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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

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this is bbc news with the headlines. i'm shaun ley, the headlines eight p.m.... a british member of parliament, sir david amess, has been stabbed to death while meeting constituents at a church hall outside london. he was attacked with a knife multiple times as he met constituents at a local church on leigh—on—sea at lunchtime. he died at the scene. a 25—year—old man was arrested immediately at the scene on suspicion of murder. he remains in custody. a knife was also recovered at the scene. the prime minister has described sir david is one of the kindest people in politics. david is one of the kindest people in olitics. ~ ., ., ., , in politics. think all our hearts are in shock _ in politics. think all our hearts are in shock and _ in politics. think all our hearts are in shock and sadness - in politics. think all our hearts | are in shock and sadness today in politics. think all our hearts i are in shock and sadness today at the loss _ are in shock and sadness today at the loss of— are in shock and sadness today at the loss of sir david amos impey, who was_ the loss of sir david amos impey, who was killed in the constituency surgery— who was killed in the constituency
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surgery in— who was killed in the constituency surgery in a church after almost 40 years _ surgery in a church after almost 40 years of _ surgery in a church after almost 40 years of continuous service to the people _ years of continuous service to the people of— years of continuous service to the people of essex and the whole of the united _ people of essex and the whole of the united kingdom sir david amos. we lost a constituency mp who worked for didht— lost a constituency mp who worked for didn't matter— lost a constituency mp who worked for didn't matter who _ lost a constituency mp who worked for didn't matter who you - lost a constituency mp who worked for didn't matter who you were, . lost a constituency mp who worked i for didn't matter who you were, your religion _ for didn't matter who you were, your religion or— for didn't matter who you were, your religion or your — for didn't matter who you were, your religion or your culture. _ for didn't matter who you were, your religion or your culture. if— for didn't matter who you were, your religion or your culture. if you - for didn't matter who you were, your religion or your culture. if you had i religion or your culture. if you had a problem. — religion or your culture. if you had a problem. he _ religion or your culture. if you had a problem, he would _ religion or your culture. if you had a problem, he would work- religion or your culture. if you had a problem, he would work for- religion or your culture. if you had| a problem, he would work for you. police _ a problem, he would work for you. police say— a problem, he would work for you. police say they _ a problem, he would work for you. police say they are _ a problem, he would work for you. police say they are keeping - a problem, he would work for you. police say they are keeping an - a problem, he would work for you. i police say they are keeping an open mind as to whether it turns out to be a terrorist incident. at the counterterrorism unit scotland yard is now in charge of the investigation. tonight the home secretary has called a review of security for all mps. we'll bring you all a reaction from now until 9pm.
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tributes have been paid to british member of parliament sir david amess, who has been killed while holding a regular session for his constituents in essex in south east england. constituents in essex in south east despite constituents in essex in south east the efforts of p revive despite the efforts of paramedics to revive him. a 25 —year—old man was arrested at the church. he's being held on suspicion of murder. sir david amess had been an mp in essex for almost 40 years, he was first elected in 1983. he says second serving member of paul are meant to be killed, in five years, the labour mp joe cox was be killed, in five years, the labour mpjoe cox was stabbed to death in her constituency in 2016. this evening priti patel asked all police forces to be reviewed for mps with immediate effect. our home affairs correspondent,
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daniel sandford is at the scene. forensics teams and firearms officers at the methodist church where the local mp had been holding his fortnightly surgery. sir david amess's meeting with constituents had been from 10am to 1pm, butjust after midday, he was stabbed multiple times. he was treated at the scene by police and ambulance staff but died before they could get him to hospital. sir david amess was the mp for southend west and well—respected locally. he'd represented the seat for the conservative party since 1997 and was a high—profile brexit supporter and a member of the european research group. i think all our hearts are full of shock and sadness today at the loss of sir david amess, mp, who was killed in his constituency surgery in a church after almost 40 years of continuous service to the people of essex and the whole of the united kingdom.
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and the reason i think people are so shocked and saddened is, above all, he was one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics. the police investigation is still in its early stages, but a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. detectives say the man was detained shortly after officers arrived, and a knife was recovered at the scene. one witness who was opposite the church when it happened told me he saw a woman coming out and calling an ambulance, and then, after armed police arrived, he saw a man of african appearance being led away. as constituents gathered near the church, there was a sense of acute shock. and all were keen to pay tribute, regardless of which party they had voted for. it's so tragic. this is such a nice area, and for this to happen, it's... what can i say? he was such a nice person who loved everyone. and he was doing such a brilliant job for all the local residents.
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at 69 years old, sir david was a veteran politician who'd first been elected to parliament in 1983. he's now become the second mp to be killed at a constituency surgery in just over five years. jo cox was murdered in birstall injune 2016. today is a dark and a shocking day, the more so because, heartbreakingly, we've been here before. informed by his faith, sir david had a profound sense of public duty, and he was highly respected and much liked across the houses of parliament, on all sides. the murder of another mp at a meeting with constituents has again sent shock waves through the world of politics. how can politicians do their best for those they represent if public surgeries are seen as too dangerous? essex police made a statement
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a short while ago. at just after atjust after midday at just after midday today, essex police were called to reports of a stabbing in eastwood road north, leigh—on—sea. the response of the emergency services at this incident was immediate, and our officers arrived on scene within minutes. when they arrived, they found sir david amess impey who had suffered multiple injuries —— mp. this a difficult incident but our officers and paramedics extremely hard to save sir david. tragically he died at the scene. a 25 —year—old man was arrested immediately at the scene, on suspicion of murder. he remains in custody. a knife was also recovered at the scene. the investigation it's in its early stages and being led by officers
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from the specialist counterterrorism. we made it clear at the time of the incident we did not believe there is any immediate further threat to anyone else in the area. it will be for investigators to determine whether or not this is a terrorist incident. but as always, they will keep an open mind. today is a tragic day for the family, the community of southend, and indeed for the whole of greater essex. sir david has dedicated his life to the serving the communities of essex and southend. today, he was simply dispensing his duties when his life was horrifically cut short. i know the residence of essex and southend west will stand together to remember him. here it essex police, officers across our forests, particularly in
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southend, have enjoyed a long—standing, positive working relationship with sir david, and today's events will be hard to take for anyone who knew him. especially trained family liaison officers are providing support his family today —— specially trained. our officers will continue to work around the clock ensure justice is delivered for sir david and his family. and i'd like to thank the people of southend for their understanding as the investigation continues. i would urge anyone who has any information in relation to this terrible incident to call essex police on 101, online or indeed via crimestoppers. finally i ask for everyone to respect the privacy of sir david's family in this really difficult time. and lastly, to say that my personal thoughts, having worked with sir david, and of course all of those from essex police and our prayers are with sir david and his family at this difficult time. thank you.
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his family at this difficult time. thank yep-— his family at this difficult time. thank yon-— thank you. thank you, chief constable. _ thank you. thank you, chief constable. this _ thank you. thank you, chief constable. this is _ thank you. thank you, chief constable. this is a - thank you. thank you, chief| constable. this is a shocking thank you. thank you, chief - constable. this is a shocking and utterty— constable. this is a shocking and utterly despicable attack against somebody who was an outstanding mp and has _ somebody who was an outstanding mp and has worked tirelessly for their community many years. my prayers are with sir— community many years. my prayers are with sir david _ community many years. my prayers are with sir david and his family at this incredibly difficult time. i know— this incredibly difficult time. i know from personal experience the passion _ know from personal experience the passion with which he stood up for and represented this community. he had a _ and represented this community. he had a big _ and represented this community. he had a big heart. ialso and represented this community. he had a big heart. i also want to acknowledge the officers who attended the event for their bravery and courage. it is vital that we have the — and courage. it is vital that we have the police all our support to ensure _ have the police all our support to ensure that they can do theirjob. at this _ ensure that they can do theirjob. at this time. for anybody who has information, please do not hesitate to contact _ information, please do not hesitate to contact the police. thank you.
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you heard — to contact the police. thank you. you heard the chief constable of essex, bj harrington. dominic is in essex, bj harrington. dominic is in essex and was listening to that news conference and gave us this reaction. . conference and gave us this reaction- -_ conference and gave us this reaction. . conference and gave us this reaction.. ., . ., , reaction. . you could clearly tell from their— reaction. . you could clearly tell from their statements _ reaction. . you could clearly tell from their statements how - reaction. . you could clearly tell. from their statements how shocked and devastated they are. we haven't actually learned any more facts to be honest about the nature of the attack and the circumstances of actually what's happened at the methodist church where sir david was holding his constituency surgery, his regiment, her regular friday surgery. the more important thing is we have now established it's been confirmed that scotland yard counterterrorism has taken primacy in this. that means the counterterrorism network, all of its huge resources are being thrown at this investigation to establish exactly what the circumstances are. al cabbie eight —— cabbie out that by saying it it doesn't mean it was
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an act of terrorism, what was the motive for this attack on sir david. but it means to get the most amount of resources there and it is now. so things which would be going on at the moment is a 25 —year—old man who was taken into custody and arrested at the scene, which indicates the suspect wasn't someone that apprehended. his devices, assuming he is mobile phones or computers, will be interrogated by specialist officers looking for clues as to his motive, and if it'll be terrorism they'll be looking for evidence of mind—set and ideology, which is always a critical part of these investigations in the early stages. the second thing is a team and specialist officers will be going to his home, they'll be conducting the most incredible search you could ever imagine, i've known searches involving counterterrorism officers which have gone in for many, many
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days literally tearing up floorboards and peeling back wallpaper in some instances looking for evidence. this is the scale of what's going on. only if police find evidence of an ideological mind—set that this attack was allegedly carried out for an ideological purpose will they call this an act of terrorism. so what the essex police have got is all these resources coming in to help them, but we are still no closer to understanding the motive. as for the individual himself, he's in custody on suspicion of murder. if the police believe that there is a possibility that this is an act of terrorism, they can rearrest him and hold him under the terrorism act which means they can hold him for a lot longer. . 5ir which means they can hold him for a lot longer- -— lot longer. . sir david had been an mp in essex _ lot longer. . sir david had been an mp in essex since _ lot longer. . sir david had been an mp in essex since 1983, _ lot longer. . sir david had been an mp in essex since 1983, first - lot longer. . sir david had been an mp in essex since 1983, first for. mp in essex since 1983, first for basil gin and motor recently for southend. he was married with five children and a well—known figure in his community. tribute to have been paid across the political divide,
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the premise recalled in one of the nicest, kindest and most gentle people in politics. sir david a, i described today as a man who devoted his life to his constituents —— sir david amess, mp. this was the general his victory signalled a surprise win forjohn major's conservatives. david andrew amess has been duly elected to serve as member for this constituency. he was known as highly accessible to constituents in southend, an energetic advocate for the area. will my right honourable friend tell one of his ministers to organise a city status competition so at long last southend—on—sea can become a city? those who knew him best have been left shocked. he was devoted to that constituency and he was always full of enthusiasm for things that were going on in southend, full of enthusiasm for
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parliament, full of life. it's just a horrible shock. his senseless killing follows a series of attacks on mps all in their constituencies. in 2000, nigeljones, a liberal democrat, attacked with a sword. his aide, andrew pennington, died. in 2010, the labour mp stephen timms suffered life—threatening injuries — stabbed in the stomach, he survived. and in 2016, labour'sjo cox murdered, shot and stabbed while out during the referendum campaign. her killing happened as the nation argued over brexit. many worry that political debates are becoming increasingly polarised and social media has fuelled the trend, among them jo cox's sister, now an mp herself. it's really important that we get good people in public life, - but this is the risk— that we are all taking, you know, and so many mps today will be scared by this, i and my partner came home and said, "i don't want you to do it anymore." i in recent years security around parliament has become intense. here mps are tightly protected
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but outside in their local areas they are vulnerable. sir david amess himself wrote after the attack on nigeljones, "we all make ourselves readily available to our constituents. it could happen to any of us." i think more should have been learned from previous attacks and i suspect that the house authorities will now do a complete review of security for mps and peers and their staff. we need to do it for everybody who comes face—to—face with the general public. sir david leaves behind his wife and five children, and urgent questions. why are they now bereaved? why is more not being done to protect mps? sir david amess, who has died today at the age of 69. sir desmond swaim is conservative mp for a new forest west, thanks for joining us this evening. your
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reflections on david amess, who you serve as a colleague with for many years? he serve as a colleague with for many ears? ., , serve as a colleague with for many ears? . , ., ., , serve as a colleague with for many ears? ., ., ., , ., years? he was a lovely man, the prime minister _ years? he was a lovely man, the prime minister was _ years? he was a lovely man, the prime minister was quite - years? he was a lovely man, the prime minister was quite right i years? he was a lovely man, the i prime minister was quite right and he is externally popular. he was by everyone. and you could tell that whenever he got to speak, there be a great roar of approval. he was gentle, but he was also extremely robust, and really robust in fighting for the interests of his and citrusy. a tremendous parliamentarian.— and citrusy. a tremendous parliamentarian. and citrusy. a tremendous arliamentarian. ., , . parliamentarian. how effective was he? ithink parliamentarian. how effective was he? i think he _ parliamentarian. how effective was he? i think he was _ parliamentarian. how effective was he? i think he was very _ parliamentarian. how effective was he? i think he was very effective. l he? i think he was very effective. the quintessential _ he? i think he was very effective. the quintessential backbencher, | the quintessential backbencher, working from committees, building up a body of support behind a particular issue, whether it was endometriosis or whether it was animal welfare, endometriosis or whether it was animalwelfare, or endometriosis or whether it was animal welfare, or whatever. he endometriosis or whether it was animalwelfare, orwhatever. he was animalwelfare, orwhatever. he was a very effective operator. you animal welfare, or whatever. he was a very effective operator.— a very effective operator. you must reflect tonight _ a very effective operator. you must reflect tonight on _ a very effective operator. you must reflect tonight on the _ a very effective operator. you must reflect tonight on the questions - a very effective operator. you must reflect tonight on the questions ofl reflect tonight on the questions of security. we've heard priti patel this evening asking police forces to
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look urgently to cast a fresh eye over it. it's a dilemma, how open and accessible you are and how vulnerable that makes you. that is true, but equally _ vulnerable that makes you. that is true, but equally a _ vulnerable that makes you. that is true, but equally a sense - vulnerable that makes you. that is true, but equally a sense of- true, but equally a sense of proportion that ordinary people have been murdered and attacked. it's a fact of life, and i think we should bejust a fact of life, and i think we should be just a little bit careful about going over the top on members of parliament. of course it's terrible what's happened, and we must examine all the things that we can do to reduce the circumstances in which that can happen. but nevertheless, in a democracy it important that representatives have contact with the people they represent. i'm very fortunate. i've never been threatened or felt threatened fortunate. i've never been threatened orfelt threatened in fortunate. i've never been threatened or felt threatened in any way. but clearly others have been, and we've got to address that — but
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we have to address it with a sense of proportion. . in we have to address it with a sense of preportion- -_ of proportion. . in a sense, is not 'ust of proportion. . in a sense, is not just about — of proportion. . in a sense, is not just about your — of proportion. . in a sense, is not just about your safety, _ of proportion. . in a sense, is not just about your safety, it's - of proportion. . in a sense, is not just about your safety, it's about| just about your safety, it's about for example the safety of the people who work for you and of other constituents who mayjust have the misfortune to be in a constituency surgery when someone decides to kick off. i surgery when someone decides to kick off. ., , surgery when someone decides to kick off. . , , .., off. i agree entirely, but i come back to. off. i agree entirely, but i come backto- how— off. i agree entirely, but i come back to. how this _ off. i agree entirely, but i come back to. how this is _ off. i agree entirely, but i come back to. how this is really - off. i agree entirely, but i come back to. how this is really rare. | back to. how this is really rare. we should examine the circumstances and examine what can be done. but what we don't want to do is to sacrifice the essentials of democracy that voters have access to their politicians. . 50 voters have access to their politicians. ._ voters have access to their politicians. . voters have access to their oliticians.. . , . ., politicians. . so any reflection you have on that _ politicians. . so any reflection you have on that question, _ politicians. . so any reflection you have on that question, you'll- politicians. . so any reflection you have on that question, you'll wait| have on that question, you'll wait until you know a bit more about the circumstances in this?— circumstances in this? absolutely. we are all in _ circumstances in this? absolutely. we are all in the _ circumstances in this? absolutely. we are all in the dark _ circumstances in this? absolutely. we are all in the dark at _ circumstances in this? absolutely. we are all in the dark at the - we are all in the dark at the moment, if that's actually how it
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happened. but then again we've seen these things happen in the past, so an element of caution is required. also a sense of proportion. as i say, sarah everard going home, attacked by a police man — how utterly random is that? attacked by a police man - how utterly random is that?- attacked by a police man - how utterly random is that? when you first became _ utterly random is that? when you first became an _ utterly random is that? when you first became an mp, _ utterly random is that? when you first became an mp, a _ utterly random is that? when you first became an mp, a few- utterly random is that? when you first became an mp, a few years i utterly random is that? when you i first became an mp, a few years ago now but by the time you came into the commons, david amess was a bit of an old lag. how was he to new members. ? he of an old lag. how was he to new members ?_ of an old lag. how was he to new members- ?_ of an old lag. how was he to new members. ? ., , , , ,., members. ? he was a superb sorts of advice- he — members. ? he was a superb sorts of advice. he would _ members. ? he was a superb sorts of advice. he would immediately - members. ? he was a superb sorts of advice. he would immediately take i advice. he would immediately take you aside, give you the benefit of his experience, a tremendously kind man, prepared to give you time — that's the most precious resource you have is a member of parliament, you have is a member of parliament, you were always under pressure. but he would give you time. if you were in a bind or had a difficulty, he'd give you the benefit of his experience, he'd talk you through and be really helpful and say, you know, if you need more, come back.
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will you miss him? i know, if you need more, come back. will you miss him?— will you miss him? i certainly miss him. as i will you miss him? i certainly miss him- as i say. _ will you miss him? i certainly miss him. as i say, he _ will you miss him? i certainly miss him. as i say, he was _ will you miss him? i certainly miss him. as i say, he was the - him. as i say, he was the most delightful colleague. i think it's a terrible shame. 5ir delightful colleague. i think it's a terrible shame.— delightful colleague. i think it's a terrible shame. sir desmond swain, thank ou terrible shame. sir desmond swain, thank you very _ terrible shame. sir desmond swain, thank you very much. _ terrible shame. sir desmond swain, thank you very much. speaker- terrible shame. sir desmond swain, thank you very much. speaker of. terrible shame. sir desmond swain, | thank you very much. speaker of the house of commons, sir lindsay hoyle, has given his reaction to sir david's death.— has given his reaction to sir david's death. this is absolute shock. david's death. this is absolute shock- we _ david's death. this is absolute shock. we are _ david's death. this is absolute shock. we are all— david's death. this is absolute shock. we are all in _ david's death. this is absolute shock. we are all in shock. - david's death. this is absolute i shock. we are all in shock. david was a friend of everybody. whatever your divide was, he was friendly will stop he was a politician that served his constituents. he was so well loved. his family, his friends, everybody thought the best of him, and he's been taken away from us. i never, ever thought we would be in this position again. tragically, jo cox... he loved being an mp, david love serving the people he represented. the fact is david has
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been killed, he's killed because people don't value the job that mps do. and i've got to say that everybody will be thinking one thing — david has been taken, much love, much respected, and it's a tragic loss to the house. as i said, all of our thoughts are with his family and friends. �* our thoughts are with his family and friends. . . . , ., . , ., friends. and the circumstances are 'ust friends. and the circumstances are just horrendous, _ friends. and the circumstances are just horrendous, aren't _ friends. and the circumstances are just horrendous, aren't they - just horrendous, aren't they absolutely horrendous. here he is meeting his constituents, serving his constituents. it's a job he loved, he loved being a member of parliament. he loved representing his constituents, he loved taking up issues on behalf of his constituents. he wanted it to be a city, southend, he always challenged parliament on behalf of southend. they have lost a great servant, but we've all lost a great friend. this certainly raises questions about the security and vulnerability of both doing the work and carrying out
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their daily lives. are you concerned about the safety of mps, ?- about the safety of mps, ? always have and always _ about the safety of mps, ? always have and always will _ about the safety of mps, ? always have and always will be. - about the safety of mps, ? always have and always will be. it's - about the safety of mps, ? always have and always will be. it's one | about the safety of mps, ? always. have and always will be. it's one of the measures, like many things, that worries. things keep you awake. you —— awake at night, the safety of mps. we are in very troubled times, and it is on us to figure out what to do. we've put lots of measures in place following jo cox, we keep looking at it and will continue to looking at it and will continue to look at it. we need to find out what the circumstances were and we need to understand happened here. and of course, we will always look to improve and bring in new security measures to ensure that mps could carry out their duties. they want to be representing their constituents. democracy must always survive. and the people who challenge that must not be allowed to win — hence why
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i've reassured my surgery that nothing will stop us, but the one thing we need to do is to make sure our mps are protected.. thing we need to do is to make sure our mps are protected. ._ our mps are protected.. i'll ask you about carrying _ our mps are protected.. i'll ask you about carrying out your _ our mps are protected.. i'll ask you | about carrying out your surgery here today — why did you make that decision and how did it feel to do that still,? decision and how did it feel to do that still, ?_ that still,? i've got to say, i asked my staff _ that still,? i've got to say, i asked my staff if _ that still,? i've got to say, i asked my staff if they - that still,? i've got to say, i asked my staff if they were | that still,? i've got to say, i - asked my staff if they were happy, because i feel i've got to go ahead. were expecting to see me — and the fact is we've got to ensure that democracy will not be taken away the people. i'm here for them, democracy will not be taken away the people. i'm here forthem, because in the end, nobody will stand in the way of... what happens here is tragic, and i don't want it to happen to anyone else. quite rightly, i still have to represent my constituents. 5ir rightly, i still have to represent my constituents.— rightly, i still have to represent my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, seaker of my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, speaker of the _ my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, speaker of the house _ my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, speaker of the house of _ my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, speaker of the house of commons. j my constituents. sir lindsay hoyle, - speaker of the house of commons. let me bring you some breaking news from the duke and duchess of cambridge, william and kate — they have tweeted
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their shock and sadness at the killing of david amess, adding that their thoughts and prayers are with sir david's family, colleagues and friends. the conservative mpjohn wooding dale told me sir david's death was an absolute tragedy. . i've known david as a friend for nearly 40 years, we've been parliamentary colleagues for 30 years. he was a terrific mp, he cared passionately about his constituents, and he was always available to them. and it is therefore all the more tragic that he should meet his end in this way. and it's a huge loss for the people of southend, a huge loss for parliament in general, and of course we think about his family in this terrible time. he we think about his family in this terrible time.— we think about his family in this terrible time. . , , ., ., terrible time. he was the epitome of a six man in — terrible time. he was the epitome of a six man in the early _ terrible time. he was the epitome of a six man in the early '90s, - terrible time. he was the epitome of a six man in the early '90s, wasn't i a six man in the early '90s, wasn't he? that shot of him beaming,
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grinning widely — he almost had a cheshire cat smile, that seem to hang around in the area for a few seconds after he'd gone. in 1992, the night thatjohn major one against the odds, big conservative victory, and that was one of the first seats labour had hoped to win. what do you think are the qualities he brought to the job that made him able to hold a seat like that, sometimes against the odd democrat odds? he sometimes against the odd democrat odds? ., , . sometimes against the odd democrat odds? . , . ._ sometimes against the odd democrat odds? . , . . ~' sometimes against the odd democrat odds? ., . . ,, ., odds? he was elected way back, long before me. — odds? he was elected way back, long before me, 1983 _ odds? he was elected way back, long before me, 1983 for _ odds? he was elected way back, long before me, 1983 for basil _ odds? he was elected way back, long before me, 1983 for basil den. - odds? he was elected way back, long before me, 1983 for basil den. in - before me, 1983 for basil den. in the thatcher era, basil den was a litmus test. the fact that david won it for the conservative party was the proof that the thatcher government was sweeping in. and he was a great campaigner. he moved subsequently to southend, and he was passionate about southend. david championed many causes in his time in parliament. but the thing he
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cared about most was his constituents in southend. it almost became a joke which he made that whatever particular issue he was raising, be it at pmqs or another time, he would always end with his call for southend to be made a city. but it was indicative of his total commitment to his constituency and the people of southend. i commitment to his constituency and the people of southend. i mentioned it to one your — the people of southend. i mentioned it to one your colleagues _ the people of southend. i mentioned it to one your colleagues earlier, - it to one your colleagues earlier, he had a tigger is quality to him, bouts of enthusiasm about everything you seem to be involved with. absolutely right, he was mostly cheerful and great company. david was always hugely entertaining, and he was always positive, always optimistic and immensely supportive of anybody who came to him with any problems. he was a very generous spirit — and for that reason, i
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think he was liked right across the whole of parliament, as has been demonstrated by the many attributes that have been paid to him today. . does this cause you to reflect on security as an mp? you've been in mp since the early '90s._ since the early '90s. that's right. it's since the early '90s. that's right. it's obvious _ since the early '90s. that's right. it's obvious he _ since the early '90s. that's right. it's obvious he something - since the early '90s. that's right. l it's obvious he something someone since the early '90s. that's right. - it's obvious he something someone is always a para —— aware of, but it is part of thejob always a para —— aware of, but it is part of the job that we are available and we should be. i have a meeting with the chief superintendent for north essex this morning to talk about general policing matters, and the subject of security came up, and we are aware and we take precautions. but at the end of the day, it is incredibly important that mps remain available and accessible to their constituents. it's such a fundamental part of the job that we have this linkage. i think it would diminish the role of an mp hugely if there was any way —— if it was in
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any way reduced. we must be careful and take precautions, but the fact that mps hold surgeries and their constituencies on a regular basis so any of their constituents can come and see them is, in my view, absolutely, essentially —— essential part of it all. 5ir absolutely, essentially -- essential part of it all-— part of it all. sir david was killed as he was _ part of it all. sir david was killed as he was carrying _ part of it all. sir david was killed as he was carrying out _ part of it all. sir david was killed as he was carrying out his - part of it all. sir david was killed as he was carrying out his duty l as he was carrying out his duty meeting his constituency. pretty patel has asked all police forces to review security arrangements for mps with immediate effect. what can be done to protect mps as they do the job, oras done to protect mps as they do the job, or as they that are they as protected as they can be? villa greendale was brought in after the murder ofjo cox. i asked him earlier whether there were limits to what can be done. first earlier whether there were limits to what can be done.— what can be done. first and foremost. _ what can be done. first and foremost, my _ what can be done. first and foremost, my thoughts - what can be done. first and foremost, my thoughts are | what can be done. first and - foremost, my thoughts are with the family, friends and colleagues of
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the deceased, and i know it'll be a devastating day for them. in relation to the question around priti patel and asking police to review the security around politicians, that's a fairly regular occurrence and it would be something that, when i was running the team in parliament, we would do pretty regularly. and that would really look at the many security arrangements which all politicians are entitled to, and seeing whether they all had that. in many of them have, but some of them have chosen either or not to have some of it or all of it. and equally, some chose not to necessarily follow the advice that was given around how to keep themselves and their staff safe. so unconscious that they have an awful lot of security available to them, i know since i've left they've even increase that to include security
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guards at their actual constituency offices. but again, not all of them choose to have that and there's various reasons for that. so i think there is a great deal on offer, but a lot of it is choice, not compulsory. and maybe one of the changes that might have to be made is that there is more pressure placed on mps to actually take all the measures they have and to ensure that they follow the advice they are given. and your experience... why don't they take the advice given in your experience? are there reasons that are given for that?— are given for that? there's lots of different reasons. _ are given for that? there's lots of different reasons. one _ are given for that? there's lots of different reasons. one size - are given for that? there's lots of different reasons. one size does. are given for that? there's lots of i different reasons. one size does not fit all, and therefore there has to be a degree of likability. if you were in mp in an inner—city urban environment, you may well have a very fixed location for your
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constituency surgery. if, however, you're in a more rural environment, that may not be feasible and therefore you may have to go to meet constituencies more localised and therefore you may be in temporary venues or, as i believe it happened today, a church, or other venues, and therefore sometimes those security arrangements that we would advise are not always practicable. equally, others feel it is not something they want to have. i remember mps saying to me but that's not what the public gets so i'm not going to do it. people have their own particular reasons for it, with the advice is good advice, it is well thought out, it is researched, and i would advise all the politicians out there to review, not just for the police to review the policies but the politicians themselves to review what practices they are running their surgeries by, because we know that their surgeries and the locality does around the
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surgeries are the most horrible places they are.— places they are. that is philip grindell of — places they are. that is philip grindell of the _ places they are. that is philip grindell of the company - places they are. that is philip i grindell of the company defuse, which was brought department after the death ofjo cox to help mps improve their security. it is 28 minutes to 9pm. you're watching bbc news. i am shaun ley. as we've been hearing, the conservative mp sir david amess has been stabbed to death at a constituency surgery he was holding in essex. the 69—year—old mp was attacked as he met constituents in leigh—on—sea just before midday. police arrived at the scene at belfairs methodist church within minutes, but sir david died there despite the efforts of paramedics. he received multiple stab wounds according to police. a 25—year—old man was arrested at the church and is being held on suspicion of murder. this evening, a vigil has been held in his memory. at a service at saint peter's church, close to where sir david was killed, fatherjeffrey woolnough paid tribute, saying, "he carried that great east london spirit of having
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no fear and being able to talk to people at the level they're at." "what can we say? he died doing the thing he loved, meeting his constituents, his local people." and he called him "mr southend". this is what constituents had to say about him. i was watching kelly and i have heard he was stabbed so many times. i was shocked. i was crying. i can't control myself. he was doing so a brilliantjob for the control myself. he was doing so a brilliant job for the local control myself. he was doing so a brilliantjob for the local people. he would go to people and he would say their— he would go to people and he would say their names, you know their names, — say their names, you know their names, and _ say their names, you know their names, and he would chat to them, and when _ names, and he would chat to them, and when i've been around with him, it was— and when i've been around with him, it was clear— and when i've been around with him, it was clear he had not done any rehearsal, — it was clear he had not done any rehearsal, he differ member and people _ rehearsal, he differ member and people - — rehearsal, he differ member and people — what they did, where they lived _ people — what they did, where they lived -- _ people — what they did, where they lived -- he— people — what they did, where they lived. —— he remembered people. a
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proper— lived. —— he remembered people. a proper mp~ — lived. -- he remembered people. a proper mr— proper mp. local memories of sir david amess- _ the prime minister has been giving his reaction to today's tragic events: i think all our hearts are full of shock and sadness today to the loss of sir david amess, mp, who was killed in his constituency surgery in a church after almost 40 years of continuous service to the people of essex and the whole of the united kingdom. and the reason i think people are so shocked and saddened is above all he was one of the kindest, nicest, most gentle people in politics, and he also had an outstanding record of passing laws to help the most vulnerable, whether the people were suffering from endometriosis, passing laws to and cruelty to animals or doing a huge amount to reduce the fuel poverty etc by people up and down the
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country. david was a man who believed passionately in this country and its future, and we have lost today a fine public servant and a much loved friend and colleague, and our thoughts are very much today with his wife, his children and his family. with his wife, his children and his famil . �* ., with his wife, his children and his famil . . . ., , with his wife, his children and his famil . . . .,, , , ., family. and what was the sense of shock when _ family. and what was the sense of shock when you _ family. and what was the sense of shock when you and _ family. and what was the sense of shock when you and your- family. and what was the sense of shock when you and your cabinet l shock when you and your cabinet colleagues heard about this? not something anybody expected to hear on a situate surgery, and 70 who has been _ on a situate surgery, and 70 who has been a _ on a situate surgery, and 70 who has been a conservative mp for a very lon- been a conservative mp for a very long time, — been a conservative mp for a very long time, 40 years. what was the reaction of— long time, 40 years. what was the reaction of you and your colleagues when _ reaction of you and your colleagues when that— reaction of you and your colleagues when that news came through? i think eve bod when that news came through? i think everybody was — when that news came through? i think everybody was deeply _ when that news came through? i think everybody was deeply shocked, - when that news came through? iiii�*u “la; everybody was deeply shocked, and heart stricken. and our thoughts, as i say, are very much with his family, with his wife, with his children, and for the rest, we must really leave the police to get on
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with their investigation for cipinko very much. with their investigation for cipinko ve much. .,~ with their investigation for cipinko ve much. ., with their investigation for cipinko very much-— with their investigation for cipinko ve much. ., ., , ., very much. speaker of the house of commons as _ very much. speaker of the house of commons as a _ very much. speaker of the house of commons as a two-day _ very much. speaker of the house of commons as a two-day come - very much. speaker of the house of commons as a two-day come of - very much. speaker of the house of - commons as a two-day come of course, commons as a two—day come of course, he is shocked, _ commons as a two—day come of course, he is shocked, saddened, distressed, but he _ he is shocked, saddened, distressed, but he also— he is shocked, saddened, distressed, but he also says this raises the issue _ but he also says this raises the issue of— but he also says this raises the issue of mp safety. we have two mps from the _ issue of mp safety. we have two mps from the two main parties westminister killed any space of five years. this is a problem, an urgent _ five years. this is a problem, an urgent problem, isn't it? | five years. this is a problem, an urgent problem, isn't it?- urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need _ urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need to _ urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need to do _ urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need to do is _ urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need to do is let - urgent problem, isn't it? ithink what we need to do is let the i urgent problem, isn't it? i think- what we need to do is let the police get on with their investigation, and i'm sure that all those issues will be considered in the proper time, but i think this is a moment for us to think of sir david, his wife, his family and our thoughts are very much with them. thank you very much. borisjohnson speaking in bristol. tributes have been pouring in to sir david amess, mps united in shock and sadness. deputy prime minister dominic raab tweeted that he was "heartbroken that we have lost sir david", whom he described as "a great common sense politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heart, and tremendous
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generosity of spirit". chancellor rishi sunak said... foreign secretary liz truss said she was "devastated" and called sir david "a lovely, lovely man and great parliamentarian". there was a similar reaction from across the political divide. the labour leader keir starmer called the news "horrific and deeply shocking". liberal democrat leader sir ed davey said it was "a truly terrible day for british politics but most importantly of all our prayers are with all the people who loved david". and scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon tweeted... the welsh first minister mark drakeford called the attack a "truly despicable and horrifying act". and former prime minister tony blair said he was "shocked and horrified" by the news.
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flags outside parliament are lowered to half mast. the sister of the murdered mp jo cox, kim leadbeater, now herself the labour mp for batley and spen, has been reacting to the news. totally shocked by what happened. to think that something so horrific could happen to another mp. and scared and frightened. yeah, a real roller coaster of emotions, to be honest. my mum, my dad, my partner, my friends— are you ok? and i was ok. i was in a school, actually, but the shock and the feeling as a family, to what we went through and that anotherfamily is family, to what we went through and that another family is having to go through that again, is horrific. it is hard to put into words how that feels for me, but the main thing we
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are think about is david's family, his friends and actually the community that he represents and has her presented for such a long time. and i think that's the thing people need to understand, is it's about a lot of people whose lives would have been changed forever today. and i know people still come up to me and talk to me about where they were when jo was talk to me about where they were whenjo was killed. their lives have just been changed. and it is so hard, because we have a job to do, and ifind myself now hard, because we have a job to do, and i find myself now working as a politician and try to help people and do good things for people, and it is really important we get good people in public life, but this is the risk that we are all taking. and so many mps today will be scared by this. and my partner came home and said, i don't want to do it anymore. i don't... because the next time that phone goes, it could be a different conversation. so there are some any layers to this. at the heart of it are david's family and
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friends, and i know for them now that they're likely never be the same again. they will think about this everything today for the rest of their and i can say, even david's staff, so many people today will have an out there trying to do the right thing, try to do a really importantjob, in public life, and then this happens? it is unbelievable that it can happen. i still can't believe this has happened. it feels very raw for me, and a note for the message i've been receiving from politicians across the political spectrum, for them, it is incredibly raw. but the main people that are on my mind are david's family and friends, and i know the roller coaster that they will now be on, and there is so little that you can say, because it has happened. kim little that you can say, because it has happened-— little that you can say, because it has happened. little that you can say, because it has ha ened. ., , ~ has happened. kim leadbetter, the mp for batley and — has happened. kim leadbetter, the mp for batley and spen, _ has happened. kim leadbetter, the mp for batley and spen, the _ has happened. kim leadbetter, the mp for batley and spen, the seat _ has happened. kim leadbetter, the mp for batley and spen, the seat that - for batley and spen, the seat that her late sister and she represent
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and represented. earlier i spoke to the former labour leader... i asked earlier i spoke to the former labour leader... iasked her thoughts leader... i asked her thoughts on the killing of sir david amess. it the killing of sir david amess. it is a day where our thoughts go out to david's family and friends and continuance and staff because this was a truly tragic event, and it brings back terrible memories as well, of what happened tojoe l —— what happened tojo, and therefore it is important to thing about what we can do to improve the security of mps, as you've been talking about, but actually to recognise more widely that we need to make our public life safe for those who are elected to represent us, and that cannotjust be about physical security. us, and that cannotjust be about physicalsecurity. it us, and that cannotjust be about physical security. it also has to be about the broader approach that we all take to respecting our elected
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representatives and to ensuring that they can carry out that role for us, make our democracy work while also being able to be safe. jo make our democracy work while also being able to be safe.— being able to be safe. jo cox's murder was — being able to be safe. jo cox's murder was the _ being able to be safe. jo cox's murder was the first _ being able to be safe. jo cox's murder was the first killing i being able to be safe. jo cox's murder was the first killing of| being able to be safe. jo cox'sl murder was the first killing of a sitting member of parliament, the irish question aside, since 1812, over 100 years in which whatever other problems mps might have faced, outside of the irish issue, a lot of them felt relatively safe, and certainly not at risk of losing their life by doing theirjob. by being
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if we want to have a properly functioning moxie where we can raise issues, where we can disagree, passionately, but where nevertheless our public represented skin be safe taking part in that, we need to think more widely about the approach
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that we take to our politicians, the approach that we take to public debate, ifeel sad that approach that we take to public debate, i feel sad that despite the work that lots of people have done and in that immediate aftermath ofjo's death, we still face the situation where mps are abused and face intimidation and violence and, as we've seen again so sadly today, when that can sometimes tip over into the tragic death of a member of parliamentjust doing theirjob, and fulfilling what we need from our democracy to work properly in this country. democracy to work properly in this count . g ., . democracy to work properly in this count . . . . ,, democracy to work properly in this count .g .. ,, ., country. jacqui smith, the former labour home _ country. jacqui smith, the former labour home secretary, - country. jacqui smith, the former labour home secretary, now- country. jacqui smith, the former i labour home secretary, now chairs the jo cox foundation, talking labour home secretary, now chairs thejo cox foundation, talking to me in the last hour. let me bring you some breaking news. this is from dominic casciani, he says the dbc understands from an official government source that the 25—year—old man being held on
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suspicion of murdering sir david amess this lunchtime is a british national who initially appears to be of some only heritage but further inquiries, i can... of some only heritage but further inquiries, ican... —— of some only heritage but further inquiries, i can... —— somali. that is from dominic casciani. the 25—year—old man held on suspicion of killing sir david amess this lunchtime is a british national, though he may be of some only heritage. —— of somali heritage. the lib dem peer lord nigeljones was attacked in his constituency in cheltenham injanuary 2000. he was attacked by a man with a japanese sword. his assistant andrew pennington died in the attack. lord jones perceived 57 stitches to a
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wound to his hand, which happened

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