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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm mark lobel. our top stories: donate the jabs you promised. as the world health organization urges rich countries to fulfil their pledges, we're in south sudan where coronavirus vaccination falls behind target. covax was meant to ensure that low income countries like south sudan would not be left behind but now the reality on the ground is that only one in every 500 south sudanese have been fully vaccinated. deadly violence erupts in lebanon. six people are killed after gunmen attack a protest led by the shia group, hezbollah. we can hear regular bursts of automatic gunfire and the thump of rpgs like that one. we saw someone shoot
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from the top of the building and the army are now trying to work out how to contain the situation which escalated so rapidly. a bow and arrow attack in norway that left five people dead is being treated by police as a terrorist act — a vigil is held for the victims. and coldplay�*s environmentally friendly world tour — a tree planted for every ticket sold — but they're keeping their private jet. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the world health organization has urged countries and companies that control covid vaccine supplies to meet their promises to poor and developing nations. wealthy countries including the uk have pledged to donate
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more than a billion vaccine doses worldwide, but only a small proportion have been delivered. in south sudan, one of the world's poorest countries, a tiny fraction of the population is protected. the problem is not just vaccine supply. poverty, insecurity and poor infrastructure are adding to the challenge. from south sudan, anne soy reports. a south sudanese welcome dance. this is a celebration to mark the arrival of vaccines, even if it's just a trickle. not many countries have vaccinated fewer people. here, just over 120,000 doses have been administered so far in a country of more than 11 million people. this is a donation from the us government through the global covax initiative. covax was meant to meant to ensure that low income countries like south sudan would not be left behind. by now, it was hoped that one in every ten people would have been vaccinated, but the reality on the ground is that only one
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in every 500 south sudanese have been fully vaccinated. but it's not as easy as just bringing vaccines to south sudan. this is a country roughly the size of france, but you can't reach people everywhere. the issue is deployment. you have to deploy to the states and then to the counties. it's not an easy thing, given our country, given our health system, which is also not very strong. the health care workers are not well paid. they are sitting for long hours, there's a lot of people queueing up for the vaccine, so it is not an easy situation. in times of hunger, this is how food gets to people in remote parts of the country. some vaccine supplies have to be airdropped. insecurity and flooding render some airstrips unusable, making distribution a huge challenge. more than ten times expensive here in south sudan compared to some other neighbouring country where you have a reliable
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road network. and yet, the distribution often has to be done quickly when the vaccines arrive. the last batch of astrazeneca doses brought here was just a month away from expiry. have in the vaccine, when they know that they are receiving vaccines that are close to expiration. it's like dumping product to africa when other people have used the majority of them. i think having vaccines that are coming on time will increase the visibility in terms of planning. here, in the world's youngest country, beset by poverty, there were hopes that wealthy countries would ensure fair play when it came to sharing vaccines. many say it's in their interests to do so. instead, despite covax, south sudan's people remain largely unprotected. anne soy, bbc news, juba.
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we can now speak to saad 0mer who's director of the yale institute for global health. 48% of the world's population has had one dose of vaccine but only 2.5% of people in low income countries have. if we look at what has happened, 16% of the 554 million jabs, is by wealthy comfrey is a month ago, only 16% have been distributed. is this a case of promises made but not kept?— but not kept? this is a tragedy- _ but not kept? this is a tragedy. promissory . but not kept? this is a - tragedy. promissory notes did notinduce tragedy. promissory notes did not induce antibodies and t cells to protect people. you need vaccines in country and you need investment in supply systems and you need investment in communication. this can be done. these countries that have low resources have almost all of them have successfully led
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large—scale early eradication campaigns. the infrastructure can be utilised and built that the fact that these doses are missing from these countries is a tragedy. missing from these countries is a traced . ., missing from these countries is a traced. ., missing from these countries is atraued. ., ., a tragedy. you call it a tragedy _ a tragedy. you call it a tragedy but _ a tragedy. you call it a tragedy but one - a tragedy. you call it a tragedy but one of- a tragedy. you call it a tragedy but one of the| a tragedy. you call it a - tragedy but one of the things and mentioned in her report was the expiry dates of these vaccines, being delivered close to expiry dates in countries where it is difficult to distribute them once they land. is that a major problem? it is is that a ma'or problem? it is art of is that a ma'or problem? it is part of the _ is that a major problem? it is part of the problem. - is that a major problem? it 3 part of the problem. often there are challenges in every immunisation programme and we know that there are challenges in low income countries and these challenges are compounded by the fact that much of the time the vaccines arrive close to expiration. so it adds to the logistical challenge, it adds to the confidence in these vaccines. we need to do better as a world. vaccines. we need to do better as a world-— as a world. and yet those countries _ as a world. and yet those countries supplying - as a world. and yet those countries supplying the l countries supplying the vaccines have their own issues, political issues. they want roosters for voters who put the politicians in power and you
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can see from their point of view, can't you, that they need to keep their populations up to speed. and that is not a problem that will change, is it? ., ., problem that will change, is it? o, a, _ , problem that will change, is it? o, a, , o, it? there are a few ways of lookin: it? there are a few ways of looking at _ it? there are a few ways of looking at this. _ it? there are a few ways of looking at this. if - it? there are a few ways of looking at this. if countries follow science and look at where the data point, it is a reasonably nuanced picture that says that some of the high—risk populations may need a booster like those who immunocompromised, and the elderly. there is less of a case for a generalised booster so if they follow science and have the prospective that, ok, often you have to split supply equitably but you can also increase the size of the pie and i say that as a vaccine researcher and immunisation researcher and immunisation researcher who has done work over a number of decades both in high and low income countries that you can increase the size of the pie. the problem is that we're not doing either. we are not equitably
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distributing and if there is justification for protecting the vulnerable population of a high income country, there has not been a serious effort, would not work with the fierce urgency to increase the size of the pie and the number of vaccines in the system for increased production and donation and through increased technology transfer.— technology transfer. thank you very much _ technology transfer. thank you very much for— technology transfer. thank you very much forjoining _ technology transfer. thank you very much forjoining us. - six people have been shot dead and many more have been injured in the lebanese capital, beirut, during a demonstration by shia muslim groups against the judge investigating last year's massive port explosion. huge tension surrounds the probe into the port explosion with the hezbollah group and its allies claiming thejudge is biased — but the families of the blast victims have given him their support. our middle east correspondent anna foster reports. it started as a protest. but the tension
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quickly mounted. within minutes, it became a battlefield. nobody knows yet who started the shooting. rapid gunfire but the exchanges of gunfire between christian and shia armed groups stirs ghosts of the country's civil war. for hours, shooting echoed through the streets of beirut. not everyone survived. translation: my wife was hiding downstairs, | but our neighbour was killed. she was shot in the head with a bullet. she had kids, her daughter got married just two days ago. it's a very confused picture right now, there are many, many soldiers out here on the streets trying to work out exactly where the firing is coming from. a lot of the exchange of fire is going onjust at this cross—section here. we can hear regular bursts of automatic gunfire, we can hear the thump of rpgs like that one.
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we've seen somebody shooting from the top of a building and the army are now trying to work out how to contain this situation, which escalated so rapidly. as the shooting faded, the clean—up started, but the scars and the divisions remain. accountability for the port blast is vital for the lebanese people, but tonight, it feels further away than ever. anna foster, bbc news, beirut. we can now speak to hussain abdul—hussain who's a research fellow at the foundation for the defence of democracies. thank you forjoining us on bbc world news. what prompted the march on thursday that led to these clashes? in march on thursday that led to these clashes?— these clashes? in principle, these clashes? in principle, the march _ these clashes? in principle, the march began _ these clashes? in principle, the march began as - these clashes? in principle, the march began as a - these clashes? in principle, l the march began as a protest against the judge the march began as a protest against thejudge in the march began as a protest against the judge in front of thejustice palace. on the way back the pro had smaller
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citizens decided to enter a christian neighbourhood. they must have terrorised these christians there and no—one knows who started the shooting, but once shooting started it turned ugly. but once shooting started it turned ugly-— but once shooting started it turned ugly. what is the issue with the judge _ turned ugly. what is the issue with the judge in _ turned ugly. what is the issue with the judge in question? i turned ugly. what is the issue i with the judge in question? the with thejudge in question? the judge is the second judge that had smaller objects too. at first had smaller was against any international investigation into the beirut port explosion but has polar insisted on domesticjudicial authority domestic judicial authority doing itsjob. there domesticjudicial authority doing itsjob. there was domesticjudicial authority doing its job. there was an investigator, a judge who was appointed before, and hezbollah said that that guy was biased against them so he was replaced with the presentjudge. again, hezbollah refuses investigation. it seems that
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hezbollah refuses all kinds of justice, international or local, and i think the only thing that hezbollah wants to see is for a judge to say that this was an accident and to just move on and i think big chunks of the lebanese population refuse this arrangement. but politicians have said recently that they think these issues can be resolved. it is important because for those issues to be resolved means that the enquiry can take base and there can be justice for these victims and their families.— justice for these victims and their families. but there has not been — their families. but there has not been justice _ their families. but there has not been justice since - their families. but there has j not been justice since 2005, ever since the prime minister was assassinated. even the un tribunal that indicted five members of hezbollah has refused thatjustice and hezbollah now refuses domestic justice. if you want. comic there will be civil war, i
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think that is hezbollah's message. think that is hezbollah's message-— think that is hezbollah's messaue. �* ., ., message. are you worried about the threat _ message. are you worried about the threat of _ message. are you worried about the threat of civil _ message. are you worried about the threat of civil war _ message. are you worried about the threat of civil war from - the threat of civil war from what you have seen? this is not the first flashpoint, is it was but i am not worried, i think there is no possibility. hezbollah is strong and can win a civil war in a matter of weeks, it can even be the lebanese army. i don't think a civil war would drag on but all it would do is force hezbollah to take things over by force. hezbollah are telling people don't let us do that. and i think that is what we saw happening today.- think that is what we saw happening today. thank you for “oininr happening today. thank you for joining us- _ stay with us on bbc news, still to come: chris martin tells the bbc — how coldplay are making their new world tour carbon neutral — but they're still opting to use private planes.
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parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he has gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, . rapping a hole — in the front of the building. this government will not weaken. democracy will prevail. it fills me with humility and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation held its breath - for the men they called the 33. and then, — bells tolled nationwide to announce the first rescue and chile let outi an almighty roar.
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this is bbc news. the latest headline: a day of mourning begins in lebanon after a bout of deadly violence. six people were killed after gunmen attacked a protest led by the shia group, hezbollah. police are treating a bow and arrow attack in norway that left five people dead as an act of terrorism. a 37 year—old is being held after a man went on the rampage last night in the town of kongsberg, from where mark lowen sent this report. a medieval weapon of modern terror, piercing the calm of this once sleepy town. police were called after six o'clock last night when an attacker fired indiscriminately from his bow and arrow. when they tried to intervene, he unleashed more volleys. by the time they caught him
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half an hour later, he had killed four women and one man and injured three others. today, police identified him as 37—year—old espen andersen brathen, a local resident of danish nationality, who had converted to islam and had previously raised concerns over radicalisation. and they say he's confessed. the act itself looks like a terror act, but we do not know what is the motivation of the perpetrator here. the supermarket where the killing spree began bears the scars of the horror, and kongsberg, this town of 25,000 people, has been shattered. norway's new prime minister, on his first day in the job, takes over a country in mourning. translation: these are gruesome acts that have been _ committed, quite surreal. my thoughts go to those who have been exposed to this, relatives, families and everybody who has been seriously frightened.
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tonight, they paid tribute to the victims. this close community in one of the world's most peaceful countries has been devastated. it's scary. beata was out shopping with her children when the rampage began. so we hid in the sport shop for, like, 45 minutes, i guess? it was dark outside and we were quite frightened. this is a small town and it's safe here. i've never been afraid to walk out in the dark before, since i was this age, but now it feels kind of unsafe. amidst the heartache, questions will linger over how a man flagged as a security risk seemingly slipped through the net. but for now, it's a time to remember and reflect on how this town's carefree spirit was crushed and how to rekindle it.
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kenyan police have arrested the husband of record—breaking runner agnes tirop, who was stabbed to death in a killing that has shocked her home country and the world of athletics. emmanuel rotich was arrested in the coastal city of mombasa over the death of the 25—year—old double world championships medallist and olympian. aru na iyengar reports. the violent killing of agnes tirop has rocked the country. police have arrested her husband in connection to her death. they said she was stabbed in the neck with a knife. family members said how 25—year—old was the main breadwinner and paid for school fees. describe how hard she worked for her success. when we not the worked for her success. when we got the news. — worked for her success. when we got the news. it _ worked for her success. when we got the news, it was _ worked for her success. when we got the news, it was really - got the news, it was really saddening because agnes has been a good person since she was young.
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been a good person since she was young-— was young. she was skilled in her bedroom _ was young. she was skilled in her bedroom on _ was young. she was skilled in her bedroom on wednesday. | was young. she was skilled in i her bedroom on wednesday. in western canada, the town is a high altitude training hub for any athlete. it high altitude training hub for any athlete-— high altitude training hub for any athlete. it has brought us really down — any athlete. it has brought us really down and _ any athlete. it has brought us really down and our _ any athlete. it has brought us really down and our hearts i any athlete. it has brought us| really down and our hearts are really down and our hearts are really heartbroken because of this challenge that we are facing. translation: as she got home the goal, she broughtjoy to the athletic was my family. whenever i saw her here at the training, it was a happy feeling because i know she fought so hard and brought kenya lots of prizes. just one month ago. _ kenya lots of prizes. just one month ago, akrotiri - kenya lots of prizes. just one j month ago, akrotiri smashed kenya lots of prizes. just one - month ago, akrotiri smashed the ten kilometre record in germany, slicing 28 seconds off the previous record. she won bronze medals in the women 10,000 metres and 2019 world championship. —— agnes tirop.
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finish fourth in the tokyo olympics this year. she made history becoming the second youngest ever gold—medallist in the women's cross—country championship after solar barred. . ., ., barred. on evidence, on what she has achieved _ barred. on evidence, on what she has achieved in _ barred. on evidence, on what she has achieved in her- barred. on evidence, on what| she has achieved in her young career thus far this is a life cut short. —— zola budd. cut short. -- zola budd. her performances _ cut short. -- zola budd. her performances gave - cut short. —— zola budd. her performances gave inspiration to many young athletes in canyon. for now, the country mourns one of its brightest young stars, stricken in the most tragic circumstances. aruna iyengar, bbc news. a hospital in canada has carried out what is believed to be a medicalfirst. doctors there performed a double lung transplant. nothing new about that of course but the organs were delivered to the hospital by a drone. the bbc�*s tim allman has the story.
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alain hodak is 63 years old. he was diagnosed two years ago with a lung that made his life a misery. it with a lung that made his life a misery-— a misery. it was close to unbearable, _ a misery. it was close to unbearable, having - a misery. it was close to - unbearable, having nowhere. doctors told him he needed a transplant when it comes to this kind of operation, every second counts. so this was how the donated organs would be transported to the hospital, especially built drone travelling across the city with the most precious cargo imaginable. thejourney the most precious cargo imaginable. the journey began at the toronto western hospital, in a trip that lasted six minutes, the drain travelled 1.5 kilometres to the toronto general hospital where the medical team were waiting. if you could fly a drain into the city then you conflate anyway and that was what we set out to do to prove that concept. pa.
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out to do to prove that concept-— out to do to prove that conce t. �* concept. a life-saving life changing _ concept. a life-saving life changing operation - concept. a life-saving life changing operation went i concept. a life-saving life - changing operation went ahead without a hitch. to changing operation went ahead without a hitch.— without a hitch. to be part of the future — without a hitch. to be part of the future is _ without a hitch. to be part of the future is kind _ without a hitch. to be part of the future is kind of- without a hitch. to be part of the future is kind of really i the future is kind of really exciting and an honour for me. i could not believe that this was — i could not believe that this was happening because i was so afraid _ was happening because i was so afraid to — was happening because i was so afraid to lose him. the was happening because i was so afraid to lose him.— afraid to lose him. the team behind the _ afraid to lose him. the team behind the drone _ afraid to lose him. the team behind the drone believes i afraid to lose him. the team i behind the drone believes this could revolutionise organ delivery. the next step testing bigger drains that can travel much further. as for alain hodak, he is travelling well and promised to take care of his new lungs. tim allman, bbc news. the british band coldplay have announced they are to go on a world tour next year but will aim to offset their carbon emissions as they go. they're working to develop a kinetic floor which would convert their fans' dancing into electricity. i love that. the band's singer chris martin also said they would plant a tree for every ticket sold. but they have still opted to use private planes. here's our entertainment correspondent colin paterson.
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coldplay, back on stage in london this week, and today, they've announced a 2022 world tour. but one with a difference. two years ago, their lead singer, chris martin, told me they wouldn't tour again until they could do so in a carbon—neutral way. we're taking time over the next year or two to work out how can not only our tour be sustainable, but how can it be actively beneficial? and it turns out that interview was a game—changer for the band. well, last time we spoke, i sort of made that up when we were talking. really? because i was trying to think of something cool to say. and... and then it sort of became a headline. and then we thought, "well, that is actually what we really feel." within a couple of weeks, the band employed two people dedicated to working out how to tour in a cleaner way.
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today, coldplay have revealed their 12—point action plan, including working with bmw to develop the first—ever mobile rechargeable concert battery. the whole show is powered from renewable energy, which is amazing. and then in terms of offsetting people being there, we're able to plant a tree for every ticket sold. and that's a lot of trees. their last tour was seen by 5.4 million people. other ideas include a kinetic floor, allowing the audience to provide power by dancing along. you know when a front man says, "we need you to jump up and down"? when i say that, i literally really need you tojump up and down. when rock stars speak about the environment, there are always cries of hypocrisy, especially when private jets are being used. yeah. are you ready for the inevitable backlash? yeah, i don't mind any backlash at all. we're trying our best, and we haven't got it perfect. and the people that give us backlash for that kind of thing, forflying, they're right. how do you tally that
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with yourself, then? i don't know, i don't mind criticism at all. it's ok. because sometimes criticism leads to improvement. and it's clear chris martin believes coldplay concerts are now green enough that he can once again go around the globe singing yellow. we wouldn't be announcing a tour unless we felt like we're far enough along that it's ok in our hearts. but we're definitely not finished. colin paterson, bbc news. no doubt he will be recycling some classics as well. before we go, banksy has shown his value. one of his work that self destroyed in a previous option sold for more than 25 dollars today, three times more than the estimate. love is in the bin shredded itself live after selling for about 2 million back in 2018. the
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auctioneerjoked he was relieved the artwork was still standing. performance art indeed. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @ mark lobel. time for us to tread ourselves, see you soon! —— shred. . hello. a chilly start to friday across the north of the uk. we've had a cold front gradually working its way southwards through thursday. that's been bringing some outbreaks of rain. and as its name implies, behind it, we've got colder air, so likely to see a touch of frost through parts of northeast scotland and northeast england to start the day on friday. further south, still holding onto this milder air through parts of south wales and into southern england. and it's here we've still got that frontal zone through friday morning, so cloudier, maybe the odd patch of rain. most of that will have fizzled out. through the afternoon, the cloud should thin and break here. and for all of us, we should see some good spells of sunshine during friday. just more cloud pushing into northern and western
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scotland through the afternoon. temperatures lower here, just nine or 10 celsius the top temperature. certainly a fresher feel compared to friday. 13 to 15 celsius further south, perhaps 16 across southwest england. but it's a fine end to the day for most, late spells of sunshine before cloud piles in across the north and west of scotland overnight, also into northern ireland and western parts of england and wales too. further east is where we'll have the clearer skies and once again a cold night, particularly for northeast scotland and northeast england, where we could see a few pockets of air frost. but this brief autumnal chill doesn't last for long. as we head into the weekend, we've got further frontal systems approaching from the west. and with those, we'll see a return of the milder air across much of england, wales and northern ireland on saturday and eventually back up into scotland on sunday. so let's take a closer look at saturday, which overall will be a cloudier day compared to friday. most will be dry, the odd patch of rain, but some rain will arrive into northern ireland as we head into the late afternoon. temperatures starting to recover on saturday, but still a fairly cool feel across the far northeast
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of england and into scotland. and on sunday, this frontal system will slide its way across and begin to weaken — look what's happening out into the west. but on sunday, we're likely to see some showers, maybe some longer spells of rain. but come the afternoon, looks like the rain will begin to ease and we should see a few spells of sunshine developing. temperatures back up into the mid, if not high teens and starting to feel a little bit less chilly across scotland as well. but as we move into next week, it will be mild, yes, but we're also likely to see some frequent showers or longer spells of rain. goodbye.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: a day of mourning's begun in lebanon after violence erupted in the capital, beirut, leaving six people dead. gunmen targeted a protest organised by shia group hezbollah. the us, un and the international community have echoed the lebanese prime minister's calls for calm. police are treating a bow and arrow attack in norway that left five people dead as an act of terrorism. a vigil�*s been held for the victims in the town of kongsberg. a 37—year—old man is under arrest. canon police has arrested the husband of an olympic winning run out. she was a double world championship medallist and olympian. —— kenyan police.
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hundreds of abbatoir workers from abroad are to be

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