Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

9:00 pm
this is bbc news with mejames reynolds. police in norway say a bow and arrow attack that left 5 people dead appears to be an act of terrorism. the doctor will see you now. the uk government urges gps to increase face—to—face appointments. at least six people have died and dozens more are injured in beirut s worst street violence for more than a decade. ladies and gentlemen, for a new world record, love is in the bin, from banksy. and going going gone. a semi—shredded banksy artwork sells for 16 million pounds.
9:01 pm
good evening. ten years on from the devastating terror attack in utoya norway is once again reeling after a deadly bow and arrow attack left five people dead. police are treating it as an act of terrorism. a 37 year old is being held after a man went on the rampage last night in the town of kongsberg, from where mark lowen sends this report. a mediaeval weapon of modern terror, piercing the calm of this once sleepy town. police were called after six o'clock last night, when an attacker fired indiscriminately from his bow and arrow. when they tried to intervene, he unleashed more volleys. by the time they caught him half an hour later, he had killed four women and one man and injured three others. he was reportedly also armed with a knife. today, police identified him as 37—year—old espen andersen brathen, a local resident of danish nationality, who had converted to islam and had previously raised
9:02 pm
concerns over radicalisation. and they say he's confessed. the act itself looks like a terror act, but we do not know what is the motivation of the perpetrator here. i think we have to wait for the investigation. the supermarket where the killing spree began bears the scars of the horror, and kongsberg, this town of 25,000 people, has been shattered. i'm shocked, i can't believe it has happened in a small town like this. i've been active within archery. i recognise the sound _ from a compound bow and i can hear the tingling of the arrow hitting the streets. - norway's new prime minister, on his first day in the job, takes over a country in mourning. translation: these are gruesome acts
9:03 pm
that have been committed, _ quite surreal, but the reality is that five people have been killed and several injured. many are shocked. so this makes a strong impression. my thoughts go to those who have been exposed to this, relatives, families and everybody who have been seriously frightened. one of the worlds and safest countries has been devastated. it may stir debate over weapons rules, the bow and arrow, not illegal in norway. and it will raise questions over how a man flagged as a security risk seemingly slipped through the net, with such deadly consequences. asne seierstad is a norwegian journalist and author of one of us 7 the story of anders breivik and the massacre in norway. she's studied extremism and radicalisation both on the far right and among radicaljihadists. thank you forjoining us. what strikes you about what we have
9:04 pm
learned so far about this attack? this person seems to be a mixture of many directions, one is that he converted to islam several years ago and he has tried to visit several mosques in the kongsberg area and they all describe him as weird and that he had questions that they could not help him with. it seems or it might be a clear case of psychiatry, that is what some people who knew him say, they had been warning notjust the police but also health authorities about this man who needed help, who sat in his home, alone, like the other young men who often commit violence, as a lone wolf. he also had a love of weapons and he had the bow and arrows, he was training in the back
9:05 pm
yard with swords, savers, bat stop—macro this is a man that the neighbourhood was very afraid of and scared children and even had people moving from the street because of him. ., ., , ., him. you have studied and written about the 2011 — him. you have studied and written about the 2011 attack _ him. you have studied and written about the 2011 attack in _ him. you have studied and written about the 2011 attack in great - about the 2011 attack in great depth, what has the country learned from that? we depth, what has the country learned from that? ~ ., , ., from that? we have been through ten ears of from that? we have been through ten years of changing _ from that? we have been through ten years of changing emotions, - from that? we have been through ten years of changing emotions, starting l years of changing emotions, starting with shock, becoming grief, and then what to do about extremism and this year it was the tenth year after the attack. there was almost like a political catharsis, where this was not just a political catharsis, where this was notjust a national political catharsis, where this was not just a national trauma, political catharsis, where this was notjust a national trauma, but the young people in the labour party youth who were attacked ten years ago, they wanted to acknowledge that they were victims because of their political views. because if that was
9:06 pm
not acknowledged, then we could not overcome, how to deal with far right terror if we do not know who are the victims. actually, today, as it was mentioned before, there was a new government today, social democratic labour party government after eight years of conservative rule and two of the ministers were actually survivors from the attack and the generation of new politicians are coming around to the power from being victims of far right extremism ten years ago. has being victims of far right extremism ten years age-— ten years ago. has norway found a wa to ten years ago. has norway found a way to continue _ ten years ago. has norway found a way to continue living _ ten years ago. has norway found a way to continue living freely - ten years ago. has norway found a way to continue living freely whilst | way to continue living freely whilst also dealing with the prospect of a tax, be it from far right inspired extremists or islamist inspired extremists? i extremists or islamist inspired extremists?— extremists? i have to say that norway has — extremists? i have to say that norway has changed - extremists? i have to say that norway has changed very - extremists? i have to say that | norway has changed very little, extremists? i have to say that . norway has changed very little, it is a very open society in terms of the barriers, it is a tolerant
9:07 pm
society, little suspicion and i think that actually people today were also a bit relieved that this is not someone part of a jeff hardy network or a far right network, that this is a man who police say acted on his own and has no followers, no online presence has been detected on him, so he seems to be a single case and that relieved people in kongsberg and the rest of norway. in the long term, how does norway root out extremism, it is notjust a problem for norway, but many other countries, in greater depth? i believe in what the former prime minister said about showing humanity and tolerance and being an open society. extremism also comes from feeling like an outcast, or being on the outside of society, so our best
9:08 pm
defence against extremism is to try to be an inclusive society and what has failed in this case seems to be all the warnings to the police, the warnings to the health authorities that he has not gotten the help he needed, to take him away from society, that is definitely a lesson learned that we will see more about in the coming days, but when it comes to the whole society, i think that the openness when it comes to education, when it comes to getting to know the ideas of extremism and what heats them, that is the path that norway has chosen up until now and seems to be continuing now with the new government that has an internal experience with terror. thank you so much. coronavirus has taken
9:09 pm
a huge toll on health services around the world. here england's chief medical officer is warning that the national health service faces �*an exceptionally difficult winter'. hospitals are dealing with a record number of people waiting for operations. and winter flu is expected to return. the uk government wants doctors to have more face—to—face appointments. but this chart shows the particular pressure uk and us medics are under. here you can see the number of doctors per 1000 people in 0ecd countries. austria is ahead. the us and the uk are below average. but we have rounded up two of them. i'm joined now by dr sarahjarvis who's a gp and clinical director of patient access dot com and dr payal patel in ann arbor michigan. thank you forjoining us. i would like to start with doctorjarvis, what you make of this call for more face—to—face appointments? i what you make of this call for more face-to-face appointments? i think one of the problems _
9:10 pm
face-to-face appointments? i think one of the problems as _ face-to-face appointments? i think one of the problems as it _ face-to-face appointments? i think one of the problems as it is - one of the problems as it is easy—to—use statistics how you want. the theory is that two years ago 80% of consultations were face—to—face, but that is 80% of a much lower number. what we have seen is that in the last two and half years, consultations have gone up and up and up and in august this year, we saw 25% more consultations than we did in august two years ago. what that means is that almost the same number of people are being seen face—to—face, but that makes a smaller percentage of the hole and what that means is that if we increase the number of patients we see face—to—face, we will not have time to sleep. see face-to-face, we will not have time to sleep-— time to sleep. tell me more about that, when — time to sleep. tell me more about that, when would _ time to sleep. tell me more about that, when would you _ time to sleep. tell me more about that, when would you sleep? - time to sleep. tell me more about that, when would you sleep? the | that, when would you sleep? the averaue that, when would you sleep? the average gp _ that, when would you sleep? the average gp is _ that, when would you sleep? iie: average gp is doing 11 that, when would you sleep? "iie: average gp is doing 11 or that, when would you sleep? i“ie: average gp is doing 11 or 12 that, when would you sleep? iie: average gp is doing 11 or 12 hour days. we have a lot of really, really unpleasant vitriol aimed at gps about the fact that for
9:11 pm
instance, the average gp works three days away, an awful lot of those are female gps with young children, there is no other profession in the country where it is unacceptable for a woman with children, young children, to work full—time, actually our version of working full—time is to work 312 hour days which is 36 hours, which is full—time for other people. let which is 36 hours, which is full-time for other people. let us brina in full-time for other people. let us bring in doctor— full-time for other people. let us bring in doctor patel _ full-time for other people. let us bring in doctor patel in _ full-time for other people. let us bring in doctor patel in michigan, j bring in doctor patel in michigan, does this sound familiar? it bring in doctor patel in michigan, does this sound familiar? it does, i have a young _ does this sound familiar? it does, i have a young child _ does this sound familiar? it does, i have a young child who _ does this sound familiar? it does, i have a young child who just - does this sound familiar? it does, i have a young child who just woke l does this sound familiar? it does, i l have a young child who just woke up in the _ have a young child who just woke up in the room — have a young child who just woke up in the room next door. i would say that it _ in the room next door. i would say that it has — in the room next door. i would say that it has been interesting in the states. _ that it has been interesting in the states, during that first year that we were — states, during that first year that we were in— states, during that first year that we were in the pandemic, we really tried to _ we were in the pandemic, we really tried to move so quickly from seeing so many— tried to move so quickly from seeing so many patients face—to—face to having _ so many patients face—to—face to having some of that outpatient care become _ having some of that outpatient care become virtual, but for some specialties like myself, internal medicine — specialties like myself, internal medicine and infectious diseases, we have continued to see patients in the hospital this whole time and we
9:12 pm
are making — the hospital this whole time and we are making a move in the us as well, going _ are making a move in the us as well, going back— are making a move in the us as well, going back to— are making a move in the us as well, going back to inpatient care because there _ going back to inpatient care because there are _ going back to inpatient care because there are a — going back to inpatient care because there are a lot of people who have 'ust there are a lot of people who have just out _ there are a lot of people who have just put off — there are a lot of people who have just put off care and we are seeing that as _ just put off care and we are seeing that as an— just put off care and we are seeing that as an additional burden as welt _ that as an additional burden as well. , ., ., ., that as an additional burden as well. , ., ., ~ ., that as an additional burden as well. , ., ., .. ., ., well. let us look at the vaccination programme. _ well. let us look at the vaccination programme. we — well. let us look at the vaccination programme, we are _ well. let us look at the vaccination programme, we are moving - well. let us look at the vaccination programme, we are moving on - well. let us look at the vaccination programme, we are moving on to| programme, we are moving on to boosters in a number of countries, doctorjarvis you will have started that in the uk, doctor patel, the president has been speaking about it. they authorised the boosters, which will be strictly made, i based on the science, that decision will be l based on the science. this will mean all three vaccines will be available for boosters. i already, more than one out of three eligible seniors have _ gotten their third shot, - their booster, and we are going to continue to provide that - additional protection for seniors and others as we head into the holidays. heading into the holidays means thanksgiving, christmas, doctor patel, is everything ready for you are? i patel, is everything ready for you are? ., . patel, is everything ready for you are? ~' ., ,.,
9:13 pm
are? i think we have some encouraging _ are? i think we have some encouraging news - are? i think we have some encouraging news that - are? i think we have some encouraging news that has are? i think we have some - encouraging news that has come out about _ encouraging news that has come out about mixing and matching boosters in that— about mixing and matching boosters in that we _ about mixing and matching boosters in that we have seen some early evidence — in that we have seen some early evidence that it might be ok if you -ot evidence that it might be ok if you got an— evidence that it might be ok if you got an initial mrna faxing to get the other— got an initial mrna faxing to get the other mrna faxing and more studies _ the other mrna faxing and more studies are showing that additionally it looks like if you -ot additionally it looks like if you got the — additionally it looks like if you got the johnson & johnson, you additionally it looks like if you got the johnson &johnson, you may do well— got the johnson &johnson, you may do well with an mrna booster. it looks— do well with an mrna booster. it looks like — do well with an mrna booster. it looks like it will be easier and easier— looks like it will be easier and easier to— looks like it will be easier and easier to get that booster no matter what your— easier to get that booster no matter what your first shot was.— what your first shot was. doctor jarvis, what your first shot was. doctor jarvis. what _ what your first shot was. doctor jarvis. what do _ what your first shot was. doctor jarvis, what do you _ what your first shot was. doctor jarvis, what do you expect - what your first shot was. doctor i jarvis, what do you expect winter what your first shot was. doctor - jarvis, what do you expect winter to be like for gps and patients? i jarvis, what do you expect winter to be like for gps and patients?- be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern _ be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern that _ be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern that we _ be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern that we could - be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern that we could end . be like for gps and patients? i have a real concern that we could end upj a real concern that we could end up with a really challenging flu season this year, because last year we had virtually no flu. that was because we were all under lockdown and we were all socially distancing and what that could mean is that on an average year about 11,000 people die from flu and maybe up to 50,000 end “p from flu and maybe up to 50,000 end up in hospital. if we have a season
9:14 pm
which is many times higher than that, as we may have, because after a year of missing out on exposure to flu, our immunity is lower, that could really threaten the nhs, especially if we combine the normal winter pressures, the flu season and the covid pressures.— the covid pressures. doctor patel, how will you _ the covid pressures. doctor patel, how will you deal _ the covid pressures. doctor patel, how will you deal with _ the covid pressures. doctor patel, how will you deal with the - the covid pressures. doctor patel, how will you deal with the return l how will you deal with the return of flu and for many of us normal patients, it was a delight not to go through flu for a year. i patients, it was a delight not to go through flu for a year.— through flu for a year. i agree, keein: through flu for a year. i agree, keeping in _ through flu for a year. i agree, keeping in mind _ through flu for a year. i agree, keeping in mind two _ through flu for a year. i agree, keeping in mind two things, i through flu for a year. i agree, i keeping in mind two things, one through flu for a year. i agree, - keeping in mind two things, one is -et keeping in mind two things, one is get your— keeping in mind two things, one is get your flu — keeping in mind two things, one is get your flu shot, you can get it at the same — get your flu shot, you can get it at the same time as your booster and that will— the same time as your booster and that will protect you and others around — that will protect you and others around you and remembering that even though— around you and remembering that even though you _ around you and remembering that even though you may be vaccinated, keeping — though you may be vaccinated, keeping with some of those things like wearing masks, social distancing, washing your hands, that will not _ distancing, washing your hands, that will not only protect you from covid-19, it will will not only protect you from covid—19, it will protect you from other— covid—19, it will protect you from other viruses as well. covid-19, it will protect you from other viruses as well.— other viruses as well. doctor jarvis, other viruses as well. doctor jarvis. can — other viruses as well. doctor jarvis. can you _ other viruses as well. doctor jarvis, can you remember. other viruses as well. doctor i jarvis, can you remember what other viruses as well. doctor - jarvis, can you remember what it was like to practise medicine before the
9:15 pm
pandemic, does it seems like a distant golden age? i pandemic, does it seems like a distant golden age?— distant golden age? i vaguely remember. — distant golden age? i vaguely remember, because - distant golden age? i vaguely remember, because i- distant golden age? i vaguely remember, because i was - distant golden age? i vaguely remember, because i was a i distant golden age? i vaguely. remember, because i was a gp distant golden age? i vaguely - remember, because i was a gp for 29 years before the pandemic and i would love to reinforce everything that my colleague has said, please, if you are eligible for your flu vaccination, this year the nhs has got the biggest flu vaccination in history, 35,000,000 people in the uk will be invited. they will not be invited in the same way as before the pandemic and we will probably never go back to the way we did before the pandemic, but for many people, actually, remote consulting works really well, it is much more convenient. what we need to do is move away from this ever shifting of the pendulum, more remote consultations are more face—to—face and find a middle ground and i think when we do that, it will better fight patients even more. doctor patel, fight patients even more. doctor patel. has _ fight patients even more. doctor patel, has the _ fight patients even more. doctor patel, has the practice _ fight patients even more. doctor patel, has the practice of - fight patients even more. doctor. patel, has the practice of medicine changed for good? brute
9:16 pm
patel, has the practice of medicine changed for good?— patel, has the practice of medicine changed for good? we were talking about burn-out _ changed for good? we were talking about burn-out before _ changed for good? we were talking about burn-out before the - changed for good? we were talking | about burn-out before the pandemic about burn—out before the pandemic and i about burn—out before the pandemic and i think— about burn—out before the pandemic and i think that is what we really need _ and i think that is what we really need to— and i think that is what we really need to remember as well. we are really— need to remember as well. we are really facing a huge challenge in health— really facing a huge challenge in health care in burn—out, we were burnt— health care in burn—out, we were burnt out— health care in burn—out, we were burnt out before the pandemic, after the pandemic it is worrisome. trying to figure _ the pandemic it is worrisome. trying to figure out — the pandemic it is worrisome. trying to figure out those ways that we can be both— to figure out those ways that we can be both patient centred as well as health— be both patient centred as well as health care worker centred moving forward _ health care worker centred moving forward. ., , health care worker centred moving forward. ., ., forward. doctorjarvis and doctor patel, forward. doctorjarvis and doctor patel. thank— forward. doctorjarvis and doctor patel, thank you _ forward. doctorjarvis and doctor patel, thank you so _ forward. doctorjarvis and doctor patel, thank you so much. - stay with us on bbc news, still to come: details on the shredded banksy artwork that fetched nearly 16 million pounds at auction earlier today. the government is to grant temporary visas allowing foreign butchers into the uk to tackle a shortage of workers in abbatoirs. thousands of pigs on farms were threatened with slaughter due to the shortage. danny savage has more.
9:17 pm
there has been an announcement within the last hour from the government, to allow butchers in abattoirs dealing with pigs to be able to come into the uk on a temporary basis for up to six months and they have also announced private storage to help out abattoirs, to temporarily store meat, to help clear the backlog. that has been welcomed here by the farmers here in east yorkshire. they say that should put a stop to on farm culling, which has started in some places and stop it happening on this farm full stop, but they say timing is everything, it needs to happen soon and the government estimates that 800 butchers will need to be brought into the country to clear this backlog. they are confident they can meet that figure, but not until november and that is causing some concern that will they come into the country quick enough to get this problem sorted? one of the biggest post—brexit rows surrounds the licence to fish. an argument between britain
9:18 pm
and france could be about to escalate as french fishermen are threatening port blockades next week as their anger grows of not being given licences to fish in british waters. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson has been talking to some of them. for laurent, british waters are as familiar as the rusting docks back home in boulogne—sur—mer. his family has fished there for generations. now, without a licence to enter british waters, he is fishing the young catch around the french coast. but fishermen like him are angry, he says, and if there is no progress by friday they plan to hit back. translation: we will create as much disruption as we can _ by blocking primary goods, the things britain needs the most. we saw the gas shortage we will try to create a shortage of something else. we are ready to block everything, calais, dunkirk, the channel tunnel, we need this fishing license and will do anything to get it.
9:19 pm
france is drawing the support of other eu nations, but has also promised a response of its own, including a possible reduction of electricity supplies to jersey. fishermen themselves are targeting christmas deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there is already lots of food and petrol, lack of staff. we are going to make things worse? maybe. as i said, there is a lot of frustration in the community here. so fairenough. in parliament last week, the french prime minister called the row a matter of principle that went beyond fishing. he said it was about getting britain to keep its word. that is a loaded comment here at the moment. the eu is in a stand—off with britain about a post brexit deal for northern ireland,
9:20 pm
and france is complaining that when it comes to illegal migration, the uk is not paying what it owes. in calais last weekend, france's interior minister said that france had not received a penny of the £54 million promised by the uk injuly. translation: we would | like the british government to respect its promise. the quicker it gives us the means to carry out the action it once, the more efficient we can be. of course we can do better if the british help us instead of squabbling with us. the uk has threatened to withhold funding if france doesn't stop more migrant boats from crushing the channel. —— crossing the channel. whether driven by principles, pragmatism or political power. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris.
9:21 pm
now it's a question we've been waiting all day to answer — how much more is a piece of art worth once you've run it through a shredder? ladies and gentlemen, for a new world record, banksy, love is in the bin, so to you, £60,000,000. and we have an answer — 16 times. you heard correctly, tonight that's how banksy�*s "love is in the bin" went for at sothebys. here's the piece of art itself. if you look closely, you'll notice that it's only half—intact. that's because back in 2018 — minutes after being sold for £1 million at auction also at sotheby�*s — concealed blades within the picture's frame spontaneously whirred into action — shredding the art. it turns out that controlled vandalism made it much more valuable. joining me now from the auction house is alex branczik, head of contemporary art at sotheby�*s. did you expect it to go for
9:22 pm
16,000,000? it did you expect it to go for 16,000,000?— did you expect it to go for 16,000,000? ., , , , 16,000,000? it did not surprise me that it made — 16,000,000? it did not surprise me that it made that _ 16,000,000? it did not surprise me that it made that price, _ 16,000,000? it did not surprise me that it made that price, because - 16,000,000? it did not surprise me that it made that price, because i i that it made that price, because i believe this to be the most important artwork by the artist and the previous record was 16,000,000, it actually sold for more and it is a new auction record for the artist and i believe it is the most important artwork by the artist. should all works of art be half shredded in order to increase their value? riff shredded in order to increase their value? . ., , shredded in order to increase their value? , ., value? of course not. the point here is that love — value? of course not. the point here is that love is _ value? of course not. the point here is that love is in _ value? of course not. the point here is that love is in the _ value? of course not. the point here is that love is in the bin _ is that love is in the bin was created live, at sotheby�*s in london in 2018, three years ago. whether the artist's intention was for the work to shred completely or not, what we so this evening is the record of probably the most important piece of performance art, i would argue, the most recognisable artwork of the 21st century.—
9:23 pm
artwork of the 21st century. really? yes. the artwork of the 21st century. really? yes- the most _ artwork of the 21st century. really? yes. the most recognisable - artwork of the 21st century. really? j yes. the most recognisable artwork of the 21st century. i know we have a long way to go... i of the 21st century. i know we have a long way to go. . ._ a long way to go... i do. we have not 79 a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years _ a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years to — a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years to go _ a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years to go before - a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years to go before you - a long way to go... i do. we have got 79 years to go before you can say that entirely for sure, what is it about banksy. that say that entirely for sure, what is it about banksy.— it about banksy. at this day, it is the most recognisable _ it about banksy. at this day, it is the most recognisable artwork i it about banksy. at this day, it is the most recognisable artwork in it about banksy. at this day, it is - the most recognisable artwork in the world. ~ . , the most recognisable artwork in the world. ~ ., , ., the most recognisable artwork in the world. ~ ., , ., world. what is it about banksy that attracts interest? _ world. what is it about banksy that attracts interest? he _ world. what is it about banksy that attracts interest? he always - attracts interest? he always attracts interest? he always attracts interest _ attracts interest? he always attracts interest because - attracts interest? he always attracts interest because he| attracts interest? he always i attracts interest because he is attracts interest? he always - attracts interest because he is the master of the one—liner. whenever banksy does something, you see massive popular appeal and it is global. i think what we have seen tonight, overthe global. i think what we have seen tonight, over the last five years, is that he has also been accepted into the collections of art collectors who collect the most important artwork of their times. he is collected and appreciated by more people than any other artist alive today. people than any other artist alive toda . ~ ., , .,
9:24 pm
people than any other artist alive today-_ the i people than any other artist alive i today._ the work today. who but the work? the work was acquired _ today. who but the work? the work was acquired by _ today. who but the work? the work was acquired by a — today. who but the work? the work was acquired by a private _ today. who but the work? the work was acquired by a private asian - was acquired by a private asian collector. it was completed for four tenths minutes with over ten bidders. we had absentee bids set in advance, online bidders, room bidders, home bidders, new bidders to sotheby�*s who have never registered with us previously. i think that is testament to what a significant artwork this is.- significant artwork this is. going back to 2018, — significant artwork this is. going back to 2018, did _ significant artwork this is. going back to 2018, did sotheby's - significant artwork this is. going back to 2018, did sotheby's know what was going to happen, that it was going to be shredded? do you really think— was going to be shredded? do you really think an _ was going to be shredded? do you really think an artist _ was going to be shredded? do you really think an artist like _ was going to be shredded? do you really think an artist like banksy i really think an artist like banksy would collaborate with an auction house? i would collaborate with an auction house? ., �* ~ ., . ., , house? i don't know. what is the answer? we _ house? i don't know. what is the answer? we had _ house? i don't know. what is the answer? we had no _ house? i don't know. what is the answer? we had no idea - house? i don't know. what is the answer? we had no idea and - house? i don't know. what is the answer? we had no idea and it i house? i don't know. what is the. answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense _ answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense for _ answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense for him _ answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense for him to - answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense for him to do - answer? we had no idea and it did not make sense for him to do so. | answer? we had no idea and it did i not make sense for him to do so. but he pulled off was genuinely one of the most, i mean, it is incredible to me now, i now know how he did it
9:25 pm
but it was incredibly audacious, and to shred and artwork as the hammer falls in one of the most established institutions of the art world, the art market, is pretty extraordinary and he managed to do it.- art market, is pretty extraordinary and he managed to do it. how do you make sure the _ and he managed to do it. how do you make sure the half _ and he managed to do it. how do you make sure the half shredded - and he managed to do it. how do you make sure the half shredded bit - and he managed to do it. how do you make sure the half shredded bit doesj make sure the half shredded bit does not break off? it is make sure the half shredded bit does not break off?— not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no _ not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk— not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk of _ not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk of that. - not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk of that. it - not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk of that. it is - not break off? it is a canvas, so there is no risk of that. it is a i there is no risk of that. it is a canvas that as the hammer fell in the auction, threaded through the bottom of the frame. it is not paper, there is no risk to it. it is now, if you want a painting or sculpture, i see it as a record of a piece of performance art. and piece of performance art. and that iece of piece of performance art. and that piece of performance _ piece of performance art. and that piece of performance art _ piece of performance art. and that piece of performance art now- piece of performance art. and that i piece of performance art now stands at more than £18,000,000. thank you forjoining us to talk about banksy�*s latest artwork. that is
9:26 pm
just about it for a moment. i will be back in a moment. see you. hello. there is a brief autumnal chill as we head towards the weekend. it comes courtesy of a cold front which has been bringing outbreaks of rain across the northern half of the uk for today. this continues on its journey southwards through this evening and overnight. behind it, a few showers developing across scotland, where we see that colder air digging in, showers could well be wintry over the highest ground. across the south of england, parts of south wales holding on to that milder air, for much of the night. let us follow the progress of this frontal zone through this evening and overnight. it continues to weaken as it moves its way southwards, the rain becoming increasingly patchy. ahead of it is some mist and fog across southern england, behind it, much clearer skies and as that cold air starts to sink its way southwards, we could well see a touch of frost across parts of scotland and into northern england as temperatures get close to zero in places.
9:27 pm
a good deal of sunshine to start the day tomorrow, away from this band of cloud, by this stage, just the odd patch of light rain and drizzle for parts of wales and the midlands and southern england, that will continue to peter out through the day, with some spells of sunshine developing. a much cooler day though, for all of us, particularly across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, where temperatures may well struggle to get into double figures. for the south, perhaps 13— 16 c the top temperature tomorrow afternoon. we will end the day on a dry note, but increasingly cloudy overnight for parts of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, wales, and south—west england, clear skies will be the further east you are. again, we could see a touch of frost across parts of north—east england and eastern scotland. certainly a chilly night for all of us away from south—west england. this is how the weekend shapes up. i said it was only a brief autumnal chill, because things will be turning milder as this frontal system starts to arrive off the atlantic, once again pushing mild air across all of the uk. so, let us put some
9:28 pm
detail on saturday first. a cloudy day, compared to friday, for most it will be dry, but there will be some outbreaks of rain driving into northern ireland, parts of north—west england and maybe north west scotland through the afternoon. those temperatures starting to perk up away from the eastern side of scotland and once again it will be a fairly chilly day and also across the northern isles as well. as we head into sunday, it is the more unsettled day of the weekend, showers or longer spells of rain pushing their way from west to east, but it will be feeling milder once again, with temperatures in the mid, if not high teens. goodbye.
9:29 pm
9:30 pm
this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a man has been arrested in norway after killing five people with a bow and arrow. police say it was an act of terror. a committee investigating the january 6th capitol riots says it will pursue criminal charges against former trump adviser steve bannon. taking a test—run for life on mars. how six would—be astronauts have turned a patch of remote israel into a version of the red planet. and britain's best new building can be found right here in london. it's the town house at kingston university, where lucky students can enjoy whatjudges have called a "a theatre for life".
9:31 pm
welcome back. six people have been shot dead and many more have been injured in the lebanese capital, beirut, during a demonstration by shia muslim groups against thejudge investigating last year's massive port explosion. huge tension surrounds the probe into the port explosion with the hezbollah group and its allies, claiming thejudge is biased — but the families of the blast victims have given him their support. 0ur beirut correspondent anna foster has the latest. it started as a protest. but within minutes, it became a battlefield. nobody knows yet who started the shooting. rapid gunfire but the gunfire stirs ghosts of the country's civil war.
9:32 pm
for hours, shooting echoed through the streets of beirut. not everyone survived. translation: my wife was hiding downstairs, | but my neighbour was killed. she was shot in the head with the bullet. she had kids, her daughter got married just two days ago. it is a very confused picture right now, there are many, many soldiers on the streets trying to work out exactly where the firing is coming from. a lot of the exchange of fire is going on at this cross—section. we can hear regular bursts of automatic gunfire and the thump of our tgs. -- rpgs. we have seen somebody shooting from the top of the building and the army are trying to work out how to contain the situation, which escalated so rapidly. as the shooting faded, the clean—up started — but the scars and the divisions remain.
9:33 pm
accountability for the port blast is vital, but tonight feels further away than ever for the lebanese people. anna foster, bbc news, beirut. to washington, where the committee investigating the january 6th capitol riots is hitting a brick wall as it tries to get evidence from donald trump's inner circle. it had subpoenaed the former president's strategist steve bannon, but he failed to turn up and has said he will not cooperate with the investigation asserting "executive privledge" under former president trump. all of this has provoked the ire of the democratic committee member adam schiff. i'm joined now by former advisor to george w bush, ron christie. hi there. good to see you. criminal
9:34 pm
contem -t hi there. good to see you. criminal contempt - — hi there. good to see you. criminal contempt - it's _ hi there. good to see you. criminal contempt - it's getting _ hi there. good to see you. criminal contempt - it's getting serious? . contempt — it's getting serious? good evening to you. one thing i would say to viewers around the world. is this — the notion that steve bannon can invoke executive privilege is a false premise. executive privilege came from the united states versus nixon case in 1972 that says yes, the president can shield very sensitive conversations with those closest aides and advisers. at the advisers themselves cannot invoke privilege, it must be invoked by the president. and a former president of the us cannot exert this privilege. so for steve bannon to say he'll exert executive privilege for his communications to the donald trump isjust simply not communications to the donald trump is just simply not a strong legal ground for him to stand on. isjust simply not a strong legal ground for him to stand on. there is a tuote ground for him to stand on. there is a quote from _ ground for him to stand on. there is a quote from mister _ ground for him to stand on. there is a quote from mister bannon's - ground for him to stand on. there is| a quote from mister bannon's lawyer last thursday, "counsel for president trump is executive privilege to not testify until the
9:35 pm
issueis privilege to not testify until the issue is resolved." but you just said it doesn't apply to advisers, so what's that strategy all about? it applies to advisers for current presidents — when i worked for president bush, there was a notion of whether or not bush advisers were dealing with a disgraced lobbyist and the president said he waived executive privilege. i testified before a congressional committee, and i did so honestly and lawfully. but that was a current president. donald trump would have to ask his successor in office, president biden, invoke executive privilege. and we've heard president biden saying he's not going to do that. so for former saying he's not going to do that. so forformer president saying he's not going to do that. so for former president trump and his former aide, for former president trump and his formeraide, steve for former president trump and his former aide, steve bannon, that's just a specious argument at best, and it's really trying to come up the works of a congressional investigation at worst.- the works of a congressional investigation at worst. let's widen the focused _ investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a _ investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a bit _ investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a bit - _ investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a bit - do _ investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a bit - do you - investigation at worst. let's widen the focused a bit - do you expect| the focused a bit — do you expect the focused a bit — do you expect the january six inquiry to uncover the january six inquiry to uncover
9:36 pm
the full story of what happened, not just on that day, but in the run—up? i certainly hope so. i spent nearly nine years of my life working on capitol hill, i looked at all of the footage from where there's folks who stormed the capital were, i worked there. i know it intimately. and i believe this is a legitimate inquiry. i believe this is legitimate, whether you are republican, democrat, independent — why did this happen, how did this happen, and how can we make sure that the men and women who work in the us capitol are protected against this happening again. ? absolutely they should and would, and must get to the bottom of this.— to the bottom of this. is america prepared for _ to the bottom of this. is america prepared for a — to the bottom of this. is america prepared for a single _ to the bottom of this. is america prepared for a single factual - prepared for a single factual account? we've seen in recent years the idea of a single shared set of facts is not always shared.- facts is not always shared. true, and the old _ facts is not always shared. true, and the old expression - facts is not always shared. true, and the old expression is - facts is not always shared. true, and the old expression is that i and the old expression is that you are entitled to your own opinion, but you aren't entitled to your own set of facts. and i think that
9:37 pm
applies here. we need to ascertain what the facts are, what did happen, and how can we make sure this doesn't happen again? i don't care if these are ardent trump supporters or ardent hillary clinton supporters — the notion that you will stormed the united states capitol building, something we haven't seen since the war of 1812, there'sjust something we haven't seen since the war of 1812, there's just no something we haven't seen since the war of 1812, there'sjust no place for this in our political discourse. . it's thursday, which means at the end of the — . it's thursday, which means at the end of the week _ . it's thursday, which means at the end of the week for _ . it's thursday, which means at the end of the week for our _ . it's thursday, which means at the end of the week for our particular i end of the week for our particular programme — what should our viewers look forward to from washington next week. ? i look forward to from washington next week. ? ., _ look forward to from washington next week. ? ., , ., week. ? i would say this to you - i would say — week. ? i would say this to you - i would say look _ week. ? i would say this to you - i would say look very _ week. ? i would say this to you - i would say look very carefully - week. ? i would say this to you - i | would say look very carefully about what speaker pelosi and chuck schumer are doing in the senate. can they find a way to bridge the gap of bringing human infrastructure bill of $3.5 trillion and an introductory bill of 1.5 trillion to send to mister biden? —— infrastructure bill. if they can't and won't,
9:38 pm
this�*ll be a huge dent on the biden presidency. if they can, it'll a sagging sale of the biden presidency, he needs a real good shot in the arm. i’are presidency, he needs a real good shot in the arm.— shot in the arm. i've never been addressed _ shot in the arm. i've never been addressed with _ shot in the arm. i've never been addressed with such _ shot in the arm. i've never been addressed with such formality, . shot in the arm. i've never been - addressed with such formality, thank you so much for yourjoining us, ron. you so much for your 'oining us, ron. , ., you so much for your 'oining us, ron. ., , ,., stay with us on bbc news. still to come: it's where's wally, but with walruses — can you help conservationists count them, by scouring satellite images? a police and crime commissioner who said women "need to be streetwise" about powers of arrest after the murder of sarah everard has resigned. philip allott, the north yorkshire pcc, caused an outcry when he said ms everard "never should have submitted" to the arrest by her killer , a serving police officer. james vincent reports. this will continually haunt you, philip. whether you like it or not,
9:39 pm
what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of a two hour meeting, the police and crime panel had their say on the commissioner's comments. they included former west yorkshire police officer tim groan. —— tim grogan. from an individual point of view, they were lamentable. but as a commissioner, with the seriousness and responsibility of that role, frankly they were unforgivable. as a member of this panel, i believe your position is unsustainable and, as a man of honour — which i know you to be — you must go, and you must go now. mr allott repeatedly apologised for his comments and said he wanted to rebuild trust. i have to say, if everyone resigns after an interview — and i accept it was a sensitive interview — nothing would ever get done in the country. and the issue really is whether i can regain trust or not, which is the fundamental question that you raised. i genuinely think
9:40 pm
can i regain trust. and if i can't regain trust, then i will do the honourable thing. in the end, the meeting unanimously passed a motion of no confidence and asked philip allott to resign. thank you, members. chair, that was a unanimous vote, as carried. _ thank you. two hours later he did. in a statement, he said... star trek�*s william shatner has just made history as the oldest man to go into orbit on board the capsule built by amazon's jeff bezos. but the duke of cambridge has told the bbc that he thinks there should be more focus on repairing this planet, rather than finding
9:41 pm
another to live on. his comments come in the run up to this weekend's inaugural earthshot prize, which prince william is launching to try to find solutions to climate change. he's been speaking to newscast�*s adam fleming. "fix our climate" is one of the five goals of the earthshot prize. the clue's in the name. the duke of cambridge's new environmental prize is inspired by president kennedy's moonshot. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. the prince wants to recapture the spirit of the '60s to make the technological leaps that could heal the planet today. but he had this message for entrepreneurs looking to the stars instead. we've seen everyone trying to get space tourism going. it's the idea we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. what would you give it out of ten, george? how many marks out of ten would you give it?
9:42 pm
it's the younger generation of royalty thinking about the generation that will follow them. i want the things that i've enjoyed, the outdoor life and the sort of nature and environment, i want that to still be there for, notjust my children but everyone else's children. and if we're not careful, we're robbing from our children's future what we do now. and i think that's not fair. we are seeing a rise in climate anxiety. young people now are growing up where their futures are basically threatened the whole time. it's very unnerving, it's very anxiety—making. george's school recently has been doing litter picking and i didn't realise, but talking to him the other day, he was already showing he was getting a bit confused and a bit annoyed by the fact they went out litter picking one day and then the very next day they did the same route at the same time, and pretty much all the same litter they'd picked up was back again. that, for him, he was trying to understand where it all came
9:43 pm
from, he couldn't understand. he was like, "we cleaned this, why has it not gone away?" and this is the message he will give to world leaders at next month's big climate change conference being held in glasgow. children love being outdoors, they love getting money, they love playing, chasing, and playing sport, and all that stuff. i think they have a truer appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than actually many of the adults. and that's where the disconnect is happening, is that those adults in position of responsibility are not channelling their inner child, to remind themselves to remember how much it meant to be outdoors. at the other end of the age range the prince will team up with sir david attenborough to award the first earthshot prizes in a ceremony this weekend. i wasjust coming back home from school, and i noticed the ironing vendors in my street using charcoal. the 15 finalists include solar—powered gadgets, apps, organisations, and initiatives — all competing for royal recognition. adam fleming, bbc news.
9:44 pm
let's look at some of the day's other news. pakistan international airlines has suspended flights to the afghan capital kabul, citing "heavy—handed" interference from the taliban. the decision came after the taliban ordered the airline to cut prices to levels seen before the fall of the western—backed government in august. pia has been the only foreign carrier operating regular flights out of kabul. ajapanese court has heard that north korea's leader kim jong—un should pay damages to five people who say they were lured to north korea underfalse pretences. the five are each demanding almost $900,000. and if you look very closely you can make out president macron on the pitch here — proudly sporting a number 3 on the back of his kit. after a full day of visiting olympic and sports facilities in northern paris, the french president — presumably playing left back — let off some steam with a game of footballjoining the gala game of the varietes club de
9:45 pm
france celebrities club. did he score? we will find out. david bowie once asked us all, "is there life on mars?" as a step towards finding out, a preparatory mission is taking place in the next best place — the negev desert in southern israel. this is where six "analogue astronauts" are living in a mock space station to test the impact of isolation and confinement on human behaviour. the five men and one woman will be living here until the end of october — and, just like on mars, will be required to wear space suits every time they exit the facility i'm joined now by dr gernot groemer, the austrian supervisor of the mission, who's now at mission control, which is back in innsbruck. thanks so much forjoining us. how is the mission going?— thanks so much forjoining us. how is the mission going? good evening, thanks for having _ is the mission going? good evening, thanks for having us. _ is the mission going? good evening, thanks for having us. we _ is the mission going? good evening, thanks for having us. we are - is the mission going? good evening, thanks for having us. we are just a l thanks for having us. we are just a few days into the mission and it's going really well. the scientific data keeps pouring in, the
9:46 pm
researchers a very happy, and right now the crew is sleeping, but we are monitoring their activities even when they aren't awake. what monitoring their activities even when they aren't awake. what do they do all da ? when they aren't awake. what do they do all day? they _ when they aren't awake. what do they do all day? they collect _ when they aren't awake. what do they do all day? they collect rock - do all day? they collect rock samples. — do all day? they collect rock samples. they _ do all day? they collect rock samples, they deploy - do all day? they collect rock| samples, they deploy rovers, do all day? they collect rock - samples, they deploy rovers, there was an area... basically, they're doing all the scientific activities you would expect a crew on mars to be doing 30 years from now. if you tra ed be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me — be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me in _ be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me in a — be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me in a room _ be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me in a room with - be doing 30 years from now. if you trapped me in a room with five - trapped me in a room with five other people for a month, it would take me 20- 30 people for a month, it would take me 20— 30 minutes until i started arguing with them about everything. how will you control the arguments? first of all, you've got to be careful with the selection of the crew. we have literally a couple hundred people applying for the crew and we select a new group every two to three years, and we've embedded more than 600 barriers to make sure we have the right stuff. then we put
9:47 pm
them through very rigorous training, five months of basic training, then they go into the mission specific training. the people who are working there right now i have been preparing two years for this mission, together with 210 researchers for more than 25 missions. researchers for more than 25 missions-— researchers for more than 25 missions. ~ ., , , missions. would these participants actually make _ missions. would these participants actually make good _ missions. would these participants actually make good astronauts - missions. would these participants actually make good astronauts on. missions. would these participants| actually make good astronauts on a real mission to mars? i actually make good astronauts on a real mission to mars?— real mission to mars? i actually think they _ real mission to mars? i actually think they would _ real mission to mars? i actually think they would be _ real mission to mars? i actually think they would be the - real mission to mars? i actually think they would be the right i real mission to mars? i actually i think they would be the right stuff, they might be a old old. 0nce think they would be the right stuff, they might be a old old. once they have the actual mission happening, but if we were to fly to mars, these are the men and women you'd want joining. are the men and women you'd want 'oinina. �* , ., joining. i've been to the negev desert many — joining. i've been to the negev desert many times, _ joining. i've been to the negev desert many times, is - joining. i've been to the negev desert many times, is a - joining. i've been to the negev desert many times, is a good. desert many times, is a good substitute for mars? absolutely. there is no _ substitute for mars? absolutely. there is no mars _ substitute for mars? absolutely. there is no mars analogue i substitute for mars? absolutely. there is no mars analogue site, | substitute for mars? absolutely. i there is no mars analogue site, but there are many that have geological twins on the red planet. we see volcanic structures, sulphuric structures, particularly pictures and images of the negev desert and
9:48 pm
compared it with mars — except for the rocks in colour, they are almost identical. so the people who are in our simulation are not on mars, but mentally they are not fully on earth either. they're somewhere in between a sneak preview of the future and what is likely to be the first humans on the red planet. there is a ossible humans on the red planet. there is a possible participant you _ humans on the red planet. there is a possible participant you might - humans on the red planet. there is a possible participant you might want i possible participant you might want to if you have word for —— room for a seventh member. he'sjust been to if you have word for —— room for a seventh member. he's just been to space for a few minutes, he is experienced. {3h space for a few minutes, he is experienced-_ space for a few minutes, he is experienced.- you i space for a few minutes, he is experienced.- you get| experienced. oh yes. you get william shatner? captain, _ experienced. oh yes. you get william shatner? captain, captain. _ experienced. oh yes. you get william shatner? captain, captain. this i experienced. oh yes. you get william shatner? captain, captain. this is a i shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common _ shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common trait. _ shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common trait. there _ shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common trait. there are i shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common trait. there are a i shatner? captain, captain. this is a very common trait. there are a lotl very common trait. there are a lot of star trek fans here, and it's so inspiring to see him after so many years effectually going into space, to see him flying up there. it's amazing, wonderful.— to see him flying up there. it's amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, ou know amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know — amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know you _ amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know you have - amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know you have to i amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know you have to go - amazing, wonderful. captain kirk, you know know you have to go to | you know know you have to go to negev desert. thank you so much for
9:49 pm
joining us. we will cover that when that happens. a new effort is underway to try and count walruses from space. it's a project that's been set up by the british antarctic survey and the wwf — and they are asking the public to help. they say getting an idea of how big the walrus population is, is essential to see how climate change is impacting these tusked beasts. our science correspondent rebecca morelle has more. huge, blubbery, and a bit grumpy. walruses are easy enough to spot, but thanks to their remote arctic location, we don't know how many of these giant beasts there are. so, you can zoom in. look, you can zoom in, there. now the public are being asked for their help and the scouts in east molesey are making a start. they're using satellite images to locate and count every atlantic and laptev sea walrus. if it's, erm, a little bit blurry, then it's harder, cos sometimes it is rocks.
9:50 pm
and they're the same colour as the walrus. we've been taking images of the earth from space for more than 60 years, but our view has changed dramatically. in the 1980s, satellites could only see subjects 30 metres in size. but they quickly improved, and a few years later, they could see features ten metres across. today, though, the most advanced imaging satellites can see details down to just 30 centimetres, and this has transformed our view of the natural world. the sea ice on which they live most i of the year is rapidly diminishing, i and they are having to change their behaviour and come out| onto [and much more often. that's almost certainly got some detrimental effect to them. - but we're not sure how much the population i is being affected by that. the walrus counts will need 500,000 volunteers to scan through images on the wwf website. with their help, we should finally find out how many walruses there are and see how they fare in the years to come.
9:51 pm
rebecca morelle, bbc news. what do a jetty museum, a mosque, and a bridge to a medieval castle have in common? they are three of this year's nominees for the riba stirling prize for architecture — which rewards the country's best new building of the last year. others on the shortlist include key worker accommodation, and one block that faced demolition. 0ur arts correspondent david silitto has more. kingston university's town house — a home for its library, its dance studios, and also a new social hub for students. wow, this is incredible. i'mjust like, "yeah, i go to uni there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels and natural cooling to create a building that is less energy—hungry. this key worker housing in cambridge is also designed to encourage a low—carbon house style.
9:52 pm
you see more bike sheds here than car parking. this year, six stirling buildings are about more than just beauty and clever ideas. care for the environment has become a prime concern. take this, windermere, and a museum to house a famous boat collection. the overriding concern, though, is don't spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to the concept of building. we have systems like the lake source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we have selected wherever possible local materials so that travel from source to site is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, a place connected with the stories of king arthur. the challenge here — to reconnect the eroded site and not damage the archaeology. and when it comes to ancient
9:53 pm
history, this building in london uses some ancient methods. lumps of stone are what is keeping these flats and offers up right, a sort of high—tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it is you will still find fossils within it. here you can see... this has come straight out of the ground? here is an ammonite shell. it is actually cheaper, fasterand far greener to put stone buildings up. we found here that we saved 92% of the embodied carbon. had this been a steel—framed building and clad in stone. this hasn't been simple. its rough exterior is not everyone�*s taste. at one point, the council was seeking to have it demolished. it was only saved after a two—year legal battle by its architect.
9:54 pm
was there a moment where you thought you'd wish you never started this? of course, yeah. sorry, you want me to elaborate obviously. even after you've won, that still a relief _ that's two—and—a—half years of stress... it's difficult. and our final building swaps steel and concrete for wood. inspired by a garden of paradise, cambridge mosque is low—carbon spirituality. six very different buildings but all reflecting a desire on the eve of a global climate summit to tread gently on the planet. david sillito, bbc news. according to the website, the winner is kingston _ according to the website, the winner is kingston university with its townhouse. laura will be with you on
9:55 pm
world news that's it for me. hello there. looking at the weather picture on thursday, we have mixed conditions, many of us pretty cloudy, but across parts of the south, a lot of sunshine. that was how things looked for much of the day in west sussex. meanwhile across scotland, we had some thicker cloud bringing outbreaks of rain to the highlands. now that rain is associated with this cold front, and through friday, that's diving southwards. behind it, the air turns much coolerfor a time. let's delve into the details, then — here's our front, a very weak affair just bringing a strip of cloud southwards across england and wales, and odd spits of rain, but nothing significant. behind that, after a chilly start to the morning, there will be lots and lots of sunshine — but it will feel a lot cooler compared with recent days. temperatures to the afternoon around
9:56 pm
8 celsius in aberdeen, 10 in newcastle, and even further southwards not quite as warm as it has been in recent days, averages in london, 14 celsius, and 15 in cardiff. friday night underneath this ridge of high pressure, temperatures drop away. it'll be cold enough for some patches of frost in the countryside across the northeast, that could see temperatures dropping down to —2 in the very coldest areas, but we aren't far from frost there in aberdeen. into the weekend, we'll see milder air returning from the southwest with south—westerly winds. these weather fronts will bring a little bit of rain at time, but the rain is actually slower to move in — that means more of us will have a better day on saturday. there'll be quite a bit of cloud around, 1—2 spots of falling cloud as it works eastwards across central and eastern areas of england, but mainly dry. temperatures 16—17 celsius towards the south, but still quite cool air hanging on in scotland. however, heading into the second half of the weekend, we see the rain and milder air
9:57 pm
pushed its way northwards — and with that comes rising temperatures. so on sunday, a lot of cloud around, probably some mist and fog patches and the cloud thick enough for and occasional spot of rain through the morning. the afternoon probably becoming a bit drier and brighter with a few sunny breaks in the cloud. temperatures milder, 14 celsius in glasgow, 18 in london — remember, 14 is about right for october. into next week, the weather pattern definitely stays unsettled, quite windy, as well. the main uncertainty with monday is exactly where this heaviest rain will be — the current models put rain across wales in the south of england, but it could end up up going quite a bit further north than this. eitherway, it looks like a pretty unsettled, blustery kind of day with gales around some of our western coast. temperatures mild again — 16 celsius in glasgow and 18 in cardiff. that milder air continues into tuesday, as well. but look at this weather front coming up from a long, long way southwest, there's
9:58 pm
a pipeline of moisture aimed towards the hills. now if this does affect the hills of wales, we could well see some localised surface water flooding because the rain could be very heavy and long—lived, as well. otherwise, there'll be some bright weather, particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk and some very high temperatures for this time of year — 17 in glasgow, we've got some 20s on the charts there for east anglia and the south. beyond that, the rest of the week stays very unsettled. low pressure firmly in charge, it'll often be very and wet — the main uncertainty is exactly about the timings of the bands of rain pushing through, but we will all see some rain at times into next week — and, as i say, an autumnal spell of weather, really. that's your weather.
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
tonight at 10: — gps in england are told to see more patients face to face amid a sharp rise in the number of people going to a&e. the government directs £250 million to help surgeries bring in more temporary staff. but gps say the money offered doesn't match the crisis they face. we haven't got the locums to come in and actually work in practices, so the idea that this money is going to help with that isjust pie in the sky. the government says the money will make a difference and warn they'll intervene if surgeries don't increase access to care. also tonight: a bow and arrow attack in norway that left five people dead is being treated by police as a terrorist attack. a vigil is held for the victims.
10:01 pm
temporary visas are offered to hundreds of abbattoir workers from abroad after warnings that healthy pigs are being culled

37 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on