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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems. west berkshire council confirms that some pcr tests carried out at one of its sites have been returning false—negative results. testing at a private laboratory involved has now been suspended. new rules will come into force
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a week on sunday allowing travellers returning to england to take private lateral flow tests, instead of more expensive pcr tests. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors ran out of time to bring charges. and... adele is back — herfirst new music for six years, released at midnight. hello. the queen has appeared to suggest she's irritated by a lack of action in tackling the climate crisis. her remarks were picked up in clips of a conversation filmed on a phone at the opening of the welsh
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parliament the senedd in cardiff and reported in this morning's daily mail. the queen was talking to the duchess of cornwall and the parliament's presiding officer, and seemed to be referring to the forthcoming cop26 climate conference. she can be heard saying she does not know who is coming to the event, which will begin in glasgow at the end of this month. let's take a look at the two clips. the queen's remarks comes after both prince charles and prince william spoke to the bbc earlier this week about the forthcoming cop26 summit and the urgency in addressing the climate change crisis.
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the narrative has changed. you know, and lots of the things you have said are now mainstream. it's taken far too long. the world leaders are gathering in glasgow to talk about the kind of issues that you were. yes, but theyjust talk, . and the problem is to get action on the ground, _ which is what i've been trying to do for the last 40 years! we, if we're not careful, we're robbing from, you know, our children's future with what we do now. children love being outdoors, they love getting muddy, they love playing and chasing and playing sport and all that stuff, and i think they have a truer appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than, actually, many of the adults. and that's where, you know, the disconnect�*s happening — is that those adults in positions of responsibility are not channelling their inner child. we can't have more clever speak, clever words, but not enough action. prince william and earlier on, prince william and earlier on, prince charles. let's speak now with our royal correspondent, sean coughlan.
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the queen saying effectively what prince charles and prince william already said earlier this week and important to stress it was a private conversation. it important to stress it was a private conversation-— conversation. it was not a formal intervention. _ conversation. it was not a formal intervention, it _ conversation. it was not a formal intervention, it was _ conversation. it was not a formal intervention, it was a _ conversation. it was not a formal intervention, it was a few- conversation. it was not a formal intervention, it was a few wordsl intervention, it was a few words being shared in private and you would need very good hearing as well. she seemed very engaged with theissues well. she seemed very engaged with the issues on the cop26 summit around climate change and it echoes some of the thoughts of other members of herfamilies some of the thoughts of other members of her families this week, prince charles and prince william. so maybe there is an insight into what they talk about around the dinner table perhaps. find what they talk about around the dinner table perhaps.— what they talk about around the dinner table perhaps. and it isn't -a dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics. — dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics. is _ dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics, is it? _ dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics, is it? it _ dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics, is it? it is - dinner table perhaps. and it isn't party politics, is it? it is a - party politics, is it? it is a conversation about saving the planet, which is in some ways not controversial.— planet, which is in some ways not controversial. no, that's right. and a . ain, controversial. no, that's right. and auain, it controversial. no, that's right. and again. it isn't _ controversial. no, that's right. and again, it isn't sort _ controversial. no, that's right. and again, it isn't sort of _ controversial. no, that's right. and again, it isn't sort of a _ controversial. no, that's right. and again, it isn't sort of a policy - again, it isn't sort of a policy position. it is talking to people in private. it is sort of showing signs of slightly an exasperated host as well, not knowing who is going to turn up for an event. will china come or not? it is where national
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diplomacy meets the politics of a dinner party. i can feel her frustration at not knowing who to say hello to win they arrive. find frustration at not knowing who to say hello to win they arrive. and of course, say hello to win they arrive. and of course. the — say hello to win they arrive. and of course, the queen _ say hello to win they arrive. and of course, the queen will— say hello to win they arrive. and of course, the queen will be - say hello to win they arrive. and of course, the queen will be there i say hello to win they arrive. and of| course, the queen will be there and other senior royals will be there. that's right, and it is something which they are very clearly committed to obviously and it shows what happens if you live in a world where everything you say scrutinised and recorded. and interpreted to a less degree. as we are doing now. but i think it is the sort of broad, of support for a project and it shows her own commitment and family's commitment to it. it isn't the first time _ family's commitment to it. it isn't the first time a _ family's commitment to it. it isn't the first time a real _ family's commitment to it. it isn't the first time a real conversation l the first time a real conversation that was thought to be in private has been overheard and reported on. no, and it is one of the perils of thejob perhaps, isn't it? and it is a world in which everybody has a camera in their pocket, everybody has the capacity to share a couple of words with the rest of the world in a few seconds. also, i suppose, because the queen doesn't say much
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about such issues in public. when people do hear what she thinks, there is a huge amount of attention paid to them so perhaps less is more. so these words will reverberate around the world, even though they were only a few snatched comments. . ~ though they were only a few snatched comments. ., ~ , ., , though they were only a few snatched comments. . ~' , ., , . comments. thank you very much indeed. sean _ comments. thank you very much indeed. sean coughlan, - comments. thank you very much indeed. sean coughlan, our- comments. thank you very much | indeed. sean coughlan, our royal correspondent. the government is planning to allow foreign lorry drivers to make more deliveries in the uk, to try to ease the pressure on supply chains. overseas drivers will now be able to make unlimited trips within a fortnight. the transport secretary, grant shapps, said it was a "common—sense measure" and would increase the number of lorry drivers on the road by several thousand. here's our political correspondentjonathan blake. thousands of extra visas have been offered to hgv drivers from abroad, in an attempt to ease pressure on supply chains in the uk. but only a fraction of them have been issued. so now, the government's going further, in a move it hopes will allow thousands of extra deliveries per month. drivers from the eu are normally
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restricted to making two deliveries within seven days, but those rules will be relaxed to allow unlimited trips within a fortnight. having some additional capacity, right now, i think everybody agrees is a good idea. this is a quick way of doing it. it doesn't require visas to do. people are already here. so, it'sjust a common—sense measure at these times. it's hoped food supply chains will be boosted by the move, with more goods being moved at a time of high demand. but the haulage industry is worried that while it might take the pressure off in the run—up to christmas, uk firms could lose out to cheaper eu rivals. pig farming is another sector that's been struggling, with thousands of healthy animals slaughtered without being processed for meat. but there's relief at the government's move to allow 800 foreign butchers into the uk and provide more cold storage. we needed butchers in these processing plants 12 weeks ago now. we, as farmers, should never have been put in this position. this really wasn't our problem.
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this was a processing problem, and we've been left to deal with the whole emotional and financial issues. farmers say the action is long overdue, but ministers deny acting too late. the government insists in the long—term, uk wages and working standards will need to rise to these challenges. but for now, they've been left with no choice but to rely on foreign labour. jonathan blake, bbc news. iain watson, our political correspondent, is at westminster. let's pick up on that point. because these are effectively short—term measures, but the long term and mission of the government is to raise wages in this country to reduce the reliance on foreign workers. . , reduce the reliance on foreign workers. ., , ., , workers. that is right, that is the vision set out _ workers. that is right, that is the vision set out by _ workers. that is right, that is the vision set out by the _ workers. that is right, that is the vision set out by the prime - workers. that is right, that is the i vision set out by the prime minister just last week at the conservative party conference, high wage, high skill economy. but the government say they are in a bit of a transition period getting from a to
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b, from low skills and low wages. it is high wages for many of course in the hgv sector at the moment because of a labour shortage. but at the moment, the government proposes a consultation, another week before they decide definitely to go ahead with relaxing the rules on foreign drivers and eu drivers and what they can do once they are here. but it looks as though they are determined to go ahead and the road haulage association says this means the government is doing the very opposite of what it was promising at its party conference last week. in effect, it is allowing bigger eu companies or companies which pay their drivers an awful lot less to come into the uk and carry out domestic deliveries, unlimited domestic deliveries, unlimited domestic deliveries, unlimited domestic deliveries, for two weeks, and they say that will undercut the current rise in wages for hgv drivers in this country. and they are also not convinced it will support out —— it will support —— it will sort out the supply issues before christmas. the government
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hope to relax it before christmas but they have to wait for the results of the consultation in the first place. the argument is at the moment if the government wants to see higher wages, perhaps they should continue currently allowing hgv drivers to see that rise in the wages and not try to bring in increased competition. what the government is insisting is because demand in the run—up to christmas is so great, then actually, the equivalent of three of 4000 more lorry drivers on the roads would be happening by relaxing the rules and the market can absorb that and wages would continue to rise in the hgv sector and more and more people are now applying forjobs sector and more and more people are now applying for jobs for sector and more and more people are now applying forjobs for training andindeed now applying forjobs for training and indeed for hgv tests, so the domestic supply will continue to increase in the longer term and a maximum six months on the relaxation of the rules. . ~ maximum six months on the relaxation of the rules-— of the rules. thank you very much, iain of the rules. thank you very much, lain watson- _ let's speak to edwin atema, head of research and enforcement
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with the fnv union, which represents drivers across the eu and europe. thank you very much. what do you think this latest proposal from the british government to allow foreign lorry drivers to make more deliveries in the uk to try and deal with these supply issues we have been seeing? this with these supply issues we have been seeing?— been seeing? this proposal will leualise been seeing? this proposal will legalise exploitation _ been seeing? this proposal will legalise exploitation in - been seeing? this proposal will legalise exploitation in the - been seeing? this proposal will legalise exploitation in the uk i been seeing? this proposal will i legalise exploitation in the uk and is oil on the fire of a broken industry, it is ridiculous. inn? is oil on the fire of a broken industry, it is ridiculous. why is it exploitation? _ industry, it is ridiculous. why is it exploitation? these - industry, it is ridiculous. why is it exploitation? these are - industry, it is ridiculous. why is i it exploitation? these are drivers who are coming here of their own free will and coming here to do some work and they are now being allowed to do some more work. yes. work and they are now being allowed to do some more work.— work and they are now being allowed to do some more work. yes, so these drivers do not — to do some more work. yes, so these drivers do not come _ to do some more work. yes, so these drivers do not come out _ to do some more work. yes, so these drivers do not come out of— to do some more work. yes, so these drivers do not come out of their - drivers do not come out of their free will. if we look to for example a case study close to westminster, there was an ikea store at wembley. that store, the head of transportation to that store is given by ikea to a transport company from lithuania, the transport company from lithuania gets their drivers from the uk. these drivers
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are isolated in their trucks full several months, completely stripped of their rights. and basically, the uk government now says, these drivers are here anyway so let's allow these lithuanian suppliers to do two weeks unlimited transports in the uk. now, how to ruin the industry even more.- the uk. now, how to ruin the industry even more. what about the visas that have _ industry even more. what about the visas that have been _ industry even more. what about the visas that have been issued, - visas that have been issued, temporary visas to bring in some staff before christmas to try and ease the supply backlog before christmas? several thousand lorry drivers have been invited to come here. and your experience, how many are going to come to the uk to do that driving? the are going to come to the uk to do that driving?— that driving? the drivers we are s-ueakin that driving? the drivers we are speaking to _ that driving? the drivers we are speaking to are _ that driving? the drivers we are speaking to are simply - that driving? the drivers we are| speaking to are simply laughing. that driving? the drivers we are - speaking to are simply laughing. do they really think that we welcome to they really think that we welcome to the uk to solve a broken industry? and in fact, the driver shortage, it is equal in the whole of western europe. and the danger of this is, to not fundamentally fix these
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issues by letting those on the top of the supply chain take their responsibility, the risk is suppliers from eastern europe who are not in danger of the shortage of drivers because they recruit them from the far east, these companies solve the supply chain issues which makes the whole industry even more below the surface because this mechanism puts their transport suppliers out of competition. and who can raise transport standards, fair transport suppliers, who are paid their prices by multinational companies on top of the supply chain, and now what the government does come rewarding bad suppliers from the continent in winning markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank ou, markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank you. from _ markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank you, from the _ markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank you, from the fnv _ markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank you, from the fnv union, - markets here in the uk. edwin atema, thank you, from the fnv union, which| thank you, from the fnv union, which represents drivers in the eu and europe. around 43,000 people may have been given incorrect covid test results,
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after they were processed by a lab in the west midlands. the uk health security agency says testing at the immensa health clinic in wolverhampton has been suspended following reports of people receiving negative pcr test results following a positive lateral flow test. it's thought those affected were tested between 8th september and 12th october. hugh pym joins me. what more do we know about this, this is quite alarming. we what more do we know about this, this is quite alarming.— what more do we know about this, this is quite alarming. we had heard about this for— this is quite alarming. we had heard about this for the _ this is quite alarming. we had heard about this for the last _ this is quite alarming. we had heard about this for the last couple - this is quite alarming. we had heard about this for the last couple of - about this for the last couple of weeks anecdotally from gps who reported they had patients getting in touch saying that they were unwelcome that they had all the symptoms, they tested positive on a lateral flow, symptoms, they tested positive on a lateralflow, then had gone to get the confirmatory pcr and it was negative. and gps were rather suspicious of this. it seems to be largely around the south west of england. then yesterday, west berkshire council came out and said
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that one of their testing sites, anyone who had been there since early october, up until the 12th, should get another test because there had been problems with processing pcr tests. to be clear, it is the laboratory in question, not the testing sites. so just in the last hour, we have heard from uk hsa, one of the bodies that replace public health england, that it is a laboratory in wolverhampton, a private laboratory, not a government run laboratory, and it has been suspended because 43,000 people have been given negative pcr results, which were incorrect. and they are in the south—west of england. it seems to have been about 10% of the overall amount that went through that. the reassurance to people is the testing system is still working, all tests will go to other labs. on the 8th of september, that goes back a little way, so who knew what and when? if you got infected in september and you got a false result
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on your pcr, the infection will almost certainly have worn off by now. so a certain number of those 43,000 will now be much better and don't have any symptoms. but some who were may be tested in the last week or so, where the results went to that lab, who will need to be contacted, and we are told that the contacted, and we are told that the contact tracing network is going to get in touch with people who need to redo their tests. but it does raise questions over how some of these labs are in. mil questions over how some of these labs are in-— labs are in. all right, thank you very much _ labs are in. all right, thank you very much indeed, _ labs are in. all right, thank you very much indeed, hugh - labs are in. all right, thank you very much indeed, hugh pym, | labs are in. all right, thank you - very much indeed, hugh pym, health editor. people who got a negative result from a covid testing site in newbury in berkshire earlier this month are being told to book another test, amid fears they were mistakenly given the all—clear. lynne doherty is the conservative leader of west berkshire council. thank you for being with us. tell us what has gone wrong.— thank you for being with us. tell us what has gone wrong. well, we were notified as you _ what has gone wrong. well, we were notified as you are _ what has gone wrong. well, we were notified as you are saying _ what has gone wrong. well, we were notified as you are saying earlier - notified as you are saying earlier by some residents who are concerned
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that they were getting negative results to pcr tests following positive results to lateral flow tests. and when we started looking at our own data coming out of the site, we could see we had a high number of negative test from that particular site so our own public health team were looking into what was going on there. and yesterday, we heard there had been an issue and we heard there had been an issue and we took the decision that once we knew, we should let our communities know it. because we had to act quickly so that they could take their own decisions about the next steps that they might take as individuals. and yes, we are encouraging everybody to get retested. and they are able to do that at the showground because she seems to be resolved. it is with the lab are not the showground itself, so there is no reason why people can't go down to the newbury showground and get tested and we encourage everybody to do that. and encourage everybody to do that. and how many people do you think that would be? we how many people do you think that would be? ~ ., �* ~' ., how many people do you think that would be? ~ ., �* ~ ., would be? we don't know the exact numbers here _ would be? we don't know the exact numbers here for _ would be? we don't know the exact numbers here for the _ would be? we don't know the exact numbers here for the residents - would be? we don't know the exact numbers here for the residents in i numbers here for the residents in west berkshire at this moment, but i
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am pleased to hear the nhs test and trace will try to make direct contact with those they have concerns around. but we also want to raise awareness, which is why we came out yesterday to say that if you had a negative pcr test and you suspect you may have covid, whether thatis suspect you may have covid, whether that is through a positive lateral flow tester symptoms, then you should be taking additional precautions and getting a pcr test on. i precautions and getting a pcr test on. , , precautions and getting a pcr test on, , , ., precautions and getting a pcr test on. , , ., , ., �* on. i guess that message won't get throu . h to on. i guess that message won't get through to everybody _ on. i guess that message won't get through to everybody and - on. i guess that message won't get through to everybody and some - on. i guess that message won't get - through to everybody and some people will slip through the net, unfortunately. will slip through the net, unfortunatel . ., ., , will slip through the net, unfortunatel. ., ., , , , unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why _ unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why i _ unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why i have _ unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why i have been _ unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why i have been doing - unfortunately. unfortunately, yes, which is why i have been doing all| which is why i have been doing all we can this morning to get our message out there as widely as possible and i will work with west berkshire council and our partnership with public health to make sure we get this out as widely as we possibly can.— as we possibly can. have you been riven an as we possibly can. have you been given any information _ as we possibly can. have you been given any information about - as we possibly can. have you been given any information about what. as we possibly can. have you been i given any information about what has gone wrong at the laboratory? ida. i gone wrong at the laboratory? no, i haven't got— gone wrong at the laboratory? no, i haven't got that _ gone wrong at the laboratory? no, i haven't got that information, - gone wrong at the laboratory? iirrl, i haven't got that information, i only know what you know and what has been put forward in that statement, that there is an issue with a particular laboratory and that that is being investigated.—
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laboratory and that that is being investiuated. . ~ , ., , . investigated. thank you very much, l nne investigated. thank you very much, lynne doherty. _ investigated. thank you very much, lynne doherty, conservative - investigated. thank you very much, lynne doherty, conservative leader| lynne doherty, conservative leader of west berkshire council. rules for travellers returning to england will be relaxed in time for the half—term holidays. from the 24th of october, fully—vaccinated people will be able to use private lateral flow tests to prove their covid status, rather than relying on the more expensive pcr test. the transport secretary said it would make travel easier and simpler. lisa minot is the sun's travel editor. we have taught you many times during this pandemic. how much difference is this going to make to travellers, especially over the half term break? well, it is huge. this is going to save the average family of four about £200 on tests for a return trip back to the uk for this and it is going to be a really positive move for the industry and hopefully, it will encourage people to say, i can now book safe in the knowledge i am not going to be shelling out for expensive pcr tests. i5 am not going to be shelling out for expensive pcr tests. is it overdue,
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in our expensive pcr tests. is it overdue, in your view. _ expensive pcr tests. is it overdue, in your view, should _ expensive pcr tests. is it overdue, in your view, should this _ expensive pcr tests. is it overdue, in your view, should this have - expensive pcr tests. is it overdue, | in your view, should this have been relaxed a little bit earlier on? i think if you look at the rest of europe, nowhere else in europe generally is having to ask people to take a test once you actually arrive in the country. so i think it deftly puts it in line with other european nations. and it is a really positive move. people have been really confused over the last few months as to which tests they had to win they had to take them. the removal of the predeparture had to take them. the removal of the predepa rtu re test had to take them. the removal of the predeparture test which we had to had to take to get back in the uk was another really positive step forward because for a lot of people, they wouldn't worry about going on holiday, what happens if i catch covid while i am abroad or do i have to quarantine abroad? it was yet another worry that was taken away and hopefully will encourage more people to book. the and hopefully will encourage more people to book-— and hopefully will encourage more people to book. the pcr tests have been coming _ people to book. the pcr tests have been coming down _ people to book. the pcr tests have been coming down in _ people to book. the pcr tests have been coming down in price, - people to book. the pcr tests have been coming down in price, but - people to book. the pcr tests have| been coming down in price, but they are still so expensive for a lot of people? are still so expensive for a lot of --eole? , . , are still so expensive for a lot of neale? , ., , are still so expensive for a lot of --eole? , . , ., people? yes, generally, you would see a pcr test _ people? yes, generally, you would see a pcr test between _ people? yes, generally, you would see a pcr test between £60 - people? yes, generally, you would see a pcr test between £60 and i people? yes, generally, you would - see a pcr test between £60 and £100. the lateral flow tests, between £25
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and £35. so there is a real difference in price, but it is also worth noting that we can start booking these new lateral flow tests from october the 22nd. and of course, you start taking them from october the 24th. so we have to make sure we are bucking the right type of lateral flow tests because there are still some available to be blocked in private testing websites at the moment.— blocked in private testing websites at the moment. what is your view of what will happen _ at the moment. what is your view of what will happen over _ at the moment. what is your view of what will happen over half-term - what will happen over half—term commitment is the travel industry looking at that as another opportunity for a boost because it has been such a tough time for them? yes, this is their last big chance to have people travelling in any great numbers. the half—term means families can travel so it is the less chance they will have before christmas to really get people in volume travelling and that is the way they are going to make money. the travel industry has a ways been a very low profit margin type of business, they don't make much profit and they rely on volume, so the chance to take away more people over half—term is going to be really welcomed. over half-term is going to be really welcomed. ~ ., ., ~ , ., ,
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welcomed. lisa minot, thank you very much indeed- — welcomed. lisa minot, thank you very much indeed. thank— welcomed. lisa minot, thank you very much indeed. thank you. _ almost 13,000 cases involving allegations of domestic abuse in england and wales have been dropped over the past five years — because prosecutors ran out of time to bring charges, within the six—month time limit. figures obtained by bbc news also suggest that while more common assaults involving domestic violence are being reported, fewer cases are being brought to trial. our political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more. i didn't know, or understand, what i was going through. i genuinely believed it was my fault. i kept asking myself, what is it that i keep doing wrong that makes them behave like this? a year ago, erica started a campaign to support survivors of domestic abuse, something she says that's very personal. when there were the good days, i'd be like, ok, i've done something right. and then, when there was something going wrong, i'd say to myself, this is what i've done wrong, i'm being punished for my own mistakes. and getting out of that mindset is what led me to eventually
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leave this relationship. erica made a report of domestic abuse to the police, but was told no—one could be charged because too much time had passed. coming forward, for me, was one of the biggest things i've ever done in my life. to sit down and say to someone that doesn't know me that these are the things that happened to me. six months isn't enough time to even fathom that sort of experience. the current law allows six months between the time an alleged common assault takes place and someone being charged. the idea is to keepjustice moving in offences the system deems less serious. but campaigners say when it comes to domestic abuse, that's not long enough, because it can take years for victims to feel able to come forward, orfor police to build a case. in the past five years, in england and wales, there were almost 13,000 cases of common assault involving domestic abuse that were never charged, because that six—month time limit was breached. and while over that period, the number of these cases
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being reported went up, the number resulting in someone being charged went down. some want a change in the law — to allow more time for domestic abuse cases to get to court. i think this is another example of where the law, the criminaljustice system, simply doesn't get violence against women and girls. we need recognition from the government of how serious this is, how you've got so many domestic abuse survivors and victims just being timed out because the law is wrong and unfair. ministers have said before they will consider this issue, which the government says it takes seriously. in a statement, a spokesman said all allegations should be investigated and pursued vigorously through the courts, where possible. and they pointed out there's no time limit on reporting other crimes, such as bodily harm, or those that add up to coercive behaviour. meanwhile, police chiefs say that six—month limit only affects a small proportion of cases. but they say there is particular
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concern around those involving domestic abuse, and they're supporting the government in analysing the issue, to ensure victims achieve justice. i used to spend a lot of time to myselfjust to reflect, to calm down. erica says it's a case she will keep on making. using my story as my strength has been the biggest thing for me. to be able to tell my story with confidence, but using it as power to basically fight back against the law and hopefully change the law has been one of the most important things to me. alex forsyth reporting there. details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc. co. uk/actionline. a murder investigation has been launched, after a teenage boy died in an assault in bristol yesterday evening. a witness told the bbc they saw three teenagers fighting in the lawrence hill area just before 6:30. avon and somerset police said the victim, who has not been identified,
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died at the scene after suffering "significant injuries". former us president bill clinton has been receiving hospital treatment in california, for a "non—covid related" infection. a spokesperson for the 75—year—old said he is "on the mend" and "in good spirits", after being admitted on tuesday. his doctors said he had received antibiotics and fluids and remained in hospital for "continuous monitoring". shoppers can spend up to £100 per transaction using their contactless card from today. however, retailers say it could take months before they ve updated their terminals to accept the new limit. there are also concerns about what the change could mean for the risk of fraud and personal spending. ben thompson reports. what was once a novelty. is that it?
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that is it and _ what was once a novelty. is that it? that is it and the _ what was once a novelty. is that it? that is it and the receipt _ what was once a novelty. is that it? that is it and the receipt welcome i that is it and the receipt welcome out here — that is it and the receipt welcome out here. ., ., a, ., ~:: , out here. now routine. more than 60% of all credit and _ out here. now routine. more than 60% of all credit and debit _ out here. now routine. more than 60% of all credit and debit card _ of all credit and debit card transactions are now contactless. before the pandemic, i would say we were 70% cash, 30% card. and now it has flicked, so right now, we are doing about 70%, may be pushing up to 80% card and the rest is cash. anything which enables people to be more willing to go on to the high street is a benefit from a commercial outlet like ourselves. 18 months ago, i could have bought and paid for these on my contactless card. up to £30. but from today, well, i can buy this much, up to £100 without putting on my pin. it is a big change. but do customers really want it? i is a big change. but do customers really want it?— really want it? i think that's a aood really want it? i think that's a good idea- — really want it? i think that's a good idea- i _ really want it? i think that's a good idea. i would _ really want it? i think that's a good idea. i would try - really want it? i think that's a good idea. i would try and - really want it? i think that's a l good idea. i would try and keep really want it? i think that's a - good idea. i would try and keep it at 45. if good idea. i would try and keep it at 45- if you _ good idea. i would try and keep it at 45. if you asked _ good idea. i would try and keep it at 45. if you asked your _ good idea. i would try and keep it at 45. if you asked your card - good idea. i would try and keep it at 45. if you asked your card or i at 45. if you asked your card or something. _
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at 45. if you asked your card or something, someone - at 45. if you asked your card or something, someone could - at 45. if you asked your card or| something, someone could just at 45. if you asked your card or - something, someone could just spend all your money on the machine. == ii all your money on the machine. -- if ou lost. all your money on the machine. -- if you lost- you — all your money on the machine. -- if you lost. you have _ all your money on the machine. -- if you lost. you have lost _ all your money on the machine. -- if you lost. you have lost all— all your money on the machine. -- if you lost. you have lost all your - you lost. you have lost all your card _ you lost. you have lost all your card and — you lost. you have lost all your card and then £100 has been taken out of— card and then £100 has been taken out of your— card and then £100 has been taken out of your bank, i would be devastated. it out of your bank, i would be devastated.— out of your bank, i would be devastated. ., , ., ., , devastated. it was a worry in the first place _ devastated. it was a worry in the first place when _ devastated. it was a worry in the first place when it _ devastated. it was a worry in the first place when it first _ devastated. it was a worry in the first place when it first came - devastated. it was a worry in the | first place when it first came out, but no _ first place when it first came out, but no seems _ first place when it first came out, but no seems to _ first place when it first came out, but no seems to have _ first place when it first came out, but no seems to have suffered i first place when it first came out, i but no seems to have suffered that badly, _ but no seems to have suffered that badly, have — but no seems to have suffered that badly, have i— but no seems to have suffered that badly, have i question— but no seems to have suffered that badly, have i question —— _ but no seems to have suffered that badly, have i question —— have - but no seems to have suffered that| badly, have i question —— have they question— badly, have i question —— have they question what — badly, have i question —— have they question what i_ badly, have i question —— have they question what i think _ badly, have i question —— have they question what i think it _ badly, have i question —— have they question what i think it is— badly, have i question —— have they question what i think it is a - badly, have i question —— have they question what i think it is a good i question what i think it is a good idea _ question what i think it is a good idea. iii— question what i think it is a good idea. , ., .,, question what i think it is a good idea. ., idea. if you lost your card for instance, _ idea. if you lost your card for instance, they _ idea. if you lost your card for instance, they would - idea. if you lost your card for instance, they would have i idea. if you lost your card for instance, they would have a l idea. if you lost your card for - instance, they would have a field day, _ instance, they would have a field day, wouldn't they? sol instance, they would have a field day, wouldn't they? so i mightjust io day, wouldn't they? so i mightjust go in _ day, wouldn't they? so i mightjust go in the _ day, wouldn't they? so i mightjust go in the bank now and just ask about— go in the bank now and just ask about that _ go in the bank now and just ask about that tomorrow. i go in the bank now and “ust ask about that tomorrow._ about that tomorrow. i think with the limit going — about that tomorrow. i think with the limit going up _ about that tomorrow. i think with the limit going up to _ about that tomorrow. i think with the limit going up to £100 - about that tomorrow. i think with the limit going up to £100 and i about that tomorrow. i think with l the limit going up to £100 and you just tap your card onto it, it is very easy to spend money without really thinking about it and engaging with it. previously, we got out cash or wrote out a cheque and now we mightjust have a card and are not aware of how much we are paying for things so there is a risk you get overcharged or you'rejust spending without really connecting without thinking of how much money you are spending. ii without thinking of how much money you are spending-— you are spending. if people are worried about _ you are spending. if people are worried about that _ you are spending. if people are worried about that limit - you are spending. if people are worried about that limit going i you are spending. if people are i worried about that limit going up, is there anything they can do about it? , ., , .., is there anything they can do about it? , .,, it? one thing people can do is either request _ it? one thing people can do is either request a _ it? one thing people can do is either request a lower - it? one thing people can do is either request a lower limit, i it? one thing people can do is - either request a lower limit, some banks are offering this and you should speak to your bank, or you
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can request to opt out of contactless altogether. three . uarters contactless altogether. three quarters of — contactless altogether. three quarters of us _ contactless altogether. three quarters of us would - contactless altogether. three quarters of us would prefer i contactless altogether. three | quarters of us would prefer to contactless altogether. three - quarters of us would prefer to set our own contactless limit. but for some card holders, that is easier said than done. got some card holders, that is easier said than done.— said than done. got in touch with them to see _ said than done. got in touch with them to see if _ said than done. got in touch with them to see if it _ said than done. got in touch with them to see if it would _ said than done. got in touch with them to see if it would be - said than done. got in touch with i them to see if it would be possible to have _ them to see if it would be possible to have a _ them to see if it would be possible to have a custom limit, the response was: _ to have a custom limit, the response was, in _ to have a custom limit, the response was, in the _ to have a custom limit, the response was, in the banking app, i can turn off contactless and then for when i do want _ off contactless and then for when i do want to— off contactless and then for when i do want to use contactless, i can then— do want to use contactless, i can then open— do want to use contactless, i can then open up my phone, open up the 6pp, then open up my phone, open up the app, log— then open up my phone, open up the app. log on _ then open up my phone, open up the app, log on to that, turn contactless back on, take the card out on _ contactless back on, take the card out on my— contactless back on, take the card out on my wallet and pay with that. that isnt— out on my wallet and pay with that. that isn't really feasible, i want a lower limit, — that isn't really feasible, i want a lower limit, even if it isjust back to the _ lower limit, even if it isjust back to the 45. — lower limit, even if it isjust back to the 45, and the response was, no, they can't— to the 45, and the response was, no, they can't do — to the 45, and the response was, no, they can't do that. the to the 45, and the response was, no, they can't do that.— they can't do that. the financial re . ulator they can't do that. the financial regulator says _ they can't do that. the financial regulator says the _ they can't do that. the financial regulator says the risk - they can't do that. the financial regulator says the risk of - they can't do that. the financial regulator says the risk of fraud | regulator says the risk of fraud remains very low and there wasn't a rise in crime last time the limit went up. uk finance says people are protected if anything goes wrong. but it's up to banks to decide whether to allow different limits. people who use their phone to pay
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are already used to spending more, without entering a pin. i are already used to spending more, without entering a pin.— without entering a pin. i think a lot of people — without entering a pin. i think a lot of people are _ without entering a pin. i think a lot of people are used _ without entering a pin. i think a lot of people are used to - without entering a pin. i think a lot of people are used to having| without entering a pin. i think a - lot of people are used to having the higher limits. they find it more convenient. and i think it was always the direction we were heading so, yes, ithink always the direction we were heading so, yes, i think it is here to stay. whether it is contactless or by phone, the way we pay is changing. the question is, shoppers happy with the speed of that change? ben thompson, bbc news, in stockport. let's see what the weather will be like if you are out shopping. it is going to turn milder again this weekend after what has been a chilly start but that chilly weather is with us for the next 24 hours, frost in northern ireland and scotland and northern england but the mildest air within southern england and south wales where you had the sunshine yesterday, more cloud and rain, may be a show on the south coast but highs of 17. elsewhere, cooler than yesterday but
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a crisp autumn day, more cloud in the north and west of scotland, a couple of showers. overnight, chile, the greater chance of frost in scotland, northern and eastern england, maybe even wales but in the west, it turns milder to the end of the night at cloud moves northwards and eastwards. still chilly tomorrow for scotland and eastern england, many places dry, more cloud around with occasional sunshine. the sickest cloud in the far west across ireland and western scotland with mix of rain, temperatures are lifting and the milder air will push to all after some overnight rain on saturday night. hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... the queen has appeared to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change, saying, "it's very irritating when they talk, but don't do."
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foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems. around 43,000 people in the south—west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. travellers returning to england will be able to take private lateral flow tests instead of more expensive pcr tests from 24th october. victims of alleged domestic abuse are seeing their cases dropped at a rapidly increasing rate, because prosecutors run out of time to bring charges. #go # go easy on me, baby... and adele is back — her first new music for six years released at midnight.
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mike is particularly excited about that but he's going to tell us about the tennis. i was up early to listen! and great news in the tennis. ten years after he first established himself in britain, cameron norrie will be the new british men's number one, after reaching the semi—finals of the indian wells tournament, with an impressive win over diego schwartzman. he's now 26, and norrie is also likely to move into the top 20 in the world rankings, and is one of the form players this year. he won the first set without even losing a game, and wrapped up the second set 6—2 against the world number 15. the whole thing tookjust under an hour and a quarter. he now faces grigor dimitrov for a place in the final. great to see hard work rewarded. i am not surprised, he has won 49 matches on tour this year as you said, and the conditions in indian
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wells clearly suit him, he is enjoying the courts. he was unbelievable last night against schwartzman, he didn't miss a ball. would think that they are pleased but they will be looking further into the tournament rather than settling on what they have done so far. us open champion emma raducanu has withdrawn from the upcoming kremlin cup in moscow. the british 18—year—old has only played once since new york, losing in the current indian wells tournament. raducanu said she was looking forward to returning to the tour in a couple of weeks. manchester city forward raheem sterling says he would be open to playing abroad if he doesn't get more game time at the etihad stadium. sterling, whose contract runs out in 2023, has started just one premier league game since the opening weekend of the season. speaking to the ft business of sport us summit, he said if there was the opportunity to go somewhere else, he would be open to it. is an english player, all i know is the premier league. you know. all you know is the premier league and i
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have always thought that maybe one day i would love to play abroad and to see how i would come up against that challenge. in the women's champions league, arsenal bounced back from their defeat to barcelona with a 4—0 thumping of hoffenheim. lea williamson scored the fourth goal a few minutes before full—time. arsenal are second in their group. next, some possibly encouraging news for england ahead of this winter's ashes tour to australia. ben stokes posted a video on social media of himself batting in the nets yesterday. it's just two weeks since the all rounder underwent a successful operation on a fractured finger. stokes last played on 26thjuly, before announcing shortly afterwards that he would be taking an indefinite breakfrom the game. the olympic silver medallist sharron davies could be awarded a gold medal, 41 years after she won silver in the pool at the moscow games. she came second in the 400 metres individual medley behind east german teenager petra schneider,
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who has since admitted to being part of a systematic doping programme. swimming's governing body, fina, is now planning to investigate suggestions of past doping, such as east germany's programme in the 1970s and 1980s, and davies is hoping her dad will get to see her with the gold. he is 85 years old, my family made massive sacrifices, they went without holidays, my brothers went without holidays, my brothers went without school uniform, my mum went without school uniform, my mum went without a washing machine so i could do my sport, no lottery those days pulled at my dad was a full—time coach, not paid a lot, had to beg steal or borrow to get money to do it and gave up hisjob. now, keepy up with a balloon is something most of us have done, in the house, as kids. may be as grown—ups! well, there is now a world cup where the athletes take it very seriously, complete with safety gear and helmets, with obstacles such as cars, placed in the arena. this is in spain, organised by football star gerard pique and his girlfriend shakira,
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who was also in the crowd. born out of competitions on social media, not only do you have to stop it touching the ground, you have to move the balloon up with your shot, not down. peru were crowned the first world champions, to the excitement of the crowd. who would have thought peru would be the balloon world champions? that's all the sport for now. ican i can see you being quite good at that! i i can see you being quite good at that! ., 4' i can see you being quite good at that! ., ~ ., 4' i can see you being quite good at that! ., ~ ., ~ ,., that! i would like to think so, miaht that! i would like to think so, might stand _ that! i would like to think so, might stand it! _ that! i would like to think so, might stand it! michael - that! i would like to think so, i might stand it! michael bushell that! i would like to think so, - might stand it! michael bushell with the latest sport. _ more than 50 child safety groups from around the world have demanded that facebook publishes its private research into the effects social media can have on the mental health of youngsters. in a letter to facebook founder mark zuckerberg, the campaigners accuse the company of putting profit before the safety of children and urge him to ensure young people are safe on his platforms. andy burrows is in charge of child safety initiatives online for the nspcc, who are leading this
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campaign, and joins me now. what do you want facebook to do exactly? what do you want facebook to do exactl ? ,., ., ., ~ what do you want facebook to do exactl ? ,., ., ., . ., what do you want facebook to do exactl ? ,., ., ., , ., , exactly? good morning. we have seen the revelations — exactly? good morning. we have seen the revelations from _ exactly? good morning. we have seen the revelations from the _ exactly? good morning. we have seen the revelations from the facebook- the revelations from the facebook whistle—blower in the past few weeks which have set out that facebook has had research in the last few years that understands the harm that children can be exposed to when using their platforms as a result of the commercial decisions but what we have not seen is a response which is any way commensurate to the problem is that they themselves have set out. what were calling on mark zuckerberg to do today is to have a course correct on how facebook engages with child safety and with child safety experts all over the world which starts with publishing their research on the scale of the problems on facebook how the design of the sites contributes harm. and really changes how facebook makes product decisions so that children are notjust an afterthought but
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their safety is baked in to how products are designed and rolled out. ., , ,, out. facebook have dismissed the attacks that _ out. facebook have dismissed the attacks that came _ out. facebook have dismissed the attacks that came from _ out. facebook have dismissed the attacks that came from frances i attacks that came from frances haugen, that whistle—blower, saying it was a misrepresentation and mark zuckerberg has previously called for more regulation in the industry and says that allegations the company deliberately withheld research on its platform safety, that those allegations are misleading so what do you say to all of that? mark zuckerberg _ do you say to all of that? mark zuckerberg is _ do you say to all of that? mark zuckerberg is absolutely - do you say to all of that? i— zuckerberg is absolutely right that regulation should be delivered but facebook should not have to wait until it is a legal obligation to protect children before it starts to
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do much more on its platforms. unfortunately, the data and the voices of children speak for themselves on this issue. we know that facebook, for example, is involved in more than half of all grooming offences in the uk in england and wales, where the platform is recorded. during the last three years, we have seen instagram become used in a more grooming offences than any other platform, and the proportion of offences as well as the overall number on instagram has continued to increase. really, what we have seen here is mark zuckerberg all too often putting his fingers in his ears when it comes to child safety. at best we have seen initiatives that are in response to negative media coverage or in response to personal tragedies and that simply isn't enough. regulation is necessary but we don't have to wait until that is on the statute book. and it's notjust facebook and mark zuckerberg? you and it's notjust facebook and mark zuckerberg?— zuckerberg? you are right, this is an industry _ zuckerberg? you are right, this is an industry wide _ zuckerberg? you are right, this is an industry wide challenge - zuckerberg? you are right, this is an industry wide challenge that i zuckerberg? you are right, this is. an industry wide challenge that has to be addressed, but what has been particularly concerning about the disclosures from the whistle—blower, frances haugen, in recent weeks, is that facebook has done research, they have been fully aware of the risks on its particular sites, but then has failed to substantively take action to address them and i think more so than that, having had
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the research and failed to act, we have then seen a pr campaign, mark zuckerberg and nick clegg, now a senior executive at the company, giving evidence and media interviews, suggesting the direct opposite. there have been many calls in recent weeks that this should be facebook�*s big tobacco moment, this is an opportunity for them to demonstrate industry leadership and that they are going to act with more transparency, with more openness, and really beat much more child—centred. and really beat much more child-centred.— and really beat much more child-centred. , �* ., , ., ~ child-centred. andy burrows, thank ou ve child-centred. andy burrows, thank you very much, _ child-centred. andy burrows, thank you very much, in — child-centred. andy burrows, thank you very much, in charge _ child-centred. andy burrows, thank you very much, in charge of- child-centred. andy burrows, thank you very much, in charge of child i you very much, in charge of child safety initiatives online the nspcc. the rules on the number of deliveries which overseas hgv drivers can make in the uk are to be relaxed, to try to ease the pressure on supply chains. the government hopes the move will help prevent shortages in the run—up to the festive season. but instead of getting caught up in a pre—christmas shopping spree, perhaps we should all think about other options — more green shopping, for example.
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with me now is bettina maidment, the founder of plastic—free hackney, which started life as an instagram account for recording her own efforts in going plastic—free. thank you for being with us. we know there will be supply shortages, it may be shortages of toys and other things we want for christmas, or to give to children, so what ideas do you have four may be a slightly alternative christmas? i you have four may be a slightly alternative christmas?- you have four may be a slightly alternative christmas? i think we “ust tried alternative christmas? i think we just tried to _ alternative christmas? i think we just tried to have _ alternative christmas? i think we just tried to have quite _ alternative christmas? i think we just tried to have quite a - alternative christmas? i think we just tried to have quite a simple i just tried to have quite a simple christmas, without being scrooge or sitting around in the dark! i think you can have a really enjoyable christmas that doesn't tap into this consumer fest that christmas has become. it is about spending time with family and loved ones, things like that, and that is what we should be focusing on, not the continual buying, this sort of crisis, as it were, i hope it makes people think a bit more and connect
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the dots but we are shipping huge amounts of plastic tat effectively from china over here for one day's pleasure and i hope people might start to connect the dots a bit. plastic not a benign substance, it is a fossil fuel, derived from fossil fuels which has a murky process from extraction and all the rest of it and then we ship it and shipping has a huge carbon footprint as well. makes christmas such a carbon intensive day and i hope we can step back and think it doesn't need to be that. we can do this in a more sustainable way.— need to be that. we can do this in a more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads _ more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads up _ more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads up and _ more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads up and down - more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads up and down the i more sustainable way. there might be mums and dads up and down the land| mums and dads up and down the land saying they agree in theory but their kids are begging for this or that toy for christmas even if it is plastic tat from china, as you describe it! give us some examples of what kind of presence you might be able to give or how you can keep christmas a fun and festive season without going to the shops and
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spending a lot of money? i without going to the shops and spending a lot of money? i have two son, a six-year-old _ spending a lot of money? i have two son, a six-year-old and _ spending a lot of money? i have two son, a six-year-old and a _ spending a lot of money? i have two son, a six-year-old and a soon i spending a lot of money? i have two son, a six-year-old and a soon to i spending a lot of money? i have two | son, a six-year-old and a soon to be son, a six—year—old and a soon to be nine—year—old they are not perfect, they don't just sit there asking nine—year—old they are not perfect, they don'tjust sit there asking for wooden blocks! they definitely want their share of the plastic but i have a simple rule which is a second—hand first. kids don't have that association that a second something lesser. if it is new to them it is a new toy. if they have got what they wanted and i happen to it online and it had been pre—used, they really don't see any different in that. that is my top rule if they do want something that i don't really want to buy them, it is to have a look and buy it second hand first. and like most parents, there are boundaries, financial pressures, all of these things. just because they present me with an arm list as long as their arm, doesn't mean they will get all of those things and it is managing expectations and saying you know, santa cannot get everybody
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everything. and talking about christmas in another way. i asked my nine—year—old what he really liked about christmas and he said it was the food and time with his grandma and things like that. these are things that we have taught them, we've tried to say to them that christmas is more about other things than just what you get in the morning. it is about the traditions, going to get the christmas tree can which we take home on a handy trolley without the plastic wrapping, getting the decorations out from previous years, it is embracing all of those traditions to make it feel festive and a warm and loving festival, without being like scrooge. ijust feel you don't have to break the bank and go all out for this mad, frenzied shopping experience to get the christmas experience. when did christmas become this massive consumer festival? we need to start looking at other ways of doing it because it is completely unsustainable. find i is completely unsustainable. and i think ou is completely unsustainable. and i think you are _
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is completely unsustainable. and i think you are talking _ is completely unsustainable. and i think you are talking not _ is completely unsustainable. and i think you are talking notjust i is completely unsustainable. and i think you are talking not just from think you are talking notjust from a climate point of view but also for many people in a way who don't have much money, especially after the pandemic, and you cannot really afford to spend hundreds of pounds this christmas but they feel under pressure that they need to? yes. this christmas but they feel under pressure that they need to? yes, and i can't sa pressure that they need to? yes, and i can't say it — pressure that they need to? yes, and i can't say it enough, _ pressure that they need to? yes, and i can't say it enough, that _ i can't say it enough, that christmas should not be stressful, it can be a stressful experience for a lot of people out there is a need to be that way. martin lewis talks about an obligation to buy things, and the greatest gift for a lot of people you can give is to take away the obligation to buy. friends of mine, i might happen to make them come at last year i had a glut of tomato chutney, i had tomatoes and i gave that and it was a no value gift, i didn't expect anything in return, but for a lot of people, this year it is going to be really tough. people are not worrying about whether they get christmas presents because they're worried about their gas bills and putting food on the
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table and these are real and genuine worries. i hope that by stepping back and looking at the festival is what it is supposed to be, the end of the year, spending time with family, about having a break from what has been happening, looking forward to the new year and if we just rephrase christmas in our minds, how we want it to be, we can have a really enjoyable day and an enjoyable festive period without these huge pressures put it doesn't have to be that way. and by making christmas as simple as possible, for me, that have saved a huge amount of money, and it saves the nervous breakdown the next day! iloathed money, and it saves the nervous breakdown the next day! what would ou like for breakdown the next day! what would you like for christmas? _ breakdown the next day! what would you like for christmas? what - breakdown the next day! what would you like for christmas? what is i breakdown the next day! what would you like for christmas? what is on i you like for christmas? what is on your list? i you like for christmas? what is on our list? ., ., ., ., , you like for christmas? what is on ourlist? ., ., ., ., , ., your list? i have got a really long list! i your list? i have got a really long list! i would _ your list? i have got a really long list! i would like _ your list? i have got a really long list! i would like a _ your list? i have got a really long list! i would like a price - your list? i have got a really long list! i would like a price on i list! i would like a price on carbon, an end to fossil fuel subsidies! i would like real action from cop 26! lots of things. big things! mil
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from cop 26! lots of things. big thins! �* , . ., ., ~ things! all right, very nice to talk to ou things! all right, very nice to talk to you with _ things! all right, very nice to talk to you with your _ things! all right, very nice to talk to you with your view _ things! all right, very nice to talk to you with your view of - things! all right, very nice to talk to you with your view of what i to you with your view of what christmas should be and maybe it will be again. bettina maidment, founder of plastic—free hackney, you very much. a university is ditching plastic milk bottles and returning to traditional 22—pint churns, in an effort to cut waste in its cafes and bars. the university of sheffield's three busiest cafes will make the switch, which they estimate will avoid the use of 27,000 plastic bottles each year. heidi tomlinson reports. milk delivery has come full circle. at a south yorkshire dairy farm, fresh milk is poured into stainless steel churns, destined for cafes a few miles away at the university of sheffield. it's a new idea to bypass the use of plastic bottles. instead of the cafes having milk in plastic bottles, i willjust put the milk in a churn and we can use a simple hand pull to get the milk out of the churn to the coffee jug for steaming for milk. no plastic involved whatsoever.
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so, this is a modern day mini—churn. it can hold ten litres of milk which is the equivalent of five of these plastic cartons. but the important thing is that this is made stainless steel, so could last a lifetime, whereas the plastic bottles are only used once. once delivered to coffee shops, the churns are housed in bespoke fridges. milk is dispensed directly intojugs, programmed to measure exactly the right amount for different drinks. we have just been using it for at least a couple of weeks now and it saves so much time and effort. we are a busy cafe and we were using quite a lot of the milk bottles so you can imagine, the bins were up and up and up. we can prove a concept, i we can show that it can work, but then we can share it with bigger business around sheffield _ and around the country. every year, the university of sheffield cafes dispose of 87,000 plastic cartons of milk. it was time to find an environmentally friendly alternative.
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steel cans were the original milk containers. they would be stacked up for collection at the side of the road. so why not borrow an idea from a bygone era? the churn will hold five times more milk than a traditional bottle will, so then your staff are having to... they can do five times more coffees before they had to stop. there is very few reasons to kind of think this isn't the way to go. switching to churns will cut the carbon footprint of milk delivery to the university by 65%. imagine the difference if every coffee shop made the change. heidi tomlinson, bbc news. a monument to pay tribute to the windrush migrants, who arrived in britain after the second world war, will be designed by artist basil watson. the statue at london waterloo station, will be of a man, a woman and a child climbing a mountain of suitcases hand—in—hand. it's been backed by £1
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million of government funding and will be unveiled next year on windrush day, which is the 22nd ofjune. it's been described as the most anticipated song of the year and last night, at midnight, adele finally released herfirst single for six years. it's called easy on me and reflects on herfeelings after going through a divorce. tim muffett reports. this is oj borg... # bbc radio 2 #. it is now officially three minutes past midnight, a new track from adele is called easy on me. are we ready? let's do this. # there ain't no going in this river. # that i've been washing
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my hands in forever... for fans of adele, the wait was finally over. six years since her last album, a chance to hear her new single, easy on me. # i can't bring myself to swim # when i am drowning in this silence, baby # let me in # go easy on me, baby # i was still a child # didn't get the chance # to feel the world around me... the song is taken from adele's fourth album, called 30, which is released next month. she says the last few years have been tough, having recently been through a divorce. she has been speaking to the zoe ball breakfast show on radio 2.
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you have been sharing over the last week what a journey putting this album together has been for you and also what you have been through. i definitely feel like i lost sight of and lost the appreciation actually what a gift it is to be into music and to be able to make it. ifeel like i got a bit frightened of it for a while and it really, really took care of me. i don't know what my outlet would have been, had i not had it, and it was bloody hard work to make just in terms of, you know, i was singing things i didn't even realise i was feeling or thinking. i can't, like, unlock a door, for my own mental health and take the key with me, i've got to leave it in the door for everyone else and i'm in a strong place now where i feel like i can put that vulnerability out. so, it is now 1am. easy on me has been available to listen to for about an hour. let's get some reaction from adele fans across the world. hello. hello!
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i'm chris, from seattle, washington. i am sabrina, from the philippines. hi, i'm anneka and i'm currently in australia. i what did you think of the new single? i it's amazing, i've been listeningl to it on repeat since this morning when i woke up and it is so good! i really, really love it. it is, like, ifeel. like it is a mixture of all the songs she's done so far. and, like, it'sjusti everything i thought it was going to be and more. i literally cried, watching that song! it's, like, telling you to free yourself from the shadows of the past. some of the little bits i that she added, it's almost like she's trying to tell us, "hi, i this is where i am six years later," and give us all an update and i really, really- like that about the song. and i'm just beyond thrilled to be hearing her voice again. - # there is a fire started in my heart # reaching a fever pitch that's bringing me out the dark... adele is one of the world's biggest selling
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artists, and other singers have their theories as to why she is so hugely popular. # don't underestimate the things that i will do... she is very connected to her normalness, and she sings about it with her extraordinaryness. so, she's an amazing combination of the terrestrial and the celestial. reaction on social media was a little more blunt. overwhelming delight that after six years adele was back. # so go easy on me... and with her new album out on the 19th of november, prepare to hear a lot more of adele's new songs over the coming months. tim muffett, bbc news.
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# so go easy on me #. the new single from adele, the first for six years so let's get an instant review from matt taylor who will also bring us the weather but what about the music? consistently nood, what about the music? consistently good. unlike _ what about the music? consistently good, unlike the _ what about the music? consistently good, unlike the weather _ what about the music? consistently good, unlike the weather in - what about the music? consistently good, unlike the weather in the i what about the music? consistentlyj good, unlike the weather in the uk! but today we have some sunshine it's been a chilly start but look at view from cumbria. but here and in other parts of scotland and northern ireland, still pretty cold only one or two degrees above freezing and we had frost for but what a contrast southern england and south wales with temperatures of 14 or 15 at the moment. these areas will warm up by
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a degree or two in the afternoon but the mild air remains, the yellow colours, and a blue indicates the extent of the more chilly air at the end of the day, 9—12 later. is the one area will fight back and this weekend we will see temperatures steadily rising, the amber colours appearing at the start of next week and temperatures above normal for this time of year when we could see highs in the high teens and even low 20s by tuesday. but warmth doesn't necessarily mean sunny. today, plenty of sunshine for most, the big exception with this front with some patchy light rain and drizzle, the odd shower on the south coast, more cloudy for many compared to many but sunshine elsewhere, a few showers in northern scotland. temperatures will be around 8—13 for many 15 — 17 in the south. going into this evening and overnight, it will turn chilly
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quickly so if you're out, you'll need a jacket. frost developing across some parts of the north and east, but front moves northwards in the west, temperatures rising here overnight into the morning. but confirmation that in rural areas there will be a frost to start tomorrow in the north and east. high pressure in the east, staying dry but a change to a milder air as this front with low pressure comes from the atlantic, initially throwing more cloud our way on saturday, so if you isolated showers, remain in the north of scotland but some elsewhere. and turning more grace in the west, patchy rain, may be some heavier births in northern ireland and western scotland later. milder air works and authors —— heavier bursts of rain. even in northern england and while their works through overnight into sunday, and most of us have some rain at times. stronger winds developing in the south and on sunday, more rain in the north—east of scotland, cloudy
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elsewhere, some showers but brighter moments as well and temperatures higher than today. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the queen appears to criticise world leaders for a lack of action on climate change. around 43,000 people in the south west of england may have been wrongly told their covid pcr test was negative, after being processed at a lab in wolverhampton. travellers returning to england will be able to take private lateral flow tests, instead of more expensive pcr tests, from 24th october, in time for the half term holidays. a day of mourning in lebanon, after violence broke out in beirut leaving six people dead. foreign lorry drivers will be allowed to make more deliveries in the uk — with unlimited trips within a fortnight — to tackle supply chain problems.
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