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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. gps in england are told to see more patients face—to—face — as ministers unveil a £250m winter rescue package. gps say the money offered doesn't match the crisis they face. we have not got the locums to come in and actually work in practices, so the idea that this money is going to help is just pie in the sky. abattoir butchers from abroad can come to the uk as seasonal workers to combat shortages in the pig industry. police in norway say a bow and arrow attack that left 5 people dead appears to be an act of terrorism. a 37 year old man is in custody. for a new world record.
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money in the banksy. a work by the graffiti artist partially shredded the first time it came up for auction — sells this time for sixteen million pounds. britain's best new building of 2021 has just been announced — it's kingston university town house — described as a "progressive new model for higher education" and coming up — are you up to the "tusk" 7 7 the british antarctic survey asks for our help to study satellite images — to see how many walruses can be spotted — and where. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the government has told gps in england to see more patients face to face — amid a sharp rise in the number of people going to accident
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and emergency departments. ministers say they'll provide extra funding to more temporary staff in surgeries and have said they will intervene if gp practices don't increase access to care. the doctors�* union, the british medical association, said it was "disappointing" that ministers remained preoccupied with appointments in person as the pandemic had proved remote consultations were "entirely appropriate and appreciated" by many. it comes as new figures show the nhs treatment backlog in england is at record levels — with more than 5.7 million people waiting for routine treatment. more and more people are going to a&e with more than a quarter waiting overfour hours to be seen. our health editor hugh pym has more. fabienne was used to regular face—to—face appointments with her gp to discuss her chronic health conditions. but since the start of the pandemic, they haven't happened, only phone consultations have been possible and she says they haven't met her needs. not to see him and to talk
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constantly to someone who doesn't know my own health issues, to talk to someone over the phone that doesn't know me at all, who has probably never had the paperwork that is needed on my conditions — it has really stressed me out. the proportion of consultations which are face—to—face in england is still well short of the pre—pandemic level. there are no comparable figures for scotland, wales and northern ireland, and the nhs will now allocate more money to practices in england, to bring in locum doctors to increase appointments, as long as they explain how they spend it. today's package is all about support, about providing gps with ever more support, so they can do more of what they love doing, which is seeing their patients. it's about having more appointments and having more prompt appointments and allowing patients to have more choice in the way that they are seen. a shift of some work treating minor illnesses to pharmacists is part of the plan to ease pressure
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on general practice. so, we've had quite. a few confrontational patients this morning. there will also be measures to cut bureaucracy, to allow gps to spend more time with patients and funding for extra security at practices. this gp in liverpool thinks the plans could have been more ambitious. clearly there are some aspects to do with trying to tackle violence or aggression, zero tolerance. and you know, we certainly need that and would welcome that. so it's good in parts, but actually, i don't think it's going to solve very much. the number of gp posts in england has gone up a bit in the last five years, but a conservative pledge in 2015 to boost the workforce by 5,000 by 2020 wasn't met. now there is a new pledge for 6,000 more in three years' time. and doctors' representatives argue the real problem is that the current workforce are struggling to keep up
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with rising demand for patient care. if i reflect on my own practice, i have no appointments left in the day and i am squeezing people in and their families in, when they are speaking to me on the phone, because they are pleading with me. and i am doing that, and my colleagues are doing that and we are knackered. we are completely exhausted. and the government is completely out of touch and clueless! some patients say they have had to go a&e, because they couldn't get gp appointments and english a&e units had their busiest ever september, with the lowest percentage treated or assessed in four hours. the uk's other nations have fared no better. across the country, and even before winter, the pressure is intensifying. hugh pym, bbc news. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. 45,066 new infections recorded in the latest 2a hour period — that's the highest number sincejuly, as well as 157 deaths — that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. meanwhile — more than 85% of people
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over the age of 12 have received their first dose of the vaccine; more than 78% have had both doses. 0ur health editor hugh pym says there have been new warnings today that we face a difficult winter ahead. those cases, week on week, seven days on previous seven days, are up in the uk 13%. hospital admissions and death numbers are up as well on that basis and interestingly today, professor chris whitty, england's chief medical officer, at a conference of gps said, that modellers really were not clear where we go from here, but he said what was clear that even if covid remained relatively low, or there was a surge, whatever happened, the nhs would, quote, have an exceptionally difficult winter because of flu and other viruses and other pressures and that really underlines what we have been hearing today from gp practices, from hospitals and a&e units, about the surge in demand that they are having to deal with now, never mind the winter months ahead.
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and professor whitty went on to say, interestingly, he was at a conference of gps, that they were doing, quote, an outstanding job, but he felt that the topic of face—to—face appointments had, quote, got rather more heat than it needed. well, let's speak now to dr natalie rout, who's a family gp in central london. thank you for talking to us. let me ask you, what do you make of this promise of an additional £250,000,000 to help gp services during the winter? i £250,000,000 to help gp services during the winter?— during the winter? i think there are a few things _ during the winter? i think there are a few things to _ during the winter? i think there are a few things to say, _ during the winter? i think there are a few things to say, firstly - during the winter? i think there are a few things to say, firstly it is - a few things to say, firstly it is important to state the facts, earlier this year, gps were seeing 1,000,000 more people per week than before the pandemic, either via digital converter stations or fa ce—to —fa ce digital converter stations or face—to—face consultations, we are having more face—to—face 7 of patient interactions and we do not
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hear that, always seem to hear is i cannot see my gp and the only way we manage to increase our capacity is via digital health care. the nhs was very behind with this before the pandemic and the pandemic has meant that we have had to embrace technology and what we are not hearing is that 82% of patients are actually happy with the type of appointment that they are getting. the 82% is an ipso source mori poll in july. just the 82% is an ipso source mori poll injuly. just be clear where that comes from. do you understand why some patients may be less comfortable with this? absolutely. i do understand _ comfortable with this? absolutely. i do understand the _ comfortable with this? absolutely. i do understand the frustration, - do understand the frustration, ideally, in an ideal world we would love to see patients face—to—face and we want to see everyone face—to—face but unfortunately the demand is too great and we do not have enough doctors. people leaving the profession for various reasons,
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due to burn—out, due to the abuse they are getting and due to the increased workload and while we do not have enough doctors to cope with that demand we have to make compromises and be able to see some people remotely, which is appropriate for many people, it is actually preferable for many people, they do not have to come in, they do not have to waste more of their time. i see both sides and i understand it is frustrating for those people who want to be seen face—to—face but we cannot cope with that demand. fist face-to-face but we cannot cope with that demand-— that demand. at what point do you think the nhs _ that demand. at what point do you think the nhs will— that demand. at what point do you think the nhs will be _ that demand. at what point do you think the nhs will be overcome, i think the nhs will be overcome, after all it was the default until the pandemic?— after all it was the default until the andemic? , , ., ., , the pandemic? yes, but unfortunately the pandemic? yes, but unfortunately the number of — the pandemic? yes, but unfortunately the number of patients _ the pandemic? yes, but unfortunately the number of patients per— the pandemic? yes, but unfortunately the number of patients per practice i the number of patients per practice has increased quite drastically over the last couple of years and the number of gps per patient has fallen, so now we are looking at one gp per 2,000 patients which when you compare that to other european countries is almost a third less gps. that is why we are not able to
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cope with demand at the moment. another thing to point out is that gps are leaving the profession because of this. the ones that remain are tired and burnt out and tired and burnt out doctors do not make good doctors. it is something we need to talk about. what make good doctors. it is something we need to talk about.— make good doctors. it is something we need to talk about. what has been our we need to talk about. what has been your personal — we need to talk about. what has been your personal though _ we need to talk about. what has been your personal though point? - we need to talk about. what has been your personalthough point? i- we need to talk about. what has been your personal though point? i think i your personalthough point? i think the anti- gp _ your personalthough point? i think the anti- gp rhetoric _ your personalthough point? i think the anti- gp rhetoric that _ your personalthough point? i think the anti- gp rhetoric that has - your personalthough point? i think the anti- gp rhetoric that has been| the anti— gp rhetoric that has been thrown around in the tabloids and media, it is demoralising, you feel undervalued, and actually it makes you feel is it worth doing the job any more? you feel is it worth doing the 'ob any moreafi you feel is it worth doing the 'ob an more? ., , ., n any more? have considered leaving? i have, of any more? have considered leaving? i have. of course. _ any more? have considered leaving? i have. of course. no — any more? have considered leaving? i have, of course, no one _ any more? have considered leaving? i have, of course, no one goes - any more? have considered leaving? i have, of course, no one goes into - have, of course, no one goes into thisjob for the money, no one goes into it for some selfish reason, we go into it to help patients, because we care about patients and at the moment we are so tired and so demoralised it is very hard to hold
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on to why we are doing ourjobs, of course i have thought about leaving. the government made a pledge in its manifesto at the end of 2019 that there would be 6,000 more gps and 26,000 more primary care professionals by 2024, it is a target that at the moment does not look like it will be here, at least according to the royal college of gps, do think there is anything that can be done in the short term to this problem, because not hitting a target is one thing, it is more important to do what you can do. absolutely. i think there are a few things the government could do, firstly support your staff. promote wellbeing amongst staff and you are not doing that by forcing gps to hit targets, forcing gps to see patients face—to—face. secondly, the public needs to be educated, we are unlikely to acquire that many gps
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over the projected timeframe, so we need to make use of our extremely skilled multidisciplinary team colleagues, we have community pharmacist, community physiotherapists, physician associates, advanced nurse practitioners and they are all skilled at what they do and you can see them as well and take the burden from a doctor who you may not need to say. i think public perception needs to change about how you might access health care even if that is not remotely and face—to—face, we need to use our colleagues. not remotely and face-to-face, we need to use our colleagues.- need to use our colleagues. thank ou ve need to use our colleagues. thank you very much _ need to use our colleagues. thank you very much for _ need to use our colleagues. thank you very much for talking - need to use our colleagues. thank you very much for talking to - need to use our colleagues. thank you very much for talking to us - need to use our colleagues. thank| you very much for talking to us this evening. professor chris whitty, the chief medical officer, addressed the royal college of gps annual conference in liverpool earlier today and he said, never worry about criticism from somebody you would not take advice from. well, one patient who has suffered more pain as a result of the record nhs waiting lists is dave warren. the 67 year old had hoped to have had a bowel operation in march last
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year, but it was postponed because of the pandemic and he's still waiting now. david, thank you for talking to us about this. it is a sensitive subject to talk about and we appreciate you sharing this. tell us your story about what happened to your story about what happened to you and what the last year and a half has been like.— half has been like. basically in september — half has been like. basically in september 20191 _ half has been like. basically in september 20191 had - half has been like. basically in september 2019i had a - half has been like. basically in| september 2019i had a blocked half has been like. basically in - september 2019i had a blocked bowel september 20191 had a blocked bowel and i ended up with a colostomy and i was told i would be able to have it reversed, which i am still waiting for, i am on the waiting list. i went into hospital last march, unfortunately it was unable to be carried out, the operation, i was discharged. i was put back on the waiting list on the 6th of august last year, over 14 months ago, the last i heard was they were hoping i might get in in december,
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but since then, it has been postponed again, so hopefully sometime next year. i was also told by my surgeon's secretary that there are people on the waiting list waiting for the same operation who have been waiting over two years now for the operation.— for the operation. good grief. i can't imagine _ for the operation. good grief. i can't imagine how _ for the operation. good grief. i can't imagine how depressing i for the operation. good grief. i i can't imagine how depressing this must be, how does it affect you day to day? it must be, how does it affect you day to da ? , , ' . must be, how does it affect you day to da ? , , , . ., must be, how does it affect you day toda? , y'. to day? it is very difficult to plan an hinu , to day? it is very difficult to plan anything. prior— to day? it is very difficult to plan anything, prior to _ to day? it is very difficult to plan anything, prior to having - to day? it is very difficult to plan anything, prior to having major. anything, prior to having major surgery in the first place, i had not long retired, i was enjoying going abroad a lot, obviously i cannot plan to do anything, because it is more important to have the operation than anything, so i can get back to day—to—day things like i used to, playing golf, playing with the grandchildren, etc. it is not
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only that, i have had a stoma, colostomy bag, it is difficult, you can feel embarrassed about going anywhere, it is very difficult. the last 18 months or so, i have been very much in lockdown, not only because of covid, but also waiting for the operation. it is because of covid, but also waiting for the operation.— for the operation. it is hard, when ou hear for the operation. it is hard, when you hear that _ for the operation. it is hard, when you hear that other _ for the operation. it is hard, when you hear that other people - for the operation. it is hard, when you hear that other people are - you hear that other people are waiting even longer than you, everyone accepts that you have to accept your place in the queue, have you given any thought at all to going private and paying for the operation? i going private and paying for the oeration? . going private and paying for the operation?— going private and paying for the oeration? ., . ., operation? i have checked about auoin operation? i have checked about going private. — operation? i have checked about going private, the _ operation? i have checked about going private, the only - operation? i have checked about going private, the only place - operation? i have checked about going private, the only place in i operation? i have checked about i going private, the only place in the country that would do it privately is london and i would probably be in hospitalfor ten days is london and i would probably be in hospital for ten days after the operation and it is an astronomical cost anyway, which really i cannot
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afford. secondly, iwould not want to spend that long away from family and friends. . ., to spend that long away from family and friends-— to spend that long away from family and friends. ~ ., ., ~ , ., and friends. dave warren, thank you for talkin: and friends. dave warren, thank you for talking to — and friends. dave warren, thank you for talking to us. _ and friends. dave warren, thank you for talking to us. thank _ and friends. dave warren, thank you for talking to us. thank you - and friends. dave warren, thank you for talking to us. thank you for - for talking to us. thank you for sharing this story with us, i am sorry you're going through this and you are obviously speaking for a lot of people judging you are obviously speaking for a lot of peoplejudging by you are obviously speaking for a lot of people judging by those figures. we hope you get some better news sooner rather than later. thank you very much. dave warren in stoke—on—trent. the government is to grant temporary visas to allow up to 800 foreign butchers into the uk to tackle a shortage of workers in abbatoirs. farmers are facing the slaughter of thousands of pigs on farms due to the shortages. 0ur north of england correspondent danny savage has been getting reaction to the decision at a pig farm in driffield in yorkshire last friday we were standing here overlooking these sows which were all expecting large litters but at the other end of the farm, the more mature pics that should be sent off to market they have not been going
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off farm quick enough and there is a backlog and it was reaching crisis point. we have had an announcement from the government to allow butchers in abattoirs dealing with pigs to be able to come into the uk on a temporary basis for up to six months and they have announced private storage to help abattoirs to temporarily store mate to help clear the backlog. that has been greeted, welcomed by the farmers here in east yorkshire and they say that should put a stop on form culling and stop it happening on this form.. they say timing is everything and it needs to happen soon and the government has estimated that 800 butchers will need to be brought in to clear this backlog and they are confident they can make that figure but not until november and that is causing some concern, will they come into the country quick enough to get this problem sorted. that was danny savage. police are treating a bow and arrow
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attack in norway that left five people dead as an act of terrorism. a 37 year old is being held after a man went on the rampage last night in the town of kongsberg, from where mark lowen sends this report. a mediaeval weapon of modern terror, piercing the calm of this once sleepy town. police were called after six o'clock last night, when an attacker fired indiscriminately from his bow and arrow. when they tried to intervene, he unleashed more volleys. by the time they caught him half an hour later, he had killed four women and one man and injured three others. he was reportedly also armed with a knife. today, police identified him as 37—year—old espen andersen brathen, a local resident of danish nationality, who had converted to islam and had previously raised concerns over radicalisation. and they say he's confessed. the act itself looks like a terror act, but we do not know what is the motivation of the perpetrator here.
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i think we have to wait for the investigation. the supermarket where the killing spree began bears the scars of the horror, and kongsberg, this town of 25,000 people, has been shattered. i'm shocked, i can't believe it has happened in a small town like this. i've been active within archery. i recognise the sound _ from a compound bow and i can hear the tingling of the arrow hitting the streets. - norway's new prime minister, on his first day in the job, takes over a country in mourning. translation: these are gruesome acts that have been committed, _ quite surreal, but the reality is that five people have been killed and several injured. many are shocked. so this makes a strong impression. my thoughts go to those who have been exposed to this, relatives, families and everybody who have been seriously frightened.
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one of the worlds and safest countries has been devastated. it may stir debate over weapons rules, the bow and arrow, not illegal in norway. and it will raise questions over how a man flagged as a security risk seemingly slipped through the net, with such deadly consequences. a police and crime commissioner who said women "need to be streetwise" about powers of arrest after the murder of sarah everard has resigned. philip allott — the north yorkshire pcc — caused an outcry when he said ms everard "never should have submitted" to the arrest by her killer, a serving police officer. he subsequently apologised. james vincent watched an angry online meeting demand his resignation and has this report. iam i am extremely saddened that sarah ever or�*s family and friends have had to endure the circus created by your comments. i had to endure the circus created by your comments-— your comments. i was utterly devastated — your comments. i was utterly
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devastated and _ your comments. i was utterly devastated and horrified - your comments. i was utterly devastated and horrified that| your comments. i was utterly - devastated and horrified that any person _ devastated and horrified that any person could possibly say what you did say _ person could possibly say what you did sa . , . ., ., , person could possibly say what you didsa. , ., , ., did say. this will continually haunt ou, did say. this will continually haunt you. philip. _ did say. this will continually haunt you, philip, whether— did say. this will continually haunt you, philip, whether you - did say. this will continually haunt you, philip, whether you like - did say. this will continually haunt you, philip, whether you like it. did say. this will continually haunt you, philip, whether you like it or| you, philip, whether you like it or not, _ you, philip, whether you like it or not. what — you, philip, whether you like it or not. what you _ you, philip, whether you like it or not, what you said _ you, philip, whether you like it or not, what you said cannot- you, philip, whether you like it or not, what you said cannot be - you, philip, whether you like it or. not, what you said cannot be unsaid. 0ver not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the _ not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course _ not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of— not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of a _ not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of a two _ not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of a two hour- not, what you said cannot be unsaid. over the course of a two hour online| over the course of a two hour online meeting the police and crime panel have their say on the police commissioner's comments, they included former west yorkshire police officer, councillor tim grogan. police officer, councillor tim grouan. �* ., ., grogan. an individual point of view, it was awful. _ grogan. an individual point of view, it was awful, from _ grogan. an individual point of view, it was awful, from a _ grogan. an individual point of view, it was awful, from a commissionerl it was awful, from a commissioner with the seriousness of that role, frankly they were unforgivable. as a member of this panel, i believe your position is unsustainable and as a man of honour, you must go and you must go now. mr man of honour, you must go and you must go now-— must go now. mr allott repeatedly a olouised must go now. mr allott repeatedly apologised for _ must go now. mr allott repeatedly apologised for his _ must go now. mr allott repeatedly apologised for his comments - must go now. mr allott repeatedly apologised for his comments and i must go now. mr allott repeatedly i apologised for his comments and said he wanted to build back the trust over time. i he wanted to build back the trust over time. ., ., _ ,., over time. i have to say if everyone resi . ned over time. i have to say if everyone resigned to — over time. i have to say if everyone resigned to make _ over time. i have to say if everyone resigned to make a _ over time. i have to say if everyone resigned to make a mistake, - over time. i have to say if everyone resigned to make a mistake, i - over time. i have to say if everyone i resigned to make a mistake, i accept it was— resigned to make a mistake, i accept it was a _ resigned to make a mistake, i accept it was a sensitive interview, nothing _ it was a sensitive interview, nothing would ever get done in the country _ nothing would ever get done in the country. the issue really is whether
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ican_ country. the issue really is whether i can regain— country. the issue really is whether i can regain trust or not, which is the fundamental question that you raised _ the fundamental question that you raised i_ the fundamental question that you raised. i genuinely think i can regain — raised. i genuinely think i can regain trust and if i cannot, then i will do _ regain trust and if i cannot, then i will do the — regain trust and if i cannot, then i will do the honourable thing. in regain trust and ifi cannot, then i will do the honourable thing. in the end the meeting _ will do the honourable thing. in the end the meeting unanimously - will do the honourable thing. in true: end the meeting unanimously passed a motion of no confidence and asked philip allott to resign.— philip allott to resign. thank you, that was a unanimous _ philip allott to resign. thank you, that was a unanimous vote. - philip allott to resign. thank you, that was a unanimous vote. two i philip allott to resign. thank you, - that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did — that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did and _ that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did and in _ that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did and in a _ that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did and in a statement - that was a unanimous vote. two hours later he did and in a statement he - later he did and in a statement he said... iam i am pleased that he decided to resign, it took a long time and a lot of heartache and i have seen in his resignation letter saying that he has done the honourable thing. not at all, he should have resigned
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immediately. we not at all, he should have resigned immediately-— not at all, he should have resigned immediatel . ~ ., _, . immediately. we felt that confidence in him had dissipated, _ immediately. we felt that confidence in him had dissipated, not _ immediately. we felt that confidence in him had dissipated, not only- in him had dissipated, not only amongst — in him had dissipated, not only amongst the councils that we represent at the panel, but also the many— represent at the panel, but also the many voluntary organisations that he has to— many voluntary organisations that he has to work— many voluntary organisations that he has to work with and also a large proportion— has to work with and also a large proportion of the members of staff that work— proportion of the members of staff that work with him. next proportion of the members of staff that work with him.— that work with him. next year, we will have had _ that work with him. next year, we will have had a _ that work with him. next year, we will have had a decade _ that work with him. next year, we will have had a decade of- that work with him. next year, we will have had a decade of police i will have had a decade of police commissioners and there is now a call to try and strengthen the powers of public recall. james vincent there. the newjustice secretary dominic raab has told the bbc he can't promise when unprecedented delays in prosecuting and jailing criminals will be solved. in an exclusive interview, mr raab said he hoped crown court backlogs in england and wales would fall within 12 months. but he couldn't say when they would reach pre—pandemic levels. with more here's our home and legal correspondent dominic casciani.. not even the deputy prime minister, the secretary of state forjustice
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escapes the security checks at this prison in surrey. dominic raab's firstjail prison in surrey. dominic raab's first jail visit prison in surrey. dominic raab's firstjail visit since prison in surrey. dominic raab's first jail visit since taking prison in surrey. dominic raab's firstjail visit since taking on one of the toughestjobs in government, seen criminals locked up and keeping the public safe. figures today show body scanners have identified 10,000 attempts to smuggle drugs and phones into jails in england and wales in the last year, a trail of organised crime behind bars. mr; the last year, a trail of organised crime behind bars.— the last year, a trail of organised crime behind bars. my name is john security aimed _ crime behind bars. my name is john security aimed at _ crime behind bars. my name is john security aimed at rehabilitating - security aimed at rehabilitating offenders, this call handling centre a chance to give inmates hope that they can change their lives. i think a lot of people struggle to think about the future when they are released, i know it is difficult to get work and the rehabilitation system can be difficult, especially for some people. this system can be difficult, especially for some people.— for some people. this prison is recovering _ for some people. this prison is recovering from _ for some people. this prison is recovering from the _ for some people. this prison is recovering from the pandemicl for some people. this prison is i recovering from the pandemic and offenders are going back into training and education hoping for a fresh start, but the problem is that the government faces over the state
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of criminaljustice are far greater and they are going to take years to fix. a record 61,000 cases are backed up in the crown courts, prosecution is taking more than a year to complete. critics say this crisis follows years of cuts, made worse by the pandemic and they want to know how dominic raab will end it. ~ ., to know how dominic raab will end it. . ., ., to know how dominic raab will end it. ~ ., ., ., to know how dominic raab will end it. we now need to turn a corner and net the it. we now need to turn a corner and get the backlog _ it. we now need to turn a corner and get the backlog down _ it. we now need to turn a corner and get the backlog down and _ it. we now need to turn a corner and get the backlog down and that i it. we now need to turn a corner and get the backlog down and that is i it. we now need to turn a corner and| get the backlog down and that is why we have _ get the backlog down and that is why we have the super courts, the nightingale courts, we lifted the upper— nightingale courts, we lifted the upper limit on sitting days and we are using — upper limit on sitting days and we are using virtual technology and i am hopeful that within 6— 12 months we will— am hopeful that within 6— 12 months we will get _ am hopeful that within 6— 12 months we will get the backlog coming down. you cannot— we will get the backlog coming down. you cannot give me a specific figure about when the backlog will be down to a level before the pandemic? i cannot. it depends on lots of moving parts, _ cannot. it depends on lots of moving parts, the _ cannot. it depends on lots of moving parts, the collaboration which i am sure will— parts, the collaboration which i am sure will be — parts, the collaboration which i am sure will be dependent on the judiciary _ sure will be dependent on the 'udicia . , , ' sure will be dependent on the 'udicia . , , , ., , judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted b rison judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted by prison officers _ judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted by prison officers to _
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judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted by prison officers to root - judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted by prison officers to root out i judiciary. this sniffer dog, trusted | by prison officers to root out drugs and dominic raab's new best friend. the question for the justice secretary is whether he can win the trust of victims waiting for their day in court. a home ownerfrom 0xfordshire faces a large fine — after a judge ruled his security cameras and video doorbell invaded his neighbour's privacy. jon woodard said he installed the cameras in good faith to deter burglars. but his neighbour objected to being filmed, took him to court — and won. the judge said mr woodard's devices broke data laws and contributed to harrassment. we can speak now to privacy consultantjamal ahmed. thank you forjoining us. let us follow this through, as much as anything, as i understand, this is about the way these devices were used and how the information gathered by them was looked after, maintained and kept secure. what gathered by them was looked after, maintained and kept secure. what was at the heart of —
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maintained and kept secure. what was at the heart of this? _ maintained and kept secure. what was at the heart of this? good _ maintained and kept secure. what was at the heart of this? good evening, i at the heart of this? good evening, thank you for having me. what is at the heart of this is recognising the right of the individual to privacy as a basic human right and that is in both the data protection act and the gdp are which was the european piece of law that came into effect in 2018 and what that says is if you are going to be processing the personal information of someone, thatis personal information of someone, that is their voice, the video is their voice, for anything beyond purely private domestic nature, you have to follow data protection laws and by private domestic what they mean is, if you're going to be using a mobile camera or cctv, you can use it on your property up to the boundary, including your garden but anything that goes beyond the boundary into your neighbour's garden or parking space or public space means you are now in scope of uk data protection laws and what happened in this case was that the
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gentleman's recording equipment went beyond the boundary of his property and started capturing the claimant in the case. iiis and started capturing the claimant in the case-— in the case. his neighbour was sa in: , in the case. his neighbour was sa inc, i in the case. his neighbour was saying. i do — in the case. his neighbour was saying, i do not— in the case. his neighbour was saying, i do not want - in the case. his neighbour was saying, i do not want you i in the case. his neighbour was saying, i do not want you to i in the case. his neighbour was i saying, i do not want you to have recordings of when i leave the house or who visits me and that kind of thing. that sounds reasonable, but i guess he had not even considered this problem, perhaps less so with cameras, more so with the doorbells, which are becoming ubiquitous. what should we be doing? ii ape which are becoming ubiquitous. what should we be doing?— should we be doing? if we are going to be usin: should we be doing? if we are going to be using ccw _ should we be doing? if we are going to be using cctv cameras _ should we be doing? if we are going to be using cctv cameras and i to be using cctv cameras and doorbell cameras, the first thing is, any invasion of someone's audio recordings is seen as a greater risk to the rights and freedoms of an individual and that means you should have an option to toggle the recordings of, that is another violation and if you look at the case, thejudge said violation and if you look at the case, the judge said the audio recordings with the more intrusive to the claimant's rights and that amounted to harassment. these microphones are very powerful and
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can pick up conversations up to 40 metres away and you could be in your garden on a sunny afternoon, but your neighbour could be listening to all of your conversations and you have no knowledge about what they are recording, how long they will keep that information, who they will share it with and of course the other concerns are with security. anyone could potentially hack in to the wi—fi and capture that information and often times, with devices such as the ring alarm, it transmits that information to mobile phone, so you could be out and about anywhere and those recordings could be shared without your knowledge. what the information commissioner saysis what the information commissioner says is if you're going to be doing any kind of surveillance, you have a doorbell, ora any kind of surveillance, you have a doorbell, or a ring camera that is capturing sound, images or photos of anyone beyond the boundaries of your property, you have to comply with data protection laws and that means you need to put up cctv science,
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like in a shopping centre, saying that recording is taking place and you have to explain why it is taking place. you have to make sure that you do not have more footage than required for the purpose that you have opted to have the security in place and you need to give people the option to exercise their rights, do not be surprised if you have people writing to you and saying they want to exercise their rights as have an access request. potentially, it could be a legal minefield, assuming thisjudgment is not overturned at a higher level by courts, one could see that situations where people already have difficult relations with their neighbours, this could become another source of contention. in crowded areas, especially the another source of contention. i�*i crowded areas, especially the cities where we live, in close proximity to other people, it could become contentious, but it is not that complicated. all we have to do is follow the basic principles which is
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make sure whatever you're doing is fair and do it in a transparent way. if there is a sign explaining what you are doing, that means you're being transparent. the second thing is make sure you're not keeping that information for longer than required, talking about storage limitation. you do not keep it for more than seven days, within seven days you will know if there has been an incident. you can actually set those devices to auto viewing after a while. some people would say they do not want to record anything at all, other people might insist on keeping it longer. a lot of the time with the ring cameras, people want to answer the door when they are not at home, you do not need to record that information. that at home, you do not need to record that information.— that information. that is very good advice. there _ that information. that is very good advice. there is _ that information. that is very good advice. there is data _ that information. that is very good advice. there is data minimisation| advice. there is data minimisation which means _ advice. there is data minimisation which means you _ advice. there is data minimisation which means you should _ advice. there is data minimisation which means you should not i advice. there is data minimisation l which means you should not capture more information than you require.
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it is a good principle. thank you for that comprehensive explanation. it is one to get people thinking. thank you. gps in england are told to see more patients face—to—face, as ministers unveil a £250 million winter rescue package. abattoir butchers from abroad are to be allowed to come to the uk as seasonal workers to combat shortages in the pig industry. police in norway say a bow and arrow attack that left five people dead appears to be an act of terrorism. a 37—year—old man is in custody. ladies and gentlemen, for a new world record, bank see's "love in the bin," sold for £16,000,000! a work by the graffiti artist, banksy — partially shredded the first time it came up for auction — has sold this time for £16 million. britain's best new building of 2021 has been awarded to kingston university — town house in south west london — described as a "progressive new model for higher education"
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star trek�*s william shatner has just made history as the oldest man to go into orbit on board the capsule built by amazon's jeff bezos. but the duke of cambridge has told the bbc that he thinks there should be more focus on repairing this planet, rather than finding another to live on. his comments come in the run—up to this weekend's inaugural earthshot prize, which prince william is launching to try to find solutions to climate change. he's been speaking to newscast�*s adam fleming. fix our climate is one of the five goals of the earthshot prize. the clue's in the name. the duke of cambridge's new environmental prize is inspired by president kennedy's moonshot. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. the prince wants to recapture the spirit of the '60s to make the technological leaps that could heal the planet today. but he had this message for entrepreneurs looking
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to the stars instead. we've seen everyone trying to get space tourism going. it's the idea we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. what would you give it out of ten, george7 how many marks out of ten would you give it? it's our younger generation of royalty thinking about the generation that will follow them. i want the things that i've enjoyed, the outdoor life and the sort of nature environment, i want that to still be there for, notjust my children but everyone else's children. and if we're not careful, we're robbing from our children's future what we do now. and i think that's not fair. we are seeing a rise in climate anxiety, young people now are growing up where their futures are basically threatened the whole time. it's very unnerving, it's very anxiety making. george's school recently has been doing litter picking and i didn't realise, but talking to him the other day, he was already showing
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he was getting a bit confused and a bit annoyed by the fact they went out litter picking one day and then the very next day they did the same route at the same time, and pretty much all the same litter they'd picked up was back again. that, for him, he was trying to understand where it all came from, he couldn't understand. he was like, "we cleaned this, why has it not gone away?" and this is the message he will give to world leaders at next month's big climate change conference being held in glasgow. children love being outdoors, they love getting money, they love playing, chasing, and playing sport, and all that stuff. i think they have a truer appreciation of what we're going to miss and what we're letting down than actually many of the adults. and that's where the disconnect is happening, is that those adults in position of responsibility are not channelling their inner child, to remind themselves and remember how much it meant to be outdoors. at the other end of the age range the prince will team up with sir david attenborough to award
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the first earthshot prizes in a ceremony this weekend. i wasjust coming back home from school, and i noticed the ironing vendors in my street using charcoal. the 15 finalists include solar—powered gadgets, apps, organisations, and initiatives — all competing for royal recognition. adam fleming, bbc news. and you can see the full interview on newscast on bbc one at 11.35pm tonight. a new effort is under way to try and count walruses from space. it's a project that's been set up by the british antarctic survey and wwf — and they are asking the public to help. they say getting an idea of how big the walrus population is, is essential to see how climate change is impacting these tusked beasts. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has more. huge, blubbery, and a bit grumpy. walruses are easy enough to spot, but thanks to their remote arctic location, we don't know how many of these giant beasts there are. so, you can zoom in. look, you can zoom in, there.
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now the public are being asked for their help and the scouts in east molesey are making a start. they're using satellite images to locate and count every atlantic and laptev sea walrus. if it's, erm, a little bit blurry, then it's harder, cos sometimes it is rocks. and they're the same colour as the walrus. we've been taking images of the earth from space for more than 60 years, but our view has changed dramatically. in the 1980s, satellites could only see subjects 30 metres in size. but they quickly improved, and a few years later, they could see features ten metres across. today, though, the most advanced imaging satellites can see details down to just 30 centimetres, and this has transformed our view of the natural world. the sea ice on which they live most of the year is rapidly _ diminishing, and they are having i to change their behaviour and come out onto land much more often. that's almost certainly got some
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detrimental effect to them. i but we're not sure how much the population i is being affected by that. the walrus counts will need 500,000 volunteers to scan through images on the wwf website. with their help, we should finally find out how many walruses there are and see how they fare in the years to come. rebecca morelle, bbc news. jack abrey is programme delivery executive for the scouts, has been doing just that. he's leading their walrus count and helped pilot the idea. thank you so much for talking to us about this this evening. this is very intriguing, how do you count walruses7 very intriguing, how do you count walruses? ., . ., ., walruses? thanks so much for having me on. walruses? thanks so much for having me on- it's — walruses? thanks so much for having me on. it's really _ walruses? thanks so much for having me on. it's really intriguing. - walruses? thanks so much for having me on. it's really intriguing. so i walruses? thanks so much for having me on. it's really intriguing. so we i me on. it's really intriguing. so we aren't sending our young people and volunteers into space with some binoculars, we are using the latest satellite technology which is basically taking a series of hundreds of thousands of images of land and sea across the world, and by logging into a platform that
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anyone can now get involved in by going to our website, you can have a look at where these tiles come in, you can see a small slice of land or sea, and mark whether you see any walruses in that goes on to the debbie wf who are jointly rallying this campaign, and see if there any walruses there and what we can learn. i5 walruses there and what we can learn. , ' . ., walruses there and what we can learn. , , . ., , ,., learn. is it difficult to spot walruses _ learn. is it difficult to spot walruses in _ learn. is it difficult to spot walruses in these - learn. is it difficult to spot| walruses in these images? learn. is it difficult to spot i walruses in these images? what learn. is it difficult to spot _ walruses in these images? what else do they tend to get mistaken for? it's quite difficult. walrus sadly do look like rocks or barrels, sometimes even get put together in small buildings. and they are quite difficult to spot, but i think what's really nice is that one of the key life skills that our young people learn in the scouts is grit in retaliation, that determination to never give up. i was lucky enough to never give up. i was lucky enough to visit a group of our young people taking part in this campaign, and watching them get really stuck in, even after 20 minutes of not finding
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a walrus, not giving up, and seeing that spark in their eye and excitement when they finally found a walrus was heart—warming to see. tell us why the melting of the ice sheets is causing the walrus problems in particular? so walruses would normally _ problems in particular? so walruses would normally haul— problems in particular? so walruses would normally haul out _ problems in particular? so walruses would normally haul out of- problems in particular? so walruses would normally haul out of the i would normally haul out of the sea on the ice flows. with rising global sea temperatures, what we are seeing is that ice is retreating further and further, so we are having to go out further into land. despite their appearance, they're quite timid — but it's going by, cars, or even people getting too close to them can cause a stampede. walrus are literally trying to get away from something because they are scared, just due to the size of them sometimes we see 15,000 walrus in one single fallout now. that often leads to adult walruses being stampeded and trampled to death, which is obvious though shocking but is not the only bad thing. also where they are so far away from their hunting grounds, because they
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can't get onto that sea ice, they are not only exhausting the supplies of clams and other foods they eat, but some are not making it back from where they haul out where they're searching for food. that's all down the climate change.— searching for food. that's all down the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign _ the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign as _ the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign as it _ the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign as it were, - the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign as it were, to i the climate change. you're hoping to take the campaign as it were, to the| take the campaign as it were, to the glasgow climate change conference. what will the scouts be doing their? 0ur young people across the road came together to develop a campaign promise to the planet, and that's all about taking action. wherever you are across world to help fight claimant change. that can be things like committing to a planet diet or simply counting walrus from space. what we are doing along with our chief ambassador and a delegation of scouts from across the world is going to present that worked all our young people, also to ask our world leaders to make that promise too. because we can't do it without with them and we need to make bold
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decisions and commit to ensure that global warming doesn't reach that 1.5 c - global warming doesn't reach that 1.5 c — which would be a tragedy not just for walrus, but for everything on the planet. i just for walrus, but for everything on the planet-— just for walrus, but for everything on the planet. i think you 'ust won the badae on the planet. i think you 'ust won the badge for h on the planet. i think you 'ust won the badge for public i the badge for public relations. thanks so much for talking to us, and good luck with that. the climate transparency report says they'll rise by 4% across the g20 this year, having dropped by 6% last year because of the coronavirus pandemic. but that was during the pandemic. let's discuss this with professor dr peter eigen, co—chair of climate transparency. thank you very much for being with us. were you surprised by this, or had you rather unhappily been expecting this would be the case. 7 i'm not really surprised. we were
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really happy when we saw the carbon emissions plunge in connexion with the pandemic. but for most of us, it was quite clear that this would be a temporary phenomenon, as the economy picks up again everywhere in the world, as will the emissions rise again. this is exactly what is happening right now. so we are a bit sad to see that this again that we saw in 2020 is being offset right now. in fact, there even some countries which have a higher admission to macro admission right now than before the pandemic, like argentina, china, indonesia, and therefore i think it is a rather sobering and disappointing experience.— sobering and disappointing
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ex-erience. ., . ., , experience. particularly in the run-u - experience. particularly in the run-up to _ experience. particularly in the run-up to the _ experience. particularly in the run-up to the meeting - experience. particularly in the run-up to the meeting in i experience. particularly in the i run-up to the meeting in glasgow. run—up to the meeting in glasgow. we've learned some lessons in this country only recently about our reliance on c02, and areas we might not have known about, for example, in the production and distribution of meat that we rely on, and the government has signed a deal to guarantee we can still get the c02. presumably there are lots of areas where although we talk about decarbonisation, we are still a long way from achieving it7 decarbonisation, we are still a long way from achieving it?— way from achieving it? that's right, there are some _ way from achieving it? that's right, there are some good _ way from achieving it? that's right, there are some good signals - way from achieving it? that's right, there are some good signals that i way from achieving it? that's right, there are some good signals that a| there are some good signals that a number of the g 20 countries have indicated, 14 of them, that they will hire the ambition of what they can contribute to fighting global warming. but overall, they do not have a scenario or have promises or commitments that would really bring us to this magical 1.5 rate if they
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continue as they have promised to do right now, even if they do implement everything they promised. and we will end up with global warming or about 2.4% at the end of the century, which would be a total disaster. so in general, i think we are somewhat concerned, but we are happy of course at the world has spoken woken up and these meetings are even happening right now as we speak, and washington with the g 20, meeting, the membership meetings of the imf, but also the upcoming cop 26 meeting. it makes it quite clear that there is now a basic consensus spreading in society with the young people on the streets and the
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scholars and business managers, in germany yesterday big business came out with some very powerful promises of what their companies would do in order to contribute to better policies. and of course, the uk in general is doing quite well with regards to many of these different parameters. so in this sense, yes, we are concerned, but we also hope that there will be possibilities, of changing possibilities and all these areas, in traffic and housing, and buildings. building areas, in traffic and housing, and building construction rules, but also in industry. and we are also quite pleased to see a number of countries are picking up carbon pricing and hopefully the laws will commit themselves to stop burning
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down and cutting down the trees, like brazil has done for so much over the last couple years. . so in a sense, it's a mixture of good things and bad things, but in general it's encouraging. and i think it would be a very good tool for people at cop 26 to take the right decisions. ._ for people at cop 26 to take the right decisions. . doctor, thanks so much for talking _ right decisions. . doctor, thanks so much for talking to _ right decisions. . doctor, thanks so much for talking to us _ right decisions. . doctor, thanks so much for talking to us this - right decisions. . doctor, thanks so much for talking to us this evening | much for talking to us this evening on bbc news. much for talking to us this evening on bbc news-— much for talking to us this evening on bbc news. a university building in southwest london has been named as britain's new building of the year. the riba stirling prize has gone to town house, a major new space constructed for kingston university. let's take a look at the building. in a way, you may not feel like you're in a university building at all. that you're in a structure that kind of is asking you, "well, what you want to do here?" my name is gerard carty, and we are sitting in the town house at kingston university, which is a building we realised as a result of an riba
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competition in 2013. the building is surrounded on three sides by loggias, and that is an urban experience, which connects the university back to the town. the university aspired to reveal the activities of the interior of the building to the wider public. i really love being in the foyer because you watch the buses going up and down, you see people on buses looking in, and they probably say to themselves, "what goes on in there, now? i must come back and have a look sometime." for me, the thing that makes town house really special is the combination of things. i suppose it's the light, it's the space, it's the views out from the building. it's quite soft, i think, actually, for a building that is predominantly concrete. it really lends itself to encounters between staff and student, student to students, and that's really important to us, that's the feel we were hoping to create with the building. the ceiling has these
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specially—made acoustic baffles, which absorb sound. the wall panelling itself is kind of striated. in this building, you have two different aspects — a library and a dance faculty, in the one space. from an acoustic point of view, you have to keep them apart, but from an ideological and cultural point of view, you want to connect them. so that was the challenge of this project. we've designed the surrounds to the staircase so they're overlooked, so people can actually work there by standing at the edges overlooking the staircase. because there's something really phenomenal about people—watching. the building is a concrete building, it is a concrete frame. we have a thermally—active system, which allows the building to be cooled through that concrete. so not only is the concrete structure, but it's also environmental. for me, the one word that epitomises this building is "open". _ it's very important to our students that they feel that this building i is here for them, and they can move into it and occupy it, and use it- the way that they want to. the name town house contains two
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aspects — it contains town, which has a civic dimension, and it contains house, which has a sense of belonging, a sense of home. it's open and it is porous. it's a democratic space. a partially—shredded canvas of one of banksy�*s most celebrated works has sold at sotheby�*s for a record £16 million. the iconic image of a girl with a balloon was partially shredded live in front of an audience just seconds, after it sold for £1 million in 2018 at sotheby�*s. banksy renamed it "love in a bin". well, three years on and it returned to sotheby�*s for auction — and let's watch the moment earlier today that the hammer came down. and selling, ladies and gentlemen, for a new world record, banksy, "love in a bin", sold to you for £16,000,000! congratulations. with auction fees added on, the private investor who bought the piece will pay £18.5 million pounds in total. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is here to tell us more
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there was no danger of it being shredded once again. but in some ways, that event which banksy insists that the auction house wasn't in on, it was genuinely surprised everyone, it was something he decided was nothing to do with anyone else — that almost put into its own separate category of its own and enhance its value, rather than initiate, which people will find paradoxical7 so initiate, which people will find paradoxical?— initiate, which people will find paradoxical? initiate, which people will find -aradoxical? �*, ., paradoxical? so it's something that headhnes paradoxical? so it's something that headlines around _ paradoxical? so it's something that headlines around the _ paradoxical? so it's something that headlines around the world, - paradoxical? so it's something that headlines around the world, just i paradoxical? so it's something that| headlines around the world, just the image of it being shredded just as soon as the hammer came down. and lots of people in the art world have interpreted this as a new artwork being created because of the occasion, because of exactly what happened to it. and unsurprisingly because of the fact that it's a piece of art that connected with so many people across the globe because of what happened, its value has gone up of what happened, its value has gone up massively because notjust a destroyed or half destroyed painting, it's something that is the actual physical embodiment of a
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moment that people were going, "0h moment that people were going, "oh my gosh," on their phones and computers, talking to themselves about right the way around the world. so in terms of how art touches people and provokes a reaction from people, it's hard to think of a piece of art that's done anything like that in recent years. the only thing i can think of being similar in a different way where the ceramic poppies that we had nearly a decade ago, which really again just touched people, they came from all over the country to see that. it's a piece of art that transcended what you normally think of and what the public are interested in generally in art. in this case, banksy, being able to see it — it was filmed by banksy on one of his representatives in the auction house, people manage to see the picture and footage of how the shredder was actually put into the frame — so people will feel invested and fascinated by the story about what was already a valuable
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painting. it's more than any of us could afford. but because of what happened there and the whole history of seeing this piece of new art being this have shredded nature, it has become something that's been immensely more valuable as we've seen this evening. . immensely more valuable as we've seen this evening.— seen this evening. . thanks very much. joining me now is professor paul gough, who is a banksy expert and an artist. he's also the principal and vice chancellor at arts university bournemouth. thanks very much for being with us. you wouldn't have been hugely surprised by the price it fetched today. 7 surprised by the price it fetched toda . ? ., ., , , surprised by the price it fetched toda.? ., , today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. i today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. | think _ today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. i think that _ today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. i think that it's _ today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. i think that it's like - today. ? no, iwas entirely happy with it. i think that it's like a - with it. i think that it's like a revenge attack of banksy�*s. it’s with it. i think that it's like a revenge attack of banksy's. it's a really interesting _ revenge attack of banksy's. it's a really interesting thing _ revenge attack of banksy's. it's a really interesting thing for i revenge attack of banksy's. it's a really interesting thing for a i revenge attack of banksy's. it's a really interesting thing for a lot of people who don't think very much about art. they look at something like that, the shredding three years ago — can't believe it's three years ago — can't believe it's three years ago — can't believe it's three years ago — and say rather as somebody once said when the diplomat drop—dead, everything he said did
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have a significance — what did that mean? in have a significance - what did that mean? ., ._ i. have a significance - what did that mean? ., i. ., , ., mean? in a way you are seeing a uniuue mean? in a way you are seeing a unique moment. — mean? in a way you are seeing a unique moment, a _ mean? in a way you are seeing a i unique moment, a two-dimensional unique moment, a two—dimensional print turns into a four dimensional moment of media captured in time. so it is quite uniquely 2d, 3d, than for d. but also it's a recognition that the world that banksy operates in, which is actually what street art is, it's a contact sport. it's actually quite an aggressive place, it's a place where work is defaced and banksy took revenge on the auction house, and in a sense on revenge on a sense image from his past. his knock at the edge of his contemporary work. him past. his knock at the edge of his contemporary work. him defacing his own work is — contemporary work. him defacing his own work is one _ contemporary work. him defacing his own work is one way _ contemporary work. him defacing his own work is one way of _ contemporary work. him defacing his own work is one way of the _ contemporary work. him defacing his own work is one way of the artist i own work is one way of the artist putting themselves back in control? indeed, and banksy is an artist that relishes control on many levels. 0ne
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relishes control on many levels. one aspect that he's very keen on. paul. aspect that he's very keen on. paul, i think aspect that he's very keen on. paul, i think your — aspect that he's very keen on. paul, i think your line _ aspect that he's very keen on. paul, i think your line is _ aspect that he's very keen on. paul, i think your line is slightly _ i think your line is slightly coming and going. let's try one more. where is banksy going as an artist? you've looked at his work — your back, wonderful — where is he going in his work? he surprises us still, but the subject of his art and where it's located, in a sense if you're a street artist, there really isn't anywhere else to go, apart from staying on the streets. 7 but anywhere else to go, apart from staying on the streets. ? but he's a ulobal staying on the streets. ? but he's a global street _ staying on the streets. ? but he's a global street artist, _ staying on the streets. ? but he's a global street artist, isn't _ staying on the streets. ? but he's a global street artist, isn't he? i staying on the streets. ? but he's a global street artist, isn't he? he i global street artist, isn't he? he is an artist with 10.8 million followers on instagram and follows nobody, he reaches out to the public because he touches the public in different ways. people say to me, what's the street art worth? i say usually it's worth a member of the public hearing in the way for a0 minutes in order to get a selfie in front of that art. that's where
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public art really touches on a neighbourhood, on a sense of belonging and really makes a difference. and banksy is so interesting because the work contains an edge, the message — and that's what he remains anonymous even as he likes to keep his street cred, but also because i think he wants to stay with the message, the thrust of the message has to speak for him, notjust himself. .- for him, not 'ust himself. . anyone who was at— for him, notjust himself. . anyone who was at that _ for him, notjust himself. . anyone who was at that bristol _ for him, notjust himself. . anyone who was at that bristol exhibition l who was at that bristol exhibition of his art will realise how much an artist can really touch people. i mean, cues around several blocks in bristol. let me ask you about the riba sterling price, but did you make of theirjudgement tonight. ? universities have been putting a huge amount of resources into looking after students, giving them open social learning spaces. so it's a master i love some of the other nominees, i loved the bretherton, i thought it was outstanding. but what
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i've seen is very impressive and well done to that practice. . professor, thanks so much. thank ou. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hell though. there's a brief autumnal chill as we head towards the weekend. it comes courtesy of this cold front which has been bringing our bricks of rain across the northern half of the uk today. this continues on its journey southwards through this evening and overnight. behind it a few showers developing in scotland where we see that cold air digging in, shares could well be wintry over the highest ground. across the far south of england and south wales ironmen holding on to that milder air for much of the night. let's follow the progress of this frontal zone through this evening and overnight stop is that cold air starts to sink its way southwards, it could well see a touch of frost across parts of scotland in northern england as
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temperatures get close to zero in places. a good deal of sunshine to start the day tomorrow, away from this band of cloud — by this stage, just the odd patch of light rain and drizzle through parts of wales, the midlands and southern england — that will continue to peter out through the day with some spells of sunshine developing. a much cooler day though for all of us, particularly across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, where temperatures may well struggle to get into double figures. further south, 13—16 celsius the top temperature for tomorrow afternoon. then we'll end the day on a dry note, but increasingly cloudy overnight through parts of scotland, northern ireland, northwest england, wales, and southwest england. the clearer skies will be the further east you are. where again, we could see a touch of frost across parts of northeast england and eastern scotland. certainly a chilly night for all of us away from southwest england. this is how the weekend shapes up — i said it was only a brief autumnal chill because things will be turning milder as these frontal systems start to arrive off the atlantic once again,
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pushing mild air across all of uk. so let's put some detail on saturday. first — a cloudier day compared to friday. for most it will be dry, but there will be some outbreaks of rain arriving into northern ireland and the parts of northwest england, it may be northwest scotland through the afternoon. those temperatures starting to perk up away from the eastern side of scotland where, once again, it'll be a fairly chilly day, and also across the northern isles, as well. as we head into sunday, it's the more unsettled day of the weekend. showers or longer spells of rain pushing their way from west to east, but it'll be feeling milder. once again, with temperatures in the mid, if not high teens. goodbye.
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this is bbc news with mejames reynolds. police in norway say a bow and arrow attack that left 5 people dead appears to be an act of terrorism. the doctor will see you now. the uk government urges gps to increase face—to—face appointments. at least six people have died and dozens more are injured in beirut s worst street violence for more than a decade. ladies and gentlemen, for a new world record, love is in the bin, from banksy. and going going gone. a semi—shredded banksy artwork sells for 16 million pounds.

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