john was asking the viewers, what would _ repeat that. john was asking the viewers, what would you - repeat that. john was asking the viewers, what would you do - repeat that. john was asking the viewers, what would you do if. repeat that. john was asking the l viewers, what would you do if you want that much money? going back to the newcastle story, he got in touch to say, i would give my money away, all of it, to southampton, my local team. �* ,, all of it, to southampton, my local team-- that _ all of it, to southampton, my local team.- that said, _ all of it, to southampton, my local team.- that said, 184 - all of it, to southampton, my local. team.- that said, 184 million, team. bless. that said, 184 million, would it even _ team. bless. that said, 184 million, would it even touch _ team. bless. that said, 184 million, would it even touch the _ team. bless. that said, 184 million, would it even touch the sides? - team. bless. that said, 184 million, would it even touch the sides? when you are _ would it even touch the sides? when you are looking at getting into the champions league? no, you are looking at getting into the champions league?— you are looking at getting into the champions league? no, whether you ut it to champions league? no, whether you put it to some _ champions league? no, whether you put it to some players, _ champions league? no, whether you put it to some players, or _ champions league? no, whether you put it to some players, or develop i put it to some players, or develop the academy can extend the ground that wouldn't buy much of the ipl, that wouldn't buy much of the ipl, thatis that wouldn't buy much of the ipl, that is for sure. mind—boggling amounts of money, isn't it? that is for sure. mind-boggling amounts of money, isn't it? thanks, mike, will amounts of money, isn't it? thanks, mike. will see _ amounts of money, isn't it? thanks, mike, will see you _ amounts of money, isn't it? thanks, mike, will see you again _ amounts of money, isn't it? thanks, mike, will see you again later. - a nasa mission aimed at uncovering some of the mysteries of the solar system gets underway this morning. the spacecraft lucy is expected to travel more than a billion miles, over 12 years, to study space fossils. dr carly howett is one of the scientists involved, and joins us now from florida.
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first of all, why lucy? the name? lu is a first of all, why lucy? the name? lucy is a hominid _ first of all, why lucy? the name? lucy is a hominid fossil _ first of all, why lucy? the name? | lucy is a hominid fossil discovered in ethiopia. it enabled archaeologists to piece together the human record. a little bit like the lucy fossil, the lucy mission will be looking at space archaeology, so we are looking at rocks that are fundamental to the universe, to our solar system. they are primordial. they have changed since the birth of our solar system. so it is like a little bit of a throwback, a bit of a nod to the archaeology that has already been done on the earth to explaining how we got here, as we go off into space and explore the same thing, really. how did we get here? how did we evolve? did the solar system look like at its very beginning? hence the name lucy, it is not an acronym, it is actually just a name. 50 is not an acronym, it is actually just a name-— is not an acronym, it is actually just a name. so these are rocks in the orbit of—
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just a name. so these are rocks in the orbit ofjupiter, _ just a name. so these are rocks in the orbit ofjupiter, is _ just a name. so these are rocks in the orbit ofjupiter, is that - just a name. so these are rocks in the orbit ofjupiter, is that right? | the orbit ofjupiter, is that right? why is it important to learn more about them?— why is it important to learn more about them? they are at the same distance as — about them? they are at the same distance as jupiter. _ about them? they are at the same distance as jupiter. they _ about them? they are at the same distance as jupiter. they don't - distance asjupiter. they don't orbitjupiter, but they lead it or trailer, in own orbit. they are really fundamental pieces of this jigsaw puzzle. so they have been unchanged since the beauty of our solar system. there are two ideas. they might have formed out of the kuiper belt, where pluto is, or maybe they formed where jupiter kuiper belt, where pluto is, or maybe they formed wherejupiter is right now. by looking we can figure it out, and that helps us test our solar system models. it will give us an important piece of information. we can say, yes, there was this big scramble and everything flew everywhere, or no, that probably didn't happen and things are actually where they formed. so it is really providing some evidence towards testing these models of how we got here. bud towards testing these models of how we got here-— towards testing these models of how we got here. and you are not looking for overnight — we got here. and you are not looking for overnight wins, _ we got here. and you are not looking for overnight wins, are _ we got here. and you are not looking for overnight wins, are you, - we got here. and you are not looking for overnight wins, are you, with - for overnight wins, are you, with this project? over a decade in the making, six years on the first orbit and another six years on the second orbit. you have to be patient, don't you, to be in the space game? to be an outer solar _ you, to be in the space game? to be
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an outer solar system _ you, to be in the space game? to be an outer solar system scientist - you, to be in the space game? to be an outer solar system scientist you l an outer solar system scientist you have to be patient. we waited nine years to get to pluto, this will be six years, like is say, than 12 years to get to the trojan asteroids. but we do have a flyby in about four years of the main belt destroyed, so we get to test our systems, and we are actually going to fly by the earth twice on the route out to jupiter to to fly by the earth twice on the route out tojupiter to gain some gravity to speed up, so we will be able to test our systems then. so we don't quite have to wait six years for the first set of data, but six years to get to the trojan asteroids. years to get to the tro'an asteroids.�* years to get to the tro'an asteroids. ~ . . , ., ., years to get to the tro'an asteroids. ~ . ., , ., ., , asteroids. what was that moment be like when the — asteroids. what was that moment be like when the first _ asteroids. what was that moment be like when the first data _ asteroids. what was that moment be like when the first data comes - asteroids. what was that moment be like when the first data comes in? i like when the first data comes in? it is always absolutely exciting. anybody that has explored any when you can relate to that. seeing something nobody else has seen before is definitely a thrill and i am very excited to wait six until we get there. am very excited to wait six until we aet there. ~ i. am very excited to wait six until we aet there. ~ ., get there. when you say that will brina get there. when you say that will bring together — get there. when you say that will bring together little _ get there. when you say that will bring together little bits - get there. when you say that will bring together little bits of - get there. when you say that will bring together little bits of the i bring together little bits of the jigsaw, ultimately, the big jigsaw is, how did we get here? jigsaw, ultimately, the big 'igsaw is, how did we get here? absolutely. that is an incredibly _ is, how did we get here? absolutely. that is an incredibly difficult - that is an incredibly difficult thing to answer. like i say, this is just one piece of thatjigsaw. nasa is sending multiple missions to
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asteroids, and all that information will feed into understanding our solar system as a whole. so cyrus rex is sending a little piece of a main asteroid back, and another nasa mission, psyche, will explore an iron world. so what was probably the core of a dwarf planet, the outside blew off and now we are looking at the metallic rich core stop button launches later in the year. so just a really exciting times asteroid science. we will be learning a lot about asteroids the next five years. what did we learn from the pluto mission? ~ ., , ., mission? where to begin? the main thin to mission? where to begin? the main thing to me — mission? where to begin? the main thing to me is _ mission? where to begin? the main thing to me is that _ mission? where to begin? the main thing to me is that pluto _ mission? where to begin? the main thing to me is that pluto is - mission? where to begin? the main thing to me is that pluto is active. . thing to me is that pluto is active. when we got there there was this region on pluto that didn't have any craters, but implies something is going on. craters only get eroded if there is an active process, and cratering happens everywhere. so the idea that this world which is about the same size as the continental united states, well away from the sun, no big gas giant or big source of energy, has geologic activity, but was mind blowing to me. it was not expected. itjust goes to show
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you what exploration can bring. it is always the things you are not expecting to see that other most amazing thing. i am sure that will be with lucy as well. can't wait to see what we discover. brute be with lucy as well. can't wait to see what we discover.— be with lucy as well. can't wait to see what we discover. we don't know whether pluto — see what we discover. we don't know whether pluto expressed _ see what we discover. we don't know whether pluto expressed any - see what we discover. we don't know| whether pluto expressed any opinions about being downgraded to a dwarf planet? we about being downgraded to a dwarf lanet? ~ ., ., , ., , ., planet? we have not been able to check in on _ planet? we have not been able to check in on it _ planet? we have not been able to check in on it yet, _ planet? we have not been able to check in on it yet, i _ planet? we have not been able to check in on it yet, i will— planet? we have not been able to check in on it yet, i will look- planet? we have not been able to check in on it yet, i will look into . check in on it yet, i will look into that some more.— check in on it yet, i will look into that some more. stop luck with the mission. that some more. stop luck with the mission- lt — that some more. stop luck with the mission. it sounds _ that some more. stop luck with the mission. it sounds incredibly - mission. it sounds incredibly exciting, and i admire your patience. —— the best of luck. exciting, and i admire your patience. -- the best of luck. thank ou. patience. -- the best of luck. thank you- thank — patience. -- the best of luck. thank you- thank you _ patience. -- the best of luck. thank you. thank you very _ patience. -- the best of luck. thank you. thank you very much, - patience. -- the best of luck. thank you. thank you very much, carly - you. thank you very much, carly howard. you. thank you very much, carly howard- the _ you. thank you very much, carly howard. the very _ you. thank you very much, carly howard. the very opposite - you. thank you very much, carly howard. the very opposite of. you. thank you very much, carly howard. the very opposite of a . howard. the very opposite of a 'ournalist howard. the very opposite of a journalist mindset, _ howard. the very opposite of a journalist mindset, isn't - howard. the very opposite of a journalist mindset, isn't it? - howard. the very opposite of a journalist mindset, isn't it? i. journalist mindset, isn't it? know! journalist mindset, isn't it? i know! now, now, now. the. journalist mindset, isn't it? i- know! now, now, now. the media deadlines. — know! now, now, now. the media deadlines, and _ know! now, now, now. the media deadlines, and the _ know! now, now, now. the media deadlines, and the idea _ know! now, now, now. the media deadlines, and the idea of - know! now, now, now. the media deadlines, and the idea of waiting| deadlines, and the idea of waiting six minutes let alone six years for any sort _ six minutes let alone six years for any sort of— six minutes let alone six years for any sort of result. but six minutes let alone six years for any sort of result.— any sort of result. but potentially the result will— any sort of result. but potentially the result will be _ any sort of result. but potentially the result will be a _ any sort of result. but potentially the result will be a bit _ any sort of result. but potentially the result will be a bit more - the result will be a bit more exciting than some of the stories we have covered. exciting than some of the stories we have covered-— have covered. maybe, you say that. let's find out. _ have covered. maybe, you say that. let's find out. let's _ have covered. maybe, you say that. let's find out. let's give _ have covered. maybe, you say that. let's find out. let's give matt - have covered. maybe, you say that. let's find out. let's give matt six i let's find out. let's give matt six minules— let's find out. let's give matt six minutes and see what he can give us with the _ minutes and see what he can give us with the weather. good morning and i hope you are all
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well. most places are dry around the country. if you thought it was a bit chilly, yes. these are close to the average for mid—october. a good nine degrees in elgin with temperatures between 18 and 21 celsius. the milder air will be creeping in slowly this weekend. the milder edge of the south—west. you can just about make out the weather front, the writ —— ribbon of cloud. you can see pushing into shot. on the little
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zone of thick cloud there is a spots of light rain and drizzle. mist and fog in the wake of it across wales and the south—west and that will take to mid— late morning. a bit more cloud than yesterday. the cloudiest of all western scotland where for some it might turn wet this afternoon. . stilla where for some it might turn wet this afternoon. . still a bit chilly in a very far north. the mid—october of reg. —— average. some clear skies through the english channel and many places will see rain at times overnight into tomorrow morning. tomorrow's forecast. outbreaks of rain. these two areas will stay
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largely dry and bright through the day. a bit of it damp start at still plenty of cloud even with the odd sunny break. temperatures creeping up sunny break. temperatures creeping up on what we will see today. this is a big area of low pressure driving a weather through next week, bringing in ourairfrom driving a weather through next week, bringing in our airfrom the mid—atlantic. you see the weather fronts on the chart. the milder air pushes in and will bring up because those outbreaks of rain and the temperatures as i said tuesday. giving you a quick example that it will be a changeable week. windiest conditions probably on wednesday at end of the week temperatures will drop once again. probably a bit colder than it was yesterday. that is how it is looking. still colder than it was yesterday. that is how it is looking.— is how it is looking. still a sprinkling _ is how it is looking. still a sprinkling of _ is how it is looking. still a sprinkling of sunshine, i is how it is looking. still a - sprinkling of sunshine, though, mid week.
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6:48am. back at 7am with full coverage, tributes to sir david amis who was killed yesterday. —— david amess. the implications across the political world. a man clearly remembered as being kind and really dedicated to his constituents. time now for this week's travel show. this week on the show: tasting the future in wales. so you've got a sweet potato, butternut squash, cricket. laughs. and in search of something special in the skies of new zealand. i'm st davids in wales. with a population ofjust
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1800, it is the uk's smallest designated city. i'm visiting a farm that's cottoned on to a trend which has still to catch on in britain, but that's already feeding some 2 billion people around the world. set across 100 acres of pembrokeshire's countryside, the bug farm is home to dozens of species of insects, and it's the only one of its kind in the uk. as someone who's scared of bugs, i wasn't sure what to expect, and, as always, i was thrown right into the deep end. so who've you got here? this is one of our giant stick insects. it doesn't have a common name, so little is known about it. do you want to hold it? yes. i will do it. i willjust pop her on to you. she will grip on a tiny bit. it's like a live twig! she won't go anywhere. you never notice them if they are in a bush. amazing! as well as offering this unique take on a petting zoo, sarah hopes herfarm inspire an important shift
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in the way we view bugs, into seeing them as a potential resource in the battle against climate change. so the bug farm is first and foremost a place where you come to the awesome insects and invertebrates like this. we want people to come here and have an experience, they are not sure and go, wow! if we can get that insight and then allow people to go, ok, let me learn a bit more about them, they are quite fascinating, they are really useful as well. that's the idea. the bug farm's main draw is arguably its grub kitchen. it's the only restaurant in the uk devoted to eating insects. so we don't eat insects. don't worry, we aren't going to eat you! what we can do is if we look at including insects in our diet, we can actually get protein very efficiently from a group of animals we don't usually eat here in the west. it makes loads of sense because you can get a similar amount of protein
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to beef from insects but with up to 25% less feed going in. a fraction of the land use because insects can be found vertically. right. i have to admit, andy, i have never tried about waste food before. not to my knowledge, anyway. i have eaten a few flies in my time. i am terrified what i will find inside. what have we got in here? you have got a sweet potato, squash, cricket, yellow mealworm and there is a buffalo insect as well, which is the larvae of a lesser mealworm. go ahead if you want to have a try, go for it. you're chucking me in the deep end with this one. and i love pecora. quite a lot to live up to. the buffalo worm is quite a subtle rice flavour, the mealworm has a nutty different flavour
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and the crickets, some people think taste like mushroom, some say white chocolate. that's really nice. if i didn't know... the spice is amazing. i know the ingredients and i can see my little bug friends in there, but i wouldn't necessarily know that i'm eating an insect—based thing. that is the sort of thing we want to get people to get their heads around, insects add this savoury taste. even the welsh government is behind this bug revolution. recently providing andy and sarah a grant to help tackle obesity in schools. we are not going to say to people not eat meat, that's not the message we want to get across. i am surprised more chefs haven't tried this so far.
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as far as i am aware the uk, we are the only restaurant to have insects on menu full—time. i've grown attached to my stick insect friend, so i don't think i will be swapping out my courgettes for crickets. from the sound of it here in the uk a sprinkling of insects on your chips might be more commonplace in the not too distant future. finally, winter's fast approaching here, by far the best time to go hunting for the northern lights. the arctic phenomenon on so many of our bucket lists. but did you know there's an equally impressive display in the southern hemisphere, the aurora australis. we've been on board a unique flight over the skies of new zealand to seek it out.
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it's really one of the world's most phenomenal natural light shows. it's very otherworldly, very dramatic. since moving to dunedin in 2013 i've become completely and utterly bonkers about this amazing phenomenon, and i've spend many dark night chasing around remote parts of southern new zealand when we get to see the australis. but a few years ago i realised if i wanted to see the aurora australis i've gotta get way south of new zealand. we've got to get an airliner, basically. find the active area of aurora and then start orbiting around until you get fantastic views, and that's what we're doing tonight. we are ten hours, really chasing auroras across the southern ocean, 41,000 feet in an amazing aircraft. boeing 787.
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we've just seen the numbers and the aurora is brewing for a bit of a storm. there is a bit of a party here in christchurch. i always like to hold off on the champagne until we've seen the aurora. that's my personal way of doing things but this is pretty exciting times. this stuff is important. tourism is important to our country, and whatever happens tonight, and i hope to god we see an aurora because otherwise i'm hiding in the toilet, this is really important. ijust want to say, rachel, what an amazing job you have done. thank you. the flight�*s our pivot project. we came into covid as specialists and traveled to latin america and antarctica. covid put an end to that so we knew we had to do something else. as it turned out,
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there had been an astronomer, doctor ian griffin, who in 2017 and 2018 had done some private charters to see the southern lights. so i reached out to him, hi, i'm rachael. we'd like to recreate these flights again. he kindly said yes and came on board. we're sold out, 273 on board tonight. 273 also coming on board tomorrow night. so, it's really, it's amazing. we are excited. we're starting to get into the aurora zone, and as you can tell from all the tape, we're trying to see the aurora, but in a minute the lights will go down and hopefully we can get some good pictures. can the lights go down?
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we will turn them down right now. awesome. yay! start looking out the window. look, you can see it just ahead of us. look, look! it's starting to come in now. can you see it through the windows? yes. starting to see it. did you see that? oh, yes! so good. yeah, i enjoyed it a lot.
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fantastic. it was so exciting and to pray and wish and everything, - it was unbelievable. we flew into an aurora storm tonight so we got some lovely images. certainly for me it is one of the best flights i've ever seen. the aurora tonight was spectacular. now it's time for a quick breakfast and processing images for the rest of the day. right, that's all for this week. but coming up next time...
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christa's in iceland at the volcano that became a destination of choice for hundreds of lockdown locals earlier this year. someone asked me if it was sped up, and is not. if you want to see a longer version, it is on iplayer. search for bbc travel show on all the main platform then you will find us there. for now, though, keep planning those next trips and we will see you back on the road very, very soon. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today: tributes to sir david amess, the mp stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. police have declared his killing as a terrorist incident. our offices will continue to work
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around the clock to ensure justice is delivered for sir david and his family. and i would like to thank the people of south bend —— southend for their understanding of the investigation continues. at a church service last night, sir david's constituents described him as an mp who always listened, and who loved representing his area. his heart was in his community. it really was. he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. he constituency mp you could ever wish for. ., , constituency mp you could ever wish for. . , . , constituency mp you could ever wish for. ,, for. he was at his happiest when he was helping — for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people. _ for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people, he _ for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people, he was - for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people, he was a - for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people, he was a true i was helping people, he was a true servant _ was helping people, he was a true servant and an inspiration. questions asked about how a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million pound government contract. it's carry on for now for newcastle boss steve bruce but one of his rivals, liverpool'sjurgen klopp, is worried by the emergence of the new north—east superpower. as the premier league returns this weekend. it wasn't you, or me. one lucky french ticket—holder wins
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the euromillions record jackpot, £184 million. and after a cooler day yesterday, but with more sunshine, the cloud returns this weekend. temperatures on the rise. i will have the full forecast for you here on breakfast. it's saturday, the 16th of october. our top story: the killing of the conservative mp sir david amess has been declared as a terrorist incident, by police. sir david was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery in essex yesterday. officers say they are investigating a potential link to islamist extremism and are searching two addresses in the london area. a 25—year—old man remains in custody. the prime minister described sir david as "one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics." here's our political correspondent helen catt.
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in leigh—on—sea, worshippers came together in a mass to remember their mp. sir david amess had been a member of parliament in essex for 38 years. colleagues described him as a kind man devoted to his constituency of southend west. he made everybody feel valued and he listened, he was a good listener. you felt it. people felt he represented them in the houses of parliament. he was at his happiest when he was helping people. he was a true servant and an inspiration. his heart was in his- community, it really was. he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. - it was there in the middle of the day at a different church in leigh—on—sea that he was stabbed multiple times. he'd been holding one of his regular surgeries to meet constituents. police officers and paramedics tried to save him, but he died at the scene.
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a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. last night police declared it was a terrorist incident. a tragic day for the family and colleagues of sir david, the community of southend and indeed for the whole of greater essex. sir david has dedicated his life to serving the communities of essex and southend. and he was simply dispensing his duties when his life was horrifically cut short. it was five years ago that the labour mp jo cox was murdered in her constituency. the fatal attack on sir david has raised questions once again about the safety of mps. it's so hard, because we have a job to do and i find myself now working as a politician and trying to help people and trying to do good things for people, and it's really important that we get good people in public life, but this is the risk that we're all taking. you know, and so many mps today will be scared by this. the speaker of the house of commons,
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who went ahead with his own constituency surgery last night, said security measures would need to be looked at. we've got to make sure the politicians are safe, the people who work for them, theirfamilies, the people of the house of commons. we've seen the terrorist attack there as well. what we won't do, we won't give into it, though. we will continue to ensure that democracy will be there. we have got to make sure we have that relationship with our electors is there. that's the unique part of british politics, but we've got to make sure that mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by their local police forces today. the home secretary has ordered an immediate review of their security. the flags in westminster are flying at half mast for sir david amess, as questions are already being asked once again about how to keep his colleagues safe. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. in a moment we will speak to our political correspondent
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peter saull, who is in downing street, but first to ben boulos who is in leigh—on—sea for us this morning. ben, police have confirmed they are treating the killing as a terrorist incident — what more do we know? yes, what more do we know? so what we know at this 5 is yes, so what we know at this stage is that a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. police, as you say, are treating it as a terrorist incident. that means that the metropolitan police's counterterrorism command is leading the investigation into what went on here yesterday. it means a huge amount of resources are being put into the investigation. they will write now be scouring electronic devices, any cctv, and we also understand they are searching two properties as well as they continue to also questioned a 25—year—old man. the phrase police have used is
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that they see a potential link to islamist extremism. so they are clearly, there is clearly a sense of urgency to try to gather any footage, —— cam footage, smart doorbell footage or anybody who may have been in the area who has a little bit of information that might help piece together the picture of the events leading up to yesterday's tragic events. the events leading up to yesterday's tragic events-— tragic events. then, we will get the reaction from _ tragic events. then, we will get the reaction from the _ tragic events. then, we will get the reaction from the wider _ tragic events. then, we will get the reaction from the wider political - reaction from the wider political world in a few minutes, but in terms of where you are, with his constituents, a constituency that mattered so much to david amess, people must be feeling it so acutely? people must be feeling it so acutel ? , ., acutely? yes, we saw that with the viuil held acutely? yes, we saw that with the vigil held yesterday, _ acutely? yes, we saw that with the vigil held yesterday, people - acutely? yes, we saw that with the| vigil held yesterday, people coming together to reflect, to come to terms with what had happened, and also to share memories and pay tribute to him. after all, so david was the mp southend west for more than 20 years, and even before that, since 1983, he was the for basildon. —— sir david. so he is well—known and clearly well liked in the area,
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and clearly well liked in the area, and we saw that in the tribute, not just from constituents and colleagues and friends and across the political divide, but from people who had never met him face—to—face, but knew him as a local character and as someone who championed issues that were not only important to him but championed the town and the burrow of southend, which was clearly so dear to his heart. �* �* ., .,, which was clearly so dear to his heart. �* 1, ., ,, heart. indeed. ben boulos, thank ou. our political correspondent peter saull is in downing street for us this morning. that face—to—face contact with constituents is seen as a cornerstone of british democracy, isn't it, but once again the safety of mps has been called into question here? ., , of mps has been called into question here? . , ., , , here? that is absolutely right, nina. politicians _ here? that is absolutely right, nina. politicians of _ here? that is absolutely right, nina. politicians of all - here? that is absolutely right, nina. politicians of all stripes. nina. politicians of all stripes will be reflecting on the tragic death of sir david amess yesterday. what of them describing him yesterday is notjust a colleague, but a friend. —— lots of them. of course, he was not alone yesterday and holding a constituency surgery. hundreds of these will have been happening up and down the country yesterday. it is considered a really
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important part of a democratic process, but mps can come face—to—face with the people who elect them, to represent them in the house of commons. the prime minister was asked yesterday about security concerns. this was of course just five years since another murder of a labour mp injo cox. he wouldn't engage with that wider issue, he said now was the time to reflect on the life and the work of sir david amess. �* , ., the life and the work of sir david amess. �* ,., . the life and the work of sir david amess. ~ ,., ., ., , ., ., amess. above all, he was one of the kindest, nicest, _ amess. above all, he was one of the kindest, nicest, most— amess. above all, he was one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle - amess. above all, he was one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle people| kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics. _ kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics, and he also had an outstanding record of passing laws to help _ outstanding record of passing laws to help the most vulnerable, whether they were _ to help the most vulnerable, whether they were the people who are suffering from endometriosis, passing — suffering from endometriosis, passing laws to end cruelty to animals. _ passing laws to end cruelty to animals, or doing a huge amount to reduce _ animals, or doing a huge amount to reduce the — animals, or doing a huge amount to reduce the fuel poverty suffered by people _ reduce the fuel poverty suffered by people up and down the country. the home people up and down the country. iie: home secretary, people up and down the country. tie: home secretary, priti people up and down the country. i““ie: home secretary, priti patel, has been holding talks with police
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forces. they in turn would get into contact with all 100 and —— 650 mps up contact with all 100 and —— 650 mps up and down the country to talk about what kind of measures they can put in place. there is a police operation, operation bridger, put in place in the aftermath of the murder ofjo cox in 2016, to put in place things like shutters and alarms to better protect mps and their staff, but already some mps are saying, look, we need to carry on doing this, of course, but you might remember so much elwood in 2018 did cpr to a police officer who was attacked, fatally stabbed at the gates to the houses of parliament. he is saying that perhaps mps need to go back to what they were doing during a pandemic, not holding face—to—face meetings with their constituents but doing it online or over the phone.— constituents but doing it online or over the phone. peter investments to, man over the phone. peter investments to. many thanks- _ over the phone. peter investments to, many thanks. -- _ over the phone. peter investments to, many thanks. -- in _ over the phone. peter investments to, many thanks. -- in spinster. i over the phone. peter investments| to, many thanks. -- in spinster. -- westminster- _ questions are being raised around how a lab that recorded thousands of faulty covid pcr results won a multi—million pound government contract. testing has now been suspended
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at the private lab in wolverhampton and an investigation has been ordered into why it took a month to identify the failures. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. the wolverhampton lab at the centre of the faulty tests enquiry is run by a company called immensa health clinic limited. it was awarded a government contract worth £119 million to carry out pcr tests just a few months after being set up, one of a number of lucrative government contracts the company has won. but now thousands of people who received a false negative test are living with the knowledge they may have inadvertently infected someone. really cross with the system, and also, i wanted to do the right thing. i wanted not to go out into society and spread something, you know, make people poorly. but i was being told that's what i should do. but also, over the course of the last week, i've had five pcr tests.
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the expense and the waste of money, as well, that doesn't sit easily with me either. some campaigners say that this episode has exposed a lack of regulation of testing providers. they're outside of the health system and outside of any quality control by health professionals. we've seen this a lot with companies who don't really know what it is they're existing to do, but need some form of revenue while they're working it out, and that's what this company started as, and during the pandemic, because they could do some testing, they started doing covid testing as well and they scaled up very rapidly. immensa is a subsidiary of dante labs, which was also offering pcr tests of foreign travellers. but it's now under investigation by the competition and markets authority over concerns it has been treating customers unfairly, one of a number of covid testing terms facing similar investigations. dante labs says it's cooperating fully with the cma inquiry, but recognises a small number of customers face challenges. immensa health clinic says it's fully collaborating with health officials and added it has already analysed more than 2.5 million samples for nhs test and trace.
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but there will be questions over whether millions of taxpayers' money has been wisely spent. dominic hughes, bbc news. if you have not had the chance to check last night's lottery numbers yet, spoiler alert, check last night's lottery numbers yet, spoileralert, i check last night's lottery numbers yet, spoiler alert, iam check last night's lottery numbers yet, spoiler alert, i am afraid we have bad news for you. the record 184 million pounds euromillions jackpot has been claimed by a ticket—holder in france. zut alors! this huge price went unclaimed _ zut alors! this huge price went unclaimed after _ zut alors! this huge price went unclaimed after tuesday's - zut alors! this huge price went i unclaimed after tuesday's draw, which meant last night's game was going to attract more interest than usual. the most recent uk euromillions winners to go public after a big win were frances and patrick connolly, from northern ireland, who scooped close to
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115 million in 2019. john, ican john, i can hear the disappointment in your voice but it wasn't you, but you do know that you have to buy a ticket in order to be in it?— ticket in order to be in it? that's what i ticket in order to be in it? that's what i keep _ ticket in order to be in it? that's what i keep going _ ticket in order to be in it? that's what i keep going wrong. - ticket in order to be in it? that's| what i keep going wrong. games ticket in order to be in it? that's i what i keep going wrong. games in the gallery, working with us this morning, he told me he won £4 50 p. so there you go. don't dismiss it. £4.50, guess who is buying the coffees this morning. 14 minutes past seven. coffees this morning. 14 minutes past seven-— past seven. let's check in with matt. past seven. let's check in with matt- good — past seven. let's check in with matt. good morning. - past seven. let's check in with matt. good morning. look- past seven. let's check in with matt. good morning. look at. past seven. let's check in with i matt. good morning. look at the difference there! good morning to both of you. a bit of a stark contrast this morning. hope you are having a good saturday so far. actually start across the northern half of the country, down to —2 in parts of northumberland, whereas we are at 30 degrees in the south. so it is that mild air in the south, which hasjust about south. so it is that mild air in the south, which has just about clung on, a little bit chilly yesterday,
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it is the mild hour which will go through this weekend. we will see temperatures gradually rise, but will be the case today for the south—west of the country, most places today should have a dry day, if you have outdoor plans it isn't looking too shabby. what's more cloud than we saw yesterday, but there is the contrast that we have. the cold air across scotland, parts of northern and eastern england, mild air to of northern and eastern england, mild airto the of northern and eastern england, mild air to the south and the west. bringing about the change, this will just about make it out. a little line of cloud. that is a warm front with warm air behind. the white areas rain bearing cloud. that will be on later in the day, especially due to west. you can see it approaching parts of ireland. rain pushing across southern counties of england, light rain or drizzle further north into northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland at times, but mist and fog at the moment in parts of wales and south—west is the biggest issue. but will clear tree with sunshine in the afternoon. sunny breaks elsewhere, not a bad day in the north of scotland, turning wet in the west of scotland, turning wet in the west of scotland and northern ireland. that is as the mild agates as far north as liverpool to hold this afternoon,
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as liverpool to hold this afternoon, a little bit on the cool side further north, but temperatures of 9-12 further north, but temperatures of 9—12 are around average for this part of the year. as we go through the evening and overnight, it stays reasonably clear in parts of orkney, shetland, the north of scotland and a few showers, a few clear skies to the south as well for stopping between 20 of cloud and outbreaks of rain which will keep the temperatures up tonight. it won't be anywhere near as cold to some of you as it was last night. a mild start to sunday. early risers, good chance you will see wet weather at times, heavy bursts around as well. the exception to that will be shetland again, down through the english channel to the south—east, morning sunshine here and maybe it will stay dry across the south through the day. the rain, when you see it in the morning, should start to fizzle out. still the odd spot of light rain and drizzle here and there, especially into the afternoon. the skies will be brighter, a bit of sunshine, a fairly cloudy day away from the top and tail of the uk and temperature starting to lift a bit more, 12—17. as we go into next week, driving that warm air will be this area of low pressure, bringing
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it up southerly winds all the way from the mid—atlantic, so as i said, tuesday we could see temperatures anywhere between 18 and 21. that doesn't mean sunshine, though. plenty of rain at times through next week, windiest on wednesday and then turning cooler towards the end of the week once again. back to you both. let's return to our main story now. dozens of people have attended a vigil at a church in leigh—on—sea to remember the mp sir david amess, who was stabbed to death while carrying our his constituency work yesterday. the service was led by parish priest fatherjeff woolnough, whojoins us now, alongside kevin buck, a conservative southend councillor who worked with sir david for ten years. father fjeff, can we start with you, please? look like an incredibly moving service that you took —— fatherjeff. brute
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moving service that you took -- fatherjeff-— fatherjeff. we needed to do something — fatherjeff. we needed to do something quickly, - fatherjeff. we needed to do something quickly, we - fatherjeff. we needed to do something quickly, we didn't fatherjeff. we needed to do - something quickly, we didn't have a lot of time. david is a practising catholic and the best we could do was offer a mass rip over of —— a mass repose of his altar then we spoke for a few moments. ten or 12 people came to the lectern and gave moving tributes to a man who is known by all and loved by all, i have to say it is a huge, huge loss. fatherjeff, we're looking at the pictures of the service now but we have heard from so many constituents who said this was an mp who was truly connected to his constituents are truly understood every body there and life there.— are truly understood every body there and life there. but's right. i describe sir _ there and life there. but's right. i describe sir david _ there and life there. but's right. i describe sir david is _ there and life there. but's right. i describe sir david is old - there and life there. but's right. i describe sir david is old school. l there and life there. but's right. i j describe sir david is old school. a good friend to me, we're both from east london and click on different levels. he had that great ability to communicate at all different levels
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and through that wonderful smile that he always portrayed, he could placate and also just settle an awkward discussion very, very quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask you. _ quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask you. you _ quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask you, you are _ quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask you, you are involved i quickly. it was a great gift. kevin, can i ask you, you are involved in | can i ask you, you are involved in local politics that also a close friend of sir david. can you put into words the sense of shock and grief within the community? weill. into words the sense of shock and grief within the community? well, i think it isjust _ grief within the community? well, i think it isjust that _ grief within the community? well, i think it is just that at _ grief within the community? well, i think it isjust that at the _ grief within the community? well, i think it isjust that at the moment. | think it is just that at the moment. we're _ think it is just that at the moment. we're still— think it is just that at the moment. we're still in a deep sense of shock what _ we're still in a deep sense of shock what has _ we're still in a deep sense of shock what has happened to sir david. as we've _ what has happened to sir david. as we've seen— what has happened to sir david. as we've seen the tributes pouring in, the messages i have received just in the messages i have received just in the last— the messages i have received just in the last 24— the messages i have received just in the last 24 hours from people just you know. — the last 24 hours from people just you know, commiserating. he was a very sincere. — you know, commiserating. he was a very sincere, kind man and that is what _ very sincere, kind man and that is what he _ very sincere, kind man and that is what he brought to his politics and we have _ what he brought to his politics and we have seen that from the outpouring of grief in the community at the _ outpouring of grief in the community
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at the moment.— outpouring of grief in the community at the moment. when you're working closel with at the moment. when you're working closely with him, _ at the moment. when you're working closely with him, kevin, _ at the moment. when you're working closely with him, kevin, what - at the moment. when you're working closely with him, kevin, what are - closely with him, kevin, what are the things you remember? any stories or things you are trying to focus on today? or things you are trying to focus on toda ? ., or things you are trying to focus on toda ? . , ,., ., , today? there are 'ust so many. he alwa s today? there are 'ust so many. he always had _ today? there are 'ust so many. he always had a — today? there arejust so many. he always had a smile _ today? there arejust so many. he always had a smile on _ today? there arejust so many. he always had a smile on his - today? there arejust so many. he always had a smile on his face - today? there arejust so many. he. always had a smile on his face every time that— always had a smile on his face every time that you met him. he was always looking _ time that you met him. he was always looking positive, he always looked on the _ looking positive, he always looked on the positive side, always looking for the _ on the positive side, always looking for the good in people and that was david _ for the good in people and that was david it— for the good in people and that was david it is— for the good in people and that was david. it is so tragic that he died doing _ david. it is so tragic that he died doing what— david. it is so tragic that he died doing what he loved which was at meetings — doing what he loved which was at meetings of people and helping people — meetings of people and helping people. | meetings of people and helping --eole. meetings of people and helping ”eole. ., r meetings of people and helping --eole. ., ~ ,. , people. i saw one mp described him as the smiley _ people. i saw one mp described him as the smiley ester _ people. i saw one mp described him as the smiley ester politician - people. i saw one mp described him as the smiley ester politician in - as the smiley ester politician in parliament. kevin, itjust sounds like he had all the time in the world for everybody that he met stop he was there chatting, he seems to have a very easy manner.— have a very easy manner. well, he did and again. _ have a very easy manner. well, he did and again, that _ have a very easy manner. well, he did and again, that was _ have a very easy manner. well, he did and again, that was a - have a very easy manner. well, he did and again, that was a thing, i have a very easy manner. well, hej did and again, that was a thing, he could _ did and again, that was a thing, he could put— did and again, that was a thing, he could put anyone at ease, he could help anyone. it was always about helping _ help anyone. it was always about helping others. what he did he did
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for others, — helping others. what he did he did for others, he never did for himself _ for others, he never did for himself. he wasjust quite a remarkable man and a remarkable mp. father— remarkable man and a remarkable mp. fatherjeff, _ remarkable man and a remarkable mp. fatherjeff, how do you, going forward, how do you try and help the community now to deal with this and to heal in some way? mr; community now to deal with this and to heal in some way?— to heal in some way? my first thou~hts to heal in some way? my first thoughts are _ to heal in some way? my first thoughts are actually - to heal in some way? my first thoughts are actually with - to heal in some way? my firstj thoughts are actually with the church which is just behind thoughts are actually with the church which isjust behind us here because it has happened on the ground, on their sacred space. these things actually bring faith communities together and i was in touch, ora manfrom communities together and i was in touch, or a man from a local muslim community called us yesterday to express their sincere condolences, this will bring all the different faith groups together and make them strong. that is a good thing and it won't extinguish the light of his smile either. that is what we've got to work on now. we've got to work on
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some serious ecumenical relationships between the faith communities that have lost their greatest supporter.— communities that have lost their greatest supporter. kevin, there is a lot of talk — greatest supporter. kevin, there is a lot of talk this _ greatest supporter. kevin, there is a lot of talk this morning _ greatest supporter. kevin, there is a lot of talk this morning generally j a lot of talk this morning generally about the safety of mps and whether we need to do more about offering them protection and may be more police protection when they are doing surgery meetings with their constituents. what do you think so david amess would have made of that talk? would he have wanted extra protection?— protection? no, and that is the challenae protection? no, and that is the challenge that _ protection? no, and that is the challenge that we _ protection? no, and that is the challenge that we have - protection? no, and that is the challenge that we have here. it protection? no, and that is the - challenge that we have here. it has made _ challenge that we have here. it has made us _ challenge that we have here. it has made us all, whatever we do in public— made us all, whatever we do in public life. _ made us all, whatever we do in public life, it has made us all think— public life, it has made us all think twice about the safety of ourselves and of our families and we do what _ ourselves and of our families and we do what we — ourselves and of our families and we do what we do as local and national politicians _ do what we do as local and national politicians because that's what we want to, _ politicians because that's what we want to, and we want to give back to the community and help those but our families— the community and help those but our families don't use it and we shouldn't forget there is a
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devastated family. there is a wife and five _ devastated family. there is a wife and five children and a much wider family— and five children and a much wider family that — and five children and a much wider family that is grieving this morning for the _ family that is grieving this morning for the loss of their father and the husband — for the loss of their father and the husband. ~ ,,., , ., , ,., , husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin, husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin. what _ husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin, what do _ husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin, what do you _ husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin, what do you think - husband. absolutely, absolutely. kevin, what do you think david i husband. absolutely, absolutely. - kevin, what do you think david amess would have thought then about this talk of zoom constituency surgeries, police on the door, maybe metal detectors, and chasing... changing the face of the way we do politics? it maybe a consequence of what happened yesterday but i don't think he would _ happened yesterday but i don't think he would have approved. i personally don't approve, really. i know we have _ don't approve, really. i know we have to — don't approve, really. i know we have to take our own personal safety very seriously but, you know, i enjoy— very seriously but, you know, i enjoy doing, as sir david did, meeting _ enjoy doing, as sir david did, meeting the people. that's why we do this so— meeting the people. that's why we do this so we _ meeting the people. that's why we do this so we can meet the people and help the _ this so we can meet the people and help the people and i don't want to do that— help the people and i don't want to do that from behind a tv screen or behind _ do that from behind a tv screen or behind a _ do that from behind a tv screen or behind a glass screen or a security box because then we've lost. father jeff. box because then we've lost. father jeff, ifi
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box because then we've lost. father jeff. if i just — box because then we've lost. father jeff, if i just finish _ box because then we've lost. father jeff, if i just finish with _ box because then we've lost. father jeff, if i just finish with you, - jeff, if ijust finish with you, you've talked about the different faiths coming together, and people of no faith, i suppose, as well. absolutely. over the next few days, what are you expecting to happen in terms of the community grieving and sharing this loss? i terms of the community grieving and sharing this loss?— sharing this loss? i can't speak for members of _ sharing this loss? i can't speak for members of the _ sharing this loss? i can't speak for members of the denominations i sharing this loss? i can't speak for. members of the denominations and otherfaiths but i'm pretty members of the denominations and other faiths but i'm pretty sure you'll find that over this weekend, churches and mosques and synagogues and temples will have extra people, perhaps attending, to offer their own form of prayers for the family and of course in the catholic tradition that is for the repose of the soul of dso david. i you'll find that —— dear sir david. i think people will want to come out and have a public pouring out of grief for this great, great guy. qm. have a public pouring out of grief for this great, great guy. 0k, thank ou both for this great, great guy. 0k, thank you both so — for this great, great guy. 0k, thank
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you both so much _ for this great, great guy. 0k, thank you both so much for _ for this great, great guy. 0k, thank you both so much forjoining - for this great, great guy. 0k, thank you both so much forjoining us- for this great, great guy. 0k, thank you both so much forjoining us on. you both so much forjoining us on breakfast and reflecting on your friend and colleague so david amess. i know it is a dreadful time there and it is tough to turn up the next morning and go on tv so we really appreciate your time. —— sir david amess. appreciate your time. -- sir david amess. ., ., appreciate your time. -- sir david amess. ., ,, , ., appreciate your time. -- sir david amess. ., ,, , ,, amess. thank you, god bless. goodbye- _ amess. thank you, god bless. goodbye. community - amess. thank you, god bless. goodbye. community really i amess. thank you, god bless. i goodbye. community really coming touether. goodbye. community really coming together- we _ goodbye. community really coming together. we will _ goodbye. community really coming together. we will be _ goodbye. community really coming together. we will be speaking i goodbye. community really coming together. we will be speaking to i together. we will be speaking to jackie smith, chair of thejo cox foundation. these threats are something that mps just live with. questions again around their safety. it is 7:25am. much more on that are the implications throughout the morning. but every week, presenter ros atkins takes an in—depth look at one of the issues in the news. this week, he examines the rising tensions between china and taiwan.
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this is a story about how historic disputes have become part of a global power struggle. bi]! disputes have become part of a global power struggle.- global power struggle. all the tramlines are _ global power struggle. all the tramlines are pointing - global power struggle. all the | tramlines are pointing towards escalation and would make the escalation and would make the escalation extremely difficult if it came to blows in the taiwan strait. if you go a couple of hundred kilometres of the south—east coast of china you reach taiwan, an island that behaves as an independent state. beijing, though, considers it part of china and this graphic shows taiwan's air defence zone which chinese planes have increasingly entered, crossing and official line between mainland china and taiwan, and these incursions have risen through the year. and to taiwan this is more thanjust through the year. and to taiwan this is more than just military posturing. its defence minister says the situation is worse than it has been for 40 years and when asked if china's is capable of invading taiwan, this was the reply.
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translation: after 20 to 25 they will be fully prepared. that is our assessment. the will be fully prepared. that is our assessment-— will be fully prepared. that is our assessment. ,, , , ., assessment. the us sees it that way, too. the assessment. the us sees it that way, too- the wall — assessment. the us sees it that way, too. the wall street _ assessment. the us sees it that way, too. the wall street journal - assessment. the us sees it that way, too. the wall street journal says. .. i too. the wall streetjournal says... my too. the wall streetjournal says... my colleague michael bristow covered the story. my colleague michael bristow covered the sto . , ., ,, the story. these unnamed us officials are _ the story. these unnamed us officials are confirming i the story. these unnamed us officials are confirming that i the story. these unnamed us. officials are confirming that us special forces are in taiwan because it wants to remind beijing at a time of heightened tension over taiwan but the united states does still stand behind taiwan and will help it defend itself.— defend itself. china's response to american support _ defend itself. china's response to american support of— defend itself. china's response to american support of taiwan i defend itself. china's response to | american support of taiwan would defend itself. china's response to i american support of taiwan would not be clearer. �* ,, . american support of taiwan would not be clearer. ~ ,, ~ ., ., be clearer. translation: the taiwan . uestion be clearer. translation: the taiwan auestion is be clearer. translation: the taiwan question is purely _ be clearer. translation: the taiwan question is purely china's _ be clearer. translation: the taiwan question is purely china's internal i question is purely china's internal affair. we will not tolerate any outside interference. this affair. we will not tolerate any outside interference.— affair. we will not tolerate any outside interference. as you can hear, outside interference. as you can hear. taiwan — outside interference. as you can hear, taiwan finds _ outside interference. as you can hear, taiwan finds itself - outside interference. as you can | hear, taiwan finds itself between the tectonic plates of world power. china's economic military and economic might is on the move and america and its allies are trying to manage that, even contain it. the americans make no secret of this.
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the director of the cia this year described the most important geopolitical face —— geopolitical threat we face in the 21st—century is an increasingly adversarial chinese government, and the people of taiwan well understand the position they're in. of taiwan well understand the -osition the 're in. �* . �* . position they're in. translation: we are a small island _ position they're in. translation: we are a small island nation _ position they're in. translation: we are a small island nation so _ position they're in. translation: we are a small island nation so we - position they're in. translation: we are a small island nation so we are i are a small island nation so we are are a small island nation so we are a bargaining chip in negotiations between the big countries. we don't know when we will be a war but i think it is very likely to happen. if it really comes to that we will have to see which country has more resources and is more willing to support us. for resources and is more willing to support us— resources and is more willing to su-aortus. ., , ,., support us. for these reasons and more, tensions _ support us. for these reasons and more, tensions around _ support us. for these reasons and more, tensions around taiwan i support us. for these reasons and more, tensions around taiwan at. support us. for these reasons and i more, tensions around taiwan at risk disturbing the uneasy equilibrium in the region and to understand these current tensions we need to go back to their roots. in 1949. that is when the government was defeated by the communists and fled to taiwan. i1950 island was effectively independent. 70 years on, taiwan, while once a dictatorship, is now a democracy with press freedom. china,
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meanwhile, is an oppressive single party state. both has seen rapid economic growth. and check —— beijing's position on taiwan hasn't wavered since 1950. it sees it as part of and can do whatever it will to take it back. that is evident when we hear president xi. translation: we will never allow a foreign force to bully us, anyone who tries to try will have their heads bashed to stop. it who tries to try will have their heads bashed to stop.- who tries to try will have their heads bashed to stop. it can also be heard in the — heads bashed to stop. it can also be heard in the state _ heads bashed to stop. it can also be heard in the state owned _ heads bashed to stop. it can also be heard in the state owned global- heard in the state owned global times. depicting an invasion of taiwan and the seizing of the presidential palace. this could be put down to bombastic rhetoric and no more but the context here is that chinese military power is growing rapidly. this is one of beijing's regular military parades and this is
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what china says it spent on the military each year since 1990. it also claims that in the coming 12 months it will spend another 210 billion dollars. that would be more than any other country bar america. this military expansion is in part about america. ageing forces have also —— always dwarfed the taiwan military —— beijing forces. but they know that americans and their allies are present, militarily and diplomatically. us secretary of state anthony blink and puts it that way. state anthony blink and puts it that wa . ,, ., , ., , state anthony blink and puts it that wa. , way. the united states has a commitment _ way. the united states has a commitment to _ way. the united states has a commitment to taiwan i way. the united states has a commitment to taiwan that i way. the united states has a | commitment to taiwan that is rocksolid —— and tony blinken. and over many years has contributed to the maintenance and stability across the maintenance and stability across the taiwan strait and within the region. the taiwan strait and within the re . ion. ., ,, region. here we have the us alongside — region. here we have the us alongside japan, _ region. here we have the us alongside japan, the - region. here we have the us alongside japan, the uk, i region. here we have the us i alongside japan, the uk, canada, region. here we have the us - alongside japan, the uk, canada, the alongsidejapan, the uk, canada, the netherlands and new zealand, conducting naval exercises in the philippines see this month. there are also us military bases, the
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biggest in south korea and japan. —— philippines sea. remember this from september? the uk, us and australia designed a defence pact called aukus, with a look to countering china. and it lies its policy on taiwan. it is often called "strategic ambiguity". taiwan. it is often called "strategicambiguity". he taiwan. it is often called "strategic ambiguity". he describes how us has signalled a willingness to defend taiwan but has never described precisely how and if it well. the analyst isabel hilton explains more. and you can argue this there has been no conflict with china but if it has worked so far you would be right to ask well,
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what's changed? well, the chinese government is not known for explaining itself but there are reasons that perhaps it wanted to act now. the first is taiwan's president tsai ing—wen. she wants taiwan to be independent of china. this pro—beijing analysts leaves the show of power is in part a message to the taiwanese president. he also presents a second factor. that china is also being unreasonably provoked. the third possible reason for china's actions comes from retired us army general stanley mcchrystal.
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had china is doing this now because it can. it had china is doing this now because it can. , ' had china is doing this now because it can. , , ., ., it can. it is different than five or ten or 20 _ it can. it is different than five or ten or 20 years _ it can. it is different than five or ten or 20 years ago _ it can. it is different than five or ten or 20 years ago because i it can. it is different than five orj ten or 20 years ago because the chinese military now has enough credible power to at least contest what the united states over the % —— potential defence of taiwan. stand potential defence of taiwan. and this dynamic _ potential defence of taiwan. and this dynamic is _ potential defence of taiwan. and this dynamic is one beijing is well a rare of, not least over what it has done in hong kong. china brought in new laws that changed policing, defence and freedom of speech in hong kong. the west opposed the laws but ageing had done as precisely what it wanted and that brings us back to taiwan and while beijing might feel emboldened to act. even the prospect has observers worried. the diplomat meeting described that the status quo in the taiwanese street looks increasingly shaky. its demise would almost certainly usher in a major conflict, it told us, and
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undermine regional stability in east asia and even international order as know it. the stakes are high. here is more from howard zhang from bbc shanghai. the cost of war is of course one reason that countries pull back from conflict. but the risk remains was not even from chinese invasion or what may follow or a calculation all mistake that prompted an accidental war, from either side. and at the heart of this is a decision by china full of it was outlined by us security adviserjake sullivan when asked this by the bbc. do you think china will invade taiwan? i’m asked this by the bbc. do you think china will invade taiwan?— china will invade taiwan? i'm not auoin to china will invade taiwan? i'm not going to make — china will invade taiwan? i'm not going to make any _ china will invade taiwan? i'm not going to make any predictions. i china will invade taiwan? i'm not i going to make any predictions. what i'm going to make any predictions. what l'm going _ going to make any predictions. what i'm going to say is this. from the united _ i'm going to say is this. from the united states' perspective, there are certain under mental obligations and one _ are certain under mental obligations and one of— are certain under mental obligations and one of them is no unilateral
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changes— and one of them is no unilateral changes to _ and one of them is no unilateral changes to the status quo. and this cuts to it. taiwan _ changes to the status quo. and this cuts to it. taiwan and _ changes to the status quo. and this cuts to it. taiwan and the _ changes to the status quo. and this cuts to it. taiwan and the us i changes to the status quo. and this cuts to it. taiwan and the us want i cuts to it. taiwan and the us want the status quo. china does not. and must now decide what is willing to do to change that. and right there you have a microcosm of this global power struggle with the world's current superpower wanting things as they are and the world's coming superpower wanting things to change, with both having a vast military is to support their ambitions as well. and so taiwan's status has become a test of the limits of america's power and the possibilities of china's. when we consider that, taiwan becomes something we all have an interest in. hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. tributes continue to be paid to the mp sir david amess this
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morning, who was stabbed to death at his constituency surgery. a strong supporter of charities and campaigns, sir david recently launch an appeal for a memorial to the late dame vera lynn on the white cliffs of dover. her daughter, virginia lewis—jones, joins us now. good morning, lovely to see you. tell us about the work that you did with sir david and the memorial? he was really the instigator of the whole thing last november. he emailed me, randy, said he would like chat about this, he said he thought they should be one, as did a lot of people before him, but he was the main driving force, the leading light, if you like. it was appallingly devastating, to his poor family and close friends. our hearts go out to them. it is just dreadful. he will be really, really sorely missed. we worked together closely,
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we became a tightknit family, if you like. just can't take it in, the shock was unbelievable, as it was for all his close people. can shock was unbelievable, as it was for all his close people.— for all his close people. can you remember _ for all his close people. can you remember your— for all his close people. can you remember your last _ for all his close people. can you. remember your last conversation for all his close people. can you i remember your last conversation with him? when was that? b, remember your last conversation with him? when was that?— him? when was that? a couple of weeks ago. _ him? when was that? a couple of weeks ago, talking _ him? when was that? a couple of weeks ago, talking about - weeks ago, talking about fundraising, actually, for the memorial. at which point the wonderful paul they ran yesterday, i have to bring him back, i think in some way that david should also be remembered in the memorialfor what he has done to this point and hopefully his spirit will continue to do. a couple of weeks ago we were talking and chatting about the fundraising, et cetera, always making sure that everybody was ok and that nobody had too much on their plate, he was such a kind and wonderful man. he crossed all borders, both religiously, contrariwise and everything. the whole thing is absolutely dreadful. by whole thing is absolutely dreadful. by all accounts, he was the sort of politician who was far more
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concerned with grassroots causes like this then he was with having a spotin like this then he was with having a spot in government?— like this then he was with having a spot in government? absolutely. he alwa s spot in government? absolutely. he always said. — spot in government? absolutely. he always said. you _ spot in government? absolutely. he always said, you know, _ spot in government? absolutely. he always said, you know, he _ spot in government? absolutely. he always said, you know, he went i spot in government? absolutely. he| always said, you know, he went back to his town like mummy, they came from the same sort of roots, vaguely. he always felt a close affinity to her, he pops down and had a cup of tea and a bun. they would have a chat. he was very, very, very aware of problems, as i say, not only in his constituency but in the country, always there to help people, not who they were or what they were, what station in life, and an to use an old—fashioned phrase, he was there to help people and he will be unbelievably mist, terribly. and he will be unbelievably mist, terribl . . , ., , , terribly. once he gets hold because, from what with _ terribly. once he gets hold because, from what with her, _ terribly. once he gets hold because, from what with her, he _ terribly. once he gets hold because, from what with her, he wouldn't i terribly. once he gets hold because, from what with her, he wouldn't let | from what with her, he wouldn't let it go? from what with her, he wouldn't let it to? ., from what with her, he wouldn't let it io? ., ., from what with her, he wouldn't let it to? ., ., ., , from what with her, he wouldn't let it to? ., ., .,, ~ from what with her, he wouldn't let it to? ., ., .,, ,, ., it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier. it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier- he _ it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier. he would _ it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier. he would just _ it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier. he would just hold i it go? no, he would grab it like a terrier. he would just hold onto i it go? no, he would grab it like a | terrier. he would just hold onto it and keep going. yes, absolutely. we
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have got to continue not only for my mother, but also to david and what he began and what he will continue to do. it is part of his memorial, if you like. a very, very important person in society, and will never be forgotten for what he has done, and hopefully for what his memory will live in the future. that hopefully for what his memory will live in the future.— live in the future. that would be a lovely tribute, _ live in the future. that would be a lovely tribute, wouldn't _ live in the future. that would be a lovely tribute, wouldn't it, - lovely tribute, wouldn't it, virginia. just explain, we were discussing this earlier, people may not know how important it is when a member of parliament throws their weight behind a campaign like this, like yours? weight behind a campaign like this, like ours? .,. , weight behind a campaign like this, like ours? , , , like yours? exactly. terribly, terribly important. _ like yours? exactly. terribly, terribly important. he i like yours? exactly. terribly, terribly important. he goes i like yours? exactly. terribly,| terribly important. he goes in like yours? exactly. terribly, i terribly important. he goes in great guns, saying, iwant terribly important. he goes in great guns, saying, i want to do this, speak to his fellow mps, we need you to do this, well, you've got to do it. you know, he would almost bully people into helping, in a very nice, kind way. that we are going to miss
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terribly. kind way. that we are going to miss terribl . g , kind way. that we are going to miss terribl ., , ., , kind way. that we are going to miss terribl ., , . , ., terribly. just finally, where are ou u- terribly. just finally, where are you up to _ terribly. just finally, where are you up to now— terribly. just finally, where are you up to now with _ terribly. just finally, where are you up to now with the - terribly. just finally, where are i you up to now with the fundraising? how close are you to hopefully unveiling this statue, with a tribute? ~ ., unveiling this statue, with a tribute? . ., ., ., ., ' tribute? we have got to get to 1.5, we are nowhere _ tribute? we have got to get to 1.5, we are nowhere near— tribute? we have got to get to 1.5, we are nowhere near that - tribute? we have got to get to 1.5, we are nowhere near that amount. tribute? we have got to get to 1.5, i we are nowhere near that amount yet. we're hoping that in the few months, there will be a big catch up, but we are desperately waiting for people to contribute to it. we have had some wonderful contributions so far, but we have to keep going until we get the 1.5. i think most people know what the, what the website is, which is the dame vera lynn statue memorial .com, so if anybody wants to, and in david's memory as well, please, please sign up, we will be
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thrilled to bits if you do. shah please, please sign up, we will be thrilled to bits if you do. an added ”oinan thrilled to bits if you do. an added poignancy to _ thrilled to bits if you do. an added poignancy to that _ thrilled to bits if you do. an added poignancy to that as _ thrilled to bits if you do. an added poignancy to that as well. - thrilled to bits if you do. an added poignancy to that as well. virginia | poignancy to that as well. virginia lewis jones, who poignancy to that as well. virginia lewisjones, who worked very closely with david amess, raising money for the memorial to dame vera lynn. it is striking, the number of different causes _ is striking, the number of different causes he — is striking, the number of different causes he was involved in. we were talking _ causes he was involved in. we were talking about animal charities, some winds— talking about animal charities, some winds charities. we will talk later to somebody involved in the music man charity, david amess was involved — man charity, david amess was involved in— man charity, david amess was involved in hosting an event at the albert _ involved in hosting an event at the albert hall, spreading music and helping — albert hall, spreading music and helping people with disabilities. and all— helping people with disabilities. and all causes behind the scenes, nothing that was going to get him a lot of prominence in parliament, for example. very simple grassroots causes. mike is looking at the sport this weekend. what there is of it. the premier league is back, isn't it? it feels a bit different, but shaken up by what has happened at newcastle. it reminds me of a scene at a spaghetti western, all the players are in the bar and suddenly
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the saloon doors swing open, there is a new kid in town with lots of power. is a new kid in town with lots of aower. �* ., is a new kid in town with lots of aower. . ., ., is a new kid in town with lots of lower. “ ., ., a, is a new kid in town with lots of aower. . ., ., ., ., y is a new kid in town with lots of. power-_ yes. is a new kid in town with lots of i power-_ yes. this power. and a lot of money. yes, this champions — power. and a lot of money. yes, this champions league _ power. and a lot of money. yes, this champions league and _ power. and a lot of money. yes, this champions league and big _ power. and a lot of money. yes, this champions league and big enough i power. and a lot of money. yes, this| champions league and big enough for all of us? there are only four places. sojurgen klopp is looking and sounding a bit worried in his preface —— press conference yesterday. it's the return of the premier league, after the world cup qualifiers, and the first round of matches, since the take over of newcastle. nothing will change in the short term after the saudi—led 305 million pound take over, but the managers of the teams challenging at the top for the champions league places, are looking over their shoulders. and liverpool boss, yurgen klopp who takes his team to watford this lunchtime, is accutelty aware of the new threat coming from the north east and wants to make sure all the financial fair play rules are followed. we had a massive argument — not an argument, an issue, i would say, the whole football world, with 12 clubs or so trying to build a super league. and rightly so. but this is kind of creating a super team, if you want. guaranteed spots in the champions league, in a few years' time, not immediately, all these kinds of things. yeah, with all the things of how financial fair play is used
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nowadays, where nobody knows exactly if it is still existing or not, stuff like this. newcastle fans will love it, of course, but for the rest of us it just means there is a new superpower in newcastle. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has said maybe now�*s the time for marcus rashford to "focus on his football." rashford could make his first appearance of the season at leicester, after recovering from shoulder surgery. rashford was made an mbe in the queen's birthday honours list last year, for his free school meals campaign, and while his manager has praised all his work and campaigning off the pitch, he's now urged him to concentrate on getting back into the team. at such a young age he has done so much for the team, and he did, he has done so much off the pitch as well. and i think that time away for
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him was... was a time now, may be, to focus on himself, and get... i don't want to say get back to being himself, but you know, marcus rashford running around without enthusiasm, running in behind, not having to take on too responsibility, is a great site to see. west bromwich albion, are back on top of the championship after beating local rivals birmingham city 1—0. karlan grant scored the only goal of a tense game with 15 minutes left. that was enough for albion to go top. birmingham are without a win in five games now. what a finish it was to the rugby union premiership match at sale sharks last night. the champions harlequins thought they had done enough, to keep their unbeaten start to the season with a 2—point lead, with five minutes to go. but no, a tom curtis penalty put sale in front and then this last—gasp try from scrum half raffi quirke sealed a 28—22 win and moved sharks up
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to fourth in the table. now, at around 9:30 tonight, just after strictly and blankety blank, there could be another glorious moment for british tennis, as cameron norrie aims to reach the final of the indian wells masters tournament. it's live on bbc radio 5 live sports extra, and the new british number one is up against gregor dimitrov. norrie could even break into the world's top 20 for the first time, and he is the form player this year, having won more atp matches in 2021 than world number one novak djokovic. england's moeen ali was part of the victorious chennai super kings team in the indian premier league final in dubai. ali blasted 37 off 20 balls, to help chennai to 192—3. in reply, kolkata knight riders, captained by england t—20 skipper eoin morgan, collapsed to 165 for 9. it's a fourth ipl win for the super kings. morgan will now focus on the t—20
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world cup which starts tomorrow. in snooker, judd trump's three year reign as northern ireland open champion is over. mark allen recovered from three frames to nil down to come back and beat the world number two, 5—3 in the quarter—finals. allen will play rickey walden in the last four. and i must mention that it is the uk's which race take up to £4 million up for grabs today, the final and to thejockey�*s title race, basically. two writers going forward, william buick three winds behind the oisin murphy, so that should be an exciting finish at ascot today. is should be an exciting finish at ascot today-— should be an exciting finish at ascot toda . ., ., , ascot today. £4 million! really? yes, that is _ ascot today. £4 million! really? yes, that is what _ ascot today. £4 million! really? yes, that is what i _ ascot today. £4 million! really? yes, that is what i caught i ascot today. £4 million! really? yes, that is what i caught the i yes, that is what i caught the richest day. 50 yes, that is what i caught the richest day-— yes, that is what i caught the richest da . ., richest day. so there you go, never mind the euro _ richest day. so there you go, never mind the euro millions _ richest day. so there you go, never mind the euro millions lottery. i mind the euro millions lottery. well, — mind the euro millions lottery. well, that is peanuts. you mind the euro millions lottery. well, that is peanuts.- mind the euro millions lottery. well, that is peanuts. you can 'ust become a jockey. i well, that is peanuts. you can 'ust become a jockey. let's * well, that is peanuts. you can 'ust become a jockey. let's see i well, that is peanuts. you can just become a jockey. let's see what i well, that is peanuts. you can just i become a jockey. let's see what the become a 'ockey. let's see what the auoin will become a jockey. let's see what the going will be — become a jockey. let's see what the going will be like _ become a jockey. let's see what the going will be like for— become a jockey. let's see what the going will be like for that _ become a jockey. let's see what the going will be like for that race. - here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. pretty dry and chilly this morning. a lovely start in nottinghamshire. a
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beautiful sunrise as there was across a huge area of the uk. it is chilly for some stockholders might of the autumn so far in parts of northern england, down to around monetary or —1i. still amount —1 at the moment at the borders with scotland. martyrs conditions towards the south—west and the milder air will be pushing its way north and east slowly as we go through this weekend. ahead of it, we have a line of cloud through northern ireland and towards the south—east. patchy rain and drizzle on that. not a huge amount. many will stay dry. mist and fog clearing to some good, long sunny spells later. only a few showers in the north of scotland but western scotland, northern ireland, it will turn much more grey and wet as we go into the afternoon. wins are light that they go to a more southerly direction and it is that these pushing the milder air northwards once again although temperatures in scotland, the of england, still around where we should be from mid october, nine or 12 degrees. into this evening and overnight, a dryer night to come through the far and the far north. our regular rain this evening, northern ireland and spreading into
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the wind and whales for the morning. a much milder start tomorrow and the much milder day for most. the best of any sunshine in orkney shetland. lots of cloud elsewhere. outbreaks turning dry and brighter later and temperature is higher than today. that is how it is looking. after you both. . ~ , that is how it is looking. after you both. . . , . that is how it is looking. after you both. , ., ., ~ that is how it is looking. after you both. , ., ., both. catch up later, thank you, matt. time now for this week's newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. is it still important to broadcast daily the official statistics on covid cases, deaths and vaccinations? and for the second time in a fortnight, bbc news is accused of encouraging panic buying, this time over a logjam at ports. first, on wednesday, the star trek actor william shatner became the oldest person to go to space as he blasted off aboard the blue origin sub—orbital capsule. the 90—year—old, who played
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captainjames t kirk in the original series, took off from the texas desert with three other individuals. mr shatner�*s trip on the rocket system — developed by amazon founderjeff bezos — lasted about ten minutes. spectacular pictures, but bellerophon thought the bbc was... and dennis ess had another objection... on thursday, prince william spoke to newscast�*s adam fleming and expressed the view that saving the earth should be a higher priority than travelling into space.
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the idea this space race is on at the moment, we have been seeing people try to get the space race on. the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on this purpose, not trying to find the next place to go. the interview took place to mark this weekend's awarding of the first earthshot prize, which the prince has launched to find solutions to climate change, and that timing prompted mcguinn to ask... but forjahnavi... that wasn't the only significant royal interview on the bbc this week. on monday, prince charles spoke tojustin rowlatt, newly appointed as the corporation's first climate editor, about how to effect changes in behaviour that will help the environment. is our government doing enough to make these things happen? i couldn't possibly comment.
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it's true to say that you've got a pretty hefty carbon footprint. it must take a lot of gas to heat a palace. yes, it is, but i have tried for a very long time to make sure that the heating is done in a way that is sustainable as possible, electric cars, like my old aston martin, which i've had for 51 years, it runs on surplus english white wine. the interview brought this response from a former bbc royal correspondent, peter hunt... we put that point to bbc news, and they told us... a fortnight ago, we discussed the charge made by many
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of you that the bbc, and other news media, had created queues at the petrol pumps by excessive reporting of fuel shortages — an accusation rejected on this programme by the bbc�*s deputy director of news, jonathan munro. now a similar criticism is being made, following broadcasts such as this on wednesday's news at six. don't panic buy, but do plan ahead for christmas, that is the message to shoppers from a global shipping boss who has warned that a shortage of hgv drivers is having a knock—on effect on ports around the uk. felixstowe is the biggest — it has 50,000 containers waiting to be collected, and ships are having to wait for up to ten days to unload. several viewers contacted us about that, and similar coverage elsewhere on bbc news, and two of them recorded videos for us — terry miles and, first, julie nash. once again, the bbc is reporting a shortage,
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specifically this time that we're going to be short of things at christmas. you are repeating this over and every day this week. have you learned nothing from the fuel shortage situation you created by overreporting on this little localised temporary disruption? you started your wednesday 6pm news bulletin about the container hold—ups at felixstowe with the words don't panic buy. now we all know how well that worked when you use those words during the recent fuel shortages, so either the bbc news is incredibly naive, or it's being really irresponsible. well, i'mjoined now by paul royall, editor of bbc one�*s news bulletins. paul, what is the response to those viewers?
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first of all, just to reassure viewers, that we do take a lot of care and pay a lot of attention to what we put in our programmes, and we make judgements about what we believe is newsworthy and what crosses the bar in terms of getting into those programmes, and in the case of wednesday, we had a series of quite significant figures from the shipping industry and also from the retail industry who were beginning to say things about the situation regarding the movement of goods and the supply of goods in shops, and we reported that. those words aren't our words, they're attributed to those who say them, and of course we make a judgement on whether we think they are newsworthy, and in this case we thought they were. paul, it's fair to assume that there are likely to be more supply chain news stories like this
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in the coming weeks so does the bbc need to rethink how you cover them and if you might be contributing to panic? i think we've seen from what's going on at the international monetary fund in washington in the united states this week, the shortage and supply chain issues is a global issue and a global problem, and i don't think bbc news or other major news organisations can ignore that, this is, as a economics editor said, the plumbing of the world economy is not quite working at the moment, and what we have to do is report responsibly, assess statements that are made, claims that are made, and put them in the appropriate context, for the same time on wednesday, we reported very clearly, a carry on as normal from the government, a similar thing was said by the chancellor from washington, dc yesterday as well. paul, thank you for that. we also want to talk
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to you about the daily reporting of covid statistics. here was thursday's on the news at six. the latest official coronavirus figures show there were 45,066 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, the highest since the middle ofjuly. the average number of cases per day in the past week stands at just under 40,000. more than 7,024 people were in hospital with covid yesterday and another 157 deaths have been recorded, that the people who died within 28 days of a positive test. we've had some very specific complaints about this daily graphic. let's take them one by one. this is ian service, who emailed...
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paul, has the bbc considered when you might no longer report that figure? yeah, no, we have, and what we're trying to do with the daily data is give audiences in news programmes that are half—an—hour long, a sort of relatively time efficient picture of what the current state of covid is across the uk, and we're making judgements the whole time about what is in and out of that data, but as we're seeing at the moment cases are going up again, and probably that will be followed, if similar patterns are followed, the deaths and hospitalisations will rise as well, so i don't think we're at the point yet where we dispense with the daily data, but we keep under review what we put in it. ian made the point as well that we don't give daily statistics on other conditions such as cancer, and one might talk about flu as we go into the winter season.
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and that's a fair point and that's something we have discussed. again, i guess the difference with this is obviously covid—i9 is something new that we have all been having to deal with, and make judgements about, and hence why we still do the data for that, but we do still do periodically to pieces where for example, we might say that covid deaths or covid involved deaths were the biggest cause of death in the uk over the previous week, or previous time period, so we do try and give that wider context, but it's a fair point and it's one we do discuss, and try and keep in context. 0k. another e—mail now, from david greenwood. that is quite an important point,
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isn't it, paul? some of those infections thanks to vaccinations might be mild, and isn't a significant stat the number of people in icus? it is a significant start but it's not when we get on a daily basis so again, we will periodically, when we get reliable information on things like that we will put that in but we don't necessarily get that on a daily basis from the government dashboard. one more concerned about whether we need more detail about vaccinations to interpret the official statistics. i was thinking, is there a public service argument for what robin is proposing? there is, and again, we don't get that on a daily basis, so even if we really wanted to,
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i don't think we could. we do, when we get reliable information about the sorts of things and there was a piece a few weeks ago when we included that in a piece by a health editor to demonstrate how effective the vaccines are at preventing hospitalisation and death, so when we get that data, we use it. paul, thank you so much for coming on news watch. thanks for all your comments this week. good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today: police declare the killing of mp sir david amess as a terrorist incident, after he was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. after he was stabbed to death our
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after he was stabbed to death officers will continue around—the—clock our officers will continue to work around—the—clock to ensure justice is delivered for sir david and his family and i would like to thank the people of southend for their understanding as the investigation continues. at a church service last night, sir david's constituents described him as an mp who always listened, and who loved representing his area. his heart was in his community, he was the _ his heart was in his community, he was the best— his heart was in his community, he was the best constituency mp you could _ was the best constituency mp you could ever — was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for.— could ever wish for. he was at his ha iest could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when — could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he was _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he was helping - could ever wish for. he was at his - happiest when he was helping people. he was_ happiest when he was helping people. he was a _ happiest when he was helping people. he was a true — happiest when he was helping people. he was a true servant _ happiest when he was helping people. he was a true servant and _ happiest when he was helping people. he was a true servant and an - he was a true servant and an inspiration. — questions asked about how a covid pcr testing lab that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million pound government contract. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. and after a cooler day yesterday, but with more sunshine, the cloud is back this weekend. temperatures are on the rise. a full forecast here on
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breakfast. it's saturday the 16th of october. our top story: the killing of the conservative mp sir david amess has been declared as a terrorist incident, by police. sir david was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery in essex yesterday. officers say they are investigating a "potential link to islamist extremism" and are searching two addresses in the london area. a 25—year—old man remains in custody. the prime minister described sir david as, "one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics". here's our political correspondent, helen catt. in leigh—on—sea, worshippers came together to remember their mp. sir david amess had been a member of parliament in essex for 38 years. colleagues described him as a kind man, devoted to his
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constituency of southend west. he made everybody feel valued and he listened, he was a good listener, you felt, well, people felt he represented them in the houses of parliament. he was at his happiest when he was helping people, he was a true servant and an inspiration. his heart was in his community, he really was, he was the best i constituency mp you could ever wish for. i it was there in the middle of the day at a different church in leigh—on—sea that he was stabbed multiple times. he had been holding one of his regular surgeries to meet constituents. police officers and paramedics tried to save him, but he died at the scene. a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. last night police declared it was a terrorist incident. a tragic day for the family and colleagues of sir david, the community of southend and indeed for the whole of greater essex.
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sir david has dedicated his life to serving the communities of essex and southend and he was simply dispensing his duties the when his life was horrifically cut short. it was five years ago that the labour mp jo cox was murdered in her constituency. the fatal attack on sir david has raised questions once again about the safety of mps. it's so hard, because we've got a job to do and i find myself now working a politician and trying to help people and trying to do good things for people and it's really important that we get good people in public life. but this is the risk that we are all taking you know and so many mps today will be scared by this. the speaker of the house of commons, who went ahead with his own constituency surgery last night, said security measures would need to be looked at. we have got to make sure the politicians are - safe, the people who work for them, |the family, the people of the housel of commons, we have seen- the terrorist attacks there as well.
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what we won't do, we won't give l into it though, we will continue to ensure that democracy will be there. we have got to make sure we have that relationship with our electors. j but that is the unique part of the british politics. - but we have got to make sure mps are safe. - mps are expected to be contacted by their local police forces today. the home secretary has ordered an immediate review of their security. the flags in westminster are flying at half—mast for sir david amess, as questions are already being asked once again about how to keep his colleagues safe. helen catt, bbc news westminster. there have been so many tributes to sir david since the news broke yesterday. a little earlier we spoke to councillor kevin buck and fatherjeff woolnough, both friends of the mp from leigh—on—sea. they praised his kind and easy—going manner... he could put anyone at ease, he
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would help anyone. he was always about helping others. he never did for himself. yes, he was just quite a remarkable man and a remarkable mp. w; a remarkable man and a remarkable mp. ~ , , ., , mp. my first thoughts with the church which _ mp. my first thoughts with the church which is _ mp. my first thoughts with the church which is just _ mp. my first thoughts with the church which isjust behind - mp. my first thoughts with the church which isjust behind us, belfairs, — church which isjust behind us, belfairs, methodist church. it has happened — belfairs, methodist church. it has happened on their ground and sacred space _ happened on their ground and sacred space and _ happened on their ground and sacred space and these things bring communities together and i was in touch, _ communities together and i was in touch, or— communities together and i was in touch, or a — communities together and i was in touch, ora man from communities together and i was in touch, or a man from a local muslim community— touch, or a man from a local muslim community called us yesterday to express— community called us yesterday to express their sincere condolences, they also— express their sincere condolences, they also knew sir david. this will bring _ they also knew sir david. this will bring the — they also knew sir david. this will bring the different faith groups together and make them strong. that is a good _ together and make them strong. that is a good thing and it won't extinguish the light of his smile either~ — extinguish the light of his smile either. that is what we have got to work _ either. that is what we have got to work on _ either. that is what we have got to work on we — either. that is what we have got to work on. we have got to work on some serious _ work on. we have got to work on some serious relationships between the faith communities that have lost their— faith communities that have lost their greatest supporter.
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in a moment we will speak to our political correspondent peter saull, who is in downing street, but first to our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani who is in leigh—on—sea for us this morning. dominic, police have confirmed they are treating the killing as a terrorist incident — what more do we know? yes that's right, that news came last night after midnight from scotland yard that they have declared this as a terrorist incident. that means they believe that the killing was ideologically motivated, so that sir david was attacked for a political purpose to try to use violence to make some kind of point. in that context, it puts this dreadful incident into the same category as the awful killing in 2016 ofjo cox, when she was the mp for batley and she was attacked by a far right extremist. and in 2010 there was a similar terrorism
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attack on stephen timms, an mp for labour, when he was attacked over someone who was an opponent to the iraq war. what that means is that the police can now actually bring n they have done already, just enormous resources from the counter terrorism policing network to drive this investigation to try to get to the heart of what they know about this citizen, who we understand is a british national, try to track his movements, understand exactly what led him to this point yesterday. thank you. our political correspondent peter saull is in downing street for us this morning. peter, sir david's death will no doubt raise concerns for the safety of mps. that's right, i think all politicians will be having this at
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the forefront of their mind, not just because they have lost a colleague and friend, david amess was a very popular figures in the house of commons, but many politicians would have been doing the same yesterday, meeting staff and constituents. the prime minister borisjohnson was asked about this yesterday. it was put to him the that this was an attack on our democracy and it raises questions about mps' security. he didn't want to engage on that specific point, but he paid tribute to sir david amess. �* ,., . but he paid tribute to sir david amess. ~ ,., ., ., , but he paid tribute to sir david amess. ~ ., ., , ., ., amess. above all he was one of kindest, nicest, _ amess. above all he was one of kindest, nicest, most— amess. above all he was one of kindest, nicest, most gentle - amess. above all he was one of- kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics— kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics and he had an outstanding record of passing laws to help _ outstanding record of passing laws to help the most vulnerable, whether
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the people _ to help the most vulnerable, whether the people to do a huge amount to reduce _ the people to do a huge amount to reduce the — the people to do a huge amount to reduce the fuel poverty suffered by people _ reduce the fuel poverty suffered by people up and down the country. the home people up and down the country. the: home secretary has people up and down the country. tt9 home secretary has been people up and down the country. tt9: home secretary has been speaking people up and down the country. tt9 home secretary has been speaking to police forces about this, they in turn will get in contact with all 650 mp5. turn will get in contact with all 650 mps. there was a police operation set up in the wake of murder ofjo cox five years ago, called operation bridger to enable mps to put in place things like shutters and alarm systems to protect themselves against this kind of attack. conversations already happening among mps about whether they need to stop meeting their constituents face to face. certainly in the short—term. a lot are reluctant to do that. it is an important part of the job for many. who was in 2018 had to give cpr to a mrifr police officer said maybe it is time to go back to what many mps
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were doing during the pandemic and holding surgeries online. thank were doing during the pandemic and holding surgeries online. over the next couple of hours we'll continue to talk to those who knew sir david, in westminster and in his constituency. questions are being raised around how the lab that recorded thousands of faulty covid—19 pcr results won a multi—million pound government contract to carry out testing. operations have been suspended at the private lab in wolverhampton and an investigation has been ordered into why it took a month to identify the failures. dante labs says its co—operating fully with the inquiry, but recognises a small number of customers faced challenges. a new nasa mission to study asteroids more than a billion miles from earth, gets underway this morning. over the next 12 years, the unmanned probe will examine space rocks around jupiter, in an effort to better understand how planets were formed.
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our science correspondent, jonathan amos, reports. this is a mission that will take us back in time. nasa's lucy probe will seek out old asteroids more than a billion miles from earth, circling the sun in formation with the giant planet jupiter. they call these ancient objects trojans, city—sized lumps of rock that preserve the chemistry from the earliest days of the solar system. proof there was a reorganisation of planets more than four and after billion years ago. it planets more than four and after billion years ago.— billion years ago. it will help us test our solar _ billion years ago. it will help us test our solar system _ billion years ago. it will help us test our solar system models i billion years ago. it will help us l test our solar system models and give us an important piece of information and we can say, yes, there was a big scramble and everything flew every where, or no, that probably didn't happen and things are where they formed. it is
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providing evidence towards testing these models of how we got here. lucy will visit seven trojan asteroids over the course of the next 12 years, taking pictures and careful measurements to send back to earth. jonathan amos, bbc news. fascinating, but a long way to wait. i love it is named lucy.— fascinating, but a long way to wait. i love it is named lucy. named after an ancient fossil. _ i love it is named lucy. named after an ancient fossil. you _ i love it is named lucy. named after an ancient fossil. you got _ i love it is named lucy. named after an ancient fossil. you got the - an ancient fossil. you got the briefin: an ancient fossil. you got the briefing notes! _ an ancient fossil. you got the briefing notes! matt - an ancient fossil. you got the briefing notes! matt has - an ancient fossil. you got the briefing notes! matt has the l an ancient fossil. you got the - briefing notes! matt has the weather for us. what a stunning sun rise! unbelievable. maybe an icy start for some in northern england and scotland. a fiery sun rise for a few. a beautiful shot from the west of london. a similar scene for many. a lot of cloud around this morning. cloud thick enough for some light rain in northern ireland and the south—east. mist and fog that we
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have at the moment, wales and south—west, will clear. a lot of sunshine here in the afternoon and sunny spells else. the big exception is western scotland and northern ireland with some heavy rain. in the north still chilly. but milder air wins through night. a soggy evening in scotland and northern ireland. rain eventually into the north. the top and tail of the country should be dry tomorrow morning. six degrees in lerwick, but mainly a frost free night. sunshine tomorrow morning for the channel and orkney and shetland. some of the wet weather getting out of the way. still some light rain in the afternoon. but most dry, cloudy and milder than today and gets
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milder, but wet through monday and tuesday. more on that later. raise now we need to look at the pcr story. we talked about it last week. this fact that questions have been raised about the effectiveness and the results that have been coming through. questions are being raised around how the lab that recorded thousands of faulty covid19 pcr test results won a multi—million pound government contract. 43—thousand people in england and wales are believed to have been affected. those involved had positive lateralflow tests, followed by negative pcr
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results.the affected tests took place between the 8th of sept we're joined now by rachel ward who's a gp in newbury, one of the areas believed to have been impacted. what have you seen and heard? yes, it has been — what have you seen and heard? yes, it has been an _ what have you seen and heard? yes, it has been an interesting time. what _ it has been an interesting time. what we — it has been an interesting time. what we were starting to see a pattern — what we were starting to see a pattern emerging. we were speaking to a lot _ pattern emerging. we were speaking to a lot of— pattern emerging. we were speaking to a lot of people who said, i've .ot to a lot of people who said, i've got really— to a lot of people who said, i've got really obvious covid symptoms and i_ got really obvious covid symptoms and t have — got really obvious covid symptoms and i have had a positive lateral—flow test, but i have gone for my— lateral—flow test, but i have gone for my pcr — lateral—flow test, but i have gone for my pcr and it was negative. this was increasingly being seen in the south _ was increasingly being seen in the south of— was increasingly being seen in the south of the country and there were multipte _ south of the country and there were multiple possibilities as to why it was happening. we knew it was being looked _ was happening. we knew it was being looked into _ was happening. we knew it was being looked into. but for that interim period. — looked into. but for that interim period. it — looked into. but for that interim period, it was a tricky thing to try
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and deal— period, it was a tricky thing to try and deal with. the period, it was a tricky thing to try and deal with.— period, it was a tricky thing to try and deal with. the question is what is the impact _ and deal with. the question is what is the impact of _ and deal with. the question is what is the impact of that, _ and deal with. the question is what is the impact of that, because - is the impact of that, because potentially, there are tens of thousands of people who have been walk around thinking they don't have covid, when they do. the worry that is will lead to more cases. unfortunately so, because you know understandly people have got that pcr result and presumed they don't have covid — pcr result and presumed they don't have covid. so certainly locally we have _ have covid. so certainly locally we have been— have covid. so certainly locally we have been seeing that people have been returning to work, people have been returning to work, people have been returning to school. and we don't _ been returning to school. and we don't you — been returning to school. and we don't you know fully understand the impact _ don't you know fully understand the impact in _ don't you know fully understand the impact in specific numbers, but anecdotally, it seems we are seeing anecdotally, it seems we are seeing an increase — anecdotally, it seems we are seeing an increase in cases, certainly in local— an increase in cases, certainly in local school _ an increase in cases, certainly in local school there is is a feel that there _ local school there is is a feel that there is— local school there is is a feel that there is a — local school there is is a feel that there is a lot of covid in the schools _ there is a lot of covid in the schools. you know one of the factors will have _ schools. you know one of the factors will have been that children were
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returning — will have been that children were returning to school unknowingly with covid _ returning to school unknowingly with covid i _ returning to school unknowingly with covid. �* , :, :, covid. i live in bristol, so not that close — covid. i live in bristol, so not that close to _ covid. i live in bristol, so not that close to you, _ covid. i live in bristol, so not that close to you, but - covid. i live in bristol, so not that close to you, but it - covid. i live in bristol, so not that close to you, but it is . covid. i live in bristol, so not - that close to you, but it is another area that seems to have been affected and i'm aware of people who thought they were clear and now are beginning to wonder and you're right, cases then seem to be... rising. you wonder what the connection might be. it surprises me, bearing in mind people have been talking about it, gps have been talking about it, gps have been talking about it for a month, how has it taken, or what do you make of the fact it has taken four weeks to come up wi an answer? to the fact it has taken four weeks to come up wi an answer?— the fact it has taken four weeks to come up wi an answer? to be fair, it is a complex — come up wi an answer? to be fair, it is a complex process _ come up wi an answer? to be fair, it is a complex process and _ come up wi an answer? to be fair, it is a complex process and there - come up wi an answer? to be fair, it is a complex process and there were multiple _ is a complex process and there were multiple reasons that were potential causes _ multiple reasons that were potential causes for— multiple reasons that were potential causes for this disparity. certainly one thing — causes for this disparity. certainly one thing that we were worried about was there _ one thing that we were worried about was there a _ one thing that we were worried about was there a new variant that was amerging — was there a new variant that was amerging emerging, was it a problem with the _ amerging emerging, was it a problem with the lateral—flow test, was it the way — with the lateral—flow test, was it the way people were testing. there
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were so— the way people were testing. there were so many possibility and that has to— were so many possibility and that has to be — were so many possibility and that has to be looked into with thousands of tests— has to be looked into with thousands of tests to _ has to be looked into with thousands of tests to get to the bottom of it. but, yes, — of tests to get to the bottom of it. but, yes, of— of tests to get to the bottom of it. but, yes, of course it is the newbury— but, yes, of course it is the newbury racecourse test centre that came _ newbury racecourse test centre that came out _ newbury racecourse test centre that came out yesterday to say the problem — came out yesterday to say the problem had been identified and what we are _ problem had been identified and what we are seeing is there are multiple centres _ we are seeing is there are multiple centres across the south of the country — centres across the south of the country and i believe some in wales that have _ country and i believe some in wales that have been affected. i understand that anybody that potentially needs to be retested and needs— potentially needs to be retested and needs information about this soon will be _ needs information about this soon will be informed by sunday. some --eole, will be informed by sunday. some peeple. the _ will be informed by sunday. some people, the more _ will be informed by sunday. some people, the more recent - will be informed by sunday. some people, the more recent cases, i people, the more recent cases, people, the more recent cases, people who might still have it, will be told to get retested. but in the meantime a lot of people have come through it, but potentially passed it on. thank you forjoining us. rachel ward there. we will return to our top story now. the death of conservative mp sir
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david amess. away from politics, sir david amess was also president of the music man project, an international music education charity for people with disabilities. in 2019, he helped organise an event in which 200 children with learning disabilities performed at the royal albert hall. let's take a look. ladies and gentlemen, the music man project has taken the palladium by storm. it's conquered the royal albert hall and as it goes on to conquer the rest of the world, there is only one place they're going and
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thatis is only one place they're going and that is broadway!— that is broadway! cheering and applause so _ that is broadway! cheering and applause so ladies _ that is broadway! cheering and applause so ladies and - that is broadway! cheering and - applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand u- applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand up and — applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand up and three _ applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand up and three cheers _ applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand up and three cheers for - applause so ladies and gentlemen, stand up and three cheers for the . stand up and three cheers for the music man project. hip hip... hooray! hip hip... hooray! david stanley is the founder of the music man project and joins us now. a very difficult time for you and everybody who knew him. how will you remember him though? filth. everybody who knew him. how will you remember him though?— remember him though? oh, gosh, it is such a shock — remember him though? oh, gosh, it is such a shock this _ remember him though? oh, gosh, it is such a shock this morning. _ remember him though? oh, gosh, it is such a shock this morning. but - remember him though? oh, gosh, it is such a shock this morning. but i - such a shock this morning. but i think— such a shock this morning. but i thinkiust — such a shock this morning. but i thinkiust t — such a shock this morning. but i thinkjust i will remember his passion. _ thinkjust i will remember his passion, his enthusiasm for my charity— passion, his enthusiasm for my charity and _ passion, his enthusiasm for my charity and for the achievements for people _ charity and for the achievements for people with learning disability. as you saw, — people with learning disability. as you saw, he was such an advocate of music, _ you saw, he was such an advocate of music, of— you saw, he was such an advocate of music, of music education and performance and our dream, which we
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fulfilled _ performance and our dream, which we fulfilled over— performance and our dream, which we fulfilled over 20 year was to get to the albert — fulfilled over 20 year was to get to the albert hall and that was just the albert hall and that was just the beginning and we hoped together to help _ the beginning and we hoped together to help our students perform on broadway. but he did everything with such am _ broadway. but he did everything with such a... strength of character and with such _ such a... strength of character and with such enthusiasm. we such a. .. strength of character and with such enthusiasm.— such a... strength of character and with such enthusiasm. we saw that cli - , which with such enthusiasm. we saw that clip. which told _ with such enthusiasm. we saw that clip, which told us _ with such enthusiasm. we saw that clip, which told us so _ with such enthusiasm. we saw that clip, which told us so much, - with such enthusiasm. we saw that clip, which told us so much, that i clip, which told us so much, that smile, that energy, that boundless enthusiasm and reaching out to people in the audience. he enthusiasm and reaching out to people in the audience. he loved an audience and _ people in the audience. he loved an audience and any _ people in the audience. he loved an audience and any chance _ people in the audience. he loved an audience and any chance help - people in the audience. he loved an audience and any chance help had i people in the audience. he loved an | audience and any chance help had to .et audience and any chance help had to get up _ audience and any chance help had to get up in _ audience and any chance help had to get up in front of people, particularly his people from southend, who he adored, he felt so proud _ southend, who he adored, he felt so proud of— southend, who he adored, he felt so proud of what we had achieved. he used _ proud of what we had achieved. he used to— proud of what we had achieved. he used to come up to me all the time and say. _ used to come up to me all the time and say, what can i do for your charity— and say, what can i do for your charity now? is there anything else you need _ charity now? is there anything else you need from me. there was a few decades— you need from me. there was a few decades ago, people with learning disabilities did struggle, they were isolated _ disabilities did struggle, they were isolated many in hospitals and
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treated — isolated many in hospitals and treated as sick patients. for that journey— treated as sick patients. for that journey to— treated as sick patients. for that journey to come right the way to the albert— journey to come right the way to the albert hall, he was so proud of that andm _ albert hall, he was so proud of that andm it— albert hall, he was so proud of that andm it that— albert hall, he was so proud of that and... it that was down to his passion _ and... it that was down to his assion. : , , and... it that was down to his -assion. : , , : passion. and pretty determined. we s - oke passion. and pretty determined. we spoke earlier— passion. and pretty determined. we spoke earlier to _ passion. and pretty determined. we spoke earlier to the _ passion. and pretty determined. we spoke earlier to the daughter- passion. and pretty determined. we spoke earlier to the daughter of - spoke earlier to the daughter of vera lynn, who worked with him to raise funds for a statue for dame vera lynn, she said he was like a terrier and would not let go until he achieved it. yes terrier and would not let go until he achieved it.— terrier and would not let go until he achieved it. yes and that is what he achieved it. yes and that is what he was like- — he achieved it. yes and that is what he was like. with _ he achieved it. yes and that is what he was like. with my _ he achieved it. yes and that is what he was like. with my charity, - he achieved it. yes and that is what he was like. with my charity, with l he was like. with my charity, with me _ he was like. with my charity, with me he _ he was like. with my charity, with me. he loved grand ideas and coming up me. he loved grand ideas and coming up with— me. he loved grand ideas and coming up with amazing statements that we were going do conquer broadway, we were going do conquer broadway, we were going _ were going do conquer broadway, we were going to break a world record, which _ were going to break a world record, which we _ were going to break a world record, which we did achieve, he was full of that, _ which we did achieve, he was full of that, that _ which we did achieve, he was full of that, that energy and a lot of people — that, that energy and a lot of people have said about him being a campaigner and people have said about him being a campaignerand a grass people have said about him being a campaigner and a grass roots politician _ campaigner and a grass roots politician and that is right. he
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loved — politician and that is right. he loved a — politician and that is right. he loved a big idea and anything that pushed _ loved a big idea and anything that pushed forward southend and the southend family. | pushed forward southend and the southend family. i bet pushed forward southend and the southend family.— pushed forward southend and the southend family. i bet when you're talkin: southend family. i bet when you're talking about _ southend family. i bet when you're talking about his _ southend family. i bet when you're talking about his vitality _ southend family. i bet when you're talking about his vitality this - talking about his vitality this morning, you have to stand back and check yourself, because you can't believe you're standing there at a crime scene and he is gone? filth. t crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know. crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know- the — crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know. the events _ crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know. the events of _ crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know. the events of yesterday, i crime scene and he is gone? oh, i know. the events of yesterday, were 'ust know. the events of yesterday, were just so _ know. the events of yesterday, were just so devastating, but i woke up this morning and thought, is it all a nightmare? i could not believe it happened — a nightmare? i could not believe it happened. here we are talking about sir david _ happened. here we are talking about sir david who has passed. it is the most _ sir david who has passed. it is the most devastating news and my heart .oes most devastating news and my heart goes out _ most devastating news and my heart goes out to _ most devastating news and my heart goes out to his wonderful family, to his staff, _ goes out to his wonderful family, to his staff, it— goes out to his wonderful family, to his staff, it really isjust goes out to his wonderful family, to his staff, it really is just the most — his staff, it really is just the most awful, awful news. | his staff, it really isjust the most awful, awful news. i imagine for ou, most awful, awful news. i imagine for you. david _ most awful, awful news. i imagine for you, david some _ most awful, awful news. i imagine for you, david some difficult - for you, david some difficult conversations with the children, the young adults with learning
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disabilities, the volunteers, for whom david was so dear? well, yes. as the news — whom david was so dear? well, yes. as the news broke _ whom david was so dear? well, yes. as the news broke yesterday - as the news broke yesterday afternoon, i was teaching my students, _ afternoon, i was teaching my students, who all adored david and his character and his sense of fun. we actually— his character and his sense of fun. we actually sung a few songs in his memory— we actually sung a few songs in his memory one called peace and hope. and this _ memory one called peace and hope. and this morning, in a few moments i'm continuing and teaching some of our children, who won't really understand what's happened, but we will to— understand what's happened, but we will to come to terms with it together, threw music, because i know— together, threw music, because i know that — together, threw music, because i know that is how david would have wanted _ know that is how david would have wanted us — know that is how david would have wanted us to. i�*m know that is how david would have wanted us to-_ know that is how david would have wanted us to— know that is how david would have wanted us to. i'm sure you're right, when the time _ wanted us to. i'm sure you're right, when the time is _ wanted us to. i'm sure you're right, when the time is rights _ wanted us to. i'm sure you're right, when the time is rights and - wanted us to. i'm sure you're right, when the time is rights and people | when the time is rights and people have had time to get used to what has happened, i can imagine maybe another concert in his memory? filth. another concert in his memory? 0h, certainl . another concert in his memory? 0h, certainly. obviously very early to be thinking, but i know that is what he would _ be thinking, but i know that is what he would have wanted. we will surely a find _ he would have wanted. we will surely a find a _ he would have wanted. we will surely a find a way _ he would have wanted. we will surely
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a find a way of marking his life, his memory and all that he did for people _ his memory and all that he did for people with learning disabilities in this town — people with learning disabilities in this town. , this town. david, this will challenge _ this town. david, this will challenge some - this town. david, this will challenge some people's| challenge some people's preconceptions of what mps do, often people say about members of parliament, they're in it for themselves and here is an example of a politician dedicated to what is going on in his community. yes and that is something _ going on in his community. yes and that is something that _ going on in his community. yes and that is something that is _ going on in his community. yes and that is something that is important| that is something that is important that is something that is important that i_ that is something that is important that i get— that is something that is important that i get across, he had a huge personality, but he put the full force _ personality, but he put the full force of— personality, but he put the full force of that behind his work for people — force of that behind his work for people that were vulnerable, that had illness, that were in some help that was— had illness, that were in some help that was required of him. he put his full force _ that was required of him. he put his full force of— that was required of him. he put his full force of his energies, his enthusiasm behind them and that is not what _ enthusiasm behind them and that is not what many people think politicians are like, but he honestly, i cannot stress this enough. _ honestly, i cannot stress this enough, he wanted to help people and he did _ enough, he wanted to help people and he did help _ enough, he wanted to help people and he did help people and he did so
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much _ he did help people and he did so much behind the scenes, no one will know— much behind the scenes, no one will know what— much behind the scenes, no one will know what he was about and what he did in _ know what he was about and what he did in the _ know what he was about and what he did in the background. he didn't want— did in the background. he didn't want the — did in the background. he didn't want the limelight, he wanted the limelight— want the limelight, he wanted the limelight to go to the people of southend. so limelight to go to the people of southend. ,:, :, limelight to go to the people of southend. :, :, :, southend. so important to hear those tributes. david _ southend. so important to hear those tributes. david stanley, _ southend. so important to hear those tributes. david stanley, thank - southend. so important to hear those tributes. david stanley, thank you - tributes. david stanley, thank you for your time this morning. it is 27 minutes past 8 and we have been reflecting on the death of sir david amess. let's take a look at a few of the front pages. "a fine public servant" is the headline in the daily telegraph. the paper says a 25—year—old british man of somali origin has been arrested on suspicion of murder. the daily mail features a picture of him smiling as he gives one of his four daughters away
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at her wedding, just weeks ago. meanwhile, "he died serving the people", is the daily mirror's headline — the paper draws comparisons to the murder of labour mpjo cox in 2016. we're joined now by the former home secretaryjacqui smith, who is chair of thejo cox foundation. good morning to you. first, your memories of david amess, we have been hearing what a dedicated grass roots mp he was. he been hearing what a dedicated grass roots mp he was.— roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament _ roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament he _ roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament he was _ roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament he was a - roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament he was a kind - roots mp he was. he absolutely was and in parliament he was a kind and j and in parliament he was a kind and generous— and in parliament he was a kind and generous colleague and even when i was holding some of the most high profile _ was holding some of the most high profile roles, he would question diligently, but always with a twinkle _ diligently, but always with a twinkle and kindness and always by reminding — twinkle and kindness and always by reminding us that southend needed to become _ reminding us that southend needed to become a _ reminding us that southend needed to become a city. his reminding us that southend needed to become a city-— become a city. his campaign to make southend a city _ become a city. his campaign to make southend a city was _ become a city. his campaign to make southend a city was one _ become a city. his campaign to make southend a city was one of _
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become a city. his campaign to make southend a city was one of many - southend a city was one of many causes and it is an important reminder that many mps dedicate their time to serving their constituents as he did. absolutely and ou constituents as he did. absolutely and you know _ constituents as he did. absolutely and you know the _ constituents as he did. absolutely and you know the devastating - constituents as he did. absolutely. and you know the devastating thing about _ and you know the devastating thing about this — and you know the devastating thing about this is that it is tragic for sir david's _ about this is that it is tragic for sir david's family and those who loved _ sir david's family and those who loved him — sir david's family and those who loved him and our hearts go out to them _ loved him and our hearts go out to them but— loved him and our hearts go out to them but it — loved him and our hearts go out to them. but it is also of course an attack— them. but it is also of course an attack on — them. but it is also of course an attack on our democratic system and elected _ attack on our democratic system and elected representatives have a right to be safe _ elected representatives have a right to be safe in their public life and one of— to be safe in their public life and one of the — to be safe in their public life and one of the very important things that we — one of the very important things that we focus on at the jo cox foundation is how we can help to improve — foundation is how we can help to improve the safety of our public life. improve the safety of our public life that — improve the safety of our public life. that is what our democracy depends— life. that is what our democracy depends on and sir david's killing was a _ depends on and sir david's killing was a terrible personal tragedy, but it was— was a terrible personal tragedy, but it was also— was a terrible personal tragedy, but it was also an attack on our democracy.
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it was also an attack on our democracy-— it was also an attack on our democracy. it was also an attack on our democra . : :, :, , :, :, ,, democracy. and how do you make thins democracy. and how do you make things safer _ democracy. and how do you make things safer when _ democracy. and how do you make things safer when that _ democracy. and how do you make| things safer when that informality, we cant sit in front of our mp, our elected representative, and have a conversation? you elected representative, and have a conversation?— conversation? you are absolutely riaht, and conversation? you are absolutely right. and in _ conversation? you are absolutely right, and in this _ conversation? you are absolutely right, and in this country, - right, and in this country, particularly the constituency link is an— particularly the constituency link is an important way in which mps keep— is an important way in which mps keep in— is an important way in which mps keep in touch with those people who have elected them and represent that in parliament. and mps will want to be able _ in parliament. and mps will want to be able to— in parliament. and mps will want to be able to keep that, and of course it is right _ be able to keep that, and of course it is right that there is a review of mps' — it is right that there is a review of mps' physical and other security, and i_ of mps' physical and other security, and i think— of mps' physical and other security, and i think the home secretary and the speaker a right to be talking about— the speaker a right to be talking about that, but it has to go further than that — about that, but it has to go further than that. we all of us have a responsibility to protect our democracy which is important for this country, and we can't do that unless— this country, and we can't do that unless we — this country, and we can't do that unless we protect and respect those people _ unless we protect and respect those people who are elected as part of it. people who are elected as part of it and _ people who are elected as part of it. and mps, sometimes mps, it is quite _ it. and mps, sometimes mps, it is quite difficult for them to argue for special treatment, but they are
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special~ _ for special treatment, but they are special. they are the people who are elected _ special. they are the people who are elected in _ special. they are the people who are elected in our democracy to represent us, and we all therefore have _ represent us, and we all therefore have a _ represent us, and we all therefore have a responsibility to treat them with respect and to ensure that they are safe _ with respect and to ensure that they are safe as— with respect and to ensure that they are safe as they go about that job. the home — are safe as they go about that job. the home secretary ordering an urgent review of safety, as a former home secretary, what does that review look and sound like, and for mps and theirfamilies review look and sound like, and for mps and their families of those close to them, they will be wondering whether anything will come of it. t wondering whether anything will come of it. ~ , : wondering whether anything will come of it. ~' , : , of it. i think it very much needs to, and of it. i think it very much needs to. and as _ of it. i think it very much needs to. and as l _ of it. i think it very much needs to, and as i understand - of it. i think it very much needs to, and as i understand it - of it. i think it very much needs to, and as i understand it this i of it. i think it very much needs| to, and as i understand it this is of it. i think it very much needs i to, and as i understand it this is a review— to, and as i understand it this is a review in— to, and as i understand it this is a review in two _ to, and as i understand it this is a review in two parts, so the first part _ review in two parts, so the first part is— review in two parts, so the first part is an — review in two parts, so the first part is an immediate look by local police _ part is an immediate look by local police forces at the arrangements that mps— police forces at the arrangements that mps who live in their areas have, _ that mps who live in their areas have, and — that mps who live in their areas have, and then a fuller review about how mps _ have, and then a fuller review about how mps can be kept physically safe whilst _ how mps can be kept physically safe whilst carrying out their duties, which _ whilst carrying out their duties, which will— whilst carrying out their duties, which will involve obviously both the parliamentary authorities and also potentially the home secretary
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through— also potentially the home secretary through the police. and that is important, but it is actually to return — important, but it is actually to return to _ important, but it is actually to return to my point something that all of— return to my point something that all of us _ return to my point something that all of us need to reflect on. we all need _ all of us need to reflect on. we all need to— all of us need to reflect on. we all need to think about our approach to the way— need to think about our approach to the way in _ need to think about our approach to the way in which we talk about our mps, _ the way in which we talk about our mps, because frankly sometimes what starts _ mps, because frankly sometimes what starts as— mps, because frankly sometimes what starts as abuse, whether online or off-line, _ starts as abuse, whether online or off—line, morphs into extremist views— off—line, morphs into extremist views and — off—line, morphs into extremist views and in the most terrible circumstances into the killing of our mps. — circumstances into the killing of our mps, as we saw tragically in the case of— our mps, as we saw tragically in the case ofjo— our mps, as we saw tragically in the case ofjo cox, and as i fear we saw yesterday— case ofjo cox, and as i fear we saw yesterday with david amess. so this brings— yesterday with david amess. so this brings a _ yesterday with david amess. so this brings a responsibility on everybody ithink— brings a responsibility on everybody i think to _ brings a responsibility on everybody i think to think about what we want from _ i think to think about what we want from our— i think to think about what we want from our democracy and therefore what _ from our democracy and therefore what we _ from our democracy and therefore what we need to do to respect and keep— what we need to do to respect and keep our— what we need to do to respect and keep our public servants a. your former colleague _ keep our public servants a. your former colleague harriet - keep our public servants a. yum;- former colleague harriet harman has called for a discussion on this. is it time now?—
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called for a discussion on this. is it time now? certainly the house authorities _ it time now? certainly the house authorities and _ it time now? certainly the house authorities and the _ it time now? certainly the house authorities and the police - it time now? certainly the house authorities and the police need i it time now? certainly the house | authorities and the police need to look carefully at those issues. harriet — look carefully at those issues. harriet is _ look carefully at those issues. harriet is an extremely experienced mp, harriet is an extremely experienced mp. and _ harriet is an extremely experienced mp, and there is certainly a role for parliament alongside the police and the _ for parliament alongside the police and the government to think about how we _ and the government to think about how we keep our mps save. but it can't _ how we keep our mps save. but it can'tiust— how we keep our mps save. but it can'tjust stop there. how we keep our mps save. but it can't just stop there. we all need to think— can't just stop there. we all need to think about our attitude to those who were _ to think about our attitude to those who were elected to represent us. how we _ who were elected to represent us. how we treat them, how we talk about them, _ how we treat them, how we talk about them, how— how we treat them, how we talk about them, how we all collectively protect — them, how we all collectively protect them, because by doing that we are _ protect them, because by doing that we are protecting our democratic system~ — we are protecting our democratic s stem. : :, :, we are protecting our democratic sstem.: :, :, :, :, system. and also an appreciation of the work that _ system. and also an appreciation of the work that they _ system. and also an appreciation of the work that they do, _ system. and also an appreciation of the work that they do, but - system. and also an appreciation of the work that they do, but thinking | the work that they do, but thinking back to sitting in a constituency office, with something like a metal detector, for example, that would have made a difference? the thing here is that _ have made a difference? the thing here is that different _ have made a difference? the thing here is that different mps - have made a difference? the thing here is that different mps operate | here is that different mps operate in different ways, and they don't only do— in different ways, and they don't only do their surgeries from their constituency offices, as we saw with sir david, _ constituency offices, as we saw with
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sir david, as— constituency offices, as we saw with sir david, as we saw withjo cox, they— sir david, as we saw withjo cox, they were — sir david, as we saw withjo cox, they were out in the community as they were out in the community as they would — they were out in the community as they would want to be, visiting different— they would want to be, visiting different places, holding meetings in village _ different places, holding meetings in village halls, in churches, in libraries, — in village halls, in churches, in libraries, allowing people from all over the _ libraries, allowing people from all over the constituency to actually come _ over the constituency to actually come and — over the constituency to actually come and see them. and that is something — come and see them. and that is something which in this country we hold very— something which in this country we hold very dear, and i agree with the mps who— hold very dear, and i agree with the mps who say that they wouldn't want to see _ mps who say that they wouldn't want to see that _ mps who say that they wouldn't want to see that way in which we run our system _ to see that way in which we run our system and — to see that way in which we run our system and our democracy undermined, which _ system and our democracy undermined, which means— system and our democracy undermined, which means we all therefore if we want _ which means we all therefore if we want to— which means we all therefore if we want to continue having that sort of access _ want to continue having that sort of access to _ want to continue having that sort of access to our elected representatives, if we want to see them _ representatives, if we want to see them out — representatives, if we want to see them out and about in the community and be _ them out and about in the community and be able _ them out and about in the community and be able to chat to them about the issues — and be able to chat to them about the issues that are important to us or lobby— the issues that are important to us or lobby them about things that we care about, we all need to think about— care about, we all need to think about how— care about, we all need to think about how we treat them, how we respect _ about how we treat them, how we respect them and how we keep them safe. : :, , ~ , respect them and how we keep them safe. : .. ~ , :, respect them and how we keep them safe. : ~ , :, :, safe. and as mps had backed a parliament. — safe. and as mps had backed a parliament, what _ safe. and as mps had backed a parliament, what will - safe. and as mps had backed a parliament, what will be - safe. and as mps had backed a parliament, what will be going| parliament, what will be going through their heads? what conversations will be had in the whatsapp groups? i
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conversations will be had in the whatsapp groups?— conversations will be had in the whatsapp groups? i am not in those urou -s an whatsapp groups? i am not in those groups any more. — whatsapp groups? i am not in those groups any more, but _ whatsapp groups? i am not in those groups any more, but i _ whatsapp groups? i am not in those groups any more, but i can - whatsapp groups? i am not in those groups any more, but i can assure i groups any more, but i can assure you that _ groups any more, but i can assure you that one — groups any more, but i can assure you that one of the things that sometimes people lose about members of parliament is that of course they play a _ of parliament is that of course they play a very— of parliament is that of course they play a very special role as our elected — play a very special role as our elected representatives, but they are also— elected representatives, but they are also human beings, and they will be sad _ are also human beings, and they will be sad and _ are also human beings, and they will be sad and they will be worried. they've — be sad and they will be worried. they've lost a friend and a colleague. and they will be concerned about that. and i think that's— concerned about that. and i think that's what— concerned about that. and i think that's what they'll be talking about, — that's what they'll be talking about, whilst also worrying about how they — about, whilst also worrying about how they can carry on doing the very best for— how they can carry on doing the very best for their constituents, the people — best for their constituents, the people who have elected them, and on whose _ people who have elected them, and on whose behalf the operating parliament and in fact across the communities. but parliament and in fact across the communities.— parliament and in fact across the communities. �* :, �* :, :, , communities. but we don't want to be here aaain communities. but we don't want to be here again and — communities. but we don't want to be here again and another _ communities. but we don't want to be here again and another five _ communities. but we don't want to be here again and another five years. - here again and another five years. what is the one thing that you think should happen now? i’m what is the one thing that you think should happen now?— what is the one thing that you think should happen now? i'm sorry, there is 'ust one should happen now? i'm sorry, there isjust one thing _ should happen now? i'm sorry, there isjust one thing that _ should happen now? i'm sorry, there isjust one thing that can _ should happen now? i'm sorry, there isjust one thing that can happen. - should happen now? i'm sorry, there isjust one thing that can happen. i i isjust one thing that can happen. i know— isjust one thing that can happen. i know at— isjust one thing that can happen. i know at a — isjust one thing that can happen. i know at a time like this people want there _ know at a time like this people want there to _ know at a time like this people want there to be — know at a time like this people want there to be a simple thing that we can do— there to be a simple thing that we can do to — there to be a simple thing that we can do to solve the problem. i think
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there _ can do to solve the problem. i think there is— can do to solve the problem. i think there is a _ can do to solve the problem. i think there is a whole range of things that we — there is a whole range of things that we need to think about. on the one end _ that we need to think about. on the one end we — that we need to think about. on the one end we need to think about mps' security— one end we need to think about mps' security and — one end we need to think about mps' security and the way they arrange their— security and the way they arrange their constituency offices and their surgeries, — their constituency offices and their surgeries, but it needs to go further— surgeries, but it needs to go further than that. we also need to think— further than that. we also need to think about the way in which our public— think about the way in which our public life — think about the way in which our public life has become more divided, more _ public life has become more divided, more toxic. — public life has become more divided, more toxic, and we need to take responsibility ourselves through the media, _ responsibility ourselves through the media, through our own activities, through— media, through our own activities, through the — media, through our own activities, through the way in which politicians themselves treat each other, the turning _ themselves treat each other, the turning that around and recognising that an _ turning that around and recognising that an attack on a member of parliament is an attack on our democracy and we've all got a responsibility to protect that. and finall , responsibility to protect that. and finally. people — responsibility to protect that. jim finally, people might see responsibility to protect that. r"t:c finally, people might see the leaders of the party standing across from each other up prime minister's questions and say that there is so much hostility between the two colours, but when you hear about an mp like sir david amess, you realise he is respected throughout the house of commons. he is respected throughout the house
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of commons-— of commons. absolutely he is, respected _ of commons. absolutely he is, respected and _ of commons. absolutely he is, respected and liked _ of commons. absolutely he is, respected and liked and - of commons. absolutely he is, respected and liked and loved| of commons. absolutely he is, i respected and liked and loved by people. — respected and liked and loved by people, and we need to remember that the people _ people, and we need to remember that the people who are doing thisjob on our behalf— the people who are doing thisjob on our behalf are human beings with families— our behalf are human beings with families and loved ones. that is what _ families and loved ones. that is what makes this so tragic. but we also need — what makes this so tragic. but we also need to remember that there needs— also need to remember that there needs to — also need to remember that there needs to be robust political debate. sir david _ needs to be robust political debate. sir david amess stood up for what he believed _ sir david amess stood up for what he believed in— sir david amess stood up for what he believed in strongly. jo cox was a passionate — believed in strongly. jo cox was a passionate advocate of the causes she believed in. we are not saying there _ she believed in. we are not saying there can't— she believed in. we are not saying there can't be arguing a debate, but that has— there can't be arguing a debate, but that has to — there can't be arguing a debate, but that has to be done in a respectful and safe _ that has to be done in a respectful and safe way for those who are undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith, undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith. chair— undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith, chair of _ undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith, chair of the _ undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith, chair of the jo _ undertaking it on our behalf. jacqui smith, chair of the jo cox - smith, chair of thejo cox foundation and former labour mp, thank you very much for your time this morning. and we will have much more reaction to the killing of sir david amess on brea kfast breakfast throughout this morning. now let's check in on the premier league fixtures ahead for the weekend. it is back after the international world cup qualifiers, and for the first time since the takeover of newcastle. and that seems to be
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playing on the mind some of the big names. liverpool kick off the weekend, with a lunch time kick off against watford, with claudio ranieiri, in charge for his first game there, but it's the new force in the north east that is on the mind of liverpool manager jurgen klopp. the premier league approved the £305 million saudi—led takeover of newcastle last week, after it had received legally binding assurances the saudi arabian state would not be in control. and klopp is also keen to make sure newcastle follow the rules of financial fair play. we had a massive argument — not an argument, an issue, i would say, the whole football world, with 12 clubs or so trying to build a super league. and rightly so. but this is kind of creating a super team, if you want. guaranteed spots in the champions league, in a few years' time, not immediately, all these kinds of things.
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yeah, with all the things of how financial fair play is used nowadays, where nobody knows exactly if it is still existing or not, stuff like this. newcastle fans will love it, of course, but for the rest of us itjust means there is a new superpower in newcastle. no change yet. the same players take on tottenham tomorrow, and the same managerfor now. newcastle manager steve bruce says he'll carry on doing his job until he hears otherwise. there's been much speculation about his future following the takeover of the club. the game against tottenham tomorrow will be bruce's 1,000th match as a manager. his side are one off the bottom, and he turned the focus back on the media for all the speculation surrounding hisjob. there are brief ten minute conversation with the new owners where _ conversation with the new owners where we — conversation with the new owners where we talked about the team and we talked _ where we talked about the team and we talked about injuries and we talked — we talked about injuries and we talked about the training ground and we talked _ talked about the training ground and we talked about, it was very, very
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informal~ — we talked about, it was very, very informal. theyjust said, carry on, i'll carry— informal. theyjust said, carry on, i'll carry on — informal. theyjust said, carry on, i'll carry on until i hear otherwise. west bromwich albion are back on top of the championship after beating local rivals birmingham city 1—0. karlan grant scored the only goal of a tense game with 15 minutes left. that was enough for albion to go top. birmingham are without a win in five games now. jon is looking at me rather strangely. they are called the baggies, and they are having a bouncing run! oh, stop it! what a finish it was to the rugby union premiership match, at sale sharks last night. the champions harlequins thought they had done enough to keep their unbeaten start to the season,
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with a two—point lead with five minutes to go. but no, a tom curtis penalty put sale in front and then this last—gasp try from scrum half raffi quirke sealed a 28—22 win and moved sharks, up to fourth in the table. now at around half past nine tonight, there could be another glorious moment for british tennis, as cameron norrie aims to reach the final of the indian wells masters tournament. it's live on bbc radio 5 live sports extra, and the new british number one is up against grigor dimitrov. norrie could even break into the world's top 20 for the first time and he is the form player this year, having won more atp matches in 2021 than world number one novak djokovic. now, time for a catch of the day. england's moeen ali was part of the victorious chennai super kings team, in the indian premier league final in dubai. ali blasted 37 off 20 balls, to help chennai to 192—3. in reply kolkata knight riders, captained by england t—20 skipper eoin morgan, collapsed to 165 for 9. this was part of the reason why, a
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brilliant bit ofjuggling on the boundary. it's a fourth ipl win for the super kings. morgan will now focus on the t—20 world cup, which starts tomorrow, when bangladesh take on scotland at 3 o clock in al almarat. and england bowlerjames anderson says he would love their talisman ben stokes to come back into the fold, with the team leaving for the ashes in three weeks, but it can't be rushed. stokes has taken an indefinite break from the game to protect his mental health and has also been recovering from surgery to a finger, but there was great excitement this week when stokes posted a social media video of him batting again in the nets. it's totally on his hands. he's got to be 100% it's totally on his hands. he's got to be100% right before he comes back. he's got the full support of the team, and we willjust play it by ear, really. if he doesn't think he can play some sort of part in the ashes, then great, if not, then that's ok as well. we just want ben to be back to where he can be, because he is such a big playerfor
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this team. jimmy anderson, i was with him all day yesterday because he was doing a chance to shine event yesterday, helping young kids into the sport. i faced him in the nets. we will be doing a special coming up on breakfast in the next couple of weeks, he is looking ahead to what could be his final ashes tour, so a lot to come. oblak eyes chris whitely like i had all the protective gear on! and it will be an exciting finish to the flat season at ascot today. find the flat season at ascot today. and cameron norrie, _ the flat season at ascot today. r"t:c cameron norrie, should we brace ourselves for another emma raducanu moment? he ourselves for another emma raducanu moment? . ourselves for another emma raducanu moment? , :, , :_ moment? he is the inform player, the wa he has moment? he is the inform player, the way he has been _ moment? he is the inform player, the way he has been playing, _ moment? he is the inform player, the way he has been playing, the - moment? he is the inform player, the way he has been playing, the new - way he has been playing, the new british number one when the rankings come out on monday, and every belief
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that he can do what he has done to other players against grigor dimitrov. i don't want to jinx other players against grigor dimitrov. i don't want tojinx it. but it is a very different story to emma raducanu who burst onto the scene as a teenager, it has been a slow build of the cameron norrie, 26 now and reaching his peak, hopefully. five live sports extra tonight at 9:30pm. thank you, mike. a story for you now about history and heritage and how we remember. the future of a statue of the explorer, sir henry morton stanley, is being put to a public vote in his hometown of denbigh. the welsh adventurer is known for his nineteenth century explorations in africa — but his reputation has been damaged by accusations of violence. george herd has been finding out more. henry morton stanley, a proud son of denbigh. he famously found the missing missionary, david livingstone, in tanzania in the 1870s, uttering those immortal words, "dr livingstone, i presume?" but some say the reputation
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of stanley has been tarnished. accusations of excessive violence during his explorations and then opening up the congo to the brutal regime of king leopold ii of belgium, a regime under which millions of black africans died. last year in the wake of george floyd's murder in america and protests sweeping britain, statues started to topple. in wales, a marble of slave owner sir thomas picton was covered up in cardiff, while petitions against stanley attracted attention here. but some say the explorer should be recognised for his achievements. abandoned at birth and raised in a workhouse before setting off to america to make his fortune. hisjournalism, his writing, was a feat in itself when you consider his background, and then his explorations. he was able to prove where the source of the nile and the source of the congo was. others believe stanley's bronze should be moved and reinterpreted
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alongside the facts we know about his past. he is one of ours, and you can't wipe out history, and that's an important thing. we've got to learn from this, and by learning the facts about him, or proposed facts, then we will learn about him and people can make their own opinion. one thing is certain. those voting today have strong opinions about stanley and his statue. history's history, isn't it? we don't know, do we? i mean, there would be no statues left if everybody brought everything down in this country now, whether? it should be relocated with the knowledge now that everybody's got of his past, with the right intention as well. there's been a steady flow of people turning out to vote. it will then be up to denbigh town council to decide what happens to the statue of henry morton stanley. george herd, bbc news.
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really interesting, conversations like that they had up and down the country. that voting goes on this weekend, and we will bring you the result. about an hour ago, matt had that beautiful sunrise shot to share with us. what is happening out there this morning? we've lost you in the fog! this is a different shot than we showed you earlier, a contrast to the conditions of any sort of you yesterday. if it does feel chilly, it is just a testament to how warm october has been so far, these temperatures are close to the mid—october average, temperatures are close to the mid—octoberaverage, but the temperatures are close to the mid—october average, but the milder air is fighting back once again, and by the time we hit tuesday, the peak of the warmth, we will see temperatures widely across the uk in the upper teens and low 20s, although warmth doesn't necessarily
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mean lots of sunshine, as i will show you. there is some sunshine around away from foggy spots, a lot more cloud, and the milder air is here towards the south—west, chilly conditions, and the coldest night of autumn last night. but that milder air is coming with this cloud, pushing its way northwards. that will push into northern ireland in western scotland later today. down towards the south—east, a little patchy light rain or drizzle, but most places starting dry, the odd shower in the north of scotland. the mist and fog in the south—west were clear, sunny spells into the afternoon, and the cloud starts to bring rain into western scotland and northern ireland later. the milder and is creeping its way northwards, getting up to the likes of liverpool, hulland getting up to the likes of liverpool, hull and belfast, getting up to the likes of liverpool, hulland belfast, but getting up to the likes of liverpool, hull and belfast, but the far north of england, scotland, we stay with those cooler conditions, although temperatures around the average for the time of year. through this evening and overnight,
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chilly conditions remain, clearer skies here, and in between throughout this evening, scotland, northern ireland, a bit of a soggy evening, that rain spread into northern england, the midlands and wales later in the night and into tomorrow morning, but it does mean temperatures will drop away, a much milder night as we go through sunday morning. if you are up early, scotland, parts of england and wales, a damp start, a dry start with sunshine toward southern coastal counties, a dry start with sunshine in the far north of scotland but even if you start with outbreaks of rain, optimistic skies will brighten into the afternoon. sunny spells, one or two showers later on at a temperature starting to lift higher than they are this afternoon. beyond that, warmer air pushes in through monday and into tuesday, and because of this whirling area of low pressure dominating, but will throw weather fronts with outbreaks of rain our way, and the milder air coming up on the southerly winds. so a quick look at what is in store next week, a
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capital city forecast, the symbols indicate a fairly changeable week, rain at times, some of which will be heavy, windy conditions on wednesday, but temperatures 21 in london, 18 in edinburgh, but 11 or 12 by friday, so the colder air back by the end of the week. a sharp asharp dip a sharp dip next week, thank you, matt. that leads us onto this story! it really does. david wightman will hoping this weekend is rather less dramatic than last! and probably that this weekend's where there will be better than last. a week ago he got lost in the cairngorms mountains in the scottish highlands and spent two nights waiting to be rescued. david was left exposed to the elements — at the mercy of the mountains — after getting separated from his friend. here's what happened next. a moment ofjoy after a weekend from hell. david's survival for two nights out in the cairngorms was down to luck and mild weather after he got
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separated from his hiking partner. rescue teams were also out combing the hills, aided by colin's knowledge of their route. the two gentleman had a very detailed route plan, which made coordinating the search for the braemar team a lot easier, i believe, and it certainly helped us as well. so we could kind of home in on the likely spots where they were going to be. but it does, even with that level of planning, just the slightest little mistakes can lead like this to unplanned nights out on the hill. back at home, david's family were struggling, with no word from him after the second night exposed to the elements. his son using social media to spread the word of his dad's disappearance. it was coming on to three days missing. he'd slept outside for two nights, he was telling me. and that morning, i wasjust... i don't know, i was out of breath, i was inconsolable, i was breaking down. in my head i'd decided that i wasn't going to see my dad again.
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but luck was on his side, david was met by a group of students who already knew who he was. rescue teams all agree that david was incredibly lucky to survive not one but two nights out on these hills. and with winterjust around the corner, and even now there is a real chill in the air, the advice is to be prepared, because these hills and mountains right across scotland can be fatal. well, we'rejoined now by david and colin. the advice was to be prepared. you were prepared, won't you? for the advice was to be prepared. you were prepared, won't you?- were prepared, won't you? for the most part- — were prepared, won't you? for the most part- we _ were prepared, won't you? for the most part. we had _ were prepared, won't you? for the most part. we had the _ were prepared, won't you? for the most part. we had the right - were prepared, won't you? for the most part. we had the right gear, | were prepared, won't you? for the i most part. we had the right gear, we had the right — most part. we had the right gear, we had the right planning. _ most part. we had the right gear, we had the right planning. in _ most part. we had the right gear, we had the right planning. in theory, - had the right planning. in theory, people _ had the right planning. in theory, people knew where we were in the vicinity _ people knew where we were in the vicinity. and that was fine until something went wrong.- vicinity. and that was fine until something went wrong. david, so glad ou are something went wrong. david, so glad you are here — something went wrong. david, so glad you are here safe _ something went wrong. david, so glad you are here safe and _ something went wrong. david, so glad you are here safe and sound. - something went wrong. david, so glad you are here safe and sound. so - something went wrong. david, so glad you are here safe and sound. so this i you are here safe and sound. so this time last week, paint a picture for
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us of the situation you were in. this time last week i spent one night on the plateau in the cairngorms, and it was pretty uncomfortable sleeping on a granite rock, basically, with my rucksack as a windbreak and huddled up as best i could. , :, :, :, could. very fortunate air temperature _ could. very fortunate air temperature was - could. very fortunate air temperature was up - could. very fortunate air temperature was up for| could. very fortunate air i temperature was up for the could. very fortunate air - temperature was up for the time could. very fortunate air _ temperature was up for the time of year, which was a blessing. the next thing i was able to do was just look where i was on my online map on my phone before my phone gave up, and despite trying to recharge it, that was impossible because of the moisture in the charger. so based on the little knowledge i had in the time i had, i decided one thing i had to do was get off the plateau down to the valley, which i managed
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to do through that day, and felt i was heading in the right direction to the shelter, which was our destination the night before. unfortunately, i took the wrong turning at a fork in the river, i should have carried on the right—hand side and i turned into the left—hand valley and spent the day trying to find the shelter that i thought ought to be there and wasn't there, so... i thought ought to be there and wasn't there, so. . .— i thought ought to be there and wasn't there, so... how did you not anic? wasn't there, so... how did you not panic? at — wasn't there, so... how did you not panic? at any _ wasn't there, so... how did you not panic? at any point _ wasn't there, so... how did you not panic? at any point where - wasn't there, so... how did you not panic? at any point where you - panic? at any point where you panicked? i would panic? at any point where you panicked? iwould imagine panic? at any point where you panicked? i would imagine retaining your composure is really important, but so hard. it your composure is really important, but so hard-— but so hard. it is not easy, but you are spending _ but so hard. it is not easy, but you are spending all— but so hard. it is not easy, but you are spending all your _ but so hard. it is not easy, but you| are spending all your concentration and making sure you're not going to fall over the next piece of rocks sticking out or tripping over some bracken, so you are concentrating your whole effort on trying to move in what you think is the right direction, so the opportunity for panic, despite the length of time, is pretty low. he
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panic, despite the length of time, is pretty low-— panic, despite the length of time, is pretty low. he seems like a very cool customer. _ is pretty low. he seems like a very cool customer. when _ is pretty low. he seems like a very cool customer. when he _ is pretty low. he seems like a very cool customer. when he was - is pretty low. he seems like a very cool customer. when he was cool. cool customer. when he was cool about this, colin?— about this, colin? initially, i thouuht about this, colin? initially, i thought i — about this, colin? initially, i thought i was _ about this, colin? initially, i thought i was the _ about this, colin? initially, i thought i was the one - about this, colin? initially, i thought i was the one in - about this, colin? initially, i thought i was the one in the about this, colin? initially, i- thought i was the one in the wrong place. _ thought i was the one in the wrong place. so _ thought i was the one in the wrong place. so i — thought i was the one in the wrong place, so i thought david had logicalty— place, so i thought david had logically followed the route we had organised, and he would be waiting for me _ organised, and he would be waiting for me at— organised, and he would be waiting for me at the shack, and it wasn't until— for me at the shack, and it wasn't until i_ for me at the shack, and it wasn't until i arrive — for me at the shack, and it wasn't until i arrive there later, that i realised — until i arrive there later, that i realised i_ until i arrive there later, that i realised i had left my buddy the hill, realised i had left my buddy the hill. and — realised i had left my buddy the hill, and that is the shocking bit when _ hill, and that is the shocking bit when you — hill, and that is the shocking bit when you realise something gone wrong. _ when you realise something gone wrong. he — when you realise something gone wrong. he is in a lot of danger, i was _ wrong. he is in a lot of danger, i was safe. — wrong. he is in a lot of danger, i was safe. and that is the point where — was safe. and that is the point where you _ was safe. and that is the point where you start thinking, what do i do next? _ where you start thinking, what do i do next? what is the rational thing to do? _ do next? what is the rational thing to do? i_ do next? what is the rational thing to do? i had — do next? what is the rational thing to do? i had to get some sleep, it was midnight when i arrived. and that buys— was midnight when i arrived. and that buys you some time. you wake up in the _ that buys you some time. you wake up in the morning, you get something to eat... _ in the morning, you get something to eat... :. in the morning, you get something to eat... :, :, i. :, in the morning, you get something to eat... :, :, :, , eat... hang on, you went to sleep? yes, i eat... hang on, you went to sleep? yes. i did. _ eat. .. hang on, you went to sleep? yes. i did. partly— eat... hang on, you went to sleep? yes, i did. partly because - eat... hang on, you went to sleep? yes, i did. partly because i - eat... hang on, you went to sleep?
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yes, i did. partly because i was - yes, i did. partly because i was exhausted. _ yes, i did. partly because i was exhausted, but also it had taken me five hours _ exhausted, but also it had taken me five hours of— exhausted, but also it had taken me five hours of walking in the dark to .et five hours of walking in the dark to get to _ five hours of walking in the dark to get to safety, and i had looked inside. — get to safety, and i had looked inside. i— get to safety, and i had looked inside, i didn't think he was there, but i _ inside, ididn't think he was there, but i didn't— inside, i didn't think he was there, but i didn't know, but it is a common— but i didn't know, but it is a common thing in the mountains, you allow— common thing in the mountains, you allow your— common thing in the mountains, you allow your walking partner time to assess— allow your walking partner time to assess your situation and get to you. _ assess your situation and get to you. and — assess your situation and get to you, and overnight, whilst he went firm. _ you, and overnight, whilst he went firm. which — you, and overnight, whilst he went firm, which was a very sensible thing _ firm, which was a very sensible thing to— firm, which was a very sensible thing to do, i was able to refresh, because _ thing to do, i was able to refresh, because i— thing to do, i was able to refresh, because i would have been too fatigued — because i would have been too fatigued to do anything immediately. and that _ fatigued to do anything immediately. and that could have led to a double issue. :, :, , :, , :, , issue. potentially two casualties. and the logic _ issue. potentially two casualties. and the logic then _ issue. potentially two casualties. and the logic then at _ issue. potentially two casualties. and the logic then at that - issue. potentially two casualties. and the logic then at that point i and the logic then at that point was. _ and the logic then at that point was, when i woke up, speak to the other— was, when i woke up, speak to the other guys— was, when i woke up, speak to the other guys who i met and introduced myself— other guys who i met and introduced myself to. _ other guys who i met and introduced myself to, explain the situation, and in _ myself to, explain the situation, and in some ways the formation of the plan _ and in some ways the formation of the plan was quite easy. i wouldn't be able _ the plan was quite easy. iwouldn't be able to— the plan was quite easy. i wouldn't be able to go up onto the mountain and find _ be able to go up onto the mountain and find him, it is a vast area. the best— and find him, it is a vast area. the best thing —
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and find him, it is a vast area. the best thing i— and find him, it is a vast area. the best thing i could do was raise the alarm. _ best thing i could do was raise the alarm. and — best thing i could do was raise the alarm, and there are great professionals out there that can do this and _ professionals out there that can do this and would know the area far better— this and would know the area far better than i. but this and would know the area far better than i.— better than i. but there is a problem — better than i. but there is a problem in _ better than i. but there is a problem in doing _ better than i. but there is a problem in doing that, - better than i. but there is a - problem in doing that, because no signalfor your phone? problem in doing that, because no signal for your phone?— signal for your phone? that's it. and as it transpired, _ signal for your phone? that's it. and as it transpired, i _ signal for your phone? that's it. and as it transpired, i had - signal for your phone? that's it. and as it transpired, i had a - signal for your phone? that's it. i and as it transpired, i had a three hour— and as it transpired, i had a three hour walk— and as it transpired, i had a three hour walk to— and as it transpired, i had a three hour walk to get to a point that i could _ hour walk to get to a point that i could get— hour walk to get to a point that i could get a — hour walk to get to a point that i could get a text signal out. to even raise the alarm. _ could get a text signal out. to even raise the alarm. and _ could get a text signal out. to even raise the alarm. and david, - could get a text signal out. to even raise the alarm. and david, you - could get a text signal out. to even | raise the alarm. and david, you said you slept. was it real sleep, was it tossing and turning into delirium and... ? ~ :, tossing and turning into delirium and... ? . :, :, , and... ? well, not delirium. iwas cold enough _ and... ? well, not delirium. iwas cold enough to — and... ? well, not delirium. iwas cold enough to be _ and... ? well, not delirium. iwas cold enough to be shivering - and... ? well, not delirium. iwas cold enough to be shivering quite| and... ? well, not delirium. i was| cold enough to be shivering quite a lot at certain points, sol cold enough to be shivering quite a lot at certain points, so i had to get up and walk around a bit and flexed my hands and toes and that kind of thing, and then get back into position again. you actually sle -t at into position again. you actually slept at point — into position again. you actually slept at point square? _ into position again. you actually slept at point square? i - into position again. you actually slept at point square? i must i into position again. you actually i slept at point square? i must have had some. — slept at point square? i must have had some. i— slept at point square? i must have had some, i don't _ slept at point square? i must have had some, i don't know _ slept at point square? i must have had some, i don't know how, i slept at point square? i must have had some, i don't know how, but i i had some, i don't know how, but i did. i actually felt quite fresh in the morning, to be honest. that was fine. when i had some food and water on me and that was fine. apart from
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taking the wrong turn in the valley, which wasn't fine, i wound up at night seeing the helicopter, sol knew that something was happening, whether it was for me or something else, i had no clue. and i was waving furiously at it, but they couldn't see me. and i now know, if you have a torch with you, in daylight, shine the torch, they will see the torch in daylight. i5 daylight, shine the torch, they will see the torch in daylight.— see the torch in daylight. is that ri . ht? see the torch in daylight. is that riuht? so see the torch in daylight. is that right? so just — see the torch in daylight. is that right? sojust quickly, _ see the torch in daylight. is that right? so just quickly, what i see the torch in daylight. is that right? so just quickly, what are| see the torch in daylight. is that i right? so just quickly, what are the key things that you have learned from this experience? because you did go prepared, you had clothes, snacks, water. what extra measures would you put in place next time? i would you put in place next time? i would certainly say first and foremost raise an alarm if you lose visibility immediately to your partner. don't do what i did and think, i know which way he went, i willjust catch up. that was my biggest mistake. so make a noise early on. i didn't know how far off
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course i was, didn't know i was going to be heading for a night out, in fact two nights out, as it happens. so a survival bag is a necessity. we were sharing a tent, in my mind we were ok together, we would be sharing a tent for shelter if something goes wrong, so have a survival bag, because getting separated wasn't part of the idea. well said, because they will be people heading off this morning, walking, or overthe people heading off this morning, walking, or over the weekend, and a very quick message to the people who saved you and sorted you out in the end? i saved you and sorted you out in the end? . saved you and sorted you out in the end? :, :, :, , :, :, ,, end? i have no words to really thank all those involved. _ end? i have no words to really thank all those involved. i— end? i have no words to really thank all those involved. i think— end? i have no words to really thank all those involved. i think people i all those involved. i think people don't necessarily know that the mountain rescue teams all operate on sponsorships and charitable donations. three teams were involved in this extensive search for me, braemar, aberdeen and cairngorms mountain rescue, so anybody out there who likes the outdoors and
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wants to know that these resources can be available for them, please do donate to one of those. ithieii can be available for them, please do donate to one of those.— donate to one of those. well said. exactly the _ donate to one of those. well said. exactly the same. _ donate to one of those. well said. exactly the same. thank - donate to one of those. well said. exactly the same. thank you i donate to one of those. well said. exactly the same. thank you very| exactly the same. thank you very much for coming _ exactly the same. thank you very much for coming in. _ exactly the same. thank you very much for coming in. it _ exactly the same. thank you very much for coming in. it is - exactly the same. thank you very much for coming in. it is good i exactly the same. thank you very much for coming in. it is good to | much for coming in. it is good to see you safe and well. i'm not sure we will be able to make an adventure movie ever, because they are both so cool movie ever, because they are both so cool. it's probably the secret of their success! stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today: police declare the killing of mp sir david amess as a terrorist incident, after he was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. at a church service last night, sir david's constituents described him as an mp who always listened, and who loved representing his area. his heart was in his community,
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he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. he was at his happiest when he was helping people. he was a true servant and an inspiration. questions asked about how a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million pound government contract. all shook up — the premier league returns, but liverpool's yurgen klopp expresses his concerns about the new super power in town, after the takeover at newcastle united. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. and after a cooler day yesterday, but with more sunshine, the cloud is back this weekend. temperatures are on the rise. a full forecast on breakfast. it's saturday, the 16th of october. our top story: the killing of the conservative mp
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sir david amess has been declared as a terrorist incident, by police. sir david was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery in essex yesterday. officers say they are investigating a "potential link to islamist extremism" and are searching two addresses in the london area. a 25—year—old man remains in custody. ben boulos reports from leigh—on—sea. in leigh—on—sea, worshippers came together to remember their mp. david amess has been a mp for 38 years. described as a kind man, devoted to his constituency of southend west. he made everybody feel valued and he listened, he was a good listener. you felt, well, people felt they represented them in the houses of parliament. he represented them in the houses of
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parliament-— parliament. he was at his happiest helinu parliament. he was at his happiest helping people- _ parliament. he was at his happiest helping people- he _ parliament. he was at his happiest helping people. he was _ parliament. he was at his happiest helping people. he was a - parliament. he was at his happiest helping people. he was a true i helping people. he was a true servant — helping people. he was a true servant and an inspiration. his heart was _ servant and an inspiration. his heart was in — servant and an inspiration. his heart was in his community. he was the best— heart was in his community. he was the best constituency— heart was in his community. he was the best constituency mp _ heart was in his community. he was the best constituency mp you - heart was in his community. he was the best constituency mp you could | the best constituency mp you could ever wish— the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. — the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. it _ the best constituency mp you could ever wish for-— the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. it was 'ust down from here that yesterday i ever wish for. it was just down from here that yesterday sir _ ever wish for. it was just down from here that yesterday sir david i ever wish for. it was just down from here that yesterday sir david was i here that yesterday sir david was stabbed. he had been holding one of his regular surgeries to meet constituents. police and paramedics tried their best to save him. police last night declared the killing a terrorist incident and a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. . . man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. , , , ., of murder. these things bring faith communities _ of murder. these things bring faith communities together. _ of murder. these things bring faith communities together. and - of murder. these things bring faith communities together. and i i of murder. these things bring faith communities together. and i was i of murder. these things bring faith | communities together. and i was in touch, ora manfrom communities together. and i was in touch, or a man from a local muslim community called us yesterday, to express their sincere condolences, they also knew sir david. this will bring all the different faith groups together and make them strong. that is a good thing and i won't extinguish the light of his smile either. that is what we have got to work on, some very serious
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relationships between the faith communities that have lost their greatest supporter.— greatest supporter. today constituents _ greatest supporter. today constituents continued i greatest supporter. today constituents continued to | greatest supporter. today i constituents continued to pay respects. thy, constituents continued to pay resects. : :, :, , constituents continued to pay resects. :, :, , respects. a lot of people said about his bein: a respects. a lot of people said about his being a campaigner— respects. a lot of people said about his being a campaigner and - respects. a lot of people said about his being a campaigner and a i respects. a lot of people said about his being a campaigner and a grass| his being a campaigner and a grass roots— his being a campaigner and a grass roots politician, that is right. he loved _ roots politician, that is right. he loved a — roots politician, that is right. he loved a big — roots politician, that is right. he loved a big idea and anything that pushed _ loved a big idea and anything that pushed forward southend and the southend family. it pushed forward southend and the southend family.— pushed forward southend and the southend family. it was five years a . o southend family. it was five years a . 0 that southend family. it was five years ago that the _ southend family. it was five years ago that the labour _ southend family. it was five years ago that the labour mp _ southend family. it was five years ago that the labour mp jo - southend family. it was five years ago that the labour mp jo cox i southend family. it was five years | ago that the labour mp jo cox was ago that the labour mpjo cox was stabbed to death. the attack on sir david has raised questions about the safety of mps. david has raised questions about the safety of mps-— david has raised questions about the safety of mps. different mps operate in different way _ safety of mps. different mps operate in different way and _ safety of mps. different mps operate in different way and they _ safety of mps. different mps operate in different way and they don't i safety of mps. different mps operate in different way and they don't only i in different way and they don't only do their— in different way and they don't only do their surgeries _ in different way and they don't only do their surgeries from _ in different way and they don't only do their surgeries from their- do their surgeries from their constituency _ do their surgeries from their constituency offices, - do their surgeries from their constituency offices, as i do their surgeries from their constituency offices, as we i do their surgeries from their. constituency offices, as we saw do their surgeries from their- constituency offices, as we saw with sir david _ constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and — constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and jo _ constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and jo cox, _ constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and jo cox, they— constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and jo cox, they were i constituency offices, as we saw with sir david and jo cox, they were outl sir david and jo cox, they were out in the _ sir david and jo cox, they were out in the community— sir david and jo cox, they were out in the community as _ sir david and jo cox, they were out in the community as they- sir david and jo cox, they were out in the community as they would i sir david and jo cox, they were out i in the community as they would want to be. _ in the community as they would want to be. visiting — in the community as they would want to be, visiting different— in the community as they would want to be, visiting different places, - to be, visiting different places, holding — to be, visiting different places, holding meetings _ to be, visiting different places, holding meetings in _ to be, visiting different places, holding meetings in village i to be, visiting different places, i holding meetings in village halls, in churches. _ holding meetings in village halls, in churches, in— holding meetings in village halls, in churches, in libraries, - holding meetings in village halls, in churches, in libraries, allowingi in churches, in libraries, allowing people _ in churches, in libraries, allowing people from _ in churches, in libraries, allowing people from all— in churches, in libraries, allowing people from all over— in churches, in libraries, allowing people from all over the - people from all over the constituency _ people from all over the constituency to - people from all over the
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constituency to actuallyl people from all over the i constituency to actually come people from all over the - constituency to actually come and see them — constituency to actually come and see them and _ constituency to actually come and see them and that _ constituency to actually come and see them and that is _ constituency to actually come and see them and that is something i constituency to actually come and i see them and that is something which in this— see them and that is something which in this country— see them and that is something which in this country we _ see them and that is something which in this country we hold _ see them and that is something which in this country we hold very— see them and that is something which in this country we hold very dear. i in this country we hold very dear. the speaker— in this country we hold very dear. the speaker of— in this country we hold very dear. the speaker of house _ in this country we hold very dear. the speaker of house of- in this country we hold very dear. i the speaker of house of commons, in this country we hold very dear. - the speaker of house of commons, who went ahead with his own constituency surgery last night said security would need to be looked at. we have not to would need to be looked at. we have got to make — would need to be looked at. we have got to make sure _ would need to be looked at. we have got to make sure the _ would need to be looked at. we have got to make sure the politicians i would need to be looked at. we have got to make sure the politicians are i got to make sure the politicians are safe, the people who work for them, the family, the people of the house of commons, we have seen the terrorist attack there as well, what we won't do, we won't give in to it. we will continue to ensure that democracy will be there. we have got to make sure we have that relationship with our electors. that is the unique part of british politics. but we have got to make sure mps are safe. mp5 politics. but we have got to make sure mps are safe.— politics. but we have got to make sure mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted _ sure mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by _ sure mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by their _ sure mps are safe. mps are expected to be contacted by their local- to be contacted by their local police forces today. the home secretary has ordered a review of security. the flags at westminster are flying at half—mast for sir david amess as questions are being asked again about how to keep his colleagues safe.
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in a moment, we will speak to our political correspondent peter saull who is in downing street, but first to our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani who is in leigh—on—sea for us this morning. in fact we will go to downing street. questions raised again about the safety of mps, just five years after the death ofjo cox? the safety of mps, just five years after the death of jo cox?- after the death of jo cox? that's riaht, a after the death of jo cox? that's right, a profound _ after the death of jo cox? that's right, a profound sense - after the death of jo cox? that's right, a profound sense of- after the death of jo cox? that's right, a profound sense of shock after the death of jo cox? that's i right, a profound sense of shock in the world _ right, a profound sense of shock in the world of— right, a profound sense of shock in the world of politics. obviously, a lot of— the world of politics. obviously, a lot of mps — the world of politics. obviously, a lot of mps have lost somebody they saw not _ lot of mps have lost somebody they saw not only as a colleague, but a close _ saw not only as a colleague, but a close friend, he had been an mp for almost _ close friend, he had been an mp for almost 40 _ close friend, he had been an mp for almost 40 years. but what he was doing _ almost 40 years. but what he was doing yesterday, holding a constituency surgery, was what many, many _ constituency surgery, was what many, many mps _ constituency surgery, was what many, many mps to— constituency surgery, was what many, many mps to every friday. they see it as an— many mps to every friday. they see it as an important part of theirjob to use _ it as an important part of theirjob to use their— it as an important part of theirjob to use their constituency as a sounding _ to use their constituency as a sounding board, find out what they feel about — sounding board, find out what they feel about the big issues of the day. _ feel about the big issues of the day. so — feel about the big issues of the day, so they can raise it to the powers— day, so they can raise it to the powers that be and enact change.
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that is— powers that be and enact change. that is how — powers that be and enact change. that is how our democracy functions. the home _ that is how our democracy functions. the home secretary has launched a review _ the home secretary has launched a review into — the home secretary has launched a review into mps' security and had been _ review into mps' security and had been speaking to police force, who have been— been speaking to police force, who have been getting in touch with the 650 mps— have been getting in touch with the 650 mps across the country about the... _ 650 mps across the country about the... measures that might already be in _ the... measures that might already be in place. — the... measures that might already be in place. the shutters are available _ be in place. the shutters are available to them, that is one thing they could — available to them, that is one thing they could put in.— available to them, that is one thing they could put in.- sorry. i they could put in. peter... sorry. we are seeing — they could put in. peter... sorry. we are seeing pictures _ they could put in. peter... sorry. we are seeing pictures of - they could put in. peter... sorry. we are seeing pictures of sir i they could put in. peter... sorry. i we are seeing pictures of sir keir starmer and borisjohnson at the scene in leigh—on—sea, preparing to lay flowers, which says something about the unity a moment like this brings to politics.— brings to politics. that's right, we are reminds _ brings to politics. that's right, we are reminds what _ brings to politics. that's right, we are reminds what happened i brings to politics. that's right, we are reminds what happened in i brings to politics. that's right, we i are reminds what happened in the aftermath— are reminds what happened in the aftermath of the murder ofjo cox and that— aftermath of the murder ofjo cox and that quote of her, there is more that unites _ and that quote of her, there is more that unites us than divides us and we have _ that unites us than divides us and we have at— that unites us than divides us and we have at times a tense political
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atmosphere, but a moment like this brings— atmosphere, but a moment like this brings all— atmosphere, but a moment like this brings all people of all political persuasions together. this fundamentally has been an attack on our democracy. so quite poignant to see the _ our democracy. so quite poignant to see the leader of the opposition and the prime _ see the leader of the opposition and the prime minister together there in leigh—on—sea. with the prime minister together there in leigh-on-sea-_ leigh-on-sea. with the home secretary. _ leigh-on-sea. with the home secretary, who _ leigh-on-sea. with the home secretary, who now _ leigh-on-sea. with the home secretary, who now has i leigh-on-sea. with the home i secretary, who now has launched leigh-on-sea. with the home - secretary, who now has launched this investigation, what will that look like, jacqui smith saying it would be two layers to it, but questions around what will be achieved and the hope that we will not be here again. that is right. so she has been in touch_ that is right. so she has been in touch with — that is right. so she has been in touch with the police forces up and down _ touch with the police forces up and down the _ touch with the police forces up and down the country, there was an operation — down the country, there was an operation called operation bridger setup _ operation called operation bridger setup in _ operation called operation bridger set up in the wake ofjo cox murder that enabled mps to get bits of funding — that enabled mps to get bits of funding to better protect their homes, — funding to better protect their homes, their offices. the problem is, as_ homes, their offices. the problem is, as we _ homes, their offices. the problem is, as we have seen with sir david amess. _
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is, as we have seen with sir david amess. a — is, as we have seen with sir david amess. a lot— is, as we have seen with sir david amess, a lot of people hold different surgeries in different parts — different surgeries in different parts of— different surgeries in different parts of constituency. around westminster there is a lot of security _ westminster there is a lot of security. if you look down the street — security. if you look down the street. there is a heavily armed police _ street. there is a heavily armed police presence. that is always the case on _ police presence. that is always the case on downing street and on the houses— case on downing street and on the houses of— case on downing street and on the houses of parliament. but the most important _ houses of parliament. but the most important thing that mps do is speaking directly to the people that they represent out there in the country — they represent out there in the country. that is a far more difficult _ country. that is a far more difficult issue. some mps saying today— difficult issue. some mps saying today that now is the time to stop face to— today that now is the time to stop face to face meetings, go back to what _ face to face meetings, go back to what they— face to face meetings, go back to what they were doing during the pmd. one what they were doing during the pmd. 0he mp _ what they were doing during the pmd. 0he mp -- _ what they were doing during the pmd. one mp —— pandemic one mp gave aid to one— one mp —— pandemic one mp gave aid to one person— one mp —— pandemic one mp gave aid to one person after an attack. but some _ to one person after an attack. but some mps— to one person after an attack. but some mps are reluctant to do that, because _ some mps are reluctant to do that, because they see it as an important part of— because they see it as an important part of their— because they see it as an important part of theirjob. because they see it as an important part of theirjob-— because they see it as an important part of theirjob.
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part of their 'ob. many mps say that face to face — part of theirjob. many mps say that face to face contact, _ part of theirjob. many mps say that face to face contact, that _ part of theirjob. many mps say that face to face contact, that grass - face to face contact, that grass roots awareness that those who elect them can sit before them is a corner stone of british democracy. it is. stone of british democracy. it is, es. stone of british democracy. it is, yes- there _ stone of british democracy. it is, yes- there is— stone of british democracy. it is, yes- there is a — stone of british democracy. it is, yes. there is a lot _ stone of british democracy. it is, yes. there is a lot going - stone of british democracy. it is, yes. there is a lot going on - stone of british democracy. it is, yes. there is a lot going on in . stone of british democracy. it is, yes. there is a lot going on in the world _ yes. there is a lot going on in the world at— yes. there is a lot going on in the world at the — yes. there is a lot going on in the world at the moment. we talk about a cost—of—living crisis, energy prices going _ cost—of—living crisis, energy prices going up. — cost—of—living crisis, energy prices going up, the end to the uplift in universal— going up, the end to the uplift in universal credit, mps need to get a sense _ universal credit, mps need to get a sense of— universal credit, mps need to get a sense of how their constituents feel about _ sense of how their constituents feel about these things. parliament has not been _ about these things. parliament has not been sitting, there have been party— not been sitting, there have been party conferences happening. there will be _ party conferences happening. there will be a _ party conferences happening. there will be a lot of conversations happening out there and the mps i speak— happening out there and the mps i speak to _ happening out there and the mps i speak to have enjoyed the fact they have been— speak to have enjoyed the fact they have been able to get back to doing the face _ have been able to get back to doing the face to— have been able to get back to doing the face to face contact. and of course — the face to face contact. and of course they will come back to parliament on monday and potentially raise some _ parliament on monday and potentially raise some of the concerns they have been hearing on the ground. is an important — been hearing on the ground. is an important part of our democratic process, — important part of our democratic process, but there is a balancing act between those make, making the mps safe _
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act between those make, making the mps safe to go about their work and the people _ mps safe to go about their work and the people around them, the staff members. — the people around them, the staff members, a lot of mps have family members— members, a lot of mps have family members working for them. there is clearly— members working for them. there is clearly a _ members working for them. there is clearly a lot — members working for them. there is clearly a lot of concern there that they can — clearly a lot of concern there that they can carry on doing their day—to—day work. they can carry on doing their day-to-day work.— they can carry on doing their day-to-day work. they can carry on doing their da -to-da work. ,,., ., ,, day-to-day work. peter saull, thank ou. we day-to-day work. peter saull, thank you- we saw — day-to-day work. peter saull, thank you- we saw the _ day-to-day work. peter saull, thank you. we saw the prime _ day-to-day work. peter saull, thank you. we saw the prime minister - day-to-day work. peter saull, thank you. we saw the prime minister and | you. we saw the prime minister and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, arriving at the scene in leigh—on—sea to lay flowers. yes in leigh-on-sea to lay flowers. yes outside in leigh—on—sea to lay flowers. is; outside belfairs methodist in leigh—on—sea to lay flowers. 193 outside belfairs methodist church. our correspondent is for us. that must have been an extraordinary thing to witness, the leader of the opposition, the prime minister, the home secretary in that quiet street paying tribute the morning after? yes it has been an extraordinary sort ofm — yes it has been an extraordinary sort of... you know moment of pause and reflection — sort of... you know moment of pause and reflection to see such significant politicians arrive on this quiet— significant politicians arrive on this quiet suburb ban street here in
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-- suburbah — this quiet suburb ban street here in —— suburban street, even here is very— —— suburban street, even here is very shocked, but a very easy going btace _ very shocked, but a very easy going place and _ very shocked, but a very easy going place and then rushing down this road _ place and then rushing down this road you — place and then rushing down this road you have the blue bank s flashing. _ road you have the blue bank s flashing, the diplomatic vehicles, the kind — flashing, the diplomatic vehicles, the kind of things you see in westminster every day, they rushed down _ westminster every day, they rushed down the _ westminster every day, they rushed down the road and there is the prime minister. _ down the road and there is the prime minister, borisjohnson, the lead er of the _ minister, borisjohnson, the lead er of the opposition, keir starmer and the home _ of the opposition, keir starmer and the home connectest secretary priti patel getting out and pausing and walking _ patel getting out and pausing and walking across to the church and laying _ walking across to the church and laying those flowers and having that moment _ laying those flowers and having that moment of reflection for this appalling crime. the interesting things— appalling crime. the interesting things we have seen the politicians coming _ things we have seen the politicians coming and paying respects, coming together, _ coming and paying respects, coming together, but there is a community that is— together, but there is a community that is coming together here behind me on— that is coming together here behind me on my— that is coming together here behind me on my right there are flowers biting _ me on my right there are flowers piling up— me on my right there are flowers piling up here. there a lot of flowers— piling up here. there a lot of flowers at— piling up here. there a lot of
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flowers at the conservative party headquarters. if you want to get a sense _ headquarters. if you want to get a sense of— headquarters. if you want to get a sense of how much sir david meant to his community, here are two bunches of flowers _ his community, here are two bunches of flowers. one from the national resistance — of flowers. one from the national resistance of iran, a refugee community that sir david spoke for for many— community that sir david spoke for for many years. they arrived to lay their— for many years. they arrived to lay their own — for many years. they arrived to lay their own flowers, saying that sir david _ their own flowers, saying that sir david was — their own flowers, saying that sir david was a hero for human rights. next _ david was a hero for human rights. next door— david was a hero for human rights. next door to those flowers, another small— next door to those flowers, another small bunch from surfers against sewage. — small bunch from surfers against sewage, from local surfers who thanked — sewage, from local surfers who thanked sir david for the time he put into— thanked sir david for the time he put into cleaning up the local waters~ — put into cleaning up the local waters~ it _ put into cleaning up the local waters. it is that spectrum of experience from the small matter to the international stage and now leading — the international stage and now leading politicians coming to pay their respects. i think it sums up their respects. i think it sums up the extraordinary feelings that people — the extraordinary feelings that
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people have about this terrible tragedy~ — people have about this terrible traced . ,:, . people have about this terrible traced. . ., tragedy. over night, police have declared this _ tragedy. over night, police have declared this a _ tragedy. over night, police have declared this a terrorist - tragedy. over night, police have| declared this a terrorist incident, bring us up—to—date and what we know as far as that investigation side of things. as far as that investigation side of thin . s. , as far as that investigation side of thins. , , :, as far as that investigation side of thins. , , ., ., as far as that investigation side of thins. , , ., ,:, ., ., things. this is an important moment, what it means — things. this is an important moment, what it means is _ things. this is an important moment, what it means is that _ things. this is an important moment, what it means is that the _ things. this is an important moment, what it means is that the counter - what it means is that the counter terrorism — what it means is that the counter terrorism policing machine can get into swing — terrorism policing machine can get into swing behind this operation. they— into swing behind this operation. they have — into swing behind this operation. they have so many resources, compared _ they have so many resources, compared to your average murder squad _ compared to your average murder squad the — compared to your average murder squad. the suspect who is in custody is a 25—year—old, he is a british nationat~ — is a 25—year—old, he is a british national. what those teams will be doing _ national. what those teams will be doing is— national. what those teams will be doing is interrogating his device, his mobile — doing is interrogating his device, his mobile phone and computer, they will be _ his mobile phone and computer, they will be at _ his mobile phone and computer, they will be at his home address and trying _ will be at his home address and trying to— will be at his home address and trying to go back in time, piece together— trying to go back in time, piece together any movements that were in the system, understanding what led to these _ the system, understanding what led to these dreadful events. we understand there have been two searches — understand there have been two searches in london. we are not quite sure where _ searches in london. we are not quite sure where they are, whether they are the _ sure where they are, whether they are the individual's property, we don't _ are the individual's property, we don't know— are the individual's property, we don't know about that. but certainly
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from the _ don't know about that. but certainly from the perspective of scotland yard, _ from the perspective of scotland yard, they say it is a terrorism charge, — yard, they say it is a terrorism charge, because there was evidence there _ charge, because there was evidence there was— charge, because there was evidence there was an islamist extremist motive. — there was an islamist extremist motive. so _ there was an islamist extremist motive, so they believe the attack, the dreadful death was the product of an ideological cause that sir david — of an ideological cause that sir david died, because somebody wanted to make _ david died, because somebody wanted to make a _ david died, because somebody wanted to make a political point and use viotence — to make a political point and use violence to— to make a political point and use violence to do so. that is where the investigation is. the police have a lot of— investigation is. the police have a lot of time — investigation is. the police have a lot of time to investigate. they could _ lot of time to investigate. they could re—arrest the suspect under the terrorism act, that gives them 14 the terrorism act, that gives them m davs _ the terrorism act, that gives them m days to— the terrorism act, that gives them 14 days to hold and question him. but this— 14 days to hold and question him. but this is— 14 days to hold and question him. but this is still in the early stages _ but this is still in the early stages and there is a lot of work, a lot of— stages and there is a lot of work, a lot of policing work to be done to work _ lot of policing work to be done to work out — lot of policing work to be done to work out how and why this happened. thank— work out how and why this happened. thank you _ work out how and why this happened. thank you. and we have seen those pictures of the prime minister and
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the leader of the opposition. normally they oppose each other in the house of commons. today they are should tore shoulder. a —— shoulder to shoulder. bud should tore shoulder. a -- shoulder to shoulder-— to shoulder. and this morning we have heard _ to shoulder. and this morning we have heard about _ to shoulder. and this morning we have heard about the _ to shoulder. and this morning we have heard about the music- to shoulder. and this morning we have heard about the music man | have heard about the music man project and he had been called a hero for refugees and he helped local surfers and we heard about him campaigning for the statue for dame vela lin. now the weather. good morning to highlands of scotland. this picture sums up the day, some cloud, some sunshine and most places dry. it has been a chilly start for some, particularly in northern england and southern scotland. the milder air is moving northward. we have some mist and fog and once that clears, in the
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afternoon some sunshine. also a few showers in southern scotland and eastern counties of england for a while. but most will be dry and more persistent rain arrives in northern ireland and western scotland later. it is a gentle breeze, but it is coming from the south and that is helping the milder air move northwards. it is not with you in northern england and scotland. tonight it could be a wet evening in northern ireland and scotland, that rain spreading into wales, northern england and the midlands. the top and tail of country should be dry and tail of country should be dry and not so contrasts the temperatures, milderfor most and not so contrasts the temperatures, milder for most and temperatures, milder for most and temperatures frost—free. tomorrow, if you're up early you could get a wet start. the exceptions being through the channel and the south, dry and bright here and dry and bright in the far north of scotland. in between the cloud should break to allow some sunshine. cloudy for the
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majority. but the afternoon drier than the morning and temperatures continue to rise and they will rise further into next week. i get tensing up and shivering when matt comes up with the weather. there is always that week when you go we are in. layered up it there is always that week when you go we are in. layered up— go we are in. layered up it that is oint go we are in. layered up it that is point where _ go we are in. layered up it that is point where we — go we are in. layered up it that is point where we take _ go we are in. layered up it that is point where we take stock - go we are in. layered up it that is point where we take stock with i go we are in. layered up it that is i point where we take stock with what is happening with covid. an investigation is underway at a private laboratory in wolverhampton, after it emerged around 43,000 people in england and wales may have been incorrectly told they didn't have coronavirus. joining now to discuss that story, and all the latest covid developments, is our regular saturday panel — virologist dr chris smith and professor of public health, linda bauld.
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linda, this lab issue. we have had a lot of people getting in touch, in fact we have got an e—mail from judo m, who says i'm one of the 43,000 people have had the wrong results, do i need to get another pcr done? what shall i do. this do i need to get another pcr done? what shall i do.— what shall i do. this is obviously a very worrying _ what shall i do. this is obviously a very worrying develop _ what shall i do. this is obviously a i very worrying develop westminster, we need _ very worrying develop westminster, we need to— very worrying develop westminster, we need to recognise the testing programme has been built up at scale and it— programme has been built up at scale and it is— programme has been built up at scale and it is very— programme has been built up at scale and it is very unfortunate to see one tab — and it is very unfortunate to see one lab implicated in what has been a quality— one lab implicated in what has been a quality control failure and there will be _ a quality control failure and there will be a — a quality control failure and there will be a thorough investigation. in terms _ will be a thorough investigation. in terms of— will be a thorough investigation. in terms ofjudo and the question, my understanding is what is happening is that— understanding is what is happening is that any— understanding is what is happening is that any test and trace is getting _ is that any test and trace is getting in contact with those that are affected, that have had a false negative, — are affected, that have had a false negative, over40,000 are affected, that have had a false negative, over 40,000 potential case: _ negative, over 40,000 potential case, and — negative, over 40,000 potential case, and people should get a text message _ case, and people should get a text message or be contacted in another
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way, and _ message or be contacted in another way, and they will be given instructions as to what to do. the false _ instructions as to what to do. the false negatives look like they run over some — false negatives look like they run over some period of time and they will probably be approaching people first who _ will probably be approaching people first who received that test recently. forthem first who received that test recently. for them coming forward to .et recently. for them coming forward to get a _ recently. for them coming forward to get a pcr_ recently. for them coming forward to get a pcr will be particularly important to retest if they have the virus _ important to retest if they have the virus they — important to retest if they have the virus. they may actually, because pcrs _ virus. they may actually, because pcrs are — virus. they may actually, because pcrs are pick up the genetic material— pcrs are pick up the genetic material for a time, it may be almost — material for a time, it may be almost all— material for a time, it may be almost all the people are offered a repeat— almost all the people are offered a repeat test. don't ring your gp, don't — repeat test. don't ring your gp, don't go _ repeat test. don't ring your gp, don't go to— repeat test. don't ring your gp, don't go to a testing centre, wait to be _ don't go to a testing centre, wait to be contacted and you will be given _ to be contacted and you will be given instructions that are tailored to you _ given instructions that are tailored to you. that is notjust in england, i to you. that is notjust in england, t have _ to you. that is notjust in england, t have seen— to you. that is notjust in england, t have seen a — to you. that is notjust in england, i have seen a message for people in wales— i have seen a message for people in wales who — i have seen a message for people in wales who may be affected. we think there is about — wales who may be affected. we think there is about 4,000 _ wales who may be affected. we think there is about 4,000 cases _ wales who may be affected. we think there is about 4,000 cases in - wales who may be affected. we think there is about 4,000 cases in wales. | there is about 4,000 cases in wales. it is a shame, because it could dent people's confidence in the testing system.
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people's confidence in the testing s stem. :, , :, people's confidence in the testing sstem. :, , :, ., :, ., system. that is from a behavioural perspective. _ system. that is from a behavioural perspective. i _ system. that is from a behavioural perspective, i would _ system. that is from a behavioural perspective, i would be _ system. that is from a behavioural perspective, i would be concerned| perspective, i would be concerned about— perspective, i would be concerned about that — perspective, i would be concerned about that and i'm involved with a study— about that and i'm involved with a study looking attesting and we are speaking _ study looking attesting and we are speaking to staff and students about the importance of coming forward for tests and _ the importance of coming forward for tests and the pcr tests are highly sensitive — tests and the pcr tests are highly sensitive and they can pick up whether— sensitive and they can pick up whether somebody is positive or not and we _ whether somebody is positive or not and we have seen also this week a reassuring — and we have seen also this week a reassuring study on the lateral—flow test, showing they can pick up people — test, showing they can pick up people who are infectious. we need to retain _ people who are infectious. we need to retain trust in the testing system _ to retain trust in the testing system. the most important thing all of us can— system. the most important thing all of us can go. — system. the most important thing all of us can go, particularly in the season— of us can go, particularly in the season of— of us can go, particularly in the season of colds and flu, is get a test if— season of colds and flu, is get a test if we — season of colds and flu, is get a test if we have the symptoms, so we can self—isolate and we are not spreading — can self—isolate and we are not spreading the virus around the community. please continue to get tested _ community. please continue to get tested while this investigation is under— tested while this investigation is under way. tested while this investigation is under wa . . tested while this investigation is under wa . , ., , :, tested while this investigation is under way-— tested while this investigation is underwa. , ., , :, :, under way. chris, a question for you from, dj, under way. chris, a question for you from. dj. one _ under way. chris, a question for you from, dj, one that _ under way. chris, a question for you from, dj, one that lots _ under way. chris, a question for you from, dj, one that lots of— under way. chris, a question for you from, dj, one that lots of people . from, dj, one that lots of people are thinking about at the moment.
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i think the best way to approach this is— i think the best way to approach this is to — i think the best way to approach this is to consider— i think the best way to approach this is to consider what - i think the best way to approach this is to consider what is - i think the best way to approach this is to consider what is the i this is to consider what is the effectiveness— this is to consider what is the effectiveness for— this is to consider what is the effectiveness for a _ this is to consider what is the effectiveness for a mask. - this is to consider what is the effectiveness for a mask. we| this is to consider what is the - effectiveness for a mask. we have .ot effectiveness for a mask. we have got good _ effectiveness for a mask. we have got good data _ effectiveness for a mask. we have got good data on— effectiveness for a mask. we have got good data on mask— effectiveness for a mask. we have got good data on mask and - effectiveness for a mask. we have got good data on mask and proper ppe. _ got good data on mask and proper ppe. wearing _ got good data on mask and proper ppe. wearing in— got good data on mask and proper ppe, wearing in hospitals, - got good data on mask and proper ppe, wearing in hospitals, the - got good data on mask and proper| ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn— ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn by— ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn by doctors— ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn by doctors and _ ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn by doctors and nurses, - ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe worn by doctors and nurses, whichj ppe, wearing in hospitals, the ppe . worn by doctors and nurses, which is a really— worn by doctors and nurses, which is a really closely—fitting _ worn by doctors and nurses, which is a really closely—fitting mask, - a really closely—fitting mask, combined _ a really closely—fitting mask, combined with— a really closely—fitting mask, combined with eye _ a really closely—fitting mask, | combined with eye protection a really closely—fitting mask, - combined with eye protection and other— combined with eye protection and other measures, _ combined with eye protection and other measures, such _ combined with eye protection and other measures, such as - combined with eye protection and other measures, such as aprons, | other measures, such as aprons, gtoves. _ other measures, such as aprons, gtoves. washing _ other measures, such as aprons, gloves, washing hands— other measures, such as aprons, gloves, washing hands properly. other measures, such as aprons, i gloves, washing hands properly and putting _ gloves, washing hands properly and putting people _ gloves, washing hands properly and putting people in _ gloves, washing hands properly and putting people in well— gloves, washing hands properly and putting people in well ventilated i putting people in well ventilated spaces~ — putting people in well ventilated spaces. these _ putting people in well ventilated spaces. these measures - putting people in well ventilated spaces. these measures work. i putting people in well ventilated i spaces. these measures work. when you're _ spaces. these measures work. when you're on— spaces. these measures work. when you're on public— spaces. these measures work. when you're on public transport, _ spaces. these measures work. when you're on public transport, if- you're on public transport, if you're — you're on public transport, if you're not— you're on public transport, if you're not wearing _ you're on public transport, if you're not wearing ppe, i you're on public transport, if you're not wearing ppe, the| you're on public transport, if- you're not wearing ppe, the masks and face _ you're not wearing ppe, the masks and face coverings _ you're not wearing ppe, the masks and face coverings are _ you're not wearing ppe, the masks and face coverings are not - you're not wearing ppe, the masks and face coverings are not so i you're not wearing ppe, the masks| and face coverings are not so much there _ and face coverings are not so much there to _ and face coverings are not so much there to protect— and face coverings are not so much there to protect the _ and face coverings are not so much there to protect the wearer, - and face coverings are not so much there to protect the wearer, as i there to protect the wearer, as those — there to protect the wearer, as those around _ there to protect the wearer, as those around them _ there to protect the wearer, as those around them from - there to protect the wearer, as those around them from the i there to protect the wearer, as i those around them from the wearer. the rationale —
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those around them from the wearer. the rationale is _ those around them from the wearer. the rationale is as _ those around them from the wearer. the rationale is as we _ those around them from the wearer. the rationale is as we breath, - those around them from the wearer. the rationale is as we breath, we i the rationale is as we breath, we breathe _ the rationale is as we breath, we breathe out — the rationale is as we breath, we breathe out moisture _ the rationale is as we breath, we breathe out moisture where i the rationale is as we breath, we breathe out moisture where the i the rationale is as we breath, we i breathe out moisture where the virus is and _ breathe out moisture where the virus is and some — breathe out moisture where the virus is and some will— breathe out moisture where the virus is and some will have _ breathe out moisture where the virus is and some will have virus _ is and some will have virus particles _ is and some will have virus particles in _ is and some will have virus particles in and _ is and some will have virus particles in and they- is and some will have virus particles in and they go i is and some will have virusl particles in and they go into is and some will have virus i particles in and they go into the air and — particles in and they go into the airand others— particles in and they go into the air and others can _ particles in and they go into the air and others can breathe i particles in and they go into the | air and others can breathe them particles in and they go into the i air and others can breathe them in. and so— air and others can breathe them in. and so if— air and others can breathe them in. and so if you — air and others can breathe them in. and so if you put _ air and others can breathe them in. and so if you put something - air and others can breathe them in. and so if you put something in- air and others can breathe them in. and so if you put something in the| and so if you put something in the way it— and so if you put something in the way it does— and so if you put something in the way it does help _ and so if you put something in the way it does help to _ and so if you put something in the way it does help to soak— and so if you put something in the way it does help to soak up - and so if you put something in the way it does help to soak up the i way it does help to soak up the particles — way it does help to soak up the particles and _ way it does help to soak up the particles and reduces _ way it does help to soak up the particles and reduces the i way it does help to soak up the i particles and reduces the infectious dose that— particles and reduces the infectious dose that you're _ particles and reduces the infectious dose that you're dispensing - particles and reduces the infectious dose that you're dispensing into i particles and reduces the infectious| dose that you're dispensing into the environment — dose that you're dispensing into the environment. because _ dose that you're dispensing into the environment. because these - dose that you're dispensing into the i environment. because these coverings are not— environment. because these coverings are not there _ environment. because these coverings are not there to— environment. because these coverings are not there to protect _ environment. because these coverings are not there to protect you _ environment. because these coverings are not there to protect you as - environment. because these coverings are not there to protect you as the - are not there to protect you as the wearer, _ are not there to protect you as the wearer, because _ are not there to protect you as the wearer, because they— are not there to protect you as the wearer, because they don't - are not there to protect you as the wearer, because they don't work. are not there to protect you as the . wearer, because they don't work like that, _ wearer, because they don't work like that you _ wearer, because they don't work like that. you should _ wearer, because they don't work like that, you should not— wearer, because they don't work like that, you should not go— wearer, because they don't work like that, you should not go about - wearer, because they don't work like that, you should not go about your. that, you should not go about your business _ that, you should not go about your business thinking _ that, you should not go about your business thinking that _ that, you should not go about your business thinking that by- that, you should not go about your business thinking that by doing - that, you should not go about yourl business thinking that by doing that you're _ business thinking that by doing that you're protecting _ business thinking that by doing that you're protecting yourself— business thinking that by doing that you're protecting yourself so - business thinking that by doing that you're protecting yourself so muchi you're protecting yourself so much as protect — you're protecting yourself so much as protect others. _ you're protecting yourself so much as protect others. it— you're protecting yourself so much as protect others. it is— you're protecting yourself so much as protect others. it is personal. as protect others. it is personal choice — as protect others. it is personal choice and _ as protect others. it is personal choice and your— as protect others. it is personal choice and your own _ as protect others. it is personal choice and your own risk - as protect others. it is personal- choice and your own riskjudgment. if choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're _ choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in — choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a — choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a space _ choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a space with _ choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a space with a _ choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a space with a lot - choice and your own riskjudgment. if you're in a space with a lot of- if you're in a space with a lot of people. — if you're in a space with a lot of people. your— if you're in a space with a lot of people. your risk— if you're in a space with a lot of people, your risk has _ if you're in a space with a lot of people, your risk has gone - if you're in a space with a lot of people, your risk has gone up i if you're in a space with a lot ofi people, your risk has gone up of spreading — people, your risk has gone up of spreading coronavirus _ people, your risk has gone up of spreading coronavirus and - people, your risk has gone up of spreading coronavirus and you . people, your risk has gone up of. spreading coronavirus and you may want _ spreading coronavirus and you may want to— spreading coronavirus and you may want to change _ spreading coronavirus and you may want to change your _ spreading coronavirus and you may want to change your behaviour- spreading coronavirus and you may want to change your behaviour and| want to change your behaviour and wear _ want to change your behaviour and wear a _ want to change your behaviour and wear a face — want to change your behaviour and wear a face covering _ want to change your behaviour and wear a face covering to _ want to change your behaviour and wear a face covering to protect - wear a face covering to protect others — wear a face covering to protect others or— wear a face covering to protect others or choose _ wear a face covering to protect others or choose to _ wear a face covering to protect others or choose to travel- wear a face covering to protect others or choose to travel at. wear a face covering to protect - others or choose to travel at other tintes— others or choose to travel at other times of— others or choose to travel at other times of the — others or choose to travel at other times of the day— others or choose to travel at other times of the day or _ others or choose to travel at other times of the day or in _ others or choose to travel at other times of the day or in a _ others or choose to travel at other times of the day or in a different l times of the day or in a different way _ times of the day or in a different wa . . , times of the day or in a different wa . ., , , ~' , , ., times of the day or in a different wa. ., , ., way. that is why keeping your hands clean and keeping _
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way. that is why keeping your hands clean and keeping social— way. that is why keeping your hands clean and keeping social distance, . clean and keeping social distance, thatis clean and keeping social distance, that is probably more important than you wearing a mask?— you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the _ you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the day, _ you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the day, if— you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the day, if you _ you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the day, if you think- you wearing a mask? that's right. at the end of the day, if you think you | the end of the day, if you think you might— the end of the day, if you think you might have — the end of the day, if you think you might have the _ the end of the day, if you think you might have the infection, _ the end of the day, if you think you might have the infection, you - might have the infection, you shouldn't— might have the infection, you shouldn't be _ might have the infection, you shouldn't be travelling - might have the infection, you| shouldn't be travelling around giving — shouldn't be travelling around giving it — shouldn't be travelling around giving it to _ shouldn't be travelling around giving it to other— shouldn't be travelling around giving it to other people - shouldn't be travelling around giving it to other people and i shouldn't be travelling around . giving it to other people and you should _ giving it to other people and you should be — giving it to other people and you should be getting _ giving it to other people and you should be getting a _ giving it to other people and you should be getting a test - giving it to other people and you should be getting a test and - should be getting a test and isolating _ should be getting a test and isolating if— should be getting a test and isolating. if you're _ should be getting a test and i isolating. if you're concerned should be getting a test and - isolating. if you're concerned about your own _ isolating. if you're concerned about your own personal— isolating. if you're concerned about your own personal safety— isolating. if you're concerned about your own personal safety and - isolating. if you're concerned about your own personal safety and if- isolating. if you're concerned about your own personal safety and if you were _ your own personal safety and if you were to _ your own personal safety and if you were to catch — your own personal safety and if you were to catch the _ your own personal safety and if you were to catch the infection - your own personal safety and if you were to catch the infection and - your own personal safety and if you were to catch the infection and this| were to catch the infection and this is an— were to catch the infection and this is an important— were to catch the infection and this is an important point— were to catch the infection and this is an important point about - is an important point about pregnancy, _ is an important point about pregnancy, the _ is an important point about pregnancy, the other- is an important point about pregnancy, the other big. is an important point about. pregnancy, the other big news is an important point about - pregnancy, the other big news story has been _ pregnancy, the other big news story has been that— pregnancy, the other big news story has been that there _ pregnancy, the other big news story has been that there have _ pregnancy, the other big news story has been that there have been, - pregnancy, the other big news story has been that there have been, the| has been that there have been, the announcement _ has been that there have been, the announcement from _ has been that there have been, the announcement from the _ has been that there have been, the. announcement from the government that significant — announcement from the government that significant numbers _ announcement from the government that significant numbers of _ announcement from the government that significant numbers of pregnant| that significant numbers of pregnant women _ that significant numbers of pregnant women and — that significant numbers of pregnant women and one _ that significant numbers of pregnant women and one doctor— that significant numbers of pregnant women and one doctor i _ that significant numbers of pregnant women and one doctor i spoke - that significant numbers of pregnant women and one doctor i spoke to, l women and one doctor i spoke to, said hundreds _ women and one doctor i spoke to, said hundreds of— women and one doctor i spoke to, said hundreds of pregnant- women and one doctor i spoke to, said hundreds of pregnant women| women and one doctor i spoke to, - said hundreds of pregnant women are ending _ said hundreds of pregnant women are ending up _ said hundreds of pregnant women are ending up in _ said hundreds of pregnant women are ending up in hospital— said hundreds of pregnant women are ending up in hospital with _ ending up in hospital with coronavirus— ending up in hospital with coronavirus and _ ending up in hospital with coronavirus and the - ending up in hospital with . coronavirus and the majority unvaccinated. _ coronavirus and the majority unvaccinated. this _ coronavirus and the majority unvaccinated. this tells - coronavirus and the majority unvaccinated. this tells you | coronavirus and the majority. unvaccinated. this tells you we coronavirus and the majority- unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious— unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious about _ unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious about this _ unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious about this f— unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious about this f you - unvaccinated. this tells you we must be cautious about this f you are - be cautious about this f you are pregnant — be cautious about this f you are pregnant you _ be cautious about this f you are pregnant you are _ be cautious about this f you are pregnant, you are at— be cautious about this f you are pregnant, you are at high- be cautious about this f you are pregnant, you are at high risk. be cautious about this f you are i pregnant, you are at high risk of coronavirus _ pregnant, you are at high risk of coronavirus infection. _ pregnant, you are at high risk of| coronavirus infection. something like one — coronavirus infection. something like one in— coronavirus infection. something like one in five _ coronavirus infection. something like one in five women— coronavirus infection. something like one in five women who - coronavirus infection. something like one in five women who end i coronavirus infection. something i like one in five women who end up coronavirus infection. something - like one in five women who end up in hospital— like one in five women who end up in hospital with — like one in five women who end up in hospital with coronavirus _ like one in five women who end up in hospital with coronavirus will- like one in five women who end up in hospital with coronavirus will need i hospital with coronavirus will need breathing — hospital with coronavirus will need breathing support— hospital with coronavirus will need breathing support and _ hospital with coronavirus will need breathing support and one - hospital with coronavirus will need breathing support and one in - hospital with coronavirus will need breathing support and one in ten i hospital with coronavirus will need i breathing support and one in ten may end up— breathing support and one in ten may end up in— breathing support and one in ten may end up in intensive _ breathing support and one in ten may end up in intensive care _ breathing support and one in ten may end up in intensive care and - breathing support and one in ten may end up in intensive care and it- breathing support and one in ten may end up in intensive care and it has-
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end up in intensive care and it has risks— end up in intensive care and it has risks for— end up in intensive care and it has risks for your _ end up in intensive care and it has risks for your unborn— end up in intensive care and it has risks for your unborn baby. - end up in intensive care and it has risks for your unborn baby. so - end up in intensive care and it has risks for your unborn baby. so if. risks for your unborn baby. so if you are — risks for your unborn baby. so if you are pregnant _ risks for your unborn baby. so if you are pregnant, please - risks for your unborn baby. so if you are pregnant, please get. you are pregnant, please get vaccinated — you are pregnant, please get vaccinated and _ you are pregnant, please get vaccinated and that - you are pregnant, please get vaccinated and that may- you are pregnant, please get vaccinated and that may alsoj you are pregnant, please get- vaccinated and that may also shift you risk— vaccinated and that may also shift you risk assessment _ vaccinated and that may also shift you risk assessment or— vaccinated and that may also shift you risk assessment or your - vaccinated and that may also shift i you risk assessment or your thinking about— you risk assessment or your thinking about how— you risk assessment or your thinking about how you — you risk assessment or your thinking about how you do— you risk assessment or your thinking about how you do or— you risk assessment or your thinking about how you do or don't _ you risk assessment or your thinking about how you do or don't use - you risk assessment or your thinking about how you do or don't use public transport _ about how you do or don't use public transport or— about how you do or don't use public transport or visit— about how you do or don't use public transport or visit places _ about how you do or don't use public transport or visit places where - transport or visit places where there — transport or visit places where there will— transport or visit places where there will be _ transport or visit places where there will be lots _ transport or visit places where there will be lots of— transport or visit places where there will be lots of people. i there will be lots of people. staying _ there will be lots of people. staying with _ there will be lots of people. staying with vaccination, i there will be lots of people. staying with vaccination, a i there will be lots of people. - staying with vaccination, a question from sue. she has her vaccinations mounting up. a great question from sue. we touched — a great question from sue. we touched on this last week when nina and i touched on this last week when nina and i were _ touched on this last week when nina and i were dis cussing the last question _ and i were dis cussing the last question. so there is 45 million people — question. so there is 45 million people eligible for a flu vaccine, including — people eligible for a flu vaccine, including teenagers, which is new, many— including teenagers, which is new, many of— including teenagers, which is new, many of us — including teenagers, which is new, many of us will get called, we have a fantastic— many of us will get called, we have a fantastic study that has looked at the issue _ a fantastic study that has looked at the issue that sue is concerned
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about— the issue that sue is concerned about and _ the issue that sue is concerned about and what they did is randomised people to receive the second _ randomised people to receive the second dose of the covid vaccine and the flu _ second dose of the covid vaccine and the flu vaccine and in different arms— the flu vaccine and in different arms and _ the flu vaccine and in different arms and people had them three to four weeks— arms and people had them three to four weeks apart arms and people had them three to fourweeks apart and arms and people had them three to four weeks apart and they will looking — four weeks apart and they will looking at are their side effect and do either— looking at are their side effect and do either vaccine get affected. there — do either vaccine get affected. there may be more side effects if you get— there may be more side effects if you get both at the same time, but minimal~ _ you get both at the same time, but minimal. some people feel feverish. it minimal. some people feel feverish. it was _ minimal. some people feel feverish. it was safe _ minimal. some people feel feverish. it was safe to do so. it depends which _ it was safe to do so. it depends which group you're in the population, sue might have a relative — population, sue might have a relative in a nursing home, here in scotland _ relative in a nursing home, here in scotland they're receiving them in the same — scotland they're receiving them in the same visit. if she is in the community, she should feel confident to come _ community, she should feel confident to come forward and it has been tested — to come forward and it has been tested. . to come forward and it has been tested. , ., , ., , .,, to come forward and it has been tested. , ., , ., , . tested. chris, lots of people are oorl , tested. chris, lots of people are
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poorly. they _ tested. chris, lots of people are poorly, they have _ tested. chris, lots of people are poorly, they have done - tested. chris, lots of people are poorly, they have done the - tested. chris, lots of people are | poorly, they have done the covid test and it is not covid, they have tested again and it is still not covid, but they feel it is the worst cold they have had. is there a link that we have been separated and colds are worse, or do theyjust feel worse? colds are worse, or do they 'ust feel worsevfi colds are worse, or do they 'ust feelworse? ., , . , , . feel worse? colds always surge at this time of— feel worse? colds always surge at this time of year. _ feel worse? colds always surge at this time of year. for _ feel worse? colds always surge at this time of year. for reasons - feel worse? colds always surge at this time of year. for reasons like the school— this time of year. for reasons like the school clear— this time of year. for reasons like the school clear and _ this time of year. for reasons like the school clear and people - this time of year. for reasons like the school clear and people back. this time of year. for reasons like i the school clear and people back in school— the school clear and people back in school and — the school clear and people back in school and indoors. _ the school clear and people back in school and indoors. the _ the school clear and people back in school and indoors. the other- the school clear and people back in| school and indoors. the other point is the _ school and indoors. the other point is the weather _ school and indoors. the other point is the weather is _ school and indoors. the other point is the weather is closing _ school and indoors. the other point is the weather is closing in, - school and indoors. the other point is the weather is closing in, it - is the weather is closing in, it gets— is the weather is closing in, it gets colder— is the weather is closing in, it gets colder and _ is the weather is closing in, it gets colder and people - is the weather is closing in, it gets colder and people spendj is the weather is closing in, it - gets colder and people spend more time indoors — gets colder and people spend more time indoors with _ gets colder and people spend more time indoors with the _ gets colder and people spend more time indoors with the doors - gets colder and people spend more time indoors with the doors and - time indoors with the doors and windows— time indoors with the doors and windows closed. _ time indoors with the doors and windows closed. all— time indoors with the doors and windows closed. all these - time indoors with the doors and i windows closed. all these factors encourage — windows closed. all these factors encourage the _ windows closed. all these factors encourage the spread _ windows closed. all these factors encourage the spread of- windows closed. all these factorsi encourage the spread of infections and we _ encourage the spread of infections and we get — encourage the spread of infections and we get a — encourage the spread of infections and we get a surge _ encourage the spread of infections and we get a surge in _ encourage the spread of infections and we get a surge in infections, l and we get a surge in infections, common— and we get a surge in infections, common colds. _ and we get a surge in infections, common colds, at _ and we get a surge in infections, common colds, at this _ and we get a surge in infections, common colds, at this time - and we get a surge in infections, common colds, at this time of. and we get a surge in infections, i common colds, at this time of year. there _ common colds, at this time of year. there is— common colds, at this time of year. there is an — common colds, at this time of year. there is an extra _ common colds, at this time of year. there is an extra factor, _ common colds, at this time of year. there is an extra factor, that - there is an extra factor, that because _ there is an extra factor, that because of— there is an extra factor, that because of the _ there is an extra factor, that because of the measures - there is an extra factor, thatj because of the measures put there is an extra factor, that. because of the measures put in there is an extra factor, that - because of the measures put in place fort control— because of the measures put in place fort control of— because of the measures put in place fort control of coronavirus _ because of the measures put in place fort control of coronavirus and - fort control of coronavirus and because — fort control of coronavirus and because the _ fort control of coronavirus and because the viruss _ fort control of coronavirus and because the viruss are - fort control of coronavirus and because the viruss are spreadi fort control of coronavirus and i because the viruss are spread in fort control of coronavirus and - because the viruss are spread in the
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same _ because the viruss are spread in the same way, — because the viruss are spread in the same way, colds— because the viruss are spread in the same way, colds have _ because the viruss are spread in the same way, colds have become - because the viruss are spread in the same way, colds have become rarerj same way, colds have become rarer and the _ same way, colds have become rarer and the average _ same way, colds have become rarer and the average person _ same way, colds have become rarer and the average person would - same way, colds have become rarer and the average person would catch three _ and the average person would catch three or— and the average person would catch three or four— and the average person would catch three or four colds _ and the average person would catch three or four colds a _ and the average person would catch three or four colds a year, - and the average person would catch three or four colds a year, many- three or four colds a year, many have _ three or four colds a year, many have said — three or four colds a year, many have said they— three or four colds a year, many have said they haven't _ three or four colds a year, many have said they haven't had - three or four colds a year, many have said they haven't had a - three or four colds a year, manyi have said they haven't had a cold since _ have said they haven't had a cold since the — have said they haven't had a cold since the start _ have said they haven't had a cold since the start of— have said they haven't had a cold since the start of the _ have said they haven't had a cold since the start of the measures l have said they haven't had a cold . since the start of the measures and now we _ since the start of the measures and now we are — since the start of the measures and now we are coming _ since the start of the measures and now we are coming back— since the start of the measures and now we are coming back together l since the start of the measures and . now we are coming back together and these _ now we are coming back together and these things _ now we are coming back together and these things are — now we are coming back together and these things are returning _ now we are coming back together and these things are returning with - now we are coming back together and these things are returning with a - these things are returning with a vengeance, _ these things are returning with a vengeance, perhaps _ these things are returning with a vengeance, perhaps people - these things are returning with a| vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten — vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten what _ vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten what a _ vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten what a cold _ vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten what a cold is - vengeance, perhaps people have forgotten what a cold is like, - vengeance, perhaps people have| forgotten what a cold is like, that is part— forgotten what a cold is like, that is part of— forgotten what a cold is like, that is part of it — forgotten what a cold is like, that is part of it a _ forgotten what a cold is like, that is part of it, a psychological- is part of it, a psychological thing — is part of it, a psychological thing we _ is part of it, a psychological thing. we have _ is part of it, a psychological thing. we have used - is part of it, a psychological thing. we have used to- is part of it, a psychological. thing. we have used to feeling healthy — thing. we have used to feeling healthy the _ thing. we have used to feeling healthy. the other— thing. we have used to feeling healthy. the other is - thing. we have used to feeling healthy. the other is that - thing. we have used to feeling healthy. the other is that we l thing. we have used to feeling - healthy. the other is that we have seen _ healthy. the other is that we have seen our— healthy. the other is that we have seen our immunity— healthy. the other is that we have seen our immunity slip. _ healthy. the other is that we have seen our immunity slip. because i healthy. the other is that we have - seen our immunity slip. because when we encounter— seen our immunity slip. because when we encounter these _ seen our immunity slip. because when we encounter these things, _ seen our immunity slip. because when we encounter these things, you - seen our immunity slip. because when we encounter these things, you don't. we encounter these things, you don't always— we encounter these things, you don't always catch — we encounter these things, you don't always catch them _ we encounter these things, you don't always catch them viz _ we encounter these things, you don't always catch them viz fwli. _ we encounter these things, you don't always catch them viz fwli. if- we encounter these things, you don't always catch them viz fwli. if you - always catch them viz fwli. if you have _ always catch them viz fwli. if you have -- — always catch them viz fwli. if you have -- visibly~ _ always catch them viz fwli. if you have —— visibly. if— always catch them viz fwli. if you have —— visibly. if you're - always catch them viz fwli. if you i have —— visibly. if you're something similar— have —— visibly. if you're something similar to _ have —— visibly. if you're something similar to that— have —— visibly. if you're something similar to that particular— have —— visibly. if you're something similar to that particular form - have —— visibly. if you're something similar to that particular form of. similar to that particular form of the cold — similar to that particular form of the cold virus _ similar to that particular form of the cold virus before, _ similar to that particular form of the cold virus before, then - similar to that particular form of the cold virus before, then it- similar to that particular form of. the cold virus before, then it may stop you — the cold virus before, then it may stop you getting _ the cold virus before, then it may stop you getting obvious - the cold virus before, then it may. stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you _ stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you may— stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you may feel— stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you may feel tired, _ stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you may feel tired, but - stop you getting obvious symptoms, but you may feel tired, but you've . but you may feel tired, but you've caught— but you may feel tired, but you've caught it — but you may feel tired, but you've caught it and _ but you may feel tired, but you've caught it and you _ but you may feel tired, but you've caught it and you have _ but you may feel tired, but you've caught it and you have topped - but you may feel tired, but you've caught it and you have topped upi caught it and you have topped up your immunity. _ caught it and you have topped up your immunity, if— caught it and you have topped up your immunity, if that _ caught it and you have topped up your immunity, if that hasn't- caught it and you have topped upi your immunity, if that hasn't been
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happening. — your immunity, if that hasn't been happening. which _ your immunity, if that hasn't been happening, which it— your immunity, if that hasn't been happening, which it hasn't, - your immunity, if that hasn't been happening, which it hasn't, your. happening, which it hasn't, your response — happening, which it hasn't, your response has— happening, which it hasn't, your response has slipped _ happening, which it hasn't, your response has slipped and - happening, which it hasn't, your response has slipped and it - happening, which it hasn't, your response has slipped and it is i happening, which it hasn't, your. response has slipped and it is less good _ response has slipped and it is less good and — response has slipped and it is less good and you're _ response has slipped and it is less good and you're more _ response has slipped and it is less good and you're more likely- response has slipped and it is less good and you're more likely more | response has slipped and it is less. good and you're more likely more of the time _ good and you're more likely more of the time to— good and you're more likely more of the time to succumb— good and you're more likely more of the time to succumb to _ good and you're more likely more of the time to succumb to other- good and you're more likely more of the time to succumb to other things| the time to succumb to other things and lots _ the time to succumb to other things and lots of— the time to succumb to other things and lots of people _ the time to succumb to other things and lots of people are _ the time to succumb to other things and lots of people are getting - the time to succumb to other things and lots of people are getting stuffi and lots of people are getting stuff and lots of people are getting stuff and there — and lots of people are getting stuff and there is— and lots of people are getting stuff and there is a— and lots of people are getting stuff and there is a helping _ and lots of people are getting stuff and there is a helping of— and there is a helping of psychology, _ and there is a helping of psychology, '— and there is a helping of psychology, i feel- and there is a helping of psychology, i feel ill - and there is a helping of psychology, i feel ill for| and there is a helping of. psychology, i feel ill for the and there is a helping of- psychology, i feel ill for the first time _ psychology, i feel ill for the first time in — psychology, i feel ill for the first time in ages— psychology, i feel ill for the first time in ages and _ psychology, i feel ill for the first time in ages and we _ psychology, i feel ill for the first time in ages and we have - psychology, i feel ill for the first time in ages and we have our. psychology, i feel ill for the first - time in ages and we have our immune system _ time in ages and we have our immune system less— time in ages and we have our immune system less robust _ time in ages and we have our immune system less robust. there _ time in ages and we have our immune system less robust. there is- time in ages and we have our immune system less robust. there is a - time in ages and we have our immune system less robust. there is a range i system less robust. there is a range of factors— system less robust. there is a range of factors causing _ system less robust. there is a range of factors causing that. _ with a sprinkling of man flu in there as well. {lit with a sprinkling of man flu in there as well.— with a sprinkling of man flu in there as well._ howj with a sprinkling of man flu in - there as well._ how dare there as well. of course. how dare ou! dail there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid — there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid cases _ there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid cases i _ there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid cases i now- there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid cases i now in - there as well. of course. how dare you! daily covid cases i now in the| you! daily covid cases i now in the 40,0005 and rising, deaths averaging in excess of 100 a day. steven suggests we are getting used to it. is this what we should expect living with the virus to look like? is this the new normal?—
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the new normal? there is a big debate, including _ the new normal? there is a big debate, including amongst - the new normal? there is a big debate, including amongst my| debate, including amongst my colleagues as to whether this level of mortality is acceptable or not, and you will find scientists who have different views. a group who think we are not out of the pandemic yet, we have fantastically effective vaccines, we are still seeing some mortality, it will probably settle down, and then another group saying, we have the worst cases around europe at the moment, about 145 people lost their lives just yesterday, this isn'tjust acceptable. and the government must do more. so there are differing views about this. it is a tough time, we are going into winter, and i would say two things. i do hope that from a policy perspective governments will do all they can, we need to keep up test and trace, the availability of testing, that public health response, and of course support our colleagues in the nhs and meanwhile the rest of us need to do our bit. and so that is wearing face coverings, distancing where
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possible, and the most important message, if you have got symptoms and you are unsure, go and get a test in self—isolate. so there will be enquiries but we are definitely not out of the woods yet. we have made huge progress and we need to be optimistic about that. linda made huge progress and we need to be optimistic about that.— optimistic about that. linda borden and dr chris — optimistic about that. linda borden and dr chris smith, _ optimistic about that. linda borden and dr chris smith, many _ optimistic about that. linda borden and dr chris smith, many thanks. l optimistic about that. linda borden i and dr chris smith, many thanks. and it has not go unnoticed, you are in your lab coat this week after linda called for a new tank top last week. it attracted negative sentiment, so it attracted negative sentiment, so ithought— it attracted negative sentiment, so ithought i— it attracted negative sentiment, so i thought i would _ it attracted negative sentiment, so i thought i would turn _ it attracted negative sentiment, so i thought i would turn up— it attracted negative sentiment, so i thought i would turn up in- it attracted negative sentiment, so i thought i would turn up in my- i thought i would turn up in my official— i thought i would turn up in my official naked _ i thought i would turn up in my official naked scientist - i thought i would turn up in my official naked scientist lab - i thought i would turn up in my| official naked scientist lab coat, luckily— official naked scientist lab coat, luckily not — official naked scientist lab coat, luckily not naked _ official naked scientist lab coat, luckily not naked underneath, l official naked scientist lab coat, . luckily not naked underneath, and official naked scientist lab coat, - luckily not naked underneath, and if you are _ luckily not naked underneath, and if you are disappointed _ luckily not naked underneath, and if you are disappointed about - luckily not naked underneath, and if you are disappointed about that, . luckily not naked underneath, and ifi you are disappointed about that, you would _ you are disappointed about that, you would be _ you are disappointed about that, you would be a _ you are disappointed about that, you would be a lot— you are disappointed about that, you would be a lot more _ you are disappointed about that, you would be a lot more disappointed - you are disappointed about that, you would be a lot more disappointed if. would be a lot more disappointed if i would be a lot more disappointed if iwasi _ i was! linda| i was! i linda is i was! - linda is glad iwasi — linda is glad that she can't see you! linda is glad that she can't see ou! . ., ., linda is glad that she can't see ou! . ., , you! on another occasion, perhaps. we are ready _ you! on another occasion, perhaps. we are ready for _ you! on another occasion, perhaps. we are ready for that, _ you! on another occasion, perhaps. we are ready for that, linda! - you! on another occasion, perhaps. we are ready for that, linda! we i we are ready for that, linda! we will talk about that next week. we start talking about your mask wearing, we finish with your over
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wearing. you like i liked your tank top. wearing. you like i liked your tank to. . ~' , ., wearing. you like i liked your tank to, ., ~' , ., , . wearing. you like i liked your tank to. ., , . ,, top. thank you very much. send me one ou top. thank you very much. send me one you like — top. thank you very much. send me one you like and _ top. thank you very much. send me one you like and i _ top. thank you very much. send me one you like and i will _ top. thank you very much. send me one you like and i will wear - top. thank you very much. send me one you like and i will wear it - top. thank you very much. send me one you like and i will wear it for. one you like and i will wear it for you next— one you like and i will wear it for you next week _ one you like and i will wear it for you next week.— one you like and i will wear it for you next week. there we go, it is all out there. _ you next week. there we go, it is all out there, almost _ you next week. there we go, it is all out there, almost literally. - all out there, almost literally. this is breakfast, what else could it be! we are on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning when matt tebbutt takes over. have you got your tank top? it is all getting a bit racy over the! we have no one make it here. we have the warily entertaining josh widdicombe. have the warily entertaining josh widdicombe.— have the warily entertaining josh widdicombe._ i i have the warily entertaining josh i widdicombe._ i feel widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to _ widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to bow. _ widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to bow. i— widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to bow. ifeel- widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to bow. i feel like - widdicombe. good morning. ifeel like i need to bow. i feel like you i like i need to bow. i feel like you do as well! _ like i need to bow. i feel like you do as well! we _ like i need to bow. i feel like you do as well! we will _ like i need to bow. i feel like you do as well! we will talk - like i need to bow. i feel like you do as well! we will talk about. like i need to bow. i feel like you i do as well! we will talk about who do you think— do as well! we will talk about who do you think you _ do as well! we will talk about who do you think you are? _ do as well! we will talk about who do you think you are? a - do as well! we will talk about who do you think you are? a bit - do as well! we will talk about who do you think you are? a bit laterl do you think you are? a bit later on. let's talk about your food heaven in food hell.— on. let's talk about your food heaven in food hell. food heaven, izza. heaven in food hell. food heaven, pizza- what _ heaven in food hell. food heaven, pizza- what is _ heaven in food hell. food heaven, pizza. what is wrong _ heaven in food hell. food heaven, pizza. what is wrong with - heaven in food hell. food heaven, pizza. what is wrong with that - pizza. what is wrong with that charisma _ pizza. what is wrong with that charisma it's a very popular thing.
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you are _ charisma it's a very popular thing. you are right. charisma it's a very popular thing. you are right-— you are right. spice, i love heat, is what is — you are right. spice, i love heat, is what is possible. _ you are right. spice, i love heat, is what is possible. and - you are right. spice, i love heat, is what is possible. and then - is what is possible. and then cheese, _ is what is possible. and then cheese, which is part of pizza. and what about — cheese, which is part of pizza. and what about hell? _ cheese, which is part of pizza. and what about hell? bland _ cheese, which is part of pizza. and what about hell? bland carries. . cheese, which is part of pizza. and what about hell? bland carries. so j what about hell? bland carries. so no heat there. _ what about hell? bland carries. so no heat there. eggs, _ what about hell? bland carries. so no heat there. eggs, don't - what about hell? bland carries. so no heat there. eggs, don't trust i what about hell? bland carries. so | no heat there. eggs, don't trust the way they— no heat there. eggs, don't trust the way they move. no heat there. eggs, don't trust the way they move-— way they move. don't trust an egg? and cauliflower _ way they move. don't trust an egg? and cauliflower rice _ way they move. don't trust an egg? and cauliflower rice is _ way they move. don't trust an egg? and cauliflower rice is the _ way they move. don't trust an egg? and cauliflower rice is the worst - and cauliflower rice is the worst invention — and cauliflower rice is the worst invention in the world, isn't it? quite _ invention in the world, isn't it? quite specific, then.— invention in the world, isn't it? quite specific, then. well, yeah. i went abroad _ quite specific, then. well, yeah. i went abroad with _ quite specific, then. well, yeah. i went abroad with pizza, _ quite specific, then. well, yeah. i went abroad with pizza, you - quite specific, then. well, yeah. i | went abroad with pizza, you laugh, now i_ went abroad with pizza, you laugh, now i am _ went abroad with pizza, you laugh, now i am too specific. make your mind _ now i am too specific. make your mind up! — now i am too specific. make your mind up! we now i am too specific. make your mind u! ~ . . now i am too specific. make your mindu! . . . now i am too specific. make your mindu! . . , mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenae mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just _ mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just to _ mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just to see _ mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just to see how _ mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just to see how good - mind up! we are also taking a chilly challenge just to see how good you | challenge just to see how good you are. glynn, what are you making? abs, are. glynn, what are you making? a bit of spice, i'm making a spiced potato— bit of spice, i'm making a spiced potato pakora _ bit of spice, i'm making a spiced potato pakora with _ bit of spice, i'm making a spiced potato pakora with chickpeas - bit of spice, i'm making a spiced| potato pakora with chickpeas and bit of spice, i'm making a spiced . potato pakora with chickpeas and a little lime — potato pakora with chickpeas and a little lime and _ potato pakora with chickpeas and a little lime and yoghurt _ potato pakora with chickpeas and a little lime and yoghurt dip. - potato pakora with chickpeas and a little lime and yoghurt dip. liking i little lime and yoghurt dip. liking the mustard _
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little lime and yoghurt dip. liking the mustard top. _ little lime and yoghurt dip. liking the mustard top. you _ little lime and yoghurt dip. liking the mustard top. you are - little lime and yoghurt dipm the mustard top. you are blending little lime and yoghurt dipw the mustard top. you are blending in with the wall! and your first time on the show, what have you got for us? abs. on the show, what have you got for us? �* , , on the show, what have you got for us? . , . ., us? a genoa sponge with flavoured milk poured — us? a genoa sponge with flavoured milk poured on _ us? a genoa sponge with flavoured milk poured on top _ us? a genoa sponge with flavoured milk poured on top with _ us? a genoa sponge with flavoured milk poured on top with some - us? a genoa sponge with flavoured i milk poured on top with some cream. delicious _ milk poured on top with some cream. delicious. when you have been drinking all week? professionally? yes! i have, all in the name of research, _ yes! i have, all in the name of research, and _ yes! i have, all in the name of research, and i'm— yes! i have, all in the name of research, and i'm very- yes! i have, all in the name of research, and i'm very excitedj yes! i have, all in the name of- research, and i'm very excited this week— research, and i'm very excited this week because _ research, and i'm very excited this week because i_ research, and i'm very excited this week because i get _ research, and i'm very excited this week because i get to— research, and i'm very excited this week because i get to eat - research, and i'm very excited this week because i get to eat cake, i research, and i'm very excited this. week because i get to eat cake, and i'm week because i get to eat cake, and i'm not— week because i get to eat cake, and i'm not complaining _ week because i get to eat cake, and i'm not complaining that— week because i get to eat cake, and i'm not complaining that i— week because i get to eat cake, and i'm not complaining that i don't- i'm not complaining that i don't often _ i'm not complaining that i don't often get — i'm not complaining that i don't often get puddings, _ i'm not complaining that i don't often get puddings, but - i'm not complaining that i don't often get puddings, but i - i'm not complaining that i don't often get puddings, but i was l i'm not complaining that i don't. often get puddings, but i was very excited _ often get puddings, but i was very excited to— often get puddings, but i was very excited to get _ often get puddings, but i was very excited to get cake _ often get puddings, but i was very excited to get cake this _ often get puddings, but i was very excited to get cake this week. - often get puddings, but i was very| excited to get cake this week. find excited to get cake this week. and thanks for the _ excited to get cake this week. thanks for the whatsapp excited to get cake this week.- thanks for the whatsapp message excited to get cake this week- thanks for the whatsapp message just before the show about not wearing leopard print. helen said, i before the show about not wearing leopard print. helen said, lam wearing leopard print, so make sure you don't! and i was going to! see you don't! and i was going to! see you at ten. you don't! and i was going to! see you at ten-— you don't! and i was going to! see ouatten. . . . you at ten. last minute panic change there for matt _ you at ten. last minute panic change there for matt. _ you at ten. last minute panic change there for matt, that's _ you at ten. last minute panic change there for matt, that's a _ you at ten. last minute panic change there for matt, that's a shame. - there for matt, that's a shame. mat and the saturday kitchen gang on bbc one from ten o'clock, as ever,
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putting a smile on people's faces as they cook. the time now is 9.35, and it has been a difficult 24 hours in the uk and in british politics following the fatal attack on the conservative mp sir david amess in essex. in the last half hour, the prime minister has visited the scene of yesterday's fatal attack on conservative mp, sir david amess. borisjohnson wasjoined by labour leader, sir keir starmer, and the home secretary priti patel at belfairs methodist church. the speaker of the house, sir lindsay hoyle, was there as well. they were among a number of visitors laying flowers and paying their tributes to sir david. police say they are treating the incident as a terrorist incident. they are searching several addresses, and a 25—year—old man
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remains in custody. we can speak now to lbc broadcaster and political commentator iain dale, and labour mp tanmanjeet singh dhesi who both knew sir david. and you were due to be with david, was it even last week you would —— last night you were due to be at a dinner with him? last night you were due to be at a dinnerwith him? i last night you were due to be at a dinner with him?— last night you were due to be at a dinner with him? i last saw him at the conservative _ dinner with him? i last saw him at the conservative conference, - dinner with him? i last saw him at the conservative conference, and| dinner with him? i last saw him at i the conservative conference, and he had his characteristic cheeky grin where he said, i'm looking forward to this dinner next friday because i can turn the tables on you, because he was going to beat me rather than the other way around, and we never got to do it. i got an e—mailfrom his constituency deputy chairman only 25 minutes after the incident happened, wanting to go ahead with the event, saying that was what he would want. but they didn't know how seriously hurt he was, and of course we all know what happened then. so it was an event that was destined
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never to be. i’m it was an event that was destined never to be— it was an event that was destined neverto be. �* , ., i. . never to be. i'm so sorry to you and all his friends _ never to be. i'm so sorry to you and all his friends and _ never to be. i'm so sorry to you and all his friends and family _ never to be. i'm so sorry to you and all his friends and family who - never to be. i'm so sorry to you and all his friends and family who have i all his friends and family who have joined us this morning talking about him. you mention to the cheeky grin at the beginning of your answer, and thatis at the beginning of your answer, and that is what so many people have talked about, a serious politician with an impish sense of humour, and its related ability when he got out and about with people. he its related ability when he got out and about with people.— and about with people. he really did, and i and about with people. he really did, and | first — and about with people. he really did, and i first got _ and about with people. he really did, and i first got to _ and about with people. he really did, and i first got to know - and about with people. he really did, and i first got to know him i and about with people. he really| did, and i first got to know him in did, and ifirst got to know him in the mid—19805 when he had just been elected in the first thatcher landslide in 1983, and i don't think you could quite believe he was there, because at that time it was very unusual for a working—class lad from the east end to get elected to parliament. nowadays there are lots of working—class conservative mps, he blazed a trail, and i have been like you listening to all the tributes that have been paid, and nobody has got a bad word to say about him. obviously in the circumstances you would hope that nobody would, but he was a great campaigner, and i'm sure tas would
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pay tribute to this, if you wanted to launch a campaign, sir david amess was one of the ones you would need on your side, because he knew how to run a great campaign. we all know about the campaign to make southend a city, and i hope that happens now because it would be the best legacy that he could leave if the government were to bring that about. but he had so many other campaigns, a real record of achievement, and there are lots of individual mps in the house of commons that you could say the same about, and it is such a shame that it is only at times like this that we have these conversations. perhaps we have these conversations. perhaps we ought to think about particularly we ought to think about particularly we in the media ought to think about maybe sometimes showcasing some of the good work that individual mps do rather than just concentrate on the political to—and—fro. it is rather than just concentrate on the political to-and-fro._ political to-and-fro. it is a good oint, political to-and-fro. it is a good point. because _ political to-and-fro. it is a good point, because there _ political to-and-fro. it is a good point, because there is - political to-and-fro. it is a good point, because there is so - political to-and-fro. it is a good point, because there is so much political to-and-fro. it is a good i point, because there is so much of it. and you went on a delegation with him over to qatar. was he one of those mps who put party colours
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aside? you represent labour and he was conservative. in order to get stuff done?— stuff done? first of all, i want to ex - ress stuff done? first of all, i want to express my _ stuff done? first of all, i want to express my heartfelt _ stuff done? first of all, i want to | express my heartfelt condolences stuff done? first of all, i want to - express my heartfelt condolences to the wife _ express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and — express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and family— express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and family of— express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and family of sir— express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and family of sir david - express my heartfelt condolences to the wife and family of sir david, - the wife and family of sir david, and i_ the wife and family of sir david, and i want — the wife and family of sir david, and i want to— the wife and family of sir david, and i want to pay— the wife and family of sir david, and i want to pay tribute - the wife and family of sir david, and i want to pay tribute to - the wife and family of sir david, | and i want to pay tribute to such the wife and family of sir david, . and i want to pay tribute to such an experienced — and i want to pay tribute to such an experienced and _ and i want to pay tribute to such an experienced and somebody- and i want to pay tribute to such an experienced and somebody with . and i want to pay tribute to such an i experienced and somebody with such intellect _ experienced and somebody with such intellect and — experienced and somebody with such intellect and warmth, _ experienced and somebody with such intellect and warmth, a _ intellect and warmth, a parliamentarian - intellect and warmth, a parliamentarian who i intellect and warmth, a | parliamentarian who cut intellect and warmth, a - parliamentarian who cut across intellect and warmth, a _ parliamentarian who cut across party lines and _ parliamentarian who cut across party lines and so — parliamentarian who cut across party lines and so many— parliamentarian who cut across party lines and so many occasions, - parliamentarian who cut across party lines and so many occasions, and . parliamentarian who cut across party lines and so many occasions, and as| lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly— lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly said. _ lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly said, just _ lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly said, just last _ lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly said, just last week, - lines and so many occasions, and as you rightly said, just last week, wei you rightly said, just last week, we were _ you rightly said, just last week, we were all— you rightly said, just last week, we were all together, _ you rightly said, just last week, we were all together, more _ you rightly said, just last week, we were all together, more than - you rightly said, just last week, we were all together, more than a - you rightly said, just last week, we i were all together, more than a dozen mps went— were all together, more than a dozen mps went along — were all together, more than a dozen mps went along to _ were all together, more than a dozen mps went along to qatar, _ were all together, more than a dozen mps went along to qatar, and - were all together, more than a dozen mps went along to qatar, and sir- mps went along to qatar, and sir david _ mps went along to qatar, and sir david amess. _ mps went along to qatar, and sir david amess, he _ mps went along to qatar, and sir david amess, he was _ mps went along to qatar, and sir david amess, he was the - mps went along to qatar, and sir. david amess, he was the chairman mps went along to qatar, and sir- david amess, he was the chairman of the all-party— david amess, he was the chairman of the all-party part _ david amess, he was the chairman of the all—party part and _ david amess, he was the chairman of the all—party part and to _ david amess, he was the chairman of the all—party part and to group - david amess, he was the chairman of the all—party part and to group on - the all—party part and to group on qatar. _ the all—party part and to group on qatar. and — the all—party part and to group on qatar. and he _ the all—party part and to group on qatar, and he led _ the all—party part and to group on qatar, and he led that _ the all—party part and to group on qatar, and he led that delegation| qatar, and he led that delegation with absolute _ qatar, and he led that delegation with absolute brilliance, - qatar, and he led that delegation with absolute brilliance, because| with absolute brilliance, because not only— with absolute brilliance, because not only was— with absolute brilliance, because not only was he _ with absolute brilliance, because not only was he able _ with absolute brilliance, because not only was he able to - with absolute brilliance, because not only was he able to cross - not only was he able to cross various — not only was he able to cross various issues, _ not only was he able to cross various issues, but— not only was he able to cross various issues, but he - not only was he able to cross various issues, but he made| various issues, but he made everybody— various issues, but he made everybody feel— various issues, but he made everybody feel a _ various issues, but he made everybody feel a part - various issues, but he made everybody feel a part of - various issues, but he madej everybody feel a part of that delegation. _ everybody feel a part of that delegation, and _ everybody feel a part of that delegation, and he - everybody feel a part of that delegation, and he didn't i everybody feel a part of thatj delegation, and he didn't try everybody feel a part of that i delegation, and he didn't try to basically— delegation, and he didn't try to basically to— delegation, and he didn't try to basically to influence _
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delegation, and he didn't try to . basically to influence proceedings or to _ basically to influence proceedings or to try— basically to influence proceedings or to try to — basically to influence proceedings or to try to dominate _ basically to influence proceedingsi or to try to dominate proceedings. he actually— or to try to dominate proceedings. he actually said, _ or to try to dominate proceedings. he actually said, you _ or to try to dominate proceedings. he actually said, you are - or to try to dominate proceedings. he actually said, you are the i or to try to dominate proceedings. . he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister. — he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister, we _ he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister, we are _ he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister, we are going - he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister, we are going to- he actually said, you are the shadow rail minister, we are going to see i rail minister, we are going to see the metro. — rail minister, we are going to see the metro, would _ rail minister, we are going to see the metro, would you _ rail minister, we are going to see the metro, would you like - rail minister, we are going to see the metro, would you like to- rail minister, we are going to see the metro, would you like to lead| rail minister, we are going to see i the metro, would you like to lead on this part _ the metro, would you like to lead on this part now— the metro, would you like to lead on this part now we _ the metro, would you like to lead on this part. now we are _ the metro, would you like to lead on this part. now we are going - the metro, would you like to lead on this part. now we are going to- the metro, would you like to lead on this part. now we are going to see l this part. now we are going to see the health— this part. now we are going to see the health minister, _ this part. now we are going to see the health minister, who- this part. now we are going to see the health minister, who would i this part. now we are going to see l the health minister, who would like to lead _ the health minister, who would like to lead on— the health minister, who would like to lead on this? _ the health minister, who would like to lead on this? now— the health minister, who would like to lead on this? now we _ the health minister, who would like to lead on this? now we are - the health minister, who would like to lead on this? now we are going. the health minister, who would like. to lead on this? now we are going to talk about— to lead on this? now we are going to talk about workers' _ to lead on this? now we are going to talk about workers' rights, _ to lead on this? now we are going to talk about workers' rights, which i to lead on this? now we are going to talk about workers' rights, which of i talk about workers' rights, which of the parliamentarians _ talk about workers' rights, which of the parliamentarians would - talk about workers' rights, which of the parliamentarians would like i talk about workers' rights, which of the parliamentarians would like to| the parliamentarians would like to lead on _ the parliamentarians would like to lead on that? _ the parliamentarians would like to lead on that? and _ the parliamentarians would like to lead on that? and that _ the parliamentarians would like to lead on that? and that was - the parliamentarians would like to lead on that? and that was his i lead on that? and that was his character. _ lead on that? and that was his character, and _ lead on that? and that was his character, and that _ lead on that? and that was his character, and that takes i lead on that? and that was his character, and that takes a i lead on that? and that was hisi character, and that takes a very special— character, and that takes a very special sort _ character, and that takes a very special sort of _ character, and that takes a very special sort of person _ character, and that takes a very special sort of person to - character, and that takes a very special sort of person to be i character, and that takes a very| special sort of person to be able character, and that takes a very i special sort of person to be able to do that, _ special sort of person to be able to do that, to — special sort of person to be able to do that, to bring _ special sort of person to be able to do that, to bring everybody- special sort of person to be able to do that, to bring everybody in - special sort of person to be able to do that, to bring everybody in and i do that, to bring everybody in and to harness — do that, to bring everybody in and to harness everybody's _ do that, to bring everybody in and to harness everybody's potential. do that, to bring everybody in and i to harness everybody's potential so that we _ to harness everybody's potential so that we get — to harness everybody's potential so that we get the _ to harness everybody's potential so that we get the most _ to harness everybody's potential so that we get the most possible - to harness everybody's potential so that we get the most possible out i to harness everybody's potential sol that we get the most possible out of that we get the most possible out of that delegation _ that we get the most possible out of that delegation as _ that we get the most possible out of that delegation as we _ that we get the most possible out of that delegation as we look— that we get the most possible out of that delegation as we look to - that we get the most possible out of that delegation as we look to fosteri that delegation as we look to foster greater— that delegation as we look to foster greater ties — that delegation as we look to foster greater ties between _ that delegation as we look to foster greater ties between our _ that delegation as we look to foster greater ties between our nations. . that delegation as we look to fosterl greater ties between our nations. is greater ties between our nations. as a greater ties between our nations. a sitting mp, there are questions now raised about your vulnerability coming face—to—face with constituents every week. should they be more protection? what needs to happen now? 5ir be more protection? what needs to happen now?— be more protection? what needs to happen now? sir david's surgery was ublished happen now? sir david's surgery was published on — happen now? sir david's surgery was published on twitter, _ happen now? sir david's surgery was published on twitter, everybody - happen now? sir david's surgery was| published on twitter, everybody knew about it. _ published on twitter, everybody knew about it. and — published on twitter, everybody knew about it, and mps _ published on twitter, everybody knew about it, and mps like _ published on twitter, everybody knew about it, and mps like myself, - published on twitter, everybody knew about it, and mps like myself, we - published on twitter, everybody knew about it, and mps like myself, we doi about it, and mps like myself, we do the same _ about it, and mps like myself, we do the same thing. _ about it, and mps like myself, we do the same thing, so _ about it, and mps like myself, we do the same thing, so anybody- about it, and mps like myself, we do the same thing, so anybody in - about it, and mps like myself, we do| the same thing, so anybody in slough
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can see _ the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me _ the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me without _ the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me without the _ the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me without the need - the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me without the need for- the same thing, so anybody in slough can see me without the need for an. can see me without the need for an appointment — can see me without the need for an appointment i_ can see me without the need for an appointment. i think— can see me without the need for an appointment. i think it _ can see me without the need for an appointment. i think it is _ can see me without the need for an appointment. i think it is very- appointment. i think it is very important _ appointment. i think it is very important that— appointment. i think it is very important that members - appointment. i think it is very important that members of. appointment. i think it is very- important that members of parliament in the _ important that members of parliament in the uk _ important that members of parliament in the uk shoutd — important that members of parliament in the uk should be _ important that members of parliament in the uk should be accessible - important that members of parliament in the uk should be accessible and - in the uk should be accessible and approachable _ in the uk should be accessible and approachable i_ in the uk should be accessible and approachable. i don't— in the uk should be accessible and approachable. i don't want - in the uk should be accessible and approachable. i don't want like - in the uk should be accessible andi approachable. i don't want like the situation _ approachable. i don't want like the situation in — approachable. idon't want like the situation in other— approachable. i don't want like the situation in other nations - approachable. i don't want like the situation in other nations where i situation in other nations where people — situation in other nations where people caut— situation in other nations where people can't even _ situation in other nations where people can't even get _ situation in other nations where people can't even get access i situation in other nations where people can't even get access to| people can't even get access to their— people can't even get access to their mps, — people can't even get access to their mps, or— people can't even get access to their mps, orthere_ people can't even get access to their mps, or there are - people can't even get access to their mps, or there are a - people can't even get access to their mps, or there are a large| their mps, or there are a large entourages_ their mps, or there are a large entourages over— their mps, or there are a large entourages over security- their mps, or there are a large - entourages over security personnel. that is _ entourages over security personnel. that is hot _ entourages over security personnel. that is hot the — entourages over security personnel. that is not the type _ entourages over security personnel. that is not the type of _ entourages over security personnel. that is not the type of democracy i that is not the type of democracy that we _ that is not the type of democracy that we want _ that is not the type of democracy that we want. so _ that is not the type of democracy that we want. so that's _ that is not the type of democracy that we want. so that's what - that is not the type of democracy that we want. so that's what i- that is not the type of democracy i that we want. so that's what i would say especially — that we want. so that's what i would say especially to _ that we want. so that's what i would say especially to the _ that we want. so that's what i would say especially to the keyboard - say especially to the keyboard warriors, _ say especially to the keyboard warriors, we _ say especially to the keyboard warriors, we need _ say especially to the keyboard warriors, we need to- say especially to the keyboard warriors, we need to bring - say especially to the keyboard . warriors, we need to bring down say especially to the keyboard - warriors, we need to bring down the bile warriors, we need to bring down the bite and _ warriors, we need to bring down the bite and the — warriors, we need to bring down the bile and the abuse _ warriors, we need to bring down the bile and the abuse which _ warriors, we need to bring down the bile and the abuse which is- warriors, we need to bring down the bile and the abuse which is often- bile and the abuse which is often experiehced _ bile and the abuse which is often experiehced by— bile and the abuse which is often experienced by those _ bile and the abuse which is often experienced by those in - bile and the abuse which is often experienced by those in public. bile and the abuse which is often. experienced by those in public life, because _ experienced by those in public life, because it — experienced by those in public life, because it will— experienced by those in public life, because it will deter— experienced by those in public life, because it will deter many- experienced by those in public life, because it will deter many good . because it will deter many good people — because it will deter many good people from _ because it will deter many good people from entering _ because it will deter many good people from entering politics, l because it will deter many good . people from entering politics, and because it will deter many good - people from entering politics, and i think it _ people from entering politics, and i think it is _ people from entering politics, and i think it is also _ people from entering politics, and i think it is also important _ people from entering politics, and i think it is also important that - people from entering politics, and i think it is also important that we i think it is also important that we inject _ think it is also important that we thect some _ think it is also important that we inject some care _ think it is also important that we inject some care and _ think it is also important that we. inject some care and compassion, think it is also important that we - inject some care and compassion, and we try— inject some care and compassion, and we try to _ inject some care and compassion, and we try to respect _ inject some care and compassion, and we try to respect the _ inject some care and compassion, and we try to respect the political - we try to respect the political differences— we try to respect the political differences that _ we try to respect the political differences that we _ we try to respect the political differences that we all - we try to respect the political differences that we all have, i we try to respect the political. differences that we all have, but we try to respect the political - differences that we all have, but at the same _ differences that we all have, but at the same time, _ differences that we all have, but at the same time, we _ differences that we all have, but at the same time, we respect - the same time, we respect everybody's _ the same time, we respect everybody's rights - the same time, we respect everybody's rights to - the same time, we respect everybody's rights to have i the same time, we respectl everybody's rights to have a difference _ everybody's rights to have a difference of _ everybody's rights to have a difference of opinion. - everybody's rights to have a difference of opinion. and . everybody's rights to have a i difference of opinion. and we everybody's rights to have a - difference of opinion. and we all know— difference of opinion. and we all know that — difference of opinion. and we all know that sir _ difference of opinion. and we all know that sir david _ difference of opinion. and we all know that sir david amess, - difference of opinion. and we all know that sir david amess, it i difference of opinion. and we all- know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what— know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what he — know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what he did _ know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what he did on _ know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what he did on the _ know that sir david amess, it wasn't just what he did on the green - just what he did on the green behches _ just what he did on the green behches ih _ just what he did on the green benches in the _ just what he did on the green benches in the chamber- just what he did on the green benches in the chamber and. just what he did on the green . benches in the chamber and that infectious — benches in the chamber and that infectious smile _ benches in the chamber and that infectious smile of— benches in the chamber and that infectious smile of his _ benches in the chamber and that infectious smile of his and - benches in the chamber and that infectious smile of his and his. infectious smile of his and his ability— infectious smile of his and his
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ability to— infectious smile of his and his ability to shoehorn _ infectious smile of his and his ability to shoehorn in - infectious smile of his and his ability to shoehorn in making| ability to shoehorn in making southend—on—sea _ ability to shoehorn in making southend—on—sea a - ability to shoehorn in making southend—on—sea a city- ability to shoehorn in making i southend—on—sea a city without getting — southend—on—sea a city without getting reprimanded _ southend—on—sea a city without getting reprimanded by- southend—on—sea a city without getting reprimanded by the - southend—on—sea a city without - getting reprimanded by the speaker in various— getting reprimanded by the speaker in various debates, _ getting reprimanded by the speaker in various debates, and _ getting reprimanded by the speaker in various debates, and i— getting reprimanded by the speaker in various debates, and i would - in various debates, and i would often _ in various debates, and i would oftenioke _ in various debates, and i would oftenjoke about _ in various debates, and i would often joke about that _ in various debates, and i would often joke about that to - in various debates, and i would often joke about that to him. . in various debates, and i would oftenjoke about that to him. ii oftenjoke about that to him. i would — oftenjoke about that to him. i would say, _ oftenjoke about that to him. i would say, how— oftenjoke about that to him. i would say, how did _ oftenjoke about that to him. i would say, how did you - oftenjoke about that to him. i. would say, how did you manage oftenjoke about that to him. i- would say, how did you manage to do that white _ would say, how did you manage to do that white the — would say, how did you manage to do that while the likes _ would say, how did you manage to do that while the likes of _ would say, how did you manage to do that while the likes of us _ would say, how did you manage to do that while the likes of us would - would say, how did you manage to do that while the likes of us would end . that while the likes of us would end ”p that while the likes of us would end up getting — that while the likes of us would end up getting reprimanded _ that while the likes of us would end up getting reprimanded if— that while the likes of us would end up getting reprimanded if we - that while the likes of us would end up getting reprimanded if we eveni up getting reprimanded if we even wentiust — up getting reprimanded if we even wentiust a — up getting reprimanded if we even wentiust a bit _ up getting reprimanded if we even went just a bit of _ up getting reprimanded if we even went just a bit of course _ up getting reprimanded if we even went just a bit of course from - up getting reprimanded if we even went just a bit of course from the i went just a bit of course from the agenda _ went just a bit of course from the agenda item? _ went just a bit of course from the agenda item? but— went just a bit of course from the agenda item? but all— went just a bit of course from the agenda item? but all mps, - went just a bit of course from the agenda item? but all mps, they. went just a bit of course from the - agenda item? but all mps, they have different— agenda item? but all mps, they have different styles, _ agenda item? but all mps, they have different styles, whether _ agenda item? but all mps, they have different styles, whether that - agenda item? but all mps, they have different styles, whether that is - agenda item? but all mps, they have different styles, whether that is in. different styles, whether that is in the chamber. _ different styles, whether that is in the chamber, some _ different styles, whether that is in the chamber, some of— different styles, whether that is in the chamber, some of us - different styles, whether that is in the chamber, some of us are - different styles, whether that is in| the chamber, some of us are more direct, _ the chamber, some of us are more direct, so— the chamber, some of us are more direct, so he— the chamber, some of us are more direct, so he would _ the chamber, some of us are more direct, so he would always - the chamber, some of us are more direct, so he would always say - the chamber, some of us are more direct, so he would always say to l direct, so he would always say to me, _ direct, so he would always say to me. you — direct, so he would always say to me. you realty— direct, so he would always say to me, you really do _ direct, so he would always say to me, you really do get _ direct, so he would always say to me, you really do get stuck - direct, so he would always say to me, you really do get stuck in. l direct, so he would always say to i me, you really do get stuck in. but outside _ me, you really do get stuck in. but outside in — me, you really do get stuck in. but outside in terms _ me, you really do get stuck in. but outside in terms of _ me, you really do get stuck in. but outside in terms of advice - outside in terms of advice surgeries, _ outside in terms of advice surgeries, he— outside in terms of advice surgeries, he was- outside in terms of advice surgeries, he was well- outside in terms of advice - surgeries, he was well known as a constituency — surgeries, he was well known as a constituency mp. _ surgeries, he was well known as a constituency mp, he _ surgeries, he was well known as a constituency mp, he was - surgeries, he was well known as a l constituency mp, he was respected, and people — constituency mp, he was respected, and people nray— constituency mp, he was respected, and people may not _ constituency mp, he was respected, and people may not know— constituency mp, he was respected, and people may not know about - constituency mp, he was respected, and people may not know about his| and people may not know about his involvement — and people may not know about his involvement in _ and people may not know about his involvement in various _ and people may not know about his involvement in various all—party - involvement in various all—party part and — involvement in various all—party part and to _ involvement in various all—party part and to groups, _ involvement in various all—party part and to groups, his - involvement in various all—party part and to groups, his work - involvement in various all—party part and to groups, his work on| part and to groups, his work on animat— part and to groups, his work on animal welfare, _ part and to groups, his work on animal welfare, and _ part and to groups, his work on animal welfare, and these - part and to groups, his work on. animal welfare, and these things need _ animal welfare, and these things need to— animal welfare, and these things need to be — animal welfare, and these things need to be taken— animal welfare, and these things need to be taken into _ animal welfare, and these things need to be taken into cognize - animal welfare, and these thingsi need to be taken into cognize and is, because — need to be taken into cognize and is, because so— need to be taken into cognize and is, because so often, _ need to be taken into cognize and is, because so often, members. need to be taken into cognize andj is, because so often, members of parliament— is, because so often, members of parliament get _ is, because so often, members of parliament get targeted _ is, because so often, members of parliament get targeted just - is, because so often, members of parliament get targeted just for l is, because so often, members of. parliament get targeted just for the way that— parliament get targeted just for the way that they — parliament get targeted just for the way that they have _ parliament get targeted just for the way that they have voted _ parliament get targeted just for the way that they have voted on - parliament get targeted just for the way that they have voted on a - way that they have voted on a particular— way that they have voted on a particular issue _ way that they have voted on a particular issue or— way that they have voted on a particular issue or because i way that they have voted on a particular issue or because of| way that they have voted on a - particular issue or because of how they have — particular issue or because of how they have spoken— particular issue or because of how they have spoken on _ particular issue or because of how they have spoken on a _ particular issue or because of how they have spoken on a particular. they have spoken on a particular issue. _ they have spoken on a particular issue. but— they have spoken on a particular issue. but we _ they have spoken on a particular issue, but we want _ they have spoken on a particular issue, but we want to _ they have spoken on a particular issue, but we want to be - they have spoken on a particular issue, but we want to be able i they have spoken on a particular issue, but we want to be able toj issue, but we want to be able to conduct — issue, but we want to be able to conduct our— issue, but we want to be able to conduct our service, _ issue, but we want to be able to conduct our service, and - issue, but we want to be able to conduct our service, and it - issue, but we want to be able to conduct our service, and it is -
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conduct our service, and it is service, _ conduct our service, and it is service, because _ conduct our service, and it is service, because we - conduct our service, and it is service, because we have - conduct our service, and it is . service, because we have been elected — service, because we have been elected to— service, because we have been elected to serve _ service, because we have been elected to serve people, - service, because we have been elected to serve people, and l service, because we have been. elected to serve people, and the manrity— elected to serve people, and the majority of— elected to serve people, and the majority of our _ elected to serve people, and the majority of our work _ elected to serve people, and the majority of our work is _ elected to serve people, and the majority of our work is in - elected to serve people, and the majority of our work is in our - majority of our work is in our constituency _ majority of our work is in our constituency is _ majority of our work is in our constituency is meeting - majority of our work is in our constituency is meeting with| constituency is meeting with constituents, _ constituency is meeting with constituents, and _ constituency is meeting with constituents, and we - constituency is meeting with constituents, and we should| constituency is meeting with - constituents, and we should not be doing _ constituents, and we should not be doing anything _ constituents, and we should not be doing anything to _ constituents, and we should not be doing anything to deter— constituents, and we should not be doing anything to deter us- constituents, and we should not be doing anything to deter us from - doing anything to deter us from that _ doing anything to deter us from that. ., ., ,, ., ,., that. you were talking about the unity across _ that. you were talking about the unity across the _ that. you were talking about the unity across the different - that. you were talking about the l unity across the different political parties, and in the last half and now we have seen these pictures of the prime minister from the conservative party with priti patel, his home secretary, laying wreaths and flowers with keir starmer, the labour leader, the leader of the opposition, and the speaker of the house of commons, unity there across the political divide. ian, how significant is that? what does that say? i significant is that? what does that sa ? .., �* significant is that? what does that sa ? .. �* , ., , say? i can't remember the last time i've seen pictures _ say? i can't remember the last time i've seen pictures like _ say? i can't remember the last time i've seen pictures like that, - say? i can't remember the last time i've seen pictures like that, and - say? i can't remember the last time i've seen pictures like that, and it . i've seen pictures like that, and it does send a very powerful signal to everybody that this has to be, i was going to sit has to be a one off, but of course we have to remember that five years ago, the same thing happened to the labour mpjoe cox. there have been other incidents, stephen timms, nigeljones, they
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were attacked in their constituency surgeries, and in nigeljones's case, his assistant andrew pennington lost his life because of it. it is symbolic, but i think there has to be more than symbolism here. it is impossible to make every mp safe at their surgeries without destroying that personal relationship between the constituent and the mp. you can't have a piece of bullet—proof glass or something like that in front of you. it is like that in front of you. it is like the difference between mps doing covid, doing zoom consultations rather than meeting face—to—face, it is not the same. and i can't think of a single mp who would want a police officer standing next to them while they were in their surgery. next to them while they were in theirsurgery. so next to them while they were in their surgery. so there is always going to be an element of risk, and there will be lots of enquiries, lots of warm words, but in the end, most mps will accept that they go into the job knowing that there is this unfortunate side to people, and that they will be at risk. i hope
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that they will be at risk. i hope that doesn't deter good people from going into politics, because the natural reaction for aspiring politicians' families is to say, why are you doing this? why would you put yourself at risk by doing this job? but if nobody does the job, we will get the politicians we deserve, as the phrase goes, because it will be left of the obsessive, and we want good people from different backgrounds to want to go into politics, to aspire to go into politics, to aspire to go into politics, but this kind of thing obviously will put some people are. thank you both forjoining us on bbc breakfast this morning, reflecting on the death of sir david amess, and overnight it has become the case that police are now treating this as a terrorist incident. time now is 9:46am. in just over a fortnight�*s time, the uk will welcome the world's leaders to the un climate change conference, known as cop 26. we are going to hear an awful lot about it in the next four weeks! the event is seen as a huge
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opportunity for more than 190 countries to commit to policies that will tackle climate change. the issue is something that is close to the royal family's heart, with the queen, prince charles and prince william recently expressing their concerns. the narrative has changed, and lots of the things that you said are now mainstream. it of the things that you said are now mainstream-— mainstream. it is taking far too lonu. mainstream. it is taking far too long- they _ mainstream. it is taking far too long- they are _ mainstream. it is taking far too long. they are gathering - mainstream. it is taking far too i long. they are gathering together mainstream. it is taking far too - long. they are gathering together in glasaow long. they are gathering together in glas . ow to long. they are gathering together in glasgow to talk... _ long. they are gathering together in glasgow to talk... but _ long. they are gathering together in glasgow to talk... but the _ long. they are gathering together in glasgow to talk... but the problem | glasgow to talk... but the problem is they just — glasgow to talk... but the problem is they just talk, _ glasgow to talk... but the problem is they just talk, and _ glasgow to talk... but the problem is theyjust talk, and we _ glasgow to talk... but the problem is theyjust talk, and we need - is theyjust talk, and we need action, — is theyjust talk, and we need action, which is what i've been trying — action, which is what i've been trying to— action, which is what i've been trying to do for the last 40 years. chitdren— trying to do for the last 40 years. children love playing and chasing in sport and all that sort of stuff, and they have a true appreciation of what we are going to miss and what we are letting down than many of the adults, and that is where a bit of the disconnect is happening, is that those adults in position of responsibility are not channelling their inner child.
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the queen overheard this week ending that little look at how the royals have been reacting to cop26. bob ward is a climate change analyst from the london school of economics, and will be attending cop26. hejoins us now. lovely to see you, a busy couple of weeks ahead for you. people will be asking, what does it mean, what tangible change could come from this? because it is one of those existential causes at the moment thatis existential causes at the moment that is causing people at lot of fear. this is an annual meeting of governments that has been taking place every year since 1992 when the original treaty was signed by countries on climate change, and there are two key issues that will dominate the next few weeks leading up dominate the next few weeks leading up to cop26. the first is around the paris agreement, the second is around the relationships between poor and rich countries. the paris agreement is a landmark agreement where countries agreed to limit
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global warming to well below 2 c degrees. we have already had 1 , and although these don't sound much, thatis although these don't sound much, that is global average temperature, and the difference between the temperature today and in the last ice age is only 5, temperature today and in the last ice age is only 5 , so it makes all the difference. at the moment we are not on target to keep to that target. the emissions pledges have been put forward so far by governments for 20 or 30 or more consistent with warming of 2.7 by the end of the century, which would be disastrous.— be disastrous. obviously the pre-talks — be disastrous. obviously the pre-talks would _ be disastrous. obviously the pre-talks would be - be disastrous. obviously the pre-talks would be under i be disastrous. obviously the l pre-talks would be under way be disastrous. obviously the - pre-talks would be under way for pre—talks would be under way for some time, and it doesn't look right, does it? it is hard to see that this is going to lead to any massive agreement at the moment, because there are a lot of differences between the countries. we are talking about fundamental changes to our whole way of living, and we have to get rid of fossil fuels, the way in which we generate energy, we are going to have to make
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a move to cleaner forms of energy and cleaner ways of living. we know how to do it, but it is going to be a challenging time, and we are in a world where there are lots of tension is going on, disagreements about lots of issues, but i think all governments really are committed and so that is why they are all gathering in glasgow and we will probably see many world leaders there to talk about how we can move forward together. son despondency around china's role and the extent to which it has so far refused to commit to the same standards as the other nations. to what extent is that valid, people are saying what is the point of china is not on board.- are saying what is the point of china is not on board. china is the world's biggest — china is not on board. china is the world's biggest emitter _ china is not on board. china is the world's biggest emitter of - world's biggest emitter of greenhouse gases, they do matter, and they will be in glasgow but there has been discussions about whether president xi jinping will be there or the premier. but what is really important is that we all accept that we all have to cut our emissions, effectively to zero. the best way of persuading china to move faster is by us leading by example.
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it is not going to work if we say, we are going to start dragging our feet. when i talk to chinese researchers, they want to know about the things the uk is doing. we have cut our emissions by 44% since 1990, and our economy has grown by 75% over that in that period, which is an important lesson that you do not have to sacrifice your economy to tackle climate change. it is have to sacrifice your economy to tackle climate change.— tackle climate change. it is a different sort _ tackle climate change. it is a different sort of— tackle climate change. it is a different sort of economy, i tackle climate change. it is a . different sort of economy, mass production is what behind their search, it difficult to know how you can tell that economic growth with reducing emissions. taste can tell that economic growth with reducing emissions.— reducing emissions. we can do it because we _ reducing emissions. we can do it because we have _ reducing emissions. we can do it because we have a _ reducing emissions. we can do it because we have a modern - reducing emissions. we can do it - because we have a modern economy and we know how to change our energy system. we have managed to get rid of mostly get rid of coal as a source of power, and we have introduced renewables. we have nuclear. but china is a growing country, developing country, it wants to bring people out of poverty and is relying very heavily on coal, but it realises that coal is not just bad for them because of climate change but because it causes local air pollution which is killing lots
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of people around the world, 7 million people a year die from local air pollution around the world. that is startling. you sound a bit more optimistic than i was expecting. more optimistic than i was expecting-_ more optimistic than i was ex - ectin . . . ., , expecting. the alternative is dismal! so _ expecting. the alternative is dismal! so we _ expecting. the alternative is dismal! so we have - expecting. the alternative is dismal! so we have no - expecting. the alternative is i dismal! so we have no choice. we will speech i'm sure over the next couple of weeks, because cop26 starts in glasgow in a fortnight, and it takes a couple of weeks after that. thank you. it is 9.52. the battle for the strictly glitterball continues tonight, with eleven couples taking to the dancefloor for week four of the compeition. however, there'll be some noticable absenses — former rugby player ugo monye will miss this week due to back problems. no wonder after his dance next week! while comedian robert webb announced on wednesday that he was pulling out of the entire series. it comes after a high scoring —
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but bruising — movie week. let's take a look at the highlights. # spider—man # spider—man # spider—man # friendly neighbourhood spider—man # friendly neighbourhood spider—man # action hero... ten! #so # so what can i say # so what can i say # except you're welcome # except you're welcome # the island from the sea # the island from the sea # no need to pray # no need to pray # i guess it'sjust my way # no need to pray # i guess it's just my way of being me # makes me want to dance # makes me want to dance # it's a new romance that was last week. what is it going to be like this week? we are joined
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by former strictly professional dancer kristina rihanoff. it was quite a big week, wasn't it? movie week is the best, ijust love it. movie week is the best, i 'ust love it. , ., movie week is the best, i 'ust love it. y . , , ., , it. they were hit and miss moments. it is it. they were hit and miss moments. it is always — it. they were hit and miss moments. it is always like _ it. they were hit and miss moments. it is always like that, _ it. they were hit and miss moments. it is always like that, but _ it. they were hit and miss moments. it is always like that, but the - it is always like that, but the dancers were carefully chosen for the people, and the characters were amazing. of course sometimes they have a great dance, sometimes not so great, but overall the show was fantastic, and i'm sure all kids loved watching it.— loved watching it. and you are sa in: loved watching it. and you are saying just _ loved watching it. and you are saying just before _ loved watching it. and you are saying just before we - loved watching it. and you are saying just before we came i loved watching it. and you are saying just before we came to| loved watching it. and you are - saying just before we came to you that it saying just before we came to you thatitis saying just before we came to you that it is when it starts getting serious. and i suppose it has got even more serious this week because you have got ugo 's bad back, robert webb pulling out with heart issues. i think people are always surprised how intense physically the show is. and when people start saying things like, my medical professionals are saying to me i have to have a break,
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people think it is just an entertainment show, a bit of fun, a couple of hours of dancing, but it isn't like that. you dance and sometimes eight or nine hours a day to prepare, you have only four days to prepare, you have only four days to prepare, you have only four days to prepare a dance, that is it, because on friday you are already in rehearsal. so people don't realise how intense it is. find rehearsal. so people don't realise how intense it is.— how intense it is. and has that intensified _ how intense it is. and has that intensified over _ how intense it is. and has that intensified over the _ how intense it is. and has that intensified over the past - how intense it is. and has that intensified over the past few l intensified over the past few seasons, it has become more competitive in the standard has got higher? the competitive in the standard has got hither? , ., ., competitive in the standard has got hither? , . ., , higher? the standard gets higher, and even watching _ higher? the standard gets higher, and even watching it _ higher? the standard gets higher, and even watching it again - higher? the standard gets higher, and even watching it again last - and even watching it again last night, i wanted to refresh it in my mind, wow, it wasjust incredible, i was again hooked, and ijust admire the pros and the celebrities, because it is such intense work. and movie week, you have to act, and if you have never been on stage before, it is a lot to take in. you have to learn the dance and also learn how to act, become that character you are betraying. find to act, become that character you are betraying-— to act, become that character you are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan _ are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was _ are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was on, _ are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was on, a - are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was on, a lot - are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was on, a lot of. are betraying. and shirley said last week when dan was on, a lot of it. are betraying. and shirley said last| week when dan was on, a lot of it is if you have that moment where you panic, where something goes a little bit wrong, it is so important to
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take that moment, put it behind you and get back on it, which is not that easy, is it?— and get back on it, which is not that easy, is it? yes, fake it till ou that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make _ that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make it. — that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make it, even _ that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make it, even if— that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make it, even if you - that easy, is it? yes, fake it till you make it, even if you make| that easy, is it? yes, fake it till| you make it, even if you make a mistake, it is all ok, nobody knows the choreography, get up and go. but it is hard to learn, it comes with the profession, of course. and it is hard to learn, it comes with the profession, of course. and when strictly started _ the profession, of course. and when strictly started nearly _ the profession, of course. and when strictly started nearly two _ the profession, of course. and when strictly started nearly two decades l strictly started nearly two decades ago, it was all about the judges and the points in that kind of thing, but that was the only feedback you've got, those numbers on the sunday night. now you've got instant feedback on social media, and some of it is brutal. so they are dealing with that as well, and that is tough. i with that as well, and that is tou . h. ~' , ., with that as well, and that is tou~h. ~ , ., , with that as well, and that is tou . h. ~' , ., , ., tough. i think everyone is under a lot of pressure _ tough. i think everyone is under a lot of pressure because _ tough. i think everyone is under a lot of pressure because they - tough. i think everyone is under a lot of pressure because they can l lot of pressure because they can read the comments and see what people say. when ijoined the show it wasn't like that, it was pure ballroom dancing, no extra things, and then a couple of years later during my eight years, all of a sudden everything changed, there were props and more things with the production, so it added a lot of
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pressure on the dances, and of course the celebrities to deliver even more spectacular numbers. and of course some people considered that something not very nice, and we have to read that. you think, i worked so hard all week! but fundamentally _ worked so hard all week! but fundamentally it is great fun. you sit down with the family and everyone gets involved. we are looking ahead to tonight, aj and kai doing the samba to camilla cabello, and we have katia doing the argentine tango. and also the cha—cha—cha. it argentine tango. and also the cha-cha-cha._ argentine tango. and also the cha-cha-cha. it will be beautiful. it will be quite _ cha-cha-cha. it will be beautiful. it will be quite a _ cha-cha-cha. it will be beautiful. it will be quite a transition - cha-cha-cha. it will be beautiful. it will be quite a transition from | it will be quite a transition from this to mc hammer. i cannot visualise down doing that! it is this to mc hammer. i cannot visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the _ visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the sun, _ visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the sun, and _ visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the sun, and we - visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the sun, and we all- visualise down doing that! it is the choice of the sun, and we all love | choice of the sun, and we all love it. if you think perhaps that will get him out of his shell a little bit and show a different type of his
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character, that is what the show is about. you have to always kind of see and show different dimensions of everybody's personalities, so i will look forward to it. me everybody's personalities, so i will look forward to it.— look forward to it. me to! can you watch it and _ look forward to it. me to! can you watch it and enjoy _ look forward to it. me to! can you watch it and enjoy it, _ look forward to it. me to! can you watch it and enjoy it, do - look forward to it. me to! can you watch it and enjoy it, do you - look forward to it. me to! can you | watch it and enjoy it, do you think, i wish i was back there doing it. i i wish i was back there doing it. i watch it now with my little one who is five, so she gives me constant feedback. i like that, i didn't like that, what was that? it is so funny. but i love it, and of course i think i wish i was there, but everything evolves. �* ., , i wish i was there, but everything evolves. . ., , i wish i was there, but everything evolves. �* ., , . evolves. and does your daughter dance? she _ evolves. and does your daughter dance? she does. _ evolves. and does your daughter dance? she does. she _ evolves. and does your daughter dance? she does. she refuses i evolves. and does your daughter dance? she does. she refuses to evolves. and does your daughter i dance? she does. she refuses to go to my dance — dance? she does. she refuses to go to my dance classes, _ dance? she does. she refuses to go to my dance classes, but _ dance? she does. she refuses to go to my dance classes, but she - dance? she does. she refuses to go to my dance classes, but she likes l to my dance classes, but she likes all of the other classes i have at my studios, the gymnastics, the singing, shejust my studios, the gymnastics, the singing, she just doesn't want to do ballroom dancing. i singing, she just doesn't want to do ballroom dancing.— singing, she just doesn't want to do ballroom dancing.- i - singing, she just doesn't want to do ballroom dancing.- i can't l ballroom dancing. i love it! i can't teach my own _ ballroom dancing. i love it! i can't teach my own child. _ ballroom dancing. i love it! i can't teach my own child. she - ballroom dancing. i love it! i can't teach my own child. she will- ballroom dancing. i love it! i can't| teach my own child. she will come around. thank— teach my own child. she will come around. thank you _ teach my own child. she will come around. thank you so _ teach my own child. she will come around. thank you so much - teach my own child. she will come around. thank you so much for i around. thank you so much for joining us, we will see you in a couple of weeks. that's all from us today. bbc news channel will continue coverage of the sad story we have
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been focusing on this morning, the killing of conservative mp sir david amess. these are the pictures we have seen in the last hour of boris johnson, keir starmer, priti patel, lindsay hoyle together at the scene laying flowers. coverage continues throughout the day. breakfast is back at six o'clock tomorrow. enjoy your weekend.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: police say they're treating the killing of the mp, sir david amess, as a terrorist incident, after he was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. side by side in grief — the prime minister and leader of the opposition visit the scene as tributes are paid from across politics and sir david's constituency. his heart was in his community, he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for. he was the best constituency mp you could ever wish for.— could ever wish for. he was at his ha iest could ever wish for. he was at his happiest hen _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest hen when _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest hen when he _ could ever wish for. he was at his happiest hen when he was - could ever wish for. he was at his| happiest hen when he was helping people _ happiest hen when he was helping people. he was a true servant and an inspiration _ we'll be live from the scene in essex and be speaking to a labour mp about the dilemma mps now face, over security at their surgeries. questions asked about how
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a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results,

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