Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. around 43,000 people in the south west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative, after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. travellers returning to england will be able to take private lateral flow tests, instead of more expensive pcr tests, from 24th october, in time for the half term holidays. a day of mourning in lebanon, after violence broke out in beirut leaving six people dead. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — with unlimited trips within a fortnight —
10:01 am
to tackle supply chain problems. and... adele is back — herfirst new music for six years released at midnight. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. the queen has appeared to suggest she's irritated by a lack of action in tackling the climate crisis. her remarks were picked up in clips of a conversation at the opening of the welsh parliament the senedd in cardiff — reported in this morning's daily mail.
10:02 am
the queen was talking to the duchess of cornwall and the parliament's presiding officer, and seemed to be referring to the forthcoming cop26 climate conference. she can be heard saying she doesn't know who is coming to the event, which will begin in glasgow at the end of this month. let's take a look at the two clips. the queen's remarks come after both prince charles and prince william spoke to the bbc earlier this week about the forthcoming cop26 summit and the urgency in addressing the climate change crisis. the narrative has changed.
10:03 am
you know, and lots of the things that you said are now mainstream. it's taken far too long. the world leaders are gathering in glasgow to talk about the kind of issues that you were. yes, but theyjust talk, . and the problem is to get action on the ground, _ which is what i've been trying to do for the last 40 years! we, if we're not careful, we're robbing from, you know, our children's future with what we do now. children love being outdoors, they love getting muddy, they love playing and chasing and playing sport and all that stuff, and i think they have a truer appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than, actually, many of the adults. and that's where, you know, the disconnect�*s happening — is that those adults in positions of responsibility are not channelling their inner child. we can't have more clever speak and clever words, but not enough action. earlier, i spoke to our royal correspondent, sean coughlan, about the queen's conversation. it was a few words being shared in private. and you need very good hearing to make them out as well. but people are interested, because it provides a glimpse
10:04 am
into the queen's thoughts, i think. and she actually was very engaged with the issues around the cop26 summit on climate change. and, as you say, it echoes some of the thoughts of other members of her family this week, prince charles and prince william. so maybe, there's an insight into what they talk about around the dinner table, perhaps! and it's not party politics, is it? it's a conversation about saving the planet which is, in some ways, it's not controversial. no, that's right. and again, it's not a sort of policy position. it's talking to people in private. it's sort of showing signs of a slightly exasperated host as well, not knowing who's going to turn up for an event. you know, will china come or not? it's almost where international diplomacy meets the politics of a dinner party. and i can sort of feel her frustration with not knowing who to say hello to when they arrive. and of course, the queen is going to be there, and other senior royals are going to be there. well, that's right, and it's something obviously to which they're
10:05 am
very clearly committed. also, i suppose, it also shows what happens if you live in a world where everything you say is scrutinised and recorded, and interpreted to the last degree, as we're doing now. but as you say, i think it's the sort of broad comment of support for a project, and it shows her own commitment and herfamily�*s commitment to it. it's not the first time, of course, that a royal conversation that was thought to be in private has been overheard and reported on. no, and it's one of the perils of thejob perhaps, isn't it? and it's a world in which everybody has a camera in their pocket, everybody has the capacity to share a couple of words with the rest of the world in a few seconds. and also, i suppose, because the queen doesn't say much about such issues in public, when people do hear what she thinks, there's a huge amount of attention paid to them. so, perhaps, less is more. so these words will reverberate around the world, even though they're only a few snatched comments. around 43,000 people — mostly from the south west of england —
10:06 am
may have been given incorrect covid test results, after they were processed by a lab in the west midlands. the uk health security agency says testing at the immensa health clinic in wolverhampton has been suspended, after reports of people receiving negative pcr test results following a positive lateral flow test. it's thought those affected were tested between 8th september and 12th october. i've been speaking to our health editor, hugh pym. we had heard about this for the last couple of weeks anecdotally from gps who reported that they had patients getting in touch saying that they were unwell, they had all the symptoms come and they tested positive on a lateral flow then gone to get the confirmatory pcr and it was negative. and gps were rather suspicious of this. it seems to be largely around the south—west of england, then late yesterday, west berkshire council came out and said
10:07 am
that at one of their testing sites, anyone who had been there since early october up until the 12th should go and get another test because there had been problems with processing pcrs. to be clear, it is the laboratory in question, not the testing sites. sojust the laboratory in question, not the testing sites. so just in the last hour, we have heard from uk hsa, one of the bodies that replaced public health england, that it is a laboratory in wolverhampton, a private laboratory, not a government run one, and it has been suspended because 43,000 people have been given negative pcr results, which were incorrect. and they are in the south—west of england. it seems to have been about 10% of the overall amount that went through that lab. now, the reassurance to people is the testing system is still working, all tests will now go to other labs. the 8th of september goes back a little way so the question is, who knew what and when? if you got
10:08 am
infected in september and got a false result on your pcr, the infection will almost certainly have worn off by now so a certain number of those 43,000 will now be much better and don't have any symptoms. but some who may be tested in last week or so, where their results went to that lab, who will need to be contacted. and we are told that the contacted. and we are told that the contact tracing network is going to get in touch with people who need to redo their tests. but it does raise questions over how some of these labs are in. questions over how some of these labs are in-— labs are in. hugh pym, our health ednon rules for travellers returning to england will be relaxed in time for the half—term holidays. from the 24th of october, fully vaccinated people will be able to use private lateral flow tests to prove their covid status, rather than relying on the more expensive pcr test. the transport secretary said it would make travel easier and simpler. joining me now is rob griggs, from airlines uk. what is your reaction to that, how
10:09 am
much easier is it going to make travel and how much of a boost as it going to be for the travel industry? good morning. it is a big boost. it is the latest in what has been a series of really positive announcements over the last couple of weeks. we saw the red list coming down we saw the vaccination exemptions extend to more people are more country and this is a big change we have been calling for for a long time, moving from the more expensive pcr tests which can cost upwards of £70 down to lateral flow tests, which should be quite a bit cheaper. which will help more families get away in time for half—term. families get away in time for half-term— families get away in time for half-term. ., ., ., , , half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around _ half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around £20 _ half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around £20 or— half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around £20 or £30, - half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around £20 or £30, is - half-term. the lateral flow tests cost around £20 or £30, is that l cost around £20 or £30, is that right? cost around £20 or £30, is that riuht? . , cost around £20 or £30, is that riuht? ., , ,., cost around £20 or £30, is that riuht? ., , ., , , right? that is the sort of numbers we are hearing — right? that is the sort of numbers we are hearing so _ right? that is the sort of numbers we are hearing so quite _ right? that is the sort of numbers we are hearing so quite a - right? that is the sort of numbers we are hearing so quite a bit - we are hearing so quite a bit cheaper than the standard pcr tests. 0bviously, cheaper than the standard pcr tests. obviously, it is still a cost. 0ne obviously, it is still a cost. one day, we would like to see those later, all testing go forfully vaccinated, but it is a big step forward and it does reduced costs quite a bit. just forward and it does reduced costs quite a bit-—
10:10 am
quite a bit. just in time for the last -- half-term _ quite a bit. just in time for the last -- half-term holidays - quite a bit. just in time for the i last -- half-term holidays which quite a bit. just in time for the - last -- half-term holidays which is last —— half—term holidays which is a last chance for the travel industry to get the laced boost after such a disastrous time. == after such a disastrous time. -- late boost- _ after such a disastrous time. » late boost. yes, it has been a really challenging 18 months, we didn't really have a summer season in the end in the uk because it was so stop start, so the october half—term is a big event for travel in england. and it sort of leads up to the christmas period, which is another big time and a critical booking window for 2022, which we really hope will be a better year than this year. but the last couple of weeks has seen good steps forward so hopefully, it is progress we can build on. ,., ., so hopefully, it is progress we can build on. , ,, ., ., , build on. good steps forward, but this is only _ build on. good steps forward, but this is only england _ build on. good steps forward, but this is only england for— build on. good steps forward, but this is only england for the - build on. good steps forward, but this is only england for the time l this is only england for the time being? this is only england for the time bein: ? ., , ., being? for the time being, we have seen, we being? for the time being, we have seen. we exuect — being? for the time being, we have seen, we expect the _ being? for the time being, we have seen, we expect the devolved - seen, we expect the devolved administrations to align, they have tended to. it can be confusing of countries in the uk do different things, but hopefully, we will see all the countries come on board quite quickly. all the countries come on board quite quickly-— all the countries come on board quite quickly. what other changes would ou quite quickly. what other changes would you and _ quite quickly. what other changes would you and the _ quite quickly. what other changes would you and the industry - quite quickly. what other changes would you and the industry like i quite quickly. what other changes would you and the industry like to see now as things do relax? weill. would you and the industry like to see now as things do relax? well, we have seen some _ see now as things do relax? well, we have seen some good _ see now as things do relax? well, we have seen some good steps - see now as things do relax? well, we
10:11 am
have seen some good steps forward. | see now as things do relax? well, we| have seen some good steps forward. i think we still have hotel quarantine from red list countries. we understand the need for a red list, but we have seen other countries move away from the hotel element to something like home quarantine if you are fully vaccinated from those countries, that might be a step. we also have that testing regime for fully vaccinated. most countries in europe don't have arrivals testing if you are fully vaccinated so if we can move forward into next year taking it away, that would be great. and also, things like the passenger locator forms. and also, things like the passenger locatorforms. again, it is and also, things like the passenger locator forms. again, it is a and also, things like the passenger locatorforms. again, it is a little bit more admin you have to do now which you didn't have to do before covid so if we can move to an infant —— and even simple way of doing that with even less testing, that would be better and help to strengthen the recovery, but we have seen good steps in the last couple of weeks. it is good to talk to you, thank you very much, rob griggs, from airlines uk. in lebanon, a national day of mourning has begun for six people shot dead in violent clashes in the centre of the capital, beirut. there have been international calls
10:12 am
for calm, with the united nations, the us and france all urging a de—escalation of the tensions. gunfire erupted during a demonstration by shia muslim groups against the judge investigating last year's devastating port blast. 0ur middle east correspondent, anna foster, described the mood in beirut this morning. well, there's a cautious calm, i think, on the streets of beirut this morning. today's been declared a national day of mourning, which means that government buildings are closed and municipal business will stop. crucially, schools have been closed as well. students have been told not to go to universities. the funerals will happen in a few hours for those people who died yesterday. i think what everybody is waiting to see is what will happen next, is how long this quiet peace will hold. and i think there will be a lot of focus on what happens next with the blast investigation. shortly before that protest
10:13 am
started yesterday morning, judgejudge tarek bitar was given permission once again to resume that suspended investigation. and i think everybody will watch to see whether that resumption happens, whether the mps who have so far resisted giving evidence will do so, and whether or not really that investigation will continue on course, or whether it will be in some way derailed before it comes to a verdict. how scared, how worried are people that yesterday's scenes may not have been a one—off? well, people have seen these kind of scenes on the streets of beirut before. it's important to say not for a very long time. it's at least a decade until there's been gunfire of that range and duration on the streets of beirut. things like rockets, as you heard there, being fired. but people who lived through the civil war here in beirut, they've seen that before, and that really worries them. they are concerned that they will see scenes like that again and they don't want their children to live through what they lived through between 1975 and 1990. so there is real concern from people. they want to see this resolved, but there are simmering tensions. this is a sectarian dispute.
10:14 am
and of course, there's history of that lasting and being very, very difficult to mediate and difficult to solve. so i think people are waiting and hoping this morning that that will be the end of it for now, at least. the lebanese army deployed now in the capital, how will that calm the situation and how much power does it actually have in the midst of all those very powerful militia groups? what's really interesting about the lebanese army, actually, is that they are in many ways the glue that's holding the country together at the moment. they do a lot ofjobs that other armies don't do. they do the jobs of the police very often as well. they are overstretched, they've been receiving donations of food and equipment from different countries around the world. their soldiers are only receiving a very small amount of money. so things are very difficult for them. but we saw them out on the streets yesterday in large number. i was, at one point, surrounded by soldiers who were trying to decide what to do. they were looking at the buildings around them and they were making a plan, and if they saw people firing from those buildings, then
10:15 am
they would go in and they would raid them to try and stop what was going on. there were soldiers on the street in great number. i think in the end, the reason this conflict died down was not because the army necessarily stepped in and stopped it. it was a calm which descended on its own. the army is still very well respected here in lebanon, but they have an extraordinarily difficultjob to do when it comes to keeping the peace. particularly when you consider, as we were saying, the things that the lebanese people are living through at the moment. lack of electricity, lack of medicines, lack of fuel. the lebanese lira has lost 90% of its value just in the last year or so. people are angry and tired here in beirut, and it means that tensions are always simmering just below the surface. anna foster, with the latest from beirut. the man suspected of killing five people with a bow and arrow in norway has been handed over to health services, the prosecution said, amid speculation, he may have mental health issues. 37—year—old espen andersen brathen is due to appear in court this morning.
10:16 am
a danish muslim convert, he has reportedly confessed to the crime that the authorities say appears to have been an act of terror. security services say he has been "in and out of the health system". 0ur correspondent mark lowen is in kongsberg, where the attack took place, and where the suspect was known to authorities. there were fears over his radicalisation. we know that he had converted to islam. a video has emerged which he posted to social media, in which he issues a warning and proclaims his muslim faith. so the question now is whether the radicalisation was what drove him to pick up a bow and arrow and go on a killing spree through this small, peaceful town of 25,000 people on wednesday evening, killing five people, or to what extent psychiatric problems were at play. he is undergoing psychiatric treatment. that could last several weeks. there will be a court appearance this morning, we don't know if you physically will be there or whether he will be represented by
10:17 am
a lawyer, but he is expected to be remanded in custody. meanwhile, here there has been a candlelit vigil and candles are still glowing this morning, that candles, roses and cuddly toys as well. we spoke to people here yesterday, some of whom were crying, others comforting their relatives, saying they are trying to come to terms with the devastation that has been wrought on this town. it is no way�*s worst mass killing in a decade since the far right extremist anders breivik killed 57 people here. we expect the prime minister to come here this morning to read —— to reassure people and to try to restore the spirit of this town which feels so profoundly crushed. a ~ town which feels so profoundly crushed. ~ ., ., the uk government is planning to allow foreign lorry drivers to make more deliveries in the uk, to try to ease the pressure on supply chains. 0verseas drivers will now be able to make unlimited trips within a fortnight. the transport secretary grant shapps said it was a "common—sense measure" and would increase the number of lorry drivers on the road
10:18 am
by several thousand. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. thousands of extra visas have been offered to hgv drivers from abroad, in an attempt to ease pressure on supply chains in the uk. but only a fraction of them have been issued. so now, the government's going further, in a move it hopes will allow thousands of extra deliveries per month. drivers from the eu are normally restricted to making two deliveries within seven days, but those rules will be relaxed to allow unlimited trips within a fortnight. having some additional capacity, right now, i think everybody agrees is a good idea. this is a quick way of doing it. it doesn't require visas to do. people are already here. so, it'sjust a common—sense measure at these times. it's hoped food supply chains will be boosted by the move, with more goods being moved at a time of high demand. but the haulage industry is worried that while it might take
10:19 am
the pressure off in the run—up to christmas, uk firms could lose out to cheaper eu rivals. pig farming is another sector that's been struggling, with thousands of healthy animals slaughtered without being processed for meat. but there's relief at the government's move to allow 800 foreign butchers into the uk and provide more cold storage. we needed butchers in these processing plants 12 weeks ago now. we, as farmers, should never have been put in this position. this really wasn't our problem. this was a processing problem, and we've been left to deal with the whole emotional and financial issues. farmers say the action is long overdue, but ministers deny acting too late. the government insists in the long—term, uk wages and working standards will need to rise to these challenges. but for now, they've been left with no choice but to rely on foreign labour. jonathan blake, bbc news. almost 13,000 cases involving allegations of domestic abuse in england and wales have been dropped over the past five years, because prosecutors ran out of time to bring charges, within the six—month time limit.
10:20 am
figures obtained by bbc news also suggest that while more common assaults involving domestic violence are being reported — fewer cases are being brought to trial. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more. i didn't know, or understand, what i was going through. i genuinely believed it was my fault. i kept asking myself, what is it that i keep doing wrong that makes them behave like this? a year ago, erica started a campaign to support survivors of domestic abuse, something she says that's very personal. when there were the good days, i'd be like, 0k, i've done something right. and then, when there was something going wrong, i'd say to myself, this is what i've done wrong, i'm being punished for my own mistakes. and getting out of that mindset is what led me to eventually leave this relationship. erica made a report of domestic abuse to the police, but was told no—one could be charged because too much time had passed.
10:21 am
coming forward, for me, was one of the biggest things i've ever done in my life. to sit down and say to someone that doesn't know me that these are the things that happened to me. six months isn't enough time to even fathom that sort of experience. the current law allows six months between the time an alleged common assault takes place and someone being charged. the idea is to keepjustice moving in offences the system deems less serious. but campaigners say when it comes to domestic abuse, that's not long enough, because it can take years for victims to feel able to come forward, orfor police to build a case. in the past five years, in england and wales, there were almost 13,000 cases of common assault involving domestic abuse that were never charged, because that six—month time limit was breached. and while over that period, the number of these cases being reported went up, the number resulting in someone being charged went down. some want a change in the law — to allow more time for domestic abuse cases to get to court.
10:22 am
i think this is another example of where the law, the criminaljustice system, simply doesn't get violence against women and girls. we need recognition from the government of how serious this is, how you've got so many domestic abuse survivors and victims just being timed out because the law is wrong and unfair. ministers have said before they will consider this issue, which the government says it takes seriously. in a statement, a spokesman said all allegations should be investigated and pursued vigorously through the courts, where possible. and they pointed out there's no time limit on reporting other crimes, such as bodily harm, or those that add up to coercive behaviour. meanwhile, police chiefs say that six—month limit only affects a small proportion of cases. but they say there is particular concern around those involving domestic abuse, and they're supporting the government in analysing the issue, to ensure victims achieve justice. i used to spend a lot of time to myselfjust
10:23 am
to reflect, to calm down. erica says it's a case she will keep on making. using my story as my strength has been the biggest thing for me. to be able to tell my story with confidence, but using it as power to basically fight back against the law and hopefully change the law has been one of the most important things to me. alex forsyth reporting there. details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc. co. uk/actionline. polish mps have passed a controversial bill that allows border guards to immediately expel migrants who've crossed the border illegally, even if they are asylum seekers. poland has seen a huge surge in the number of people — many from the middle east — trying to reach the country illegally from belarus. aru na iyengar reports. migrants in the forest, checking their belongings on the poland—belarus border.
10:24 am
this is mohammed. he's a former travel agent from yemen. he says polish guards forced him back into belarus when he arrived at the polish border. they said they would bring us to the un camp. so they lied to us. we go with them. then they take our phones and they break our sim cards. he's one of thousands of people from the middle east, africa and afghanistan who have tried to enter poland from belarus in recent weeks. the united nations high commissioner for refugees says poland's in breach of international law in pushing migrants back to belarus, instead of offering them asylum. but that hasn't stopped poland passing a bill to spend over $400 million on a wall between it and belarus, and bringing in new laws which could mean a lengthy ban from entering poland if a migrant
10:25 am
is caught trying to enter illegally. this woman from syria is now in a migrant centre in poland, but only after four attempts to get in from belarus. they say, you will go there and get asylum there, but they took us to the belarussian border again. the eu has accused belarus of deliberately opening its borders to migrants from the middle east and africa, knowing that many will use the opportunity to enter the eu via poland. it says this is in retaliation for eu—imposed sanctions on belarus over its crackdown on dissent. and on the western side of poland, this is where many end up. in august, 200 arrived at this camp in germany, via poland and belarus. now, 100 to 150 are arriving each day. translation: the real problem | is the human trafficking organised by the belarus regime. as far as we know, i
10:26 am
the human trafficking has been increased —i we noticed that in the increased numbers here. in the beginning, it was mostly people from iraq, 90%- of them males travelling alone. now, it has diversified. german and polish politicians are calling for tougher action against this influx through belarus. meanwhile, the conditions and outlook for these people illustrates a growing human crisis. aruna iyengar, bbc news. south—east asian nations are to hold a virtual meeting of their foreign ministers later to discuss whether to exclude myanmarfrom the regional bloc — asean. they have to decide what to do before a summit at the end of this month with other world leaders. i've been speaking to our southeast asia correspondent jonathan head about how significant not inviting myanmar to the summit would be. well, that would amount to a de facto suspension of myanmar�*s
10:27 am
membership and that has never happened. asean has existed for 54 years and there is no mechanism for fully expending member states. when asean allowed myanmar to become a member in the 1990s, it was very controversial, myanmar was under a very repressive government and they organised its non—confrontational approach and dialogue would eventually draw the myanmar military out and persuade them to open out and that is what we saw ten years ago. now asean is in a real bind, myanmar is a member and technically has a veto over its decisions, but the rest of the world has looked at this deepening crisis and evolving conflict where people are taking up arms against the military and all of them, the united states, china, the eu, australia, basically saying to asean, you sort it out. but asean states are divided, something the behaviour of myanmar is so bad and it isn't cooperating with them on even very limited purposes it made to ease the file in six months ago,
10:28 am
that it must be at least suspended for the moment and not allowed to attend summits. thailand which has the longest border with myanmar is very worried about the breach of ties, communication links they have with the hunter and feel that would make things worse, so it will be a very fraught meeting and we're not sure what compromise they welcome up with. asean, it is probably its greatest crisis that the association has placed where one of its own members has gone so rogue and where the country it is now governing is falling down. i mean, the humanitarian situation in myanmar is “p humanitarian situation in myanmar is up to critical and we have got constant clashes, where local militias formed by people opposed to the coup are clashing with the military, often with huge cost in lives, this is happening all the time, and at the moment, this region isjust struggling to time, and at the moment, this region is just struggling to think about how it can stop this conflict getting worst with inevitable consequences when you see refugees and others poring over borders. an australian state has
10:29 am
announced its now able to relax its covid travel restrictions, after 18 months. fully vaccinated australians — but not tourists — will be allowed to fly into new south wales from november — without having to quarantine. the australian prime minister scott morrison has welcomed the news. this is further demonstration of australians getting vaccinated is enabling them to do more and more and more. new south wales is hitting 80% double—dose vaccination rates. here in this city, it is turning into one of the more vaccinated cities in the world today. and that is a great achievement for australia and, in particular, those right across greater sydney. and it has been hard—fought and hard—won, and that's why i welcome the fact that this is a further sign of the national plan coming into effect and allowing australians to start reclaiming so many of the things that have been taken from them throughout this pandemic. 0ur sydney correspondent shaimaa khalil told me more about the new changes. a big policy shift because now, new south wales is the first
10:30 am
and only state so far to allow quarantine—free travel for australians, which means that if you are a fully vaccinated australian citizen, australian permanent resident and immediate family including parents, you can come into sydney and not be required to quarantine in a hotel or at home. what you will be required to do is present proof of vaccination and that this jab is approved by the australian medical authorities. you will also be required to have returned a negative covid—19 test before you get on your plane. the prime minister, as we heard there, welcomed the news. he also did clarify that this does not yet include non—australians, it does not yet include tourists. he said the government has not made a decision on when tourists will be allowed back in australia — there was a bit of confusion over that. but generally, i think, for australians overseas, it now means that they can reunite with their families and not have
10:31 am
to think about quarantine. that is a huge deal. it will also mean that airlines will have to ramp up planes to sydney in the coming weeks. interestingly, what this also will mean is that people in new south wales will be able to travel internationally, so will be able to go to the uk or the us, before they are able to travel domestically, because most of the internal domestic state borders are still closed. now look at the latest headlines on bbc news. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. around 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. travellers returning to england will be able to take private lateral flow tests instead of more expensive pcr tests from 24th october
10:32 am
a day of mourning in lebanon after violence broke out in beirut leaving six people dead. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems. # go easy on me, baby #. and adele is back — her first new music for six years released at midnight. suppliers around the world are struggling to cope with a rise in consumer demand, as countries emerge from pandemic lockdowns. us president biden announced the country's largest port, los angeles, will start operating 24/7 — an effort to help ease supply chain blockages since christmas is approaching. the shortages are causing dramatic price rises in everything, from food to energy, to consumer goods.
10:33 am
de shortages are causing dramatic price rises in and everything. with me now to talk more is eamon barrett from altitude, a specialist bicycle retailer based in waterford city, ireland. thank you for being with us. tell us about the problems you have had. globally, the bicycle industry is in a prolonged period of shortage, demand is for extra pink —— exceeding the ply, supplies cannot keep up with the demand and anybody who has been into a bicycle shop in the last 18 months knows that the days of being able to walk in and pick up your bike is gone. you are now looking at a much longer lead time, restricted choice, even getting your bike repaired is becoming a challenge because of the ongoing component shortages globally, because of the man a factoring constraint in asia. i
10:34 am
don't know how much you know about the supply chain issues, but how much of it is contain blockages, lorry driver shortages, can you put yourfinger lorry driver shortages, can you put your finger on lorry driver shortages, can you put yourfinger on what is lorry driver shortages, can you put your finger on what is causing the problems? mil your finger on what is causing the roblems? �* ., .,, , ., problems? all of those things are contributing _ problems? all of those things are contributing to _ problems? all of those things are contributing to it _ problems? all of those things are contributing to it but _ problems? all of those things are contributing to it but actually - problems? all of those things are contributing to it but actually the | contributing to it but actually the biggest it to —— biggest issue is the inability of the industry to mmp the inability of the industry to ramp up the production to the scale of the increase in demand as a result of the pandemic opened at the very early days of covid, we had this kind of golden period of about 60 days when demand went through the roof and the supply was still there to meet it but because the demand was happening all across europe and indeed globally, the warehousesjust emptied of all of the buffer stock very quickly and suddenly, you know, for any number of complex reasons, itjust for any number of complex reasons, it just wasn't possible for any number of complex reasons, itjust wasn't possible to replenish that stock and impact the industry has never managed to replenish its buffer stock. container ships and
10:35 am
bikes come in, they are presold to shops, straight out the door, leaving warehouses again of any replenishment. all of the issues around shipping and shortages of hgv drivers, they all play a part in the delays, but the source reason goes right back to asia, where government enforced factory shutdowns limited capacity because of social distancing, all of these issues have led to the supply output from the major component manufacturers having a knock—on impact of bicycle factories being unable to build enough bikes because they did not have the components. and that will be an ongoing problem. i got notified yesterday that the chinese government is beginning a series of enforced power shutdowns, regionally, where each region will have to take its turn having its power turned off, and that means factories will basically be producing nothing for 14 days. when
10:36 am
you add that into the other complications, itjust leads to ongoing delays. it complications, it 'ust leads to ongoing delays._ complications, it 'ust leads to ongoing delays. it is a nightmare for our ongoing delays. it is a nightmare for your business, _ ongoing delays. it is a nightmare for your business, you _ ongoing delays. it is a nightmare for your business, you don't - ongoing delays. it is a nightmare| for your business, you don't have enough stock to sell so how hard is it to survive? we enough stock to sell so how hard is it to survive?— enough stock to sell so how hard is it to survive? we have been dealing with that problem _ it to survive? we have been dealing with that problem now— it to survive? we have been dealing with that problem now for— it to survive? we have been dealing with that problem now for about. it to survive? we have been dealing | with that problem now for about the past 12 months and it certainly has involved a lot of creative thinking. some of it is not really ideal from a commercial point of view because we are now having to sometimes purchase components at retail across europe from wherever we can find them and there is obviously no margin in that for us but it is part of trying to keep the business running and keep the repair end of the business running. locally, we are kind of diverse fight in that we deal with a number of very large bike brands. the trickle of supply across the people we deal with has meant we have never actually run out but we have certainly had points where, for a month it feels you are turning all your customers away because you just don't have what they are looking for. band because you just don't have what they are looking for.— because you just don't have what they are looking for. and the irony is we have — they are looking for. and the irony is we have the _
10:37 am
they are looking for. and the irony is we have the cop _ they are looking for. and the irony is we have the cop 26 _ they are looking for. and the irony is we have the cop 26 climate - they are looking for. and the irony . is we have the cop 26 climate change summit coming up shortly, everybody is being urged not to drive around so much, to get on bikes instead and people like you can't actually sell them! , ., , , ., people like you can't actually sell them! , , ., ., them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, them! yes, the irony is not lost on me. believe _ them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, believe me! _ them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, believe me! it— them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, believe me! it is— them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, believe me! it is an _ them! yes, the irony is not lost on me, believe me! it is an ongoing l me, believe me! it is an ongoing issue and i think customers have some become more patient and understanding because it is not news to anybody that these problems exist. you are having to work with it as best you can. we are probably more lucky than most but it remains a global problem and the outlook we see and what we are being told by the brands is that it is not a problem that will go away anytime soon. the recovery point where normal stocks are back in the warehouses is now forecast to be in the last quarter of 2022, maybe early 2023. the last quarter of 2022, maybe early 2021— the last quarter of 2022, maybe earl 2023. ., ., ~ ., ., early 2023. good to talk to you and aood luck, early 2023. good to talk to you and good luck, eamon _ early 2023. good to talk to you and good luck, eamon barrett - early 2023. good to talk to you and good luck, eamon barrett from - good luck, eamon barrett from
10:38 am
altitude which is a specialist bicycle retailer in waterford city. some breaking news from afghanistan in the last few minutes and it has been another mosque attack, this time in the city of kandahar. seven have been killed and 13 injured according to a doctor from a provincial hospital we are hearing 13 have been injured, and the attack was at a mosque in kandahar, a shia must. a spokesman for the taliban government's interior ministry said the authorities were collecting details. it took place in kandahar, tearing through the mosque in the southern city during friday prayers, causing very heavy casualties, as you would expect, the mosque was probably pretty full at the time.
10:39 am
the latest casualties toll is seven dead and 13 injured but no claim of responsibility yet although suspicion may fall on islamic state point the taliban are now in control of kandahar and the rest of afghanistan. jacky wright, a corporate vice president for the tech giant microsoft, has been named as the most influential black person in the 2022 powerlist. the powerlist celebrates leading figures with african and caribbean heritage working in health, business, science and the arts. footballer marcus rashford and actress michaela coel also feature in the top ten. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. there are many women of colour coming through the pipeline. the question is, is the door open? hello. . ., , question is, is the door open? hello-_ nice i question is, is the door open? | hello._ nice to question is, is the door open? - hello._ nice to be hello. nice to see you. nice to be back in the _ hello. nice to see you. nice to be back in the office. _
10:40 am
hello. nice to see you. nice to be back in the office. global - hello. nice to see you. nice to be back in the office. global leader, | back in the office. global leader, businesswoman, _ back in the office. global leader, businesswoman, technology - businesswoman, technology trailblazer. jackie wright has worked her way up to become one of the most senior bosses in big tech. how did a girl from tottenham end up being a global tech leader? i how did a girl from tottenham end up being a global tech leader?— being a global tech leader? i come from a family _ being a global tech leader? i come from a family from _ being a global tech leader? i come from a family from the _ being a global tech leader? i come from a family from the caribbean, | from a family from the caribbean, from a family from the caribbean, from jamaica, my dad served in the royal air force. my mother, windrush, came on a boat to this country and they had a life they had to strive and against all odds, and my dad really instilled in me that i could be and do anything. no matter what he was going through. nobody ever hired jacky and said could become they hired me because i put this and this and this and that's not tokenism, i had to know my craft. i5 not tokenism, i had to know my craft. , ., ., ., , ., craft. is one of the huge demands of the da 'ob craft. is one of the huge demands of the day job and _ craft. is one of the huge demands of the day job and raising _ craft. is one of the huge demands of the day job and raising three - the dayjob and raising three children, making time to inspire the next generation of leaders is one of her top priorities.— her top priorities. talent is everywhere _ her top priorities. talent is everywhere but _ her top priorities. talent is| everywhere but opportunity her top priorities. talent is i everywhere but opportunity is her top priorities. talent is - everywhere but opportunity is not. it is imperative that, as i step
10:41 am
into a room, as i go and meet people, people see that they can also be important and i will create also be important and i will create a door that says welcome and people all walks of life, from all backgrounds and experiences, they too can have the opportunity. her rise to the — too can have the opportunity. her rise to the top — too can have the opportunity. her rise to the top has not been easy. and there have been many challenges along the way. but she says the rewards have been worth it. have you always had that burning passion for tech, and to be involved in the tech world? ., ., , ,, ., world? no, i had the burning passion to chance world? no, i had the burning passion to change the — world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. _ world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. as _ world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. as i _ world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. as i thought - to change the world. as i thought about the injustices that occur in life, and the problems we have from an existential perspective, i always want to solve problems. but i fell into technology, and then i realised technology can help change things. showing no signs of slowing down best could be yet to come.- best could be yet to come. digital is at the core _ best could be yet to come. digital is at the core of _ best could be yet to come. digital is at the core of everything - best could be yet to come. digital is at the core of everything we - best could be yet to come. digital| is at the core of everything we do, it is an ethos. technology plays in
10:42 am
every aspect of our lives and you have a role as a leader, no matter what or who you are in society, to help leave the world in a better place than you found it. let's speak to someone who's made the top ten — lord simon woolley. he's the principal of homerton college at cambridge university and co—founder of operation black vote. thank you for being with us. i suppose some people might ask what is the point of a list like this but it inspires young people, as we heard in the report? that it inspires young people, as we heard in the report?— heard in the report? that is it, 10096, heard in the report? that is it, 100%, it is — heard in the report? that is it, 100%, it is to _ heard in the report? that is it, 10096, it is to showcase - heard in the report? that is it, 10096, it is to showcase blackl heard in the report? that is it, - 10096, it is to showcase black talent 100%, it is to showcase black talent on our doorstep but also to be a beacon for black and brown kids and also working class kids up and down the country to say, yes, you can. it is not a work in the park, you heard jackie talking about the barriers, and we are here to try to remove those barriers so we can unleash talent. that is what the black powerlist is about, showcasing and
10:43 am
unleashing talent for the next generation. unleashing talent for the next generation-— unleashing talent for the next reneration. ~ ., ., , generation. what are the barriers that persist? _ generation. what are the barriers that persist? you _ generation. what are the barriers that persist? you look _ generation. what are the barriers that persist? you look at - generation. what are the barriers. that persist? you look at someone like jacky wright, extraordinary successful and corporate vice president but a girl from tottenham who has done equally well but it's a rarity so why are they still there, the barriers?— rarity so why are they still there, the barriers? that's the problem it is the exception _ the barriers? that's the problem it is the exception rather _ the barriers? that's the problem it is the exception rather than - the barriers? that's the problem it is the exception rather than the i is the exception rather than the rule. if the likes of jacky and simon and marcus rashford everywhere really can have a pathway to success, everybody benefits. i think the biggest challenge we have is denial, denialthat there the biggest challenge we have is denial, denial that there are still persistent barriers and structural inequalities based on race. a few months ago, we launched the colour of power, to show the 1100 top jobs, of power, to show the 1100 top jobs, and it is almost spot the black person, and there were very few women, 27%. there's a long way to go but interestingly, in the last 18
10:44 am
months have been some really big conversations in business, in the academic world, local government, that are looking around and saying, we're not doing good enough, what is our game plan? and where they do that, it is not a zero—sum game, because i went means you lose, it means we both win. pie gets bigger, the talent pool grows, and everyone benefits. tell the talent pool grows, and everyone benefits. , ., , ., ., benefits. tell us about your own story because — benefits. tell us about your own story because it _ benefits. tell us about your own story because it is _ benefits. tell us about your own story because it is always i story because it is always fascinating i think to hear how individuals have made it and i think you grew up in a council estate in leicester, leaving school without a—levels, and now you are the first black man to lead an 0xbridge college. black man to lead an oxbridge collere. �* , , ., ., , black man to lead an oxbridge collere. �* _ ., ., college. i'm deeply honoured its a ureat college. i'm deeply honoured its a great college- _ college. i'm deeply honoured its a great college. _ i think we are losing you, i'm afraid, just as we were getting to hear your life story. let's see if
10:45 am
we don't hear from lord hear your life story. let's see if we don't hearfrom lord simon woolley any more. are you back with us? wejust lost woolley any more. are you back with us? we just lost you, woolley any more. are you back with us? wejust lost you, a bit of woolley any more. are you back with us? we just lost you, a bit of a dodgy connection somewhere on the line but you were telling us about your life story and how you made it from a leicester counsel state to running an 0xbridge college? it is running an oxbridge college? it is an running an 0xbridge college? it 3 an extraordinaryjourney and never in a million years would i have thought i went from the council estate to be knighted by the queen and in the house of lords and now heading the college but i think central to it is hard work and endeavour. self belief, which was given to me by my mother. a bit of luck, no doubt about that. but the belief that you can, that when you do, everyone benefits and from this interview i'm going to a meeting with young emerging black leaders and i want to inspire them but also white working class kids as well that are often told that they can't and they never will be. 0ur society,
10:46 am
our country we do it a disservice by not offering pathways, not believing in them, that they can do great things. i want to thank the ceo of the black powerlist because he spent his life showcasing talent, but ensuring that that talent reaches down to others, pulls them up and says, we are all greater for this. and what would you say to those people who say it is fine to say a young black kid on a council estate now, if he or she works really hard, they will make it, but you talked about barriers earlier and may be those barriers will get in the way evenif those barriers will get in the way even if you do work hard? you're riaht, even if you do work hard? you're right. and _ even if you do work hard? you're right, and unfortunately- even if you do work hard? you're right, and unfortunately they i even if you do work hard? you're i right, and unfortunately they almost certainly will get in the way but it is what you do when you're confronted with it, do you go over, under, push it round? that's myjob as a matter of fact, breaking down barriers, and ensuring that these institutions are the very best they
10:47 am
can be by embracing this talent. there was a long way to go. sometimes you have leaders that will say, i acknowledge there is a problem and let's do something about it, but i'm afraid there are others that are in denial and say it is a level playing field, look at you, lord simon woolley, you're in a higher place. it isn't, and denial is the greatest problem right now and once we get over that, i feel particularly in these troubled times, with brexit and people protesting on the streets, to have a voice, it is up to the leaders on the black powerlist and other leaders to lean in together, work together and ensure that the talent in the uk as a pathway to success. it is great to listen to you and i'm glad we persisted with the line because it was well worth hearing what you had to say. you are in a high place now but you won't always come as you were telling us, lord simon woolley, thank you so much for your time. the headlines on bbc news...
10:48 am
the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. around 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. travellers returning to england will be able to take private lateral flow tests instead of more expensive pcr tests from 24th october. more than 50 child safety groups from around the world have demanded that facebook publishes its private research into the effects social media can have on the mental health of youngsters. in a letter to facebook founder, mark zuckerberg, the campaigners accuse the company of putting profit before the safety of children and urge him to ensure young people are safe on his platforms.
10:49 am
the former us president bill clinton has been admitted to hospital in california with an infection. the 75—year—old is said to be
10:50 am
in good spirits and on the mend in an intensive care unit. mr clinton had major heart surgery in 2004, but there's no suggestion his current condition is related to that. italy's national airline for the past 70 years, alitalia, has operated its final service before being replaced by a smaller successor. a domestic flight between rome and sardinia brought an end to the company that on several occasions only survived through huge bailouts from the italian taxpayer and private investors. the new national carrier, known as ita, will inherit part of alitalia's fleet, many of its airport slots, and part of its workforce. of course, the pandemic has been the biggest shock that aviation has ever seen, both the deepest and longest crisis faced by airlines, globally. there have been a number of failures but that aside, alitalia is a very particular case. it has had structural losses for many, many years, with only very fleeting and occasional profitability, and a long history of backwards and forwards excessive political involvement. a monument to pay tribute to the windrush migrants, who arrived in britain after the second world war, will be designed by artist basil watson. the statue at london waterloo station, will be of a man, a woman and a child climbing a mountain of suitcases hand—in—hand. it's been backed by £1 million of government funding and will be unveiled next year on windrush day,
10:51 am
are it's been described as the most anticipated song of the year and last night, at midnight, adele finally released her first single for six years. it's called easy on me, and reflects on herfeelings after going through a divorce. and so far, it has not disappointed her legions of fans, as tim muffett reports. this is 0] borg... # bbc radio 2 #. it is now officially three minutes past midnight, a new track from adele is called easy on me. are we ready? let's do this. # there ain't no going in this river. # that i've been washing my hands in forever... for fans of adele, the wait was finally over. six years since her last album, a chance to hear her new single, easy on me.
10:52 am
# when i am drowning in this silence, baby # let me in # go easy on me, baby # i was still a child # didn't get the chance # to feel the world around me... the song is taken from adele's fourth album, called 30, which is released next month. she says the last few years have been tough, having recently been through a divorce. she has been speaking to the zoe ball breakfast show on radio 2. you have been sharing over the last week what a journey putting this album together has been for you and also what you have been through. i definitely feel like i lost sight of and lost the appreciation actually what a gift it is to be into music and to be able to make it. ifeel like i got a bit frightened of it for a while and it really, really took care of me. i don't know what my outlet
10:53 am
would have been, had i not had it, and it was bloody hard work to make just in terms of, you know, i was singing things i didn't even realise i was feeling or thinking. i can't, like, unlock a door, for my own mental health and take the key with me, i've got to leave it in the door for everyone else and i'm in a strong place now where i feel like i can put that vulnerability out. so, it is now 1am. easy on me has been available to listen to for about an hour. let's get some reaction from adele fans across the world. hello. hello! i'm chris, from seattle, washington. i am sabrina, from the philippines. hi, i'm anneka and i'm currently in australia. . what did you think of the new single? i it's amazing, i've been listeningl to it on repeat since this morning when i woke up and it is so good! i really, really love it. it is, like, ifeel. like it is a mixture of all the songs she's done so far.
10:54 am
and, like, it'sjust. everything i thought it was going to be and more. i literally cried, watching that song! it's, like, telling you to free yourself from the shadows of the past. some of the little bits i that she added, it's almost like she's trying to tell us, "hi, i this is where i am six years later," and give us all an update and i really, really- like that about the song. and i'm just beyond thrilled to be hearing her voice again. - # there is a fire starting in my heart # reaching a fever pitch that's bringing me out the dark... adele is one of the world's biggest selling artists, and other singers have their theories as to why she is so hugely popular. # don't underestimate the things that i will do... she is very connected to her normalness, and she sings about it with her extraordinaryness. so, she's an amazing combination of
10:55 am
the terrestrial and the celestial. reaction on social media was a little more blunt. 0verwhelming delight that after six years adele was back. # so go easy on me... and with her new album out on the 19th of november, prepare to hear a lot more of adele's new songs over the coming months. tim muffett, bbc news. # so go easy on me #. the new singerfrom. victoria is up
10:56 am
next, she doesn't have a dell but she has three adele tribute acts! well worth waiting for. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt what did you think of the song? it was great! you need a bit of adele to warm up a cold morning and it was chilly across the country this morning. we had the return of frost on the ground, this was in the scottish borders a few hours ago, look at the blue sky overhead but there has been a bit of a difference across the country, much milder in the south, yellow colours, 16 degrees in the afternoon but in the north, the chill remains all—day. but in the next few days, notice the warmer amber is coming with developing southerly winds and we are back into milder air next week, temperatures in the afternoons into the high teens if not low 20s. today, a contrast, the difference between the
10:57 am
mild and occult is this front, this cloud in the south and southern wales, some brittle and the odd heavy shower, north, more chile than recently but blue skies overhead and 60 or 70 degrees particularly with any breaks and some sunshine. —— 16 or 17. this front moves northward overnight, temperatures rising and elsewhere, some showers in northern scotland, clearer skies for a time for many and it means perhaps a more widespread frost, scotland and northern england, may be as far south as parts of wales and the midlands and east anglia. we are under high pressure which keeps things dry today, but change is afoot, milderair coming things dry today, but change is afoot, milder air coming after this system which will work in through the day on saturday. had a bit, a lot more cloud tomorrow, some sunny spells and the odd shower, mainly in the far north of scotland but the cloud and breeze picks up in the west late without breaks of rain in northern ireland and western scotland before the day is out. still a bit chilly in scotland and
10:58 am
the far north, the cloud blotting out some sunshine but turning milder elsewhere and mild air will push through all of us on saturday night into sunday, most of us having some rain as the fronts moved eastwards. pinpointing where the wettest weather will be on sunday is bit difficult, they could be persistent rain in the north of scotland, some cloud and sunny spells and the odd shower elsewhere. temperatures into the upper teens and even milder at the upper teens and even milder at the start of next week. goodbye for now.
10:59 am
11:00 am
covid hello, it's friday. this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. the headlines at 11... an estimated 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems.
11:01 am
and adele releases her first new music for six years — telling the bbc she's in a strong place to put her vulnerability out. coming up — we'll be speaking to three adele tribute acts. hello, and welcome to bbc news. around 43,000 people, mostly from the south—west of england, may have been given incorrect covid test results, after they were processed by a lab in the west midlands. the uk health security agency says testing at the immensa health clinic in wolverhampton has been suspended after reports of people receiving negative pcr test results following a positive lateral flow test.
11:02 am
it's thought those affected were tested between 8th september and 12th october. 0ur health correspondent jim reed joins me. 0k, ok, so we have always been told pcr tests are the gold standard. what has been going on here? for a while, somethin: has been going on here? for a while, something strange _ has been going on here? for a while, something strange has _ has been going on here? for a while, something strange has been - has been going on here? for a while, something strange has been going i has been going on here? for a while, . something strange has been going on. we have been hearing anecdotal reports at the bbc that a lot of people in the south—west appear to have been taking lateral flow tests, these are the ones you take in 15 minutes at home, getting a positive result, feeling ropey with quite obvious covid symptoms, then if you get a positive lateral flow you can apply for a pcr test. these are one of the laboratory tests. these tests were coming back and often they were coming back negative. people were contacting the bbc and other journalists, saying "wejust don't know what's going on here." this has been going on for a couple of weeks, and this morning the uk health security agency came out and said
11:03 am
there actually appears to have been a problem with the laboratory that is testing some of these pcr samples. this is a laboratory in wolverhampton, it is run by a private company, and what they are saying is that about 43,000 people may have received a negative pcr when actually they were positive. they are saying those people are now being contacted and being asked to test again. this is between two dates, between the 8th of september and the 12th of october, are when these tests would have taken place. like you said in the introduction, concerns were raised after people started getting these positive lateral flows and then negative pcr tests. �* , ., ., tests. i'm 'ust looking at the date to check. tests. i'm just looking at the date to check. yeah, _ tests. i'm just looking at the date to check. yeah, you're _ tests. i'm just looking at the date to check. yeah, you're right. if. to check. yeah, you're right. if thatis to check. yeah, you're right. if that is you... how will you know it's you, though? that is you. .. how will you know it's you, though?— it's you, though? you should be contacted _ it's you, though? you should be contacted by — it's you, though? you should be contacted by test _ it's you, though? you should be contacted by test and _ it's you, though? you should be
11:04 am
contacted by test and trace. i it's you, though? you should bej contacted by test and trace. the concern here is there is people having received a negative pcr... will be going out and about normally. will be going out and about normally-— will be going out and about normall . , , ., ., normally. they might be going to school, normally. they might be going to school. they _ normally. they might be going to school, they could _ normally. they might be going to school, they could have - normally. they might be going to school, they could have been i school, they could have been schoolchildren who might be affected here. we have been contacted this morning by a teacher who said that he received a negative lateral flow... a positive lateral flow and then a negative pcr, and he wasn't convinced by this at all that he actually decided to stay home anyway. but there will be other people in a situation who would not have done that, would have been out and about in the community.- and about in the community. thanks very much- — professor alan mcnally is from the institute of microbiology and infection at the university of birmingham — he helped establish one of the covid testing labs in the uk. how do you react to this news, first of all? �* .,, ., , how do you react to this news, first ofall?�* , �*, ., of all? i'm astonished. it's not very often _ of all? i'm astonished. it's not very often it — of all? i'm astonished. it's not very often it happens - of all? i'm astonished. it's not very often it happens but i i of all? i'm astonished. it's not very often it happens but i am |
11:05 am
of all? i'm astonished. it's not i very often it happens but i am close to speechless on this. i can't understand how it has happened at this scale. — understand how it has happened at this scale, and it's truly astonishing news.- this scale, and it's truly astonishing news. this scale, and it's truly astonishin: news. �* , , ., astonishing news. ok, let's try to work out how _ astonishing news. ok, let's try to work out how it _ astonishing news. ok, let's try to work out how it might _ astonishing news. ok, let's try to work out how it might have i astonishing news. ok, let's try to i work out how it might have happened. what are your theories? you work out how it might have happened. what are your theories?— what are your theories? you know, i have been personally _ what are your theories? you know, i have been personally responsible i what are your theories? you know, i j have been personally responsible for a lot of— have been personally responsible for a lot of covid pcr tests, and if you do that _ a lot of covid pcr tests, and if you do that test — a lot of covid pcr tests, and if you do that test properly with all of the appropriate controls that you need _ the appropriate controls that you need to— the appropriate controls that you need to make sure that the acid is working _ need to make sure that the acid is working well, there is no way that you should — working well, there is no way that you should have missed the sheer volume _ you should have missed the sheer volume of— you should have missed the sheer volume of negative, false negative results _ volume of negative, false negative results we — volume of negative, false negative results we are talking about here. if results we are talking about here. if you _ results we are talking about here. if you control each step then you should _ if you control each step then you should see — if you control each step then you should see if you have this level of systematic— should see if you have this level of systematic failure of your testing process — systematic failure of your testing process. that all comes down to quality— process. that all comes down to quality control and quality assurance, oversight and management, and i assurance, oversight and management, and hust— assurance, oversight and management, and ijust cannot fathom the
11:06 am
failings _ and ijust cannot fathom the failings that would lead to this level— failings that would lead to this level of— failings that would lead to this level of false negative results. could — level of false negative results. could it — level of false negative results. could it be to do with a batch of pcr tests? could it be to do with the lab? it pcr tests? could it be to do with the lab? ., , ., pcr tests? could it be to do with the lab? .,, ., ., , ., , the lab? it has got to be the lab. you have controls _ the lab? it has got to be the lab. you have controls in _ the lab? it has got to be the lab. you have controls in place i the lab? it has got to be the lab. you have controls in place such l the lab? it has got to be the lab. i you have controls in place such that if the _ you have controls in place such that if the asset — you have controls in place such that if the asset itself is not working you will— if the asset itself is not working you will see it very quickly. what this comes — you will see it very quickly. what this comes down to is that... the only— this comes down to is that... the only thing — this comes down to is that... the only thing i— this comes down to is that... the only thing i can imagine is that appropriate controls were not being used, _ appropriate controls were not being used. or— appropriate controls were not being used, orthere appropriate controls were not being used, or there was some sort of systematic— used, or there was some sort of systematic failure in how the results — systematic failure in how the results were being reinterpreted. but this— results were being reinterpreted. but this is— results were being reinterpreted. but this is not faulty readings, this is— but this is not faulty readings, this is impossible. so but this is not faulty readings, this is impossible.— but this is not faulty readings, this is impossible. so should this articular this is impossible. so should this particular lab _ this is impossible. so should this particular lab stop _ this is impossible. so should this particular lab stop doing - this is impossible. so should this particular lab stop doing these i particular lab stop doing these tests right now? i particular lab stop doing these tests right now?— particular lab stop doing these tests right now? i believe they have. i believe _ tests right now? i believe they have. i believe they _ tests right now? i believe they have. i believe they have i tests right now? i believe they i have. i believe they have stopped operations there. i would hope so. there _ operations there. i would hope so. there needs to be an absolute fundamental investigation into how this lab _
11:07 am
fundamental investigation into how this lab was operating and what levels _ this lab was operating and what levels of— this lab was operating and what levels of quality control and quality _ levels of quality control and quality assurance were performed on that lab _ quality assurance were performed on that lab. when i was involved very early— that lab. when i was involved very early in _ that lab. when i was involved very early in the — that lab. when i was involved very early in the milton keynes lab, helping — early in the milton keynes lab, helping to set that up, there was a huge _ helping to set that up, there was a huge amount of oversight from nhs england. _ huge amount of oversight from nhs england, from the department of health _ england, from the department of health. i've not been any system for quite _ health. i've not been any system for quite some — health. i've not been any system for quite some time now but i would hope that level— quite some time now but i would hope that level of _ quite some time now but i would hope that level of quality assurance checking — that level of quality assurance checking still goes on, and the network— checking still goes on, and the network particularly when dealing with laps — network particularly when dealing with laps like this private provider lab with laps like this private provider tab that _ with laps like this private provider tab that is — with laps like this private provider lab that is never operated in the space _ lab that is never operated in the space before, there needs to be a look at _ space before, there needs to be a look at how— space before, there needs to be a look at how much oversight there is of these _ look at how much oversight there is of these testing labs. gk, look at how much oversight there is of these testing labs.— of these testing labs. ok, is it significant _ of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that _ of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that it _ of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that it is _ of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that it is a - of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that it is a private l of these testing labs. ok, is it i significant that it is a private lab or not? what is your view? it’s significant that it is a private lab or not? what is your view? it's a significant _ or not? what is your view? it's a significant in _ or not? what is your view? it's a significant in that _ or not? what is your view? it's a significant in that this _ or not? what is your view? it's a significant in that this is - or not? what is your view? it's a significant in that this is a i significant in that this is a company and a laboratory that has never— company and a laboratory that has never operated a infectious disease diagnostic— never operated a infectious disease diagnostic space before. that is an issue _ diagnostic space before. that is an issue but — diagnostic space before. that is an issue. but as long as you have that oversight— issue. but as long as you have that oversight then that doesn't need to
11:08 am
be an— oversight then that doesn't need to be an issue. clearly, there is an issue _ be an issue. clearly, there is an issue here — be an issue. clearly, there is an issue here and i would imagine, i would _ issue here and i would imagine, i would hope there is currently a very thorough _ would hope there is currently a very thorough investigation into the level— thorough investigation into the level of— thorough investigation into the level of oversight that was performed on this lab and how this happened — performed on this lab and how this happened. we performed on this lab and how this ha ened. ~ ., �* ~ ., ., , happened. we don't know the answer to a desk, happened. we don't know the answer to a desk. i'm — happened. we don't know the answer to a desk, i'm going _ happened. we don't know the answer to a desk, i'm going to _ happened. we don't know the answer to a desk, i'm going to ask _ happened. we don't know the answer to a desk, i'm going to ask you i to a desk, i'm going to ask you anyway. could it be happening at other laps?— anyway. could it be happening at other las? ., ., ., , ., other laps? yeah, i would hope that ha--ens other laps? yeah, i would hope that happens regularly — other laps? yeah, i would hope that happens regularly anyway. - other laps? yeah, i would hope that happens regularly anyway. if i other laps? yeah, i would hope that happens regularly anyway. if you i happens regularly anyway. if you think— happens regularly anyway. if you think about hospital labs that do this for— think about hospital labs that do this for a — think about hospital labs that do this for a living, they have this fora living, they have external— this for a living, they have external quality assurance so they share _ external quality assurance so they share examples and you have to have concordance — share examples and you have to have concordance of results and tests and so oh _ concordance of results and tests and so oh i_ concordance of results and tests and so oh idon't— concordance of results and tests and so on. i don't know that happens in the lighthouse lab network but i think— the lighthouse lab network but i think it — the lighthouse lab network but i think it would make sense to have a thorough _ think it would make sense to have a thorough look at the quality of data being _ thorough look at the quality of data being produced by every single lab in that— being produced by every single lab in that network. i�*m being produced by every single lab in that network.— in that network. i'm 'ust going to sa with in that network. i'm 'ust going to say with this h in that network. i'm 'ust going to say with this official i in that network. i'm just going to say with this official statement i say with this official statement says. the government awarded immensa
11:09 am
a contract in 2020 to urgently develop pcr testing for covid in line with test and trace requirements. the contract did not go to tender, allowing urgent... "in 2020, we adapted and evolved into covid—19 testing, taking advantage of our digital systems to deliver world leading covid—19 testing solutions." and the chief executive of the immensa health clinic is saying that they are fully collaborating with the uk health security agency on this matter. "quality is paramount for us, we have proudly analysed 2.5 million samples per nhs test and trace, working closely with the great teams at the department for health and the uk health security agency. we don't wish this matter anything else to tarnish the amazing work done by the uk in this pandemic." what are the consequences of people getting a
11:10 am
false negative pcr test, and going out and carrying on with their daily lives? i out and carrying on with their daily lives? , , ., lives? i guess time will tell on that. current _ lives? i guess time will tell on that. current positivity i lives? i guess time will tell on that. current positivity rate i lives? i guess time will tell on | that. current positivity rate for pcr is — that. current positivity rate for pcr is about 20%, so at a minimum you are— pcr is about 20%, so at a minimum you are talking about 9000 people who were — you are talking about 9000 people who were given a wrong result and he went out _ who were given a wrong result and he went out into the world, about their daily basis, — went out into the world, about their daily basis, with covid. we know that people with double vaccinations are less _ that people with double vaccinations are less likely to transmit covid, but 9000 — are less likely to transmit covid, but 9000 people mixing without face coverings. _ but 9000 people mixing without face coverings, quite rightly. they were not doing _ coverings, quite rightly. they were not doing anything wrong but they had covid — not doing anything wrong but they had covid and they went out into the community, — had covid and they went out into the community, and i really hope that has not _ community, and i really hope that has not had — community, and i really hope that has not had a significant impact in cases. _ has not had a significant impact in cases, particularly in the south—west where anecdotally this has been _ south—west where anecdotally this has been reported more. i guess we will see _ has been reported more. i guess we will see in_ has been reported more. i guess we will see in the next couple of weeks if we get _ will see in the next couple of weeks if we get a — will see in the next couple of weeks if we get a spike of cases in the south—west of england. if we get a spike of cases in the south-west of england.- if we get a spike of cases in the south-west of england. thank you ve much south-west of england. thank you very much for— south-west of england. thank you very much for talking _ south-west of england. thank you very much for talking us _ south-west of england. thank you very much for talking us to i south-west of england. thank you very much for talking us to delay. | very much for talking us to delay. we really appreciate it.
11:11 am
the queen has appeared to suggest she's irritated by a lack of action in tackling the climate crisis. her remarks were heard by a daily mailjournalist during conversations at the opening of welsh parliament, the senedd, in cardiff yesterday. the queen was talking to the duchess of cornwall and the parliament s presiding officer, and seemed to be referring to the forthcoming cop26 climate conference. tv microphones weren't close enough to pick the comments up very well — so here's a subtitled clip. the queen's remarks come after both prince charles and prince william spoke to the bbc earlier this week about
11:12 am
the cop26 summit and the urgency in addressing the climate change crisis. the narrative has changed. you know, lots of the things that you said are now mainstream... it's taken far too long. world leaders are gathering in glasgow to talk about the kind of issues... yeah, but theyjust talk. and the problem is to get action on the ground, which is what i've been trying to do for the last 40 years. if we're not careful, we are robbing from our children's future — what we do now. children love being outdoors, they love getting muddy, they love playing and chasing and playing sport and that stuff. i think they have a truer appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than actually many of the adults, and that's where a bit of the disconnect�*s happening. is that those adults in a position of responsibility are not channelling their inner child. we can't have more clever speak, clever words, but not enough action. let's speak to our climate editorjustin rowlatt. it's not exactly controversial that
11:13 am
the queen thinks there is a problem. loads of families think there is a climate crisis.— climate crisis. anyone who was talk to scientists. _ climate crisis. anyone who was talk to scientists, they _ climate crisis. anyone who was talk to scientists, they spoke _ climate crisis. anyone who was talk to scientists, they spoke to i climate crisis. anyone who was talk to scientists, they spoke to greta i to scientists, they spoke to greta thunberg. loads of people think not enough action is happening. to be honest, most world leaders get this, most have looked at the science, they don't want climate change to happen. i mean, who once our world to plunge into climate chaos? most world leaders get it as well. what we don't appreciate, at the risk of sounding like i'm name—dropping, i did a interview with tony blair about an hour ago which will broadcast in a few days. what we are asking politicians to do is move away from the fields that have driven the industrial revolution, that have created the wealth that we all enjoy now and move towards new ways of doing it. it is possible, but there are costs and difficulties, and that is all very difficult. so the world leaders
11:14 am
sitting in the conferences in glasgow gets the peril, they understand there is a risk, they also know it is down the track, it is not going to happen immediately. but they also know that there is going to be costs for them for making a change, and they have to resolve that tension, those difficulties themselves. and they've got you have in mind that in the future we will look back... there is no exaggeration to say that we will look back on this conference and we will say "you were asked to step up and do something on this issue, did you do what was necessary?" they know they are going to be judged on this. coming back to your point, i think the queen is not alone in being frustrated about the speed of action on climate. this being frustrated about the speed of action on climate.— action on climate. as you have 'ust interviewed — action on climate. as you have 'ust interviewed a fi action on climate. as you have 'ust interviewed a former i action on climate. as you have 'ust interviewed a former prime i action on climate. as you have just i interviewed a former prime minister, regarding politicians, are they being honest enough with us, taxpayers and voters, about how much it is going to cost us? because it will be taxpayer's money in the end. there are costs associated with
11:15 am
taking out gas boilers, and i think it is fair to say that the technology is not there yet. you are not getting a direct replacement. it is not as good... heat pump is not a good as a boiler in delivering heat to your home. to persuade people to make that change that probably does had to be some kind of encouragement in terms of subsidy. look at in the other way. there is a huge industry here to create these new technologies, and perhaps as a nation we should be investing or finding a way to encourage our companies to invest in a technology and create jobs. companies to invest in a technology and createjobs. there are benefits, but there are challenges. this is something that we, the bbc, other news organisations need to do, we need to be clear with people about what is at stake. tide need to be clear with people about what is at stake.— need to be clear with people about what is at stake. we talk about the financial cost, _ what is at stake. we talk about the financial cost, but _ what is at stake. we talk about the financial cost, but actually, i what is at stake. we talk about the financial cost, but actually, when l financial cost, but actually, when you look at the cost to the environment... you look at the cost to the environment. . ._ you look at the cost to the environment... �* _,, ,
11:16 am
environment... and the future costs to future generations. _ environment... and the future costs to future generations. what i environment... and the future costs to future generations. what will i to future generations. what will your grandchildren be saying to you... it your grandchildren be saying to ou. .. , your grandchildren be saying to ou... , ., , ., ., your grandchildren be saying to you... it is really hard to think about decades _ you... it is really hard to think about decades hence. i you... it is really hard to think about decades hence. we i you... it is really hard to think about decades hence. we are | you... it is really hard to think i about decades hence. we are not a s-ecies about decades hence. we are not a species that _ about decades hence. we are not a species that is _ about decades hence. we are not a species that is good _ about decades hence. we are not a species that is good at _ about decades hence. we are not a species that is good at forward i species that is good at forward planning. i struggle to book things ahead. my summer holiday, i normally do it a few weeks before we go. we are really bad at planning ahead. we are really bad at planning ahead. we are really bad at planning ahead. we are really bad at understanding the future. we are making changes that happen on geological timescales. thousands, hundreds of thousands, millions of years. and our lives are much shorter than that. it is a tough concept to get. but we do need tough concept to get. but we do need to grasp this if we are going to make the sort of changes that are necessary. make the sort of changes that are necessa . ., ~' make the sort of changes that are necessa . ., ~ , ., the man who's accused of killing five people in a bow—and—arrow attack in norway on wednesday has been handed over to health services. the danish muslim convert, who lives in the town of kongsberg,
11:17 am
where the attack took place, is has confessed to the killings, which officials say were an act of terror. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is in kongsberg, where the suspect was known to authorities. there were warning signs over his potential radicalisation before wednesday's attack took place, it had been flagged to the security services as recently as last year. in 2017, he posted a video to facebook saying, "i come with a warning, bearwitness facebook saying, "i come with a warning, bear witness that i am a muslim." he had a previous conviction for burglary, and there was a restraining order against him threatening to kill a relative. i made the heartache of this small, peaceful town of 25,000 people, there are also the lingering question is now over whether the police could have done more to stop him earlier, before wednesday's attack, and indeed during the attack itself. when he took his bow and
11:18 am
arrow to a supermarket, apparently firing indiscriminately, killing five people and killing three others, police confronted him within minutes but then he shot a volley of arrows towards them and then it took arrows towards them and then it took a further 34 minutes for them to be able to capture him. in those 84 minutes, he went on his killing spree and killed these five people. so this town very extremely shaken, people are still coming all through the day. also be getting now, i think, to ask questions over whether he should have been stopped earlier given the warning signs and fears, really, that things could have happened. it is a decade since norway's deadliest mass killing. 115—year—old girl here, he would come down with her school friends, said she thought they were better prepared, and she said she was shocked that this had happened and
11:19 am
this was allowed to happen in this peaceful town.— this was allowed to happen in this teacefultown. ., ,, , ., , . peaceful town. thank you very much, mark. almost 13,000 cases involving allegations of domestic abuse in england and wales have been dropped over the past five years, because prosecutors ran out of time to bring charges, within the six—month time limit. figures obtained by bbc news also suggest that while more common assaults involving domestic violence are being reported — fewer cases are being brought to trial. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more. i didn't know, or understand, what i was going through. i genuinely believed it was my fault. i kept asking myself, what is it that i keep doing wrong that makes them behave like this? a year ago, erica started a campaign to support survivors of domestic abuse, something she says that's very personal. when there were the good days, i'd be like, "0k, i've done something right." and then, when there was something
11:20 am
going wrong, i'd say to myself, "this is what i've done wrong, i'm being punished for my own mistakes." and getting out of that mindset is what led me to eventually leave this relationship. erica made a report of domestic abuse to the police, but was told no—one could be charged because too much time had passed. coming forward, for me, was one of the biggest things i've ever done in my life. to sit down and say to someone that doesn't know me that these are the things that happened to me. six months isn't enough time to even fathom that sort of experience. the current law allows six months between the time an alleged common assault takes place and someone being charged. the idea is to keepjustice moving in offences the system deems less serious. but campaigners say, when it comes to domestic abuse, that's not long enough, because it can take years for victims to feel able to come forward, orfor police to build a case. in the past five years, in england and wales, there were almost 13,000 cases of common assault involving domestic
11:21 am
abuse that were never charged, because that six—month time limit was breached. and while, over that period, the number of these cases being reported went up, the number resulting in someone being charged went down. some want a change in the law — to allow more time for domestic abuse cases to get to court. i think this is another example of where the law, the criminaljustice system, simply doesn't get violence against women and girls. we need recognition from the government of how serious this is, how you've got so many domestic abuse survivors and victims just being timed out because the law is wrong and unfair. ministers have said before they will consider this issue, which the government says it takes seriously. in a statement, a spokesman said all allegations should be investigated and pursued vigorously through the courts, where possible. and they pointed out there's no time limit on reporting other crimes, such as bodily harm, or those that add up to coercive behaviour.
11:22 am
meanwhile, police chiefs say that six—month limit only affects a small proportion of cases. but they say there is particular concern around those involving domestic abuse, and they're supporting the government in analysing the issue, to ensure victims achieve justice. i used to spend a lot of time to myselfjust to reflect, to calm down. erica says it's a case she will keep on making. using my story as my strength has been the biggest thing for me. to be able to tell my story with confidence, but using it as power to basically fight back against the law and hopefully change the law has been one of the most important things to me. i'm joined by emma armstrong from reigate and banstead women's aid, who works with women escaping domestic violence. there's been a 159% increase in the number of times common assaults
11:23 am
flagged as domestic abuse have not led to charges because of the time limit. what do you think of that? it's shocking and it's disgusting that we — it's shocking and it's disgusting that we have a system in place that is meant _ that we have a system in place that is meant to— that we have a system in place that is meant to protect our victims and survivors, — is meant to protect our victims and survivors, and yet actually it is to be traumatising them and it is victim — be traumatising them and it is victim blaming. it is making them have _ victim blaming. it is making them have the — victim blaming. it is making them have the responsibility of "you did not get _ have the responsibility of "you did not get a — have the responsibility of "you did not get a conviction because she did not get a conviction because she did not come _ not get a conviction because she did not come forward in six months' time" _ not come forward in six months' time" it— not come forward in six months' time" it is— not come forward in six months' time." it is adding another barrier to what— time." it is adding another barrier to what is— time." it is adding another barrier to what is already a traumatic experience for them. i to what is already a traumatic experience for them.- experience for them. i know obviously — experience for them. i know obviously because _ experience for them. i know obviously because of- experience for them. i know obviously because of the i experience for them. i know i obviously because of the work you do, you work with peep micro women who come to you for refuge. by the time they come to you, the time is ticking anyway. and then you build them up to give them back their self esteem and some confidence, and that takes time, too, before they might even think about talking to the police. even think about talking to the tolice. ~ ., ., even think about talking to the tolice. . ., ., ..,, even think about talking to the tolice. . ., ., , even think about talking to the tolice.~ ., ., , . , police. we had a case 'ust recently where an incredibly i police. we had a case just recently where an incredibly vague - police. we had a case just recently where an incredibly vague victim . where an incredibly vague victim came _ where an incredibly vague victim came forward, moved to our refuge, and after— came forward, moved to our refuge, and after a _ came forward, moved to our refuge, and after a couple of weeks felt she was in _ and after a couple of weeks felt she was in a _
11:24 am
and after a couple of weeks felt she was in a space and a confident place to give _ was in a space and a confident place to give evidence. the perpetrator had actually broken her rib. she had medical— had actually broken her rib. she had medical evidence of this because she had gone _ medical evidence of this because she had gone to the hospital, and she also had — had gone to the hospital, and she also had a — had gone to the hospital, and she also had a text message from him confirming — also had a text message from him confirming it, saying he was apologising for what he had done to her ribs _ apologising for what he had done to her ribs. the response that she got was, _ her ribs. the response that she got was, "unfortunately you are two weeks _ was, "unfortunately you are two weeks too — was, "unfortunately you are two weeks too late." that traumatise her all over— weeks too late." that traumatise her all over again. weeks too late." that traumatise her all overagain. it isjust weeks too late." that traumatise her all over again. it isjust not good enough — all over again. it isjust not good enough it— all over again. it is 'ust not good enouth. , , ., ., ., enough. it is legislation that the is this six month _ enough. it is legislation that the is this six month time _ enough. it is legislation that the is this six month time limit i enough. it is legislation that the is this six month time limit stop| is this six month time limit stop what would your message be to politicians? tide what would your message be to politicians?— what would your message be to toliticians? ~ ., ., ., . politicians? we need to do more. we need to stop — politicians? we need to do more. we need to stop putting _ politicians? we need to do more. we need to stop putting further- need to stop putting further barriers _ need to stop putting further barriers in place and encourage victims — barriers in place and encourage victims to— barriers in place and encourage victims to come forward. let us not victim _ victims to come forward. let us not victim blame — victims to come forward. let us not victim blame them. let us give them the opportunity to have their voice heard _ the opportunity to have their voice heard and — the opportunity to have their voice heard. and let's getjustice for them — heard. and let's getjustice for them. there are so many women and children— them. there are so many women and children out _ them. there are so many women and children out there that we know are still suffering.— still suffering. apparently the six month limit. _ still suffering. apparently the six month limit, as _ still suffering. apparently the six month limit, as alex _ still suffering. apparently the six month limit, as alex mentioned, still suffering. apparently the six i month limit, as alex mentioned, and i am trying to find a reason why it
11:25 am
is six months for this particular kind of allegations when it is not six months for those of other crimes, it is meant to keep the criminaljustice crimes, it is meant to keep the criminal justice system crimes, it is meant to keep the criminaljustice system moving. there is an opportunity with the police and crime sentencing courts bill to perhaps amend this legislation. is that something you would like to see?— legislation. is that something you would like to see? definitely, it is somethint would like to see? definitely, it is something that _ would like to see? definitely, it is something that needs _ would like to see? definitely, it is something that needs to - would like to see? definitely, it is something that needs to happen. | would like to see? definitely, it is i something that needs to happen. we need to— something that needs to happen. we need to have no restriction on a time _ need to have no restriction on a time limit _ need to have no restriction on a time limit. domestic abuse is domestic— time limit. domestic abuse is domestic abuse, whether it is corrosive. _ domestic abuse, whether it is corrosive, controlling behaviour. we need _ corrosive, controlling behaviour. we need to— corrosive, controlling behaviour. we need to change that system. we need to enable _ need to change that system. we need to enable victims to have that opportunity to come forward at a time _ opportunity to come forward at a time when — opportunity to come forward at a time when they are ready and safe to do so _ time when they are ready and safe to do so we _ time when they are ready and safe to do so. we have to remember that most victims. _ do so. we have to remember that most victims. when _ do so. we have to remember that most victims, when they are assaulted, are in_ victims, when they are assaulted, are in their— victims, when they are assaulted, are in theirfamily victims, when they are assaulted, are in their family home and are not ina are in their family home and are not in a position— are in their family home and are not in a position to leave or in a position— in a position to leave or in a position of— in a position to leave or in a position of safety to come forward. na victim's — position of safety to come forward. na victim's case, she was living with— na victim's case, she was living with the — na victim's case, she was living with the perpetrator still. i encourage this change. we need this change _ encourage this change. we need this change to— encourage this change. we need this change to happen. we need to change
11:26 am
this six— change to happen. we need to change this six month time limit. it is just— this six month time limit. it is just not— this six month time limit. it is just not good enough.- just not good enough. emma armstrong- _ details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc. co. uk/actionline. a whole list of them are there. the headlines on bbc news... around 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. rules for travellers returning to england will be relaxed in time
11:27 am
for the half—term holidays. from the 24th of october, fully vaccinated people will be able to use private lateral flow tests to prove their covid status, rather than relying on the more expensive pcr test. the transport secretary said it would make travel easier and simpler. lisa minot is the sun's travel editor. it's huge. i mean, this is going to save the average family of four about £200 on tests for a return trip back to the uk for this day two and it will be a really positive move for the industry, and hopefully will encourage people to say, right, i can now book safe in the knowledge i will not be shelling out expensive ecr tests. if you look at the rest of europe, nowhere else in the rest of europe generally is having to ask people to take a test once you're actually arriving in the country, so i think it puts us in line with other european nations. and as i say, it's
11:28 am
a really positive news. people have been really confused over the last few months over which test they had to take, when they had to take them, and the removal of the predeparture test to get back into the uk was another really positive step forward, because for a lot of people, they wouldn't worry about going on holiday, but what happens if i catch covid abroad? do i have to quarantine abroad? so it's yet another thing that was taken away, another worry that was taken away and hopefully will encourage more people to book. got a little bit more news on this story of the pcr tests that are coming back negative even though people have had a previous positive lateral flow test. affecting over 40,000 in the south—west of england. we are now getting this story that potentially around 4000 possible inaccurate tests might be coming from people living in wales as well. the welsh government was apparently made aware last week of reports that a higher—than—expected number of positive lateral flow tests were resulting in negative pcr tests, and
11:29 am
that too is being investigated by the uk health security agency. we will bring you more on that as soon as we have it. the government is planning to allow foreign lorry drivers to make more deliveries in the uk, to try to ease the pressure on supply chains. 0verseas drivers will now be able to make unlimited trips within a fortnight. the transport secretary grant shapps said it was a "common sense measure" and would increase the number of lorry drivers on the road by several thousand. rod mckenzie is from the road haulage association. we can talk to him right now. hello to you. what difference will this make? ., . ., ., ~ make? hello, victoria. ithink it will make _ make? hello, victoria. ithink it will make a— make? hello, victoria. ithink it will make a difference _ make? hello, victoria. ithink it will make a difference in i make? hello, victoria. ithink it will make a difference in terms| make? hello, victoria. i think it i will make a difference in terms of supermarket deliveries, and in that way its— supermarket deliveries, and in that way it's a _ supermarket deliveries, and in that way it's a good thing. i think we will get — way it's a good thing. i think we will get more of the things that you would _ will get more of the things that you would otherwise not get. and that is really. _ would otherwise not get. and that is really, really important. from our business. — really, really important. from our business, our haulage business, it is a really— business, our haulage business, it is a really big worry because it means— is a really big worry because it means that british hauliers simply won't _ means that british hauliers simply won't be _ means that british hauliers simply won't be able to get the sort of
11:30 am
work— won't be able to get the sort of work they— won't be able to get the sort of work they were getting from the supermarkets. in other words, foreign — supermarkets. in other words, foreign overseas companies which charge _ foreign overseas companies which charge lower rates and pay their driver— charge lower rates and pay their driver is — charge lower rates and pay their driver is very little money and don't — driver is very little money and don't have _ driver is very little money and don't have the same health and safety— don't have the same health and safety considerations as we do, will undercut— safety considerations as we do, will undercut british hauliers. it is hauliers— undercut british hauliers. it is hauliers are angry about that, think it is very— hauliers are angry about that, think it is very short—sighted. so hauliers are angry about that, think it is very short-sighted.— it is very short-sighted. so what should be happening _ it is very short-sighted. so what should be happening instead, i it is very short-sighted. so what i should be happening instead, then? what we have said is a number of things. _ what we have said is a number of things, some are a bit technical but bear with— things, some are a bit technical but bear with me, things, some are a bit technical but bearwith me, i things, some are a bit technical but bear with me, i will try to make sense — bear with me, i will try to make sense we _ bear with me, i will try to make sense. we have asked lorry drivers who have _ sense. we have asked lorry drivers who have retired to come back and help out _ who have retired to come back and help out. one of the things they are telling _ help out. one of the things they are telling us _ help out. one of the things they are telling us is — help out. one of the things they are telling us is that if they have to do that— telling us is that if they have to do that they have to go to lots of classroom — do that they have to go to lots of classroom training. we want to get straight _ classroom training. we want to get straight back behind the wheel of a cab. straight back behind the wheel of a cab that— straight back behind the wheel of a cab that is— straight back behind the wheel of a cab. that is called driver cpc. we think— cab. that is called driver cpc. we think that — cab. that is called driver cpc. we think that should be changed so that more _ think that should be changed so that more drivers will come back, because at the _ more drivers will come back, because at the moment they are saying no. we think there _ at the moment they are saying no. we think there is — at the moment they are saying no. we think there is a case for extra european _ think there is a case for extra european drivers coming in if they
11:31 am
are properly qualified under the shortage — are properly qualified under the shortage occupation list. we are asking _ shortage occupation list. we are asking the government to speed up dvla _ asking the government to speed up dvla testing, and the tracker licensing, which is incredibly slow for a _ licensing, which is incredibly slow for a variety of reasons. 54,000 backlog. — for a variety of reasons. 54,000 backlog, strikes at dvla and so forth _ backlog, strikes at dvla and so forth so — backlog, strikes at dvla and so forth. so we are pretty slow on the admin— forth. so we are pretty slow on the admin side — forth. so we are pretty slow on the admin side in the uk, andjust bringing— admin side in the uk, andjust bringing in— admin side in the uk, andjust bringing in lots of cheap foreign travellers isn't really the solution.— travellers isn't really the solution. ., ~' , . travellers isn't really the solution. ., ,, , . ., solution. thank you very much for talkint to solution. thank you very much for talking to us- _ now it's time for a look at the weather. hello, a lot more sunshine around, evenif hello, a lot more sunshine around, even if it is colder for many. the big exception is the southern counties of england, and south wales, where we had the sun yesterday, more cloudy today. the odd heavier shower towards the south coast, separates milder air to the south of it and temperatures up to around 17 degrees colder
11:32 am
temperatures further north, some showers across the far north of scotland. the colder air in place means we will see frost form some, but more widely compared to last night. east anglia could see some frost tomorrow morning. temperatures on the rise in the west but overall a chilly starts the weekend for most of you. sunshine at times, cloud about tomorrow across the country, still showers in northern scotland but turning drier ? turning grey and outbreaks of rain or drizzle, rabiot shower and will also have a dry day turning mahler to the south and west. coming up next half an hour, you may have heard that iredell has released a single today, the first new music in six years. i promise three tribute act before midday but one is not well so it is two. so we have two tribute acts coming up in the next half—an—hour. before that, the next half—an—hour. before that,
11:33 am
the sport. hello, i'mjane dougall and this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre. cameron norrie will be the new british number one, after beating diego schwartzman in straight sets. he's through to the last four after beating argentina's diego schwartzman, 6—0, 6—2 injust 73 minutes. norrie — who won the first tour title of his career in mexico injuly — is nowjust one more win away from reaching his sixth final of the year. he's also on course to break into the world's top 20 for the first time when the new rankings are published on monday. and norrie will now face grigor dimitrov — the number 23 seed from bulgaria. iam not i am not surprised, he has won 49 matches on tour this year, as he said. the conditions in indian wells clearly suit him and he is enjoying the courts, and he was unbelievable last night. he didn't miss a ball. so i would think that they are
11:34 am
pleased, but they will be looking further into the tournament rather than settling on what they have done so far. �* ., than settling on what they have done so far. . ., ., .., ., , so far. and emma raducanu has withdrawn _ so far. and emma raducanu has withdrawn from _ so far. and emma raducanu has withdrawn from a _ so far. and emma raducanu has withdrawn from a tournament i withdrawn from a tournament scheduling atonement change. she has only played once since new york, losing in the current indie milestones. she said she was looking forward to returning to the tour in a couple of months.— forward to returning to the tour in a couple of months. some news has reached us — a couple of months. some news has reached us about _ a couple of months. some news has reached us about formula _ a couple of months. some news has reached us about formula 1, i a couple of months. some news has reached us about formula 1, the i reached us about formula 1, the chinese grand prix is expected to be dropped from next year's calendar. the shanghai race has not been held since the coronavirus pandemic began. restrictions surrounding coronavirus in china means holding it in china is impossible. it will be replaced by another in april, with races in australia, singapore, and japan will all take place in 2022 after all four countries missed the last two seasons because of
11:35 am
covid restrictions. it'll start in bahrain on the 20th of march and finish in abu in april.— finish in abu in april. raheem sterlint finish in abu in april. raheem sterling says _ finish in abu in april. raheem sterling says that _ finish in abu in april. raheem sterling says that he - finish in abu in april. raheem sterling says that he has i finish in abu in april. raheem| sterling says that he has been finish in abu in april. raheem i sterling says that he has been of playing abroad from a young age and maybe does not get more game time, he would be open to going elsewhere. the manchester city striker has started just one match since the started just one match since the start of the season and his contract runs out at 2023 and speaking to the ft business of sport summit, he says experience in other leagues might be good for his development. $5 an good for his development. as an en t lish good for his development. as an english player. _ good for his development. as an english player, or— good for his development. as an english player, or i _ good for his development. as an english player, ori know- good for his development. as an english player, ori know is- good for his development. as an english player, or i know is the i english player, or i know is the premier league. all you know is premier league. all you know is premier league. all you know is premier league and i always had something in my head that one day i would love to play abroad and see how i would come up against that challenge.
11:36 am
how i would come up against that challente. �* . ., how i would come up against that challente. . , ., , ., challenge. arsenal beat hockenheim last nitht in challenge. arsenal beat hockenheim last night in the _ challenge. arsenal beat hockenheim last night in the women's _ challenge. arsenal beat hockenheim last night in the women's champions league and are now second in the group behind barcelona. we already have a photograph of him holding a bat after his operation on his finger. now the england all rounder has gone one better. this is video footage of him batting in the nets yesterday. he posted it on social media, just two weeks after his operation on a fractured finger. pretty encouraging for england fans ahead of the ashes tour to australia. stokes last played on the 26th ofjuly, before announcing he would be taking an indefinite break from the game. the olympic silver medallist sharron davies could be awarded a gold medal 41 years after she took second place in the pool at the moscow games. davies, who was 17 at the time, got silver in the 400 metres individual medley, behind east germany's petra schneider, who has since admitted to doping. swimming's governing body, fina,
11:37 am
is planning to investigate east germany's programme of the �*70s and �*80s, which ended with the collapse of the communist regime. davies is hoping her dad finally get to see her with gold. i5 85 davies is hoping her dad finally get to see her with gold.— to see her with gold. is 85 years old, m to see her with gold. is 85 years old. my family _ to see her with gold. is 85 years old, my family made _ to see her with gold. is 85 years old, my family made massive i old, my family made massive sacrifices going about holidays, my brother not getting uniform, my mother without a washing machine, my dad was a full—time coach and had to beg, steal and borrow to do it. that would be lovely. _ beg, steal and borrow to do it. that would be lovely. that is all the sport for now, but you can find more on all the stories on the bbc sport website. if you are at adele fan, the wait is finally over. —— if you area are a adele fan. she has released her first song for six years, easy on me, from herforthcoming album,
11:38 am
30 which reflects on her life after going through her divorce. adele talked about the process of making her new album with zoe ball on radio 2 this morning. you have been sharing over the last sort of week what a journey putting this album together has been for you, and also what you have been through. i definitely feel like i lost sight of, and, like, lost the appreciation of actually what a gift it is to be into music and to be able to make it. ifeel like i got a bit frightened of it for a while and it really, really took care of me. i don't know what my outlet would have been, like, had i not had it and it was bloody hard work to make, just in terms of, like, i was singing things that i didn't even realise i was feeling or thinking. i can't, like, unlock a door, you know, for my own mental health and take the key with me. got to leave it in the door of everyone else, and i'm in a strong place now where i feel like i can put that vulnerability out, so, yeah.
11:39 am
with me, two adele tribute artists — katie markham. hello, katie. and i'm alsojoined byjax hall. hello. hello. said this single, easy on me, is hello. hello. said this single, easy 0n me. is her— hello. hello. said this single, easy on me, is her explaining _ hello. hello. said this single, easy on me, is her explaining her- 0n me, is her explaining her decision to walk away from her marriage a couple of years ago and the effect it had on her son in particular and she is saying go easy on me. what you make of it, katie? i think on me. what you make of it, katie? i think it is great, and it took me awhile to listen to it because i was on the way home from a gig last night, so i listened to it ten minutes after every other single person in the world, but incredible. and you just know it is an adele song from the first few chords and it is great. i love it. what about you, jacks? it is great. i love it. what about you. jacks?— it is great. i love it. what about ou,'acks? ~ ., , you, “acks? classic adele, and she is you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easin: you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easing as _ you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easing as in _ you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easing as in gently. _ you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easing as in gently. there - you, jacks? classic adele, and she is easing as in gently. there is - is easing as in gently. there is more — is easing as in gently. there is more to—
11:40 am
is easing as in gently. there is more to come, easing is in gently, definitely — more to come, easing is in gently, definitel . , . , more to come, easing is in gently, definitel. , ., definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, _ definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, i _ definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, i think— definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, i think it - definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, i think it is, - definitely. this album coming on the 19th of november, i think it is, has l 19th of november, i think it is, has been described as the divorce album. the thing that will resonate with of people? the thing that will resonate with of eo - le? , , i the thing that will resonate with of peeple?_ i think- the thing that will resonate with of people?_ i think so - the thing that will resonate with of people?_ i think so as i people? definitely. i think so as well. people? definitely. i think so as well- you _ people? definitely. i think so as well- you carry _ people? definitely. i think so as well. you carry on. _ people? definitely. i think so as well. you carry on. to _ people? definitely. i think so as well. you carry on. to be - people? definitely. i think so as. well. you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust — well. you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust so _ well. you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust so true _ well. you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust so true and _ well. you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust so true and authentic. she's just so true and authentic that she — she's just so true and authentic that she is _ she's just so true and authentic that she is singing about things people — that she is singing about things people do go through, which is why people _ people do go through, which is why people relate to her music. i think, why not? _ people relate to her music. i think, why not? there is such a high rate of divorce — why not? there is such a high rate of divorce in— why not? there is such a high rate of divorce in the world in general it is something that many people will have — it is something that many people will have gone through and to bring us to— will have gone through and to bring us to her_ will have gone through and to bring us to herfans, will have gone through and to bring us to her fans, i think, is perfect. looking _ us to her fans, i think, is perfect. looking at — us to her fans, i think, is perfect. looking at some of the lines, which i suppose you will both be singing when you do your tribute acts from tonight onwards, i changed who i was tonight onwards, i changed who i was to put you both first, but now i give up. she is talking about, as a
11:41 am
woman, putting, thinking about herself as well, notjust other people around her. herself as well, not 'ust other people around her._ herself as well, not 'ust other people around her. yes, for the last coule of people around her. yes, for the last coople of years. _ people around her. yes, for the last couple of years, you _ people around her. yes, for the last couple of years, you could - people around her. yes, for the last couple of years, you could tell, - couple of years, you could tell, pictures and visuals that she has not been happy with herself and she is obviously now making a massive difference in looks as well, she looks absolutely incredible. she is doing it for herself more than other people now, i think, whereas before, she has always fought about other people i think, from what i gather. i obviously don't know her personally, but i think the way she has portrayed herself, she has almost always but about other people and nature they are ok, but now she is saying, i am all right, and taking care of myself.- is saying, i am all right, and taking care of myself. you talk about her— taking care of myself. you talk about her appearance, - taking care of myself. you talk about her appearance, and - taking care of myself. you talk| about her appearance, and she taking care of myself. you talk- about her appearance, and she has lost a lot of weight and some have criticised herfor that, what do lost a lot of weight and some have criticised her for that, what do you think about that, jax? i criticised her for that, what do you think about that, jax?_ think about that, jax? i think that is art of think about that, jax? i think that is part of her— think about that, jax? i think that is part of her mental— think about that, jax? i think that is part of her mental health - think about that, jax? | think that | is part of her mental health journey in generat — is part of her mental health journey in general. she has talked candidly
11:42 am
about— in general. she has talked candidly about mental health since having her interviews _ about mental health since having her interviews and it is a reflection of putting _ interviews and it is a reflection of putting herself first, and to be honest. — putting herself first, and to be honest. it _ putting herself first, and to be honest, it probably was not a conscious— honest, it probably was not a conscious effort to think, right eye, _ conscious effort to think, right eye, i— conscious effort to think, right eye, i must lose weight, because she has been _ eye, i must lose weight, because she has been really open about her body and it— has been really open about her body and it is— has been really open about her body and it isjust an has been really open about her body and it is just an after effect of taking — and it is just an after effect of taking care of herself, to be honest. _ taking care of herself, to be honest, and she has done amazingly. ithink— honest, and she has done amazingly. i think it _ honest, and she has done amazingly. i think it is _ honest, and she has done amazingly. i think it is in — honest, and she has done amazingly. i think it is in the vogue interviews she has done, she talks about that it was taking control in about that it was taking control in a really turbulent time in her life, during the exercise, it helped her mentally, as you say, a kind of mentally, as you say, a kind of mental health thing. does that mean you must change your appearance, jax, or not? i you must change your appearance, jax. or not?— jax, or not? i wish i had the discipline! _ jax, or not? i wish i had the discipline! i— jax, or not? i wish i had the discipline! i love _ jax, or not? i wish i had the discipline! i love cake - jax, or not? i wish i had the discipline! i love cake too i jax, or not? i wish i had the - discipline! i love cake too much. to be honest. — discipline! i love cake too much. to be honest. i— discipline! i love cake too much. to be honest, i don't think that i would — be honest, i don't think that i would. people have a vision of adele
11:43 am
in their— would. people have a vision of adele in their mind, and whether she is bigger— in their mind, and whether she is biggeror— in their mind, and whether she is bigger or smaller, she still has the classic, _ bigger or smaller, she still has the classic, classy look with the lipstick— classic, classy look with the lipstick and i think that is why people — lipstick and i think that is why people are happy to see her anyway, as long _ people are happy to see her anyway, as long as— people are happy to see her anyway, as long as they are seeing her. is as long as they are seeing her. is it true as long as they are seeing her. it true that as long as they are seeing her. is it true that you studied adele for nine months before becoming the tribute act?— nine months before becoming the tribute act? , , , , tribute act? yes, it sounds slightly like a stalker. _ tribute act? yes, it sounds slightly like a stalker. but _ tribute act? yes, it sounds slightly like a stalker. but what _ tribute act? yes, it sounds slightly like a stalker. but what studying . like a stalker. but what studying view do? gosh, _ like a stalker. but what studying view do? gosh, watching - like a stalker. but what studying | view do? gosh, watching videos, listenin: view do? gosh, watching videos, listening to _ view do? gosh, watching videos, listening to her _ view do? gosh, watching videos, listening to her music— view do? gosh, watching videos, | listening to her music constantly, watching — listening to her music constantly, watching interviewsjust listening to her music constantly, watching interviews just to listening to her music constantly, watching interviewsjust to pick listening to her music constantly, watching interviews just to pick up her mannerisms, the way she moved, the way— her mannerisms, the way she moved, the way her— her mannerisms, the way she moved, the way her banter is so important when _ the way her banter is so important when she — the way her banter is so important when she does has show. so the way her banter is so important when she does has show.- the way her banter is so important when she does has show. so can you imitate and — when she does has show. so can you imitate and mimic— when she does has show. so can you imitate and mimic the _ when she does has show. so can you imitate and mimic the way _ imitate and mimic the way she speaks? —— hershow. imitate and mimic the way she speaks? -- her show.- speaks? -- her show. that is something — speaks? -- her show. that is something i'm _ speaks? -- her show. that is something i'm working - speaks? -- her show. that is something i'm working on - speaks? -- her show. that is - something i'm working on because i've something i'm working on because we only— something i'm working on because i've only been doing this for two or three _ i've only been doing this for two or three years — i've only been doing this for two or three years now. the accent is so north— three years now. the accent is so north london, its really strong, so it is something i am working on. and chea it is something i am working on.
11:44 am
cheap swears it is something i am working on. fific cheap swears quite it is something i am working on. fific cheap swears quite a bit. but, katie, when you impersonate out, you swear on stage? ihla. katie, when you impersonate out, you swear on stage?— swear on stage? no, we are for a broad audience, _ swear on stage? no, we are for a broad audience, from _ swear on stage? no, we are for a broad audience, from little - swear on stage? no, we are for a broad audience, from little onesl swear on stage? no, we are for a i broad audience, from little ones to i9—year—olds, so we cater for everybody. i do offstage, but not on stage. everybody. i do offstage, but not on state. �* . everybody. i do offstage, but not on state. . ., ., ., ., stage. are fair on-air for me. and ou have stage. are fair on-air for me. and you have met— stage. are fair on-air for me. and you have met her, _ stage. are fair on-air for me. and you have met her, haven't - stage. are fair on-air for me. and you have met her, haven't you, i you have met her, haven't you, katie? ella mag eskom in 2015 as part at the abc. —— katie? ella mag eskom in 2015 as part at the abc. --_ part at the abc. -- yes, in 2015. as art of part at the abc. -- yes, in 2015. as part of adele _ part at the abc. -- yes, in 2015. as part of adele in _ part at the abc. -- yes, in 2015. as part of adele in the bbc. _ part at the abc. -- yes, in 2015. as part of adele in the bbc. since - part of adele in the bbc. since then, my career has catapulted, so thank you, bbc and adele for doing that for me. i am now lead vocalist of someone like you, the adele song book, and i am now doing that in different venues like butlins, which
11:45 am
has really helped build the momentum back up to do the shows again. we are back in theatres again now, that is where i metjax, is one of my theatre shows, and she is doing amazing. i am following jax as well. she is great. find amazing. i am following jax as well. she is great-— she is great. and adele it gives you shout outs on _ she is great. and adele it gives you shout outs on stage. _ she is great. and adele it gives you shout outs on stage. she _ she is great. and adele it gives you shout outs on stage. she actually . shout outs on stage. she actually took my post _ shout outs on stage. she actually took my post off— shout outs on stage. she actually took my post off me _ shout outs on stage. she actually took my post off me and - shout outs on stage. she actually took my post off me and told - shout outs on stage. she actually took my post off me and told to l took my post off me and told to 100,000 people at her show i was an impersonator and would get tickets for our sell—out tour and i'm still waiting, so please come and see us, the tickets are there for you. ianthem the tickets are there for you. when i knew the tickets are there for you. when i knew coming _ the tickets are there for you. when i knew coming on, _ the tickets are there for you. when i knew coming on, and _ the tickets are there for you. when i knew coming on, and it _ the tickets are there for you. when i knew coming on, and it is - i knew coming on, and it is literally the highlight of my whole month, when i knew you were coming on, we were going to have three of you, but suzanne, who is from northern ireland, she is not very well today, i was going to ask the three of you to sing a line each
11:46 am
from hello or someone like you. jax, eur with a little bit of a sore throat. —— you are with a little bit of a sore throat. katie, producing hello? ., , ., , ., hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time. hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time- what _ hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time. what about _ hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time. what about the _ hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time. what about the new - hello? you put me on the spot at 8am last time. what about the new one - last time. what about the new one may be? last time. what about the new one ma be? ~' ., last time. what about the new one ma be? ,, ., ., ., last time. what about the new one may be?— i i may be? iview know it already? i know a little _ may be? iview know it already? i know a little bit _ may be? iview know it already? i know a little bit of _ may be? iview know it already? i know a little bit of it, _ may be? iview know it already? i know a little bit of it, but - may be? iview know it already? i know a little bit of it, but she - know a little bit of it, but she released it on instagram so we have the first verse, so i have literally been hogging the sound of it for a long time. —— been hogging the sound of it for a long time. -- do been hogging the sound of it for a long time- "— long time. -- do you know it already? _ long time. -- do you know it already? someone _ long time. -- do you know it already? someone like - long time. -- do you know it already? someone like you i long time. -- do you know it. already? someone like you gets very high, and howl already? someone like you gets very high, and how i very high. i will leave it up to you.— high, and how i very high. i will leave it up to you. thank you, jax. she sings- _
11:47 am
leave it up to you. thank you, jax. she smes. i've _ leave it up to you. thank you, jax. she sings. i've forgotten - leave it up to you. thank you, jax. she sings. i've forgotten the - leave it up to you. thank you, jax. i she sings. i've forgotten the words. she sings. i've forgotten the words. she sings. sings: hello by adele. and you know the next time when each she releases another album, the next time when each she releases anotheralbum, i the next time when each she releases another album, i will ask you to do it again. another album, i will ask you to do it aaain. ~ ., another album, i will ask you to do it again-_ good - another album, i will ask you to do it again._ good luck. another album, i will ask you to do i it again._ good luck and it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with — it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with the _ it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with the success _ it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with the success and - it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with the success and it - it again. what, hello? good luck and continue with the success and it is i continue with the success and it is nice to talk to you both.— continue with the success and it is nice to talk to you both. thank you havin: us nice to talk to you both. thank you having us on- _ nice to talk to you both. thank you having us on. thank _ nice to talk to you both. thank you having us on. thank you _ nice to talk to you both. thank you having us on. thank you very, - nice to talk to you both. thank you having us on. thank you very, very much. the headlines on bbc news... an estimated 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid
11:48 am
pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. in lebanon, a national day of mourning has begun for six people shot dead in violent clashes in the centre of the capital beirut. there have been international calls for calm, with the united nations, the us and france all urging a de—escalation of the tensions. gunfire erupted during a demonstration by shia muslim groups against the judge investigating last year's devastating port blast. 0ur middle east correspondent anna foster described the mood in beirut this morning. well, there's a cautious calm, i think, on the streets
11:49 am
of beirut this morning. today's been declared a national day of mourning, which means that government buildings are closed and municipal business will stop. crucially, schools have been closed as well. students have been told not to go to universities. the funerals will happen in a few hours for those people who died yesterday. i think what everybody is waiting to see is what will happen next, is how long this quiet peace will hold. and i think there will be a lot of focus on what happens next with the blast investigation. shortly before that protest started yesterday morning, judgejudge tarek bitar was given permission once again to resume that suspended investigation. and i think everybody will watch to see whether that resumption happens, whether the mp5 who have so far resisted giving evidence will do so, and whether or not really that investigation will continue on course, or whether it will be in some way derailed before it comes to a verdict. how scared, how worried are people that yesterday's scenes may not have been a one—off? well, people have seen these kind of scenes on the streets of beirut before. it's important to say not
11:50 am
for a very long time. it's at least a decade until there's been gunfire of that range and duration on the streets of beirut. things like rockets, as you heard there, being fired. but people who lived through the civil war here in beirut, they've seen that before, and that really worries them. they are concerned that they will see scenes like that again and they don't want their children to live through what they lived through between 1975 and 1990. so there is real concern from people. they want to see this resolved, but there are simmering tensions. this is a sectarian dispute. and of course, there's history of that lasting and being very, very difficult to mediate and difficult to solve. so i think people are waiting and hoping this morning that that will be the end of it for now, at least. the lebanese army deployed now in the capital, how will that calm the situation and how much power does it actually have in the midst of all those very powerful militia groups? what's really interesting about the lebanese army, actually, is that they are in many ways the glue that's holding the country
11:51 am
together at the moment. they do a lot ofjobs that other armies don't do. they do the jobs of the police very often as well. they are overstretched, they've been receiving donations of food and equipment from different countries around the world. their soldiers are only receiving a very small amount of money. so things are very difficult for them. but we saw them out on the streets yesterday in large number. i was, at one point, surrounded by soldiers who were trying to decide what to do. they were looking at the buildings around them and they were making a plan, and if they saw people firing from those buildings, then they would go in and they would raid them to try and stop what was going on. there were soldiers on the street in great number. i think in the end, the reason this conflict died down was not because the army necessarily stepped in and stopped it. it was a calm which descended on its own. the army is still very well respected here in lebanon, but they have an extraordinarily difficultjob to do when it comes to keeping the peace. particularly when you consider, as we were saying, the things that the lebanese people are living
11:52 am
through at the moment. lack of electricity, lack of medicines, lack of fuel. the lebanese lira has lost 90% of its value just in the last year or so. people are angry and tired here in beirut, and it means that tensions are always simmering just below the surface. jacky wright, who is a corporate vice president for the tech giant microsoft, has been named as the most influential black person in the uk's 2022 powerlist. the list celebrates leading figures with african and caribbean heritage working in health, business, science and the arts. marcus rashford and michaela coel also feature in the top ten. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell, reports. there are many women of colour coming through the pipeline. the question is, is the door open? hello. hey, jackie. nice to see you. nice to be back in the office, isn't it? global leader, businesswoman,
11:53 am
technology trailblazer — jackie wright has worked her way up to become one of the most senior bosses in big tech. how did a girl from tottenham end up being a global tech leader? i come from a family from the caribbean, from jamaica, my dad served in the royal air force. my mother, windrush, came on a boat to this country. they had a life they had to strive and against all odds, and so my dad really instilled in me that i could be and do anything. no matter what he was going through. nobody ever hired jacky and said, you could be. they only hired me because i brought this and this and this and that's not tokenism, i had to know my craft. as well as the huge demands of the dayjob and raising three children, making time to inspire the next generation of leaders is one of her top priorities. talent is everywhere but opportunity is not. it is imperative that, as i step into a room, as i go and meet people, people see that they too can be important.
11:54 am
i now create a door that says welcome and people of all walks of life, from all backgrounds and experiences, too, can have the opportunity. her rise to the top has not been easy, and there have been many challenges along the way. but she says the rewards have been worth it. have you always had that burning passion for tech, and to be involved in the tech world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. you know, as i thought about the injustices that occur in life and the problems we have from an existential perspective, i always wanted to solve problems. but i fell into technology, and then i realised technology can help change things. showing no signs of slowing down, the best could be yet to come. digital is at the core of everything we do — it is an ethos. technology plays in every aspect of our lives and you have a role
11:55 am
as a leader, no matter what or who you are in society, to help leave the world in a better place than you found it. a monument to pay tribute to the windrush migrants, who arrived in britain after the second world war, will be designed by artist basil watson. the statue at london waterloo station will be of a man, a woman and a child climbing a mountain of suitcases hand—in—hand. it's been backed by £1 million of government funding and will be unveiled next year on windrush day, which is the 22nd ofjune. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, a crisp, sunny autumn day out there for many of you after what, for some, was a frosty start. we could see scenes like this again tomorrow, with a frost on the ground in some parts of the country. but the chill is a fairly short—lived one. this afternoon, temperatures down on what we've been used to for many — the blue colours indicating the extent
11:56 am
of the cold air. 9—12 degrees. milder across the south, and those yellows, notice how they take hold on the chart. milder air dominates. and if anything, it gets even warmer into the start of next week. by tuesday, we could be seeing temperatures widely into the high teens — if not the low 20s. that's the joy of autumn. so out there today the mildest air is across southern areas, but it's sitting under a weather front where you are going to have clouds, occasional drizzle, the heavier shower maybe along the south coast. the vast majority of the country, though, sunny spells and some long spells of sunshine at that. but temperatures down on recent days. just confirmation — 8—13 degrees, compared to 155 and 16s further south. now let's go into this evening and overnight. the cold air�*s in place, temperatures will drop quite quickly for many, but here's the zone that separates the cold airfrom the milder air, and that works its way northwards across the western half of the country as we go through tonight. so temperatures will rise here, but elsewhere we could see another frost around, particularly across rural parts of scotland, northern, eastern england — into parts of wales, too. and it's all because we've
11:57 am
still got high pressure in charge through tonight. so some partly clear skies, but it changes into the weekend. we turn our attention to the atlantic. it's this area of low pressure which will eventually usher in the milder air. ahead of it, we will see cloud increase tomorrow compared to today. a few showers across the far north of scotland. the odd shower elsewhere. generally cloudier with some drizzle in northern ireland at times, heavier rain into the west of scotland later. and you won't notice the yellow colours extend back northwards once again. still chilly, though, through much of scotland and the far north of england. but even here, the milder air will get in through saturday night, into sunday. outbreaks of rain spreading eastwards across the country. breezier on sunday across the south. persistent rain to begin with likely in the north and north—east of scotland. and then a scattering of showers through the day. hardly a completely wet day, it's going to be a fair bit of dry weather, some sunshine around, just the odd shower, but temperatures back on the rise more widely. really only the far north of scotland sitting in that colder air. warmer air, though, takes hold for most of us as we go into the early half of next week. the weather symbols, though, show a fairly changeable week, but by the end of the week cold air
11:58 am
could be back.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
hello, it's friday. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. an estimated 43,000 people in the south of england and wales may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. experts say they're astounded. it's not very often it happens, but i'm close to speechless on this. i cannot understand how it has happened at this scale and it's truly astonishing news. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk —
12:01 pm
unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems. and adele releases her first new music for six years — telling bbc radio 2's zoe ball she's in a strong place to put her vulnerability out there. hello, and welcome to bbc news. around 43,000 people, mostly from the south—west of england, may have been given incorrect covid test results, after they were processed by a lab in the west midlands. in the past hour, it's been announced that around 4,000 people in wales
12:02 pm
are among those affected. the uk health security agency says testing at the immensa health clinic in wolverhampton has been suspended after reports of people receiving negative pcr test results following a positive lateral flow test. it's thought those affected were tested between 8th september and 12th october. our health correspondentjim reed explained what happened. taking lateral flow tests, so these are the one you take in 15 minutes at home, getting a positive result, feeling ropey with kind of quite obvious covid symptoms, you know, loss of smell and that sort of things. then, if you get a positive lateral flow, you can then go and apply for a pcr test, these are one of these laboratory tests. these tests were coming back and often they were coming back negative. people were contacting the bbc and other journalists saying, look, we don't know what is going on here. this has been going on for a couple of weeks,
12:03 pm
and then this morning, it used to be public health england, it is now called the uk health security agency, they came out and said there appears to be a problem with laboratory that has been testing some of these pcr samples. this is a laboratory in wolverhampton run by a private company, and what they are saying, as you said in the introduction, is that they think about 43,000 people may have received a negative pcr when actually they were positive. they're saying those people are now being contacted and being asked to test again. this is between two dates, between the 8th of september and the 12th of october when these tests would have taken place. like you said in the introduction, concerns raised after people started getting these positive lateral flows and then negative pcr testing. i'm looking at the dates to check. you will be contacted. no, you should be contacted to say you need a secondary follow—up tests, but the concern here is those
12:04 pm
people, having received a negative pcr... will be going out and about. exactly, they might be going into school, schoolchildren might have taken a lateral flow and been affected here. we've been contacted by a teacher actually who said that he received a negative lateralflow, a positive lateral flow, sorry, and then a negative pcr but was not convinced about it at all because he felt so ropey, so he decided to stay home anyway, but there will be other people in this situation who you would imagine would not have done that and would have been out in the community quite legitimately. i've been speaking to professor alan mcnally from the institute of microbiology and infection at the university of birmingham — he helped establish one of the first covid testing labs in the uk — and says he's in disbelief. i'm astonished. it's not very often it happens but i'm close to speechless on this. i can't understand how it's happened at this scale, and it's truly astonishing news.
12:05 pm
ok, well, let's try and work out how it might have happened. what are your theories? you know, i've been personally responsible for an awful lot of covid pcr tests, and if you do that test properly with all of the appropriate controls that you need to check that the acid's working well, then there's no way that you should have missed the sheer volume of negative — false negative — results we're talking about here. the pcr process, there are various steps in it. if you control each step then you should see if you have this level of systematic failure of your testing process. that all comes down to quality control and quality assurance, oversight and management, and ijust cannot fathom the failings that would lead to this level of false negative results. could it be to do with a batch of pcr tests? could it be to do with the lab?
12:06 pm
it's got to be the lab. because you have controls in place such that if the acid itself is not working you will see it very quickly. what this comes down to is that... the only thing i can imagine is appropriate controls were not being used, or there was some sort of systematic failure in how the results were being read and interpreted. but this is not faulty reagents, it's impossible. so should this particular lab stop doing these tests right now? i believe they have. i believe the uk hsa has stopped operations there. i would hope so. there needs to be an absolute, huge, fundamental investigation into how this lab was operating and what levels of quality control and quality assurance were performed on that lab. i think back to when i was involved
12:07 pm
very early in the milton keynes lab, in helping to set that up — there was a huge amount of quality oversight from nhs england, from the department of health. i've not been in the system for quite some time now but i would hope that level of quality assurance checking still goes on in the network, particularly when dealing with labs like this — private provider lab — that's never operated in this space before. there needs to be a look at how much oversight there is of these testing labs. ok, is it significant that it's a private lab or not? what's your view? it's significant in that this is a company and a laboratory that has never operated an infectious disease diagnostic space before. that's not an issue. a lot of the lighthouse labs never operated in this space before. but as long as you have that oversight then that doesn't need to be an issue. clearly, there is an issue here and i would imagine, i would hope, there's currently
12:08 pm
a very thorough investigation into the level of oversight that was performed on this lab and how this happened. we don't know the answer to this — i'm going to ask you anyway. could it be happening at other labs? should there be a quick look at all the labs who are doing pcr tests? yeah, i would hope that happens regularly anyway. if you think about hospital labs that do this for a living, they have external quality assurance systems, so they share samples and you have to have concordance of results and tests and so on. i don't know that happens in the lighthouse lab network but i think it would make sense to have a thorough look at the quality of data being produced by every single lab in that network. i'v e i've got some latest ons figures for you regarding covid—19 rates. they say an estimated one in 16 people in england had covid—19 in the latest
12:09 pm
week. sarah croft, the head of analytics, said the estimates released today showed an increase in infection rates in england wales but a decrease in scotland. in northern ireland, the rate is uncertain. the queen has appeared to suggest she's irritated by a lack of action in tackling the climate crisis. her remarks were heard by a daily mailjournalist during conversations at the opening of the welsh parliament, the senedd, in cardiff yesterday. the queen was talking to the duchess of cornwall and the parliaments presiding officer, and seemed to be referring to the forthcoming cop26 climate conference. tv microphones weren't close enough to pick the comments up very well — so here's a subtitled clip.
12:10 pm
the queen's remarks come after both prince charles and prince william spoke to the bbc earlier this week about cop26 and the urgency in addressing the climate change crisis. the narrative has changed. you know, lots of the things that you said are now mainstream... it's taken far too long. world leaders are gathering in glasgow to talk about the kind of issues... yeah, but theyjust talk. and the problem is to get action on the ground, which is what i've been trying to do for the last 40 years. if we're not careful, we're robbing from our children's future — what we do now. children love being outdoors, they love getting muddy, they love playing and chasing and playing sport and that stuff. i think they have a truer
12:11 pm
appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than actually many of the adults, and that's where a bit of the disconnect�*s happening. is that those adults in a position of responsibility are not channelling their inner child. we can't have more clever speak, clever words, but not enough action. i'm nowjoined by caroline aston, royal expert and writer for majesty magazine. hello to you. first of all, what do you think of what the queen has said? the substance of what she said? the substance of what she said? it said? the substance of what she said? , ., ., , , ., said? it brought to my mind my own mother, said? it brought to my mind my own mother. who — said? it brought to my mind my own mother, who said _ said? it brought to my mind my own mother, who said talk— said? it brought to my mind my own mother, who said talk is _ said? it brought to my mind my own mother, who said talk is cheap, - said? it brought to my mind my own mother, who said talk is cheap, it i mother, who said talk is cheap, it is the _ mother, who said talk is cheap, it is the dimming that makes the difference. i dare say her majesty was encapsulating what many of us think _ was encapsulating what many of us think a— was encapsulating what many of us think a lot — was encapsulating what many of us think. a lot of talk, a lot of very fine _ think. a lot of talk, a lot of very fine words. _ think. a lot of talk, a lot of very fine words, but our planet continues to deteriorate, and i thought prince williants— to deteriorate, and i thought prince william's commits the other day, that it _ william's commits the other day, that it is — william's commits the other day, that it is all very well having space — that it is all very well having space tourism and sending captain kirk into _ space tourism and sending captain kirk into space, but what about our own planet? i think she was mainly
12:12 pm
voicing _ own planet? i think she was mainly voicing her— own planet? i think she was mainly voicing her opinion and irritation, too, _ voicing her opinion and irritation, too, that— voicing her opinion and irritation, too, that she didn't yet know what the final— too, that she didn't yet know what the final guest list was going to be. �* , the final guest list was going to be. �*, ., .,, the final guest list was going to be. ., .,y ., be. it's controversial, only in that we don't normally _ be. it's controversial, only in that we don't normally know - be. it's controversial, only in that we don't normally know what - be. it's controversial, only in that we don't normally know what the | we don't normally know what the queen thinks about pretty much anything. queen thinks about pretty much an hina. , queen thinks about pretty much an . _. queen thinks about pretty much an hina. , ., ., anything. absolutely so. throughout her record-breaking _ anything. absolutely so. throughout her record-breaking rain, _ anything. absolutely so. throughout her record-breaking rain, platinum i her record—breaking rain, platinum jubilee _ her record—breaking rain, platinum jubilee coming up, she is stirt a very— jubilee coming up, she is stirt a very neutral course. so when she says _ very neutral course. so when she says anything that might be pointing the finger— says anything that might be pointing the finger at anyone or any institution, we sit back and take note _ institution, we sit back and take note don't _ institution, we sit back and take note. don't forget, back in 2014, at the time _ note. don't forget, back in 2014, at the time of— note. don't forget, back in 2014, at the time of the scottish referendum, she was— the time of the scottish referendum, she was on— the time of the scottish referendum, she was on record as saying people think— she was on record as saying people think before they voted, and that was picked up by the papers, too, as being _ was picked up by the papers, too, as being a _ was picked up by the papers, too, as being a really rather political statement.— being a really rather political statement. �* ., , , statement. but what she is saying... it's not particular— statement. but what she is saying... it's not particular controversial - statement. but what she is saying... it's not particular controversial in - it's not particular controversial in that so many people agree with her. i think so too. i don't think it's controversial, itjust shows i think so too. i don't think it's controversial, it just shows that the queen— controversial, it just shows that the queen very much has her finger
12:13 pm
on the _ the queen very much has her finger on the pulse, if you like, of what people _ on the pulse, if you like, of what people are — on the pulse, if you like, of what people are thinking. during this terrible — people are thinking. during this terrible pandemic, she has spoken a couple _ terrible pandemic, she has spoken a couple of— terrible pandemic, she has spoken a couple of times, she uses very simple — couple of times, she uses very simple words, non—explosive expressions, but somehow she always manages _ expressions, but somehow she always manages to— expressions, but somehow she always manages to go to the heart of sometimes really complex or difficult — sometimes really complex or difficult issues. and here she is not knowing, we think, that she was being _ not knowing, we think, that she was being recorded, and it is not a very clear— being recorded, and it is not a very clear recording anyway. but she is saying _ clear recording anyway. but she is saying what we all think. all of the nations— saying what we all think. all of the nations of— saying what we all think. all of the nations of the world now at this critical— nations of the world now at this critical point should be getting together, should be talking, but of course _ together, should be talking, but of course should be implementing the policies _ course should be implementing the policies that hopefully will save our planet in the future.- policies that hopefully will save our planet in the future. very, very briefl . our planet in the future. very, very briefly- she — our planet in the future. very, very briefly. she doesn't _ our planet in the future. very, very briefly. she doesn't know - our planet in the future. very, very briefly. she doesn't know who - our planet in the future. very, very briefly. she doesn't know who is i briefly. she doesn't know who is coming but she will be there. she is going to be heavily involved in glasgow, isn't she? absolutely, and if she looks — glasgow, isn't she? absolutely, and if she looks anything _ glasgow, isn't she? absolutely, and if she looks anything like _ glasgow, isn't she? absolutely, and if she looks anything like as - if she looks anything like as resplendent as she did yesterday, a symphony— resplendent as she did yesterday, a symphony in pink, crowned not in jewels— symphony in pink, crowned not in jewels but— symphony in pink, crowned not in jewels but that amazing hat, i'm
12:14 pm
sure _ jewels but that amazing hat, i'm sure everyone will sit back and take notice _ sure everyone will sit back and take notice i_ sure everyone will sit back and take notice. i think she is an amazing lady~ _ notice. i think she is an amazing lady. people are surprised that she is using _ lady. people are surprised that she is using a _ lady. people are surprised that she is using a walking stick. well, if anyone — is using a walking stick. well, if anyone deserved a walking stick it as her _ anyone deserved a walking stick it as her and — anyone deserved a walking stick it as her. and you can't use a cane perhaps— as her. and you can't use a cane perhaps to — as her. and you can't use a cane perhaps to give a little smack sometimes, and maybe that is what we should _ sometimes, and maybe that is what we should see _ sometimes, and maybe that is what we should see. . ~ sometimes, and maybe that is what we should see. ., ,, , ., ., ., . should see. thank you, caroline. we are osina should see. thank you, caroline. we are posing here _ should see. thank you, caroline. we are posing here to _ should see. thank you, caroline. we are posing here to say _ should see. thank you, caroline. we are posing here to say goodbye - should see. thank you, caroline. we are posing here to say goodbye to i are posing here to say goodbye to you if you are watching us on bbc two. rules for travellers returning to england will be relaxed in time for the half—term holidays. from the 24th of october, fully vaccinated people will be able to use private lateral flow tests to prove their covid status, rather than relying on the more expensive pcr test. the transport secretary said it would make travel easier and simpler. earlier, we spoke to lisa minot, the sun's travel editor who says it's a positive move for the travel industry. it's huge. i mean, this is going
12:15 pm
to save the average family of four about £200 on tests for a return trip back to the uk for this day two and it will be a really positive move for the industry, and hopefully will encourage people to say, right, i can now book safe in the knowledge i will not be shelling out for expensive pcr tests. if you look at the rest of europe, nowhere else in the rest of europe generally is having to ask people to take a test once you're actually arriving in the country, so i think it puts us in line with other european nations. and as i say, it's a really positive move. people have been really confused over the last few months over which test they had to take, when they had to take them, and the removal of the predeparture test to get back into the uk was another really positive step forward, because for a lot of people, they wouldn't worry about going on holiday, but what happens if i catch covid abroad? do i have to quarantine abroad? so it's yet another thing that was taken away, another worry that was taken away and hopefully will encourage more people to book.
12:16 pm
joining me now is doctor stephen griffin, a virologist at the university of leeds. hello to you. so is this the right move? ~ ~ . , move? well, i think it really de-ends move? well, i think it really depends on _ move? well, i think it really depends on what _ move? well, i think it really depends on what the - move? well, i think it really. depends on what the priorities move? well, i think it really- depends on what the priorities are here. clearly, the priorities have been given to allow people to travel freely, and that is a decision that the government are taking. but if your priority would be to limit the amount of transmission and infection and movement of the virus around the planet, then i'm afraid this is probably what he would consider a backward step. i would urge that this is probably a mistake. i recognise the cost is great but perhaps that is something that the government could look at as well. right, so it is a mistake to switch from pcr is too lateral flow, right, so it is a mistake to switch from pcr is too lateralflow, even though yesterday we had researchers telling us that lateral flows were actually perhaps more accurate than we thought originally? thea;r actually perhaps more accurate than we thought originally?— we thought originally? they are accurate, they _ we thought originally? they are accurate, they are _ we thought originally? they are accurate, they are very - we thought originally? they are | accurate, they are very specific, but they are not as sensitive. especially with people who may be
12:17 pm
experiencing an infection after their vaccine, experiencing an infection after theirvaccine, it experiencing an infection after their vaccine, it can be very difficult to detect the virus in the nose and the upper respiratory tract. a pcr is really important to detect that because these people could still potentially be infectious, and it's fair to say that the uk has a fairly poor record, as does europe, in terms of maintaining border controls. we exported the alpha varied across the planet, we have already seen dell to come in, it has gone all the way across. if we continue to allow mixing and high levels of infection, i'm afraid we're going to be in danger of losing the ability of our vaccines to protect us in the future. ., ., ., ., future. ok, i want to ask you about the lab story. _ future. ok, i want to ask you about the lab story, that _ future. ok, i want to ask you about the lab story, that they _ future. ok, i want to ask you about the lab story, that they have i future. ok, i want to ask you about the lab story, that they have been. the lab story, that they have been pumping out negative pcr tests after people had had positive lateralflow tests. the uk health security agency has said this lab cannot continue doing testing at the moment. maybe
12:18 pm
40,000 people have got the wrong tests? , , ., , , tests? yes, it is absolutely shocking — tests? yes, it is absolutely shocking and _ tests? yes, it is absolutely shocking and i _ tests? yes, it is absolutely shocking and i heard i tests? yes, it is absolutely shocking and i heard allen | tests? yes, it is absolutely i shocking and i heard allen on before. i agree, shocking and i heard allen on before. iagree, it shocking and i heard allen on before. i agree, it is an issue of oversight. but really, if you are employing a private provider to deliver this sort of service, you need those assurances on the ground as well as an oversight. the sort of areas we are talking about are very large, and they really should have been picked up by the laboratory sooner. and the consequence of this, of course, is that people are walking around, considering themselves to not be positive about when in fact they are. and that can be damaging, both to their health and to others.— be damaging, both to their health and to others. thank you very much for talkin: and to others. thank you very much for talking with _ and to others. thank you very much for talking with us. _ there are reports in afghanistan at least 32 people have died and more than 50 injured. they have been
12:19 pm
taken to a hospital nearby. we can talk now to our correspondent, who is in the capital. what can you tell us about what has happened in the south? ~ , , ., , .,, south? well, this is a big mosque in kandahar city- _ south? well, this is a big mosque in kandahar city. the _ south? well, this is a big mosque in kandahar city. the explosion - south? well, this is a big mosque in kandahar city. the explosion took i kandahar city. the explosion took place and people gather together for friday prayers. from the photos that have emerged, in the aftermath of the explosion you see people who are dead and injured lying on the floor, admit shattered pieces of glass. we have heard from doctors in the area, and local reporters as well, who have told us that around 30 people have told us that around 30 people have been killed and dozens injured. it's unclear if that number will go higher. but from what you can see in the videos and the photos that is emerging, this seems to have taken place there are a lot of people had gathered together. the caliban,
12:20 pm
which is the de facto government here in afghanistan since they seize control of the country, have confirmed that this explosion took place, and they say that members of the group are investigating what happened. but this attack comes exactly a week after another attack in a mosque, in a shia mosque, in the north of afghanistan, in which scores of people were killed. it was a suicide bombing that took place last friday. it is going to increase ears among the minority shia community, who already feel themselves at risk from the caliban, it is also a challenging problem for the caliban's hold. because it's happened in kandahar, which is the stronghold for the taliban. it is a challenge for them, when you ask them publicly, just yesterday, i asked what they were doing about the increasing threat of iis attacks. he
12:21 pm
played it down, he said he doesn't think there is such a big threat for the caliban or afghanistan and so there are not any special preparations for security on that front. during and after talks with the us that took place over the weekend, they have also said that they don't want the us or any other foreign country's help to deal with the threat of iis. flan foreign country's help to deal with the threat of hs.— the threat of 115. can i ask you more generally _ the threat of 115. can i ask you more generally how _ the threat of 115. can i ask you more generally how the i the threat of 115. can i ask you | more generally how the taliban the threat of 115. can i ask you i more generally how the taliban are running the country? weeks after they took over the country? weill. they took over the country? well, firstl , they took over the country? well, firstly. there _ they took over the country? well, firstly, there is _ they took over the country? well, firstly, there is a _ they took over the country? well, firstly, there is a huge _ firstly, there is a huge humanitarian crisis in this country which was of course prior to the 15th of august there. a large part of that is because foreign development funding which is to come into this country, channelled through the government, and accounted for three quarters of a state spending, that has been frozen since the taliban took control of
12:22 pm
this country. on the ground that means that people who worked on development projects are not having jobs and getting salaries. if you look at women's rights, girls have not been allowed to go to secondary schools in most parts of afghanistan, women have not been allowed to return to work. the taliban say they want the security situation to improve and that is where they will allow these activities to resume, but the women i have been speaking to do not believe those reassurances, because they say those are the same promises that the taliban made when they were in power in the 1990s, and they never delivered on them then. time for the sport — never delivered on them then. time for the sport now. _ the breaking news this hour, the chinese grand prix is expected
12:23 pm
to be dropped from next season's formula 1 calendar when the schedule is published later today. the shanghai race has not been held since the coronavirus pandemic began and restrictions surrounding covid in china mean that holding it is impossible. it's expected to be replaced by the emilia romagna grand prix at imola in april. races in australia, canada, singapore and japan are all set to take place in 2022 after all four of those countries missed the last two seasons because of covid restrictions. the season will start in bahrain on the 20th of march and ends in abu dhabi in november. steve bruce is expected to face the media later today in his pre—match press conference ahead of newcastle's game against tottenham. it'll be the first time the manager will have answered questions since the club was taken over by the saudi—backed consortium. it's due to be his 1,000th game as a premier league manager, but speculation over bruce's future at newcastle has been rife, with extensive coverage from the press, something that aston villa manager dean smith can't understand. the media attention to hisjob role at the moment is over the top. for
12:24 pm
me, steve bruce is the manager of newcastle united. is it news that he is taking training? no, he is manager, he is there to take training. "the biggest win of my career" — that is how cameron norrie described his victory over diego schwartzman, putting him into the semifinals of indian wells and the win is set to make him the new men's british number one. norrie is also likely to move into the top 20 in the world rankings at the age of 26. he continued his impressive form, winning the first set without even losing a game. norrie then took the second set 6—2, against the world number 15, schwartzman. the whole match tookjust under an hour and a quarter. norrie now faces grigor dimitrov, for a place in the final. it's great to see hard work rewarded. i'm not surprised. he has won 49— rewarded. i'm not surprised. he has won 49 matches on tour this year, as you said _ won 49 matches on tour this year, as you said the — won 49 matches on tour this year, as you said. the condition clearly suit him~ _ you said. the condition clearly suit him he _ you said. the condition clearly suit him he is — you said. the condition clearly suit him. he is really enjoying the course — him. he is really enjoying the course. he was unbelievable last night _ course. he was unbelievable last
12:25 pm
night against schwartzman. i would think they— night against schwartzman. i would think they are pleased. but they were _ think they are pleased. but they were looking further into the tournament rather than settling on what they— tournament rather than settling on what they have done so far. there is more detail— what they have done so far. there is more detail on _ what they have done so far. there is more detail on all— what they have done so far. there is more detail on all of— what they have done so far. there is more detail on all of those - what they have done so far. there is more detail on all of those stories i more detail on all of those stories on the bbc sport website, and we will bring you all news from the conference when it happens. the government is planning to allow foreign lorry drivers to make more deliveries in the uk, to try to ease the pressure on supply chains. overseas drivers will now be able to make unlimited trips within a fortnight. the transport secretary grant shapps said it was a "common sense measure" and would increase the number of lorry drivers on the road by several thousand. i'm joined by lesley o'brien, managing partner of freightlink europe, a transport and logistics company. we area we are a national operator, transporting goods throughout the uk. general cargo. ithink
12:26 pm
transporting goods throughout the uk. general cargo. i think i speak for the whole of the transport industry when i say that the decision is not sensible and it is really an abuse of the uk operators and drivers. i really feel that we are not appreciated. truth? and drivers. i really feel that we are not appreciated.— and drivers. i really feel that we are not appreciated. why do you say that? because _ are not appreciated. why do you say that? because our _ are not appreciated. why do you say that? because our industry - are not appreciated. why do you say that? because our industry is i are not appreciated. why do you say that? because our industry is the i that? because our industry is the backbone of— that? because our industry is the backbone of the _ that? because our industry is the backbone of the economy. i that? because our industry is the backbone of the economy. we i that? because our industry is the i backbone of the economy. we have supported the economy throughout the pandemic. we have now increased salaries to get more drivers on the road, and what the government is now saying is, forget all the work that the uk industry has done and let's allow foreign competition to come in and take business off of us. and quite frankly, this could mean that some companies will go to the wall. because if foreign companies are taking our business, we are still paying our driver's salaries, we are still paying for our equipment. so i
12:27 pm
totally disagree that this is a sensible decision. 50 totally disagree that this is a sensible decision.— totally disagree that this is a sensible decision. ., ., , ., sensible decision. so what would you su: est sensible decision. so what would you suggest that — sensible decision. so what would you suggest that would _ sensible decision. so what would you suggest that would help _ sensible decision. so what would you suggest that would help with - sensible decision. so what would you suggest that would help with the i suggest that would help with the shortage of drivers, particularly as we have the deadline of christmas? well, i was at a meeting the other week. they're actually an average of 235,000 drivers who have a vocational licence. but these drivers do not have the continuous professional development. the other card that allows them to dry. if we were to relax this legislation in the short—term and allow these drivers are to come back, then we would be able to cover 100,000 shortage, which is the figure that we are saying we are short. and certainly, these drivers would be safer on our roads than the eastern european drivers, who will be attracted to come back. we know how safe our vehicles are. we have rules
12:28 pm
with regard to how often our vehicles must be inspected. these are not the same rules for foreign operators. are not the same rules for foreign o erators. �* are not the same rules for foreign o erators. . ., are not the same rules for foreign oerators. . ., , are not the same rules for foreign operators-— are not the same rules for foreign oerators. . ., , i. ., operators. and what is your view on the fact that — operators. and what is your view on the fact that they _ operators. and what is your view on the fact that they will _ operators. and what is your view on the fact that they will be _ operators. and what is your view on the fact that they will be able i operators. and what is your view on the fact that they will be able to i the fact that they will be able to do unlimited trips within the period of two weeks? this do unlimited trips within the period of two weeks?— of two weeks? this is going to attract the _ of two weeks? this is going to attract the likes _ of two weeks? this is going to attract the likes of _ of two weeks? this is going to i attract the likes of supermarkets to fill their slack, attract the likes of supermarkets to fill theirslack, but attract the likes of supermarkets to fill their slack, but what that is going to mean is that the operators that have been supporting the economy, they are going to be pushed to one side and really feel undervalued.— to one side and really feel undervalued. ., ~' , ., , to one side and really feel undervalued. ., ,, , ., , . undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talkin: undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talking to — undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talking to us. _ undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talking to us. we _ undervalued. ok, thank you very much for talking to us. we will— undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talking to us. we will see _ undervalued. 0k, thank you very much for talking to us. we will see if - for talking to us. we will see if the government listen to you. the prevalence of covid infections in england reached its highest level since january in the week ending 9th october. wales has seen the highest estimate of infections since the start of data collection in august 2020. robert cuffe is our head of statistics.
12:29 pm
roughly a million people in the uk that the ons think of coronavirus at the moment. ii that the ons think of coronavirus at the moment-— the moment. if infections are at january levels. _ the moment. if infections are at january levels, deaths _ the moment. if infections are at january levels, deaths and i january levels, deaths and hospitalisations are nowhere near that at the moment. so there is a very big difference. in last few weeks, we have seen the levels flit around a bit. 900,000 a week, up and down a little bit. probably drifting upwards a bit, but following the same roller—coaster that we are seeing in the daily case figures, with a gradual trend up into the autumn. we are seeing things move in wrong direction. wales now, one in 45 people have coronavirus. that is the highest nation in the uk. slightly different picture in the different nations. there are some bbc licence fee payers that say we should report what the latest cancer or heart disease figures are, but you don't know these figures are no do i come up know these figures are no do i come up with would that give us more
12:30 pm
context? it up with would that give us more context? , ., ., ., context? it is one of the leading cause of death _ context? it is one of the leading cause of death in _ context? it is one of the leading cause of death in the _ context? it is one of the leading cause of death in the uk, i context? it is one of the leading cause of death in the uk, 110 i context? it is one of the leading cause of death in the uk, 110 to| context? it is one of the leading i cause of death in the uk, 110 to 130 a day, and over the course of a month, that is topping most cancers and catching up with heart attacks, maybe not heart attacks and strokes together, but it is in the mix for one of the worst things going on. when it is something so changeable, when you can see that vaccination programmes bring things down and lockdowns change, it is moving around more than those measures stop we will see flu becomes serious over the winter and we will see more of that in the news. at the moment, this is still a story that is changing. the uk has taken a big bet, and the infections are higher than most places in europe. we have opened up more than other countries in europe and taken a different approach to how we treat some and autumn and we will see as we go on but that decision —— if that
12:31 pm
decision plays out well. it is still evolving and i am looking at it thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather, let's trundle across the newsroom tojoin ben. very good afternoon to you. the shock to the system this morning. in the northern half of the uk with temperatures around or below freezing, a touch of frost in places, but after the cold start, most are enjoying lots of sunshine right now but will continue through the afternoon. the odd clad in northern scotland, the channel possible in south—west england, milder air holding possible in south—west england, milderair holding on, possible in south—west england, milder air holding on, 16 in plymouth, 8 or 9 in aberdeen. this evening, more cloud rolling in from the west, this landmark. where it is clear, anotherfrosty the west, this landmark. where it is clear, another frosty night for eastern scotland and england. most places will get off to a great start tomorrow, some drizzle around, the cloud will break the sunny spells and north—east scotland should see
12:32 pm
sunshine as well. temperatures, though, will start to creep upwards again, trend continuing into sunday, milderfeeling day on again, trend continuing into sunday, milder feeling day on sunday, again, trend continuing into sunday, milderfeeling day on sunday, and there will be some cloud and outbreaks of rain around at times. good afternoon, here are your headlines. an estimated 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. experts say they're astounded. it's not very often it happens, but i'm speechless and don't know how it has happened at the scale, and it is truly astonishing years. —— it is truly astonishing years. —— it is truly astonishing. the queen appears to criticise
12:33 pm
world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems. and adele releases her first new music for six years, telling bbc radio 2's zoe ball she's in a strong place to put her vulnerability out there. our top story today — health officials have estimated that around 43,000 people may have incorrectly been given negative pcr covid—19 test results from a lab in wolverhampton. we've heard that 4,000 of those cases are in wales. our wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff. tell us what you know. you mentioned
12:34 pm
4000, 1096 of — tell us what you know. you mentioned 4000, 1096 of the — tell us what you know. you mentioned 4000, 1096 of the overall— tell us what you know. you mentioned 4000, 10% of the overall tests - tell us what you know. you mentioned 4000, 1096 of the overall tests that. 4000, 10% of the overall tests that have been given incorrectly in wales. the health minister has been speaking about this this morning. she said the welsh government were made aware there was possibly an issue when they heard there was a large amount of lateral flow positive test last week, but a large amount of negative pcr tests. the majority of pcr tests do go to a lab in newport, south wales, to be tested, however, a member did go to wolverhampton, which is why they have estimated there are 4000 in wales that were tested between the a fifth september and 12th of october and may have been given as a wrong test. the welsh government will be contacting all and contact tracing all people having a test after the 4th of october and they will potentially have to have another test after what has happened there. thank you.
12:35 pm
some of the world's toughest workplace covid rules come into effect in italy today. all workers must hold a �*green pass' showing proof of vaccination, a negative test or recovery from the virus. anyone without one faces suspension from work and stoppage of pay, and a fine of up to 1500 euros. but some businesses say that rather than encouraging vaccination, the rules will cause more disruption to the economy, that's already been hit hard by the pandemic. let's talk about this with professor michele geraci, former undersecretary of state at italy's ministry of economic development. what do you think about these new rules? , , . ., , rules? the new rule is perceived as discriminatory _ rules? the new rule is perceived as discriminatory for _ rules? the new rule is perceived as discriminatory for those _ rules? the new rule is perceived as discriminatory for those with i rules? the new rule is perceived as discriminatory for those with lower| discriminatory for those with lower income, something unusual in a g7 country, because the green pass is obtained by either getting the vaccine or doing a pcr test. however, the vaccine is free and pcr
12:36 pm
testis however, the vaccine is free and pcr test is not, so in reality, the choice is only available to rich people who can afford pcr test, but low must take the vaccine, and this has created lots of acrimoniously —— acrimonious and the polarisation of society. wright and what are the vaccination rate in italy? it is getting close to 80% above teenage ages, so it is quite good, that is why people claim that those who do not get the vaccine, they will not be swayed. so maybe we have reached a point where we can just let free testing for people who would be seen this as being given the choice, and being voluntary, rather than taking the vaccine. at the moment, vaccine is imposed on them, and those on the margins would choose not to do the vaccine because they think there is discrimination. i am always a proponent of doing free testing,
12:37 pm
free vaccines, and slowly will get to 9095%. free vaccines, and slowly will get to 909596. , , free vaccines, and slowly will get to 909596. , ., ., , ., free vaccines, and slowly will get to 909596. , , ., to 909596. understood. these are some ofthe to 909596. understood. these are some of the strictest — to 909596. understood. these are some of the strictest rules, _ to 909596. understood. these are some of the strictest rules, i _ to 909596. understood. these are some of the strictest rules, i am _ to 909596. understood. these are some of the strictest rules, i am told, - of the strictest rules, i am told, certainly across europe, so why are they being brought in? this certainly across europe, so why are they being brought in?— certainly across europe, so why are they being brought in? this has been because of the _ they being brought in? this has been because of the lack _ they being brought in? this has been because of the lack of _ they being brought in? this has been because of the lack of speed, - they being brought in? this has been because of the lack of speed, action | because of the lack of speed, action for the last year and a half. this is the result of a government, they need to find a balance between being a leader, so choose actions, and being led by what the general public desires. there has been chaotic communication that has not informed people very well, so the government, which was weak in parliament, did not have the courage to take strict measures that were needed 18 months ago, so now they find themselves having inherited the delays and so they need to go the extra mile, which is why they do more than would have normally been ok. if we had
12:38 pm
done the right things from the beginning, i tracing out ahead of these things, tracing application to make life easier, but that was refused on grounds of privacy. so you see, many compromises — the economy, selfie, —— health, and this is not criticism of the previous government, but it happens to be like that. . ~ government, but it happens to be like that. ., ,, , ., government, but it happens to be like that. . ~' , ., ., government, but it happens to be like that. ., ,, , ., ., ., ,, ., like that. thank you for talking to us. almost 13,000 cases involving allegations of domestic abuse in england and wales have been dropped over the past five years, because prosecutors ran out of time to bring charges within the six—month time limit. figures obtained by bbc news also suggest that while more common assaults involving domestic violence are being reported, fewer cases are being brought to trial. our political correspondent,
12:39 pm
alex forsyth, has more. i didn't know, or understand, what i was going through. i genuinely believed it was my fault. i kept asking myself, what is it that i keep doing wrong that makes them behave like this? a year ago, erica started a campaign to support survivors of domestic abuse, something she says that's very personal. when there were the good days, i'd be like, ok, i've done something right. and then, when there was something going wrong, i'd say to myself, this is what i've done wrong, i'm being punished for my own mistakes. and getting out of that mindset is what led me to eventually leave this relationship. erica made a report of domestic abuse to the police, but was told no—one could be charged because too much time had passed. coming forward, for me, was one of the biggest things i've ever done in my life. to sit down and say to someone that doesn't know me that these are the things that happened to me. six months isn't enough time to even fathom that sort of experience. the current law allows six months between the time an alleged
12:40 pm
common assault takes place and someone being charged. the idea is to keepjustice moving in offences the system deems less serious. but campaigners say when it comes to domestic abuse, that's not long enough, because it can take years for victims to feel able to come forward, orfor police to build a case. in the past five years in england and wales, there were almost 13,000 cases of common assault involving domestic abuse that were never charged, because that six—month time limit was breached. and while over that period, the number of these cases being reported went up, the number resulting in someone being charged went down. some want a change in the law — to allow more time for domestic abuse cases to get to court. i think this is another example of where the law, the criminaljustice system, simply doesn't get violence against women and girls. we need recognition from the government of how serious
12:41 pm
this is, how you've got so many domestic abuse survivors and victims just being timed out because the law is wrong and unfair. ministers have said before they will consider this issue, which the government says it takes seriously. in a statement, a spokesman said all allegations should be investigated and pursued rigorously through the courts, where possible. and they pointed out there's no time limit on reporting other crimes, such as bodily harm, or those that add up to coercive behaviour. meanwhile, police chiefs say that six—month limit only affects a small proportion of cases. but they say there is particular concern around those involving domestic abuse, and they're supporting the government in analysing the issue, to ensure victims achieve justice. i used to spend a lot of time to myselfjust to reflect, to calm down. erica says it's a case she will keep on making. using my story as my strength has been the biggest thing for me. to be able to tell my story with confidence, but using it as power to basically fight back against the law and hopefully change
12:42 pm
the law has been one of the most important things to me. let's talk to erica osakwe, who founded victims too. could you tell us about the alleged assault upon you? so could you tell us about the alleged assault upon you? 50 it could you tell us about the alleged assault upon you?— assault upon you? so it started off uuite assault upon you? so it started off quite small. _ assault upon you? so it started off quite small, short _ assault upon you? so it started off quite small, short temper, - quite small, short temper, inpatients, student —— which then escalated into physical and emotional abuse.— escalated into physical and emotional abuse. people will understand — emotional abuse. people will understand physical - emotional abuse. people will understand physical abuse, i emotional abuse. people will i understand physical abuse, but emotional abuse. people will - understand physical abuse, but could you tell us more about emotional abuse. what does it mean and what does it involve? in abuse. what does it mean and what does it involve?— does it involve? in my case, it stemmed _ does it involve? in my case, it stemmed from _ does it involve? in my case, it stemmed from a _ does it involve? in my case, it stemmed from a lot _ does it involve? in my case, it stemmed from a lot of- does it involve? in my case, it stemmed from a lot of gas i does it involve? in my case, it i stemmed from a lot of gas lighting, which in my sense would be feeling like i was the reason these things were happening to me, it was my fault. i triggered them, it is my behaviour that must change. and that
12:43 pm
mind—set is essentially what kept me in the situation for as long as it did. i lost my confidence during this period of time and i couldn't understand my emotions, and essentially ijust did not think it was necessary for me to come forward about anything. was necessary for me to come forward about anything-— about anything. what was the thing that made you _ about anything. what was the thing that made you get _ about anything. what was the thing that made you get out? _ about anything. what was the thing that made you get out? i _ about anything. what was the thing that made you get out? i guess i about anything. what was the thing that made you get out? i guess it i that made you get out? i guess it was 'ust that made you get out? i guess it was just having — that made you get out? i guess it wasjust having family _ that made you get out? i guess it wasjust having family and - that made you get out? i guess itj wasjust having family and friends was just having family and friends telling me so much, how much i was changing and how much the light in me has disappeared. they made me sit down and understand the position i was in, speaking to so many other survivors, even comparing stories, just understanding the detail and the magnitude of my reality, it made me tell myself, i am better than this, i need to get that support and help and i am not problem. it is still quite _ help and i am not problem. it is still quite a _ help and i am not problem. it is still quite a big _ help and i am not problem. it is still quite a big thing to then talk
12:44 pm
to the police and report what you say was happening to you. what gave you the confidence to do that? i guess it wasjust having the police guess it was just having the police initially offer so much support due to an unrelated incident, so the police became very much aware of my story, my situation, they offered a lot of support, a lot of patience and understanding, and ifelt like a lot of survivors and victims of abuse do not get that opportunity. in a way, i felt like abuse do not get that opportunity. in a way, ifelt like i had to be grateful they were ready to support me, but of course, we all know, especially through my campaign, that it was not a happy ever after. that it was not a happy ever after. at what point where you told, then, that this case cannot be taken forward on your behalf because we have run out of time, because six months has elapsed? 50. have run out of time, because six months has elapsed?— have run out of time, because six months has elapsed? so, after making months has elapsed? so, after making m reort, months has elapsed? so, after making my report. i —
12:45 pm
months has elapsed? so, after making my report. i waited _ months has elapsed? so, after making my report, i waited for _ months has elapsed? so, after making my report, i waited for or— months has elapsed? so, after making my report, i waited for or five - my report, i waited for or five hours, and the only thing i heard from them was that we will get back to you, we will get back to you, and eventually did. the four to five months later. and i was told they could not find my police report, it had been filed wrong and i would have to do it again, and after a brief assessment over the phone, i was told it would be categorised as common assault there was nothing that could be done for me. hour common assault there was nothing that could be done for me. how did ou that could be done for me. how did you react? — that could be done for me. how did you react? tears. _ that could be done for me. how did you react? tears. there _ that could be done for me. how did you react? tears. there was i that could be done for me. how did you react? tears. there was an i you react? tears. there was an emotional— you react? tears. there was an emotional period _ you react? tears. there was an emotional period of _ you react? tears. there was an emotional period of time, i i you react? tears. there was anj emotional period of time, i had you react? tears. there was an i emotional period of time, i had a pit in my stomach, the sickness in me for a very long time and essentially a sled to me in the campaign i have today because i could not sit on this. the main thing for me was that i did not want anyone to experience being told that they were too late, essentially being told it was there falsely could not receive justice. being told it was there falsely could not receivejustice. it is could not receive 'ustice. it is actually down i
12:46 pm
could not receive 'ustice. it is actually down to i could not receive justice. it is actually down to politicians, they make the rules. what would your message to politicians be? there is a build going through parliament right now that could be amended to drop this six—month rule, it is not in place for other allegations, other offences, what would you say to them? i other offences, what would you say to them? ., _ ., ., to them? i would say to them that i would need — to them? i would say to them that i would need them _ to them? i would say to them that i would need them to _ to them? i would say to them that i would need them to desperately i to them? i would say to them that i i would need them to desperately take the time to understand the impact abuse can have on a human being, the emotional trauma, the physical trauma, and six months simply is not enough for anyone to sit down and process what they have gone through, to feel safe to come forward, and even feel confident in their story. erica, thank you very much a talking—to us, we really appreciate it. obviously we will report back should government respond to you. and if you want details on organisations that can offer information and support around the issues of domestic abuse, please do
12:47 pm
go to the website. there are so many organisations and charities that can help so please reach out if you needed. —— if you need it. jacky wright — a corporate vice president for the tech giant microsoft — has been named as the most influential black person in the uk's 2022 powerlist. the powerlist celebrates leading figures with african and caribbean heritage working in health, business, science and the arts. marcus rashford and michaela coel also feature in the top ten. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. there are many women of colour coming through the pipeline. the question is, is the door open? hello. hey, jacky. nice to see you. nice to be back in the office, isn't it? global leader, businesswoman, technology trailblazer — jacky wright has worked her way up to become one of the most senior bosses in big tech. how did a girl from tottenham end up
12:48 pm
being a global tech leader? i come from a family from the caribbean, from jamaica. my dad served in the royal air force. my mother, windrush, came on a boat to this country. they had a life they had to strive and against all odds, and so my dad really instilled in me that i could be and do anything. no matter what he was going through. nobody ever hired jacky and said, you could be. they only hired me because i brought this and this and this and that's not tokenism, i had to know my craft. as well as the huge demands of the dayjob and raising three children, making time to inspire the next generation of leaders is one of her top priorities. talent is everywhere but opportunity is not. it is imperative that, as i step into a room, as i go and meet people, people see that they too can be important. i now create a door that says welcome and people
12:49 pm
of all walks of life, from all backgrounds and experiences, too, can have the opportunity. her rise to the top has not been easy, and there have been many challenges along the way. but she says the rewards have been worth it. have you always had that burning passion for tech, and to be involved in the tech world? no, i had the burning passion to change the world. you know, as i thought about the injustices that occur in life and the problems we have from an existential perspective, i always wanted to solve problems. but i fell into technology, and then i realised technology can help change things. showing no signs of slowing down, the best could be yet to come. digital is at the core of everything we do — it is an ethos. technology plays in every aspect of our lives and you have a role as a leader, no matter what or who you are in society, to help leave the world in a better
12:50 pm
place than you found it. adele has dropped her new single after a six—year wait. easy on me is from the forthcoming album 30, which reflects her life after going through a divorce. adele was on radio 2 this morning and talk about the process of making the album. —— and talked about process. —— and talked about process. you have been sharing over the last sort of week what a journey putting this album together has been for you, and also what you have been through. i definitely feel like i lost sight of, and, like, lost the appreciation of actually what a gift it is to be into music and to be able to make it. ifeel like i got a bit frightened of it for a while and it really, really took care of me. i don't know what my outlet would have been like
12:51 pm
had i not had it and it was bloody hard work to make, just in terms of, like, i was singing things that i didn't even realise i was feeling or thinking. i can't, like, unlock a door, you know, for my own mental health and take the key with me. got to leave it in the door of everyone else, and i'm in a strong place now where i feel like i can put that vulnerability out, so, yeah. earlier, i spoke to two adele tribute artists to see what they thought of her new song. so, this single, easy on me, is adele explaining her decision to walk away from her marriage a couple of years ago and the effect it had on her son in particular, and she is saying go easy on me. what do you think of it, katie? i think it is great, and it took me a while to listen to it because i was on the way home from a gig last night and had no signal anywhere, so i listened to it ten minutes after every other single person in the world, but incredible. and you just know it is an adele song from them first few chords and it is great. yeah, i love it. what about you, jax?
12:52 pm
yeah, brilliant. just classic adele, isn't it? i feel like she is easing us in gently. it's what the fans love about her. there is more to come, but easing us in gently, definitely. this album, coming on the 19th of november, i think it is, it has been described as "the divorce album". do you think that will resonate with lots of people? definitely. i think so as well. sorry! you carry on. to be honest, she'sjust so true and authentic that she is singing about things people do go through, and that is why people relate to her music. and i think, why not? there is such a high rate of divorce in the world in general, that it is something that a lot of people will have gone through and to bring it to her fans, i think, is perfect.
12:53 pm
when you look at some of the lines, which i suppose you will both be singing when you do your tribute acts from tonight onwards — "i changed who i was to put you both first, but now i give up". so she is talking about, as a woman, putting... ..thinking about herself as well, notjust other people around her. yes, i think for the last couple of years, you could tell, pictures and visuals, that she has not been happy with herself and she has obviously now made a massive difference in looks as well — she looks absolutely incredible. so she is doing it for herself more than other people now, i think, whereas before, she has always thought about other people i think, from what i gather. i obviously don't know her personally, i wish! but i think the way she has portrayed herself, she has always thought about other people and made sure they are ok, but now she is saying,
12:54 pm
"i am all right, and i'm taking care of myself. you talk about her appearance, and she has lost a lot of weight and some have criticised herfor that, what do you think about that, jax? i think that is part of her mental health journey in general. she has talked candidly about mental health since having her interviews and it is a reflection of putting herself first, and to be honest, it probably was not a conscious effort to think, right, i must lose weight, because she has never been really hung up about her body and it is just an after effect of taking care of herself, to be honest, and she has done amazingly. and she loves her tribute act, doesn't she. and she loves her tribute act, doesn't she-— and she loves her tribute act, doesn't she. , ., , , doesn't she. yes, and she said she would aet
12:55 pm
doesn't she. yes, and she said she would get tickets _ doesn't she. yes, and she said she would get tickets for _ doesn't she. yes, and she said she would get tickets for our _ doesn't she. yes, and she said she would get tickets for our sell-out i would get tickets for our sell—out tour, i'm still waiting, so please come and seals, the tickets are there for you. come and seals, the tickets are there for you-— come and seals, the tickets are there for ou. ~ ~' , ., there for you. when i knew you were cominu on there for you. when i knew you were coming on and _ there for you. when i knew you were coming on and it _ there for you. when i knew you were coming on and it is _ there for you. when i knew you were coming on and it is literally - there for you. when i knew you were coming on and it is literally the i coming on and it is literally the highlight of my whole month, when you are coming on, i thought, we were going to have three of you and one, suzanne, who is from northern ireland, she is not very well, i hope you get better, and i was going to ask the 3d to sing a line each from hello or someone like you. jax, you have a bit of a sore throat. katie, are you happy for me to ask you to sing a little bit of hello? we did that last time and you put me on the spot at 8am in the morning. what about the new one? do on the spot at 8am in the morning. what about the new one?— what about the new one? do you know it alread ? what about the new one? do you know it already? little _ what about the new one? do you know it already? little bit _ what about the new one? do you know it already? little bit of— what about the new one? do you know it already? little bit of it. _ it already? little bit of it. she released it — it already? little bit of it. she released it on _ it already? little bit of it. she released it on instagram i it already? little bit of it. she released it on instagram and l it already? little bit of it. she i released it on instagram and we it already? little bit of it. she - released it on instagram and we had the first verse. 50 i have been hogging the the first verse. so i have been hogging the sound that for a long time. i hogging the sound that for a long time. ., �* ., . , ,
12:56 pm
time. i won't force this, but i would like — time. i won't force this, but i would like one _ time. i won't force this, but i would like one we _ time. iwon't force this, but i would like one we all- time. i won't force this, but i would like one we all know. l time. i won't force this, but i - would like one we all know. how low is very high one, —— hello is a very high one. you take it away. i will leave it up to you. sings: hello by adele in a moment, the bbc news at one with jane hill, but first it's time for a look at the weather.
12:57 pm
hello. a crisp, sunny autumn day out there for many of you after what, for some, was a frosty start. we could see scenes like this again tomorrow, with a frost on the ground in some parts of the country. but the chill is a fairly short—lived one. this afternoon, temperatures down on what we've been used to for many — the blue colours indicating the extent of the cold air. 9—12 degrees. milder across the south, and those yellows, notice how they take hold on the chart. milder air dominates. and if anything, it gets even warmer into the start of next week. by tuesday, we could be seeing temperatures widely into the high teens — if not the low 20s. that's the joy of autumn. so out there today the mildest air is across southern areas, but it's sitting under a weather front where you are going to have clouds, occasional drizzle, the heavier shower maybe along the south coast. the vast majority of the country, though, sunny spells and some long spells of sunshine at that. but temperatures down on recent days. just confirmation — 8—13 degrees, compared to 15s and 16s further south. now let's go into this evening and overnight. the cold air�*s in place, temperatures will drop quite quickly for many, but here's the zone that separates the cold airfrom the milder air, and that works its way northwards across the western half of the
12:58 pm
country as we go through tonight. so temperatures will rise here, but elsewhere we could see another frost around, particularly across rural parts of scotland, northern, eastern england — into parts of wales, too. and it's all because we've still got high pressure in charge through tonight. so some partly clear skies, but it changes into the weekend. we turn our attention to the atlantic. it's this area of low pressure which will eventually usher in the milder air. ahead of it, we will see cloud increase tomorrow compared to today. a few showers across the far north of scotland. the odd shower elsewhere. generally cloudier with some drizzle in northern ireland at times, heavier rain into the west of scotland later. and you won't notice the yellow colours extend back northwards once again. still chilly, though, through much of scotland and the far north of england. but even here, the milder air will get in through saturday night, into sunday. outbreaks of rain spreading eastwards across the country. breezier on sunday across the south. persistent rain to begin with likely in the north and north—east of scotland. and then a scattering of showers through the day. hardly a completely wet day, it's going to be a fair bit of dry weather, some sunshine around, just the odd shower, but temperatures back on the rise more widely. really only the far north of scotland sitting in that colder air.
12:59 pm
warmer air, though, takes hold for most of us as we go into the early half of next week. the weather symbols, though, show a fairly changeable week, but by the end of the week, cold air could be back.
1:00 pm
more than 40,000 people may have been incorrectly given negative pcr covid test results. most affected cases are in the south west of england, with some in the south east and in wales. it is a worry because i was out there socialising, seeing people as normal and possibly spreading the virus without even realising. work has been suspended at the lab in question. we'll have the latest. also this lunchtime... rules for overseas lorry drivers are due to be relaxed to try to ease continuing problems in the supply chain. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for their lack of action on climate change. a bbc investigation finds nearly 13,000 domestic abuse cases have been dropped by police in england and wales in the last five years.
1:01 pm
there are many women of colour coming through the pipeline.

58 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on