Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

5:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... gps in england are told to see more patients face—to—face, as ministers unveil a £250 million winter rescue package. there is a huge amount of demand on our fantastic gps and how we can help with that is through providing the financial support, getting rid of some of this red tape and helping to shift some of that demand to other, more sensible places. a warning the nhs in england faces an "exceptionally difficult" winter, as the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high of 5.7 million. north yorkshire police and crime commissioner, phillip allott, whose comments about the sarah everard case sparked outrage resigns, after a no—confidence vote. in norway, a man who killed five
5:01 pm
people using a bow and arrow, was known to the police, who say they'd had concerns he'd been radicalised. new research suggests babies of asian origin are at higher risk of being stillborn or dying shortly after birth. a leading charity calls for urgent action. and 41 years later, could british olympic silver—medallist swimmer sharron davies be about to be awarded the gold? good evening and
5:02 pm
welcome to bbc news. the government has told gps in england to see more patients face—to—face, as long waits in accident and emergency departments rise to their worst level since records began. lack of access to gps has been cited as a key factor in growing pressures on a&es. in september, a quarter of patients who came to a&e in england waited longer than four hours for treatment. meanwhile, more people than ever are waiting for routine nhs treatments in england. in august, 5.7 million patients were on waiting lists for procedures such as hip replacements, knee replacements and cataract surgery. that's the highest figure since records began. as our health correspondent katherine da costa reports. pressure on a&e departments is being felt right across the uk. a combination of covid, other respiratory viruses and more patients coming forward for care are adding to the demand.
5:03 pm
that's meant record numbers of patients in all four nations facing a long wait to be seen. in england, nearly 470,000 patients, a quarter who visited a&e, waited longer than four hours to be treated. that's up almost 70% compared to the same month two years ago. of those needing a bed, more than 100,000 waited over four hours to be admitted, with more than 5,000 waiting over 12 hours. what we can't keep doing is chucking money at the problem every winter because we haven't planned for the fact that winter happens every year, so the answers have to be what we can do now is start planning effectively and investing effectively for the long—term future of the nhs. it's notjust pressure on hospitals. gps say they are also struggling to cope with the workload. i got your message just now about the pain in your knee. doctors say telephone consultations mean they can speak to many more patients. face—to—face appointments have fallen from 80% before
5:04 pm
the pandemic to nearly 60%. many gps feel the drive to return to more in—person appointments is unhelpful. | many patients think they need to be| seen when actually they can be dealt with much more efficiently over the phone. _ and gp surgeries are currently under siege, we are unbelievably busy. - and we're kind of being - expected to be superhuman. the government set out a £250 million package for gps in england from new nhs funding announced last month. it should allow practices to hire more locums and other health care professionals. there's a promise to cut some red tape and improve security, because doctors say they are dealing with high levels of abuse. and social distancing rules are being reviewed, which could allow more patients in waiting rooms. there is a huge amount of demand on our fantastic gps and how we can help with that is through providing the financial support,
5:05 pm
getting rid of some of this red tape and helping shift some of that demand to other, more sensible places. but labour says the package doesn't solve the bigger picture. the core problem here is lack of gps, and in the election in 2019, the prime minister promised 6,000 new gps, that was his great pledge. we've now got less than we had in 2019. this walk—in centre for scans and tests in somerset is one of a0 being set up around england. the government says extra investment in measures like this will help the nhs tackle the growing backlog of care. but with 5.7 million patients in england now waiting for routine operations, the legacy of the pandemic will be felt for many years to come. let's take a look at the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. 45,066 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that's the highest number sincejuly, as well as 157 deaths. that's those who've died within 28
5:06 pm
days of a positive covid test. meanwhile, more than 85% of people over the age of 12 have received their first dose of the vaccine, more than 78% have had both doses. i'm joined now by our health correspondentjim reed. let's health correspondentjim reed. start with those c( figures, let's start with those covert figures, because goodness, when you hear that that's the for highest figure sincejuly and it is still only 0ctober, figure sincejuly and it is still only october, we are not into the depths of winter yet. on a mac yes, these figures have been picking up over the last week or so, you these figures have been picking up over the last week or so,— over the last week or so, you are startin: over the last week or so, you are starting to _ over the last week or so, you are starting to see — over the last week or so, you are starting to see infections - over the last week or so, you are starting to see infections go - starting to see infections go through to the more elderly age groups. in over 85, they have been going up. the more reassuring thing
5:07 pm
is when you look at hospitalisation and death, the vaccine appears to be doing itsjob. we have not seen huge increases yet which is quite reassuring. this ties in with exactly what the report mentioned which is the pressure on a&e and hospitals. where we are as, huge amounts of people coming in. the same level of demand approximately nand as we were seeing roughly two years ago. at the same time, hospitals have to deal with about in the uk, 7000 covid patients. everything that goes along with that, infection control, separate boards, all of this pressure at the same time, hospitals and gps are facing. mil same time, hospitals and gps are facina. �* ., ., , same time, hospitals and gps are facina. �* ., . , , facing. all of that is tied up because gps, _ facing. all of that is tied up because gps, what - facing. all of that is tied up because gps, what are - facing. all of that is tied up because gps, what are you| facing. all of that is tied up - because gps, what are you hearing from gps? the government talking about that sum of money to try to
5:08 pm
encourage, incentivise gps to see more people face—to—face. we know that's a really contentious area of debate, equally, we know people who say they cannot get an appointment with their gp and some end up going to a&e. so the pressures build. it’s to me. so the pressures build. it's a to a&e. so the pressures build. it�*s a complex picture how these things interact. where we are at the moment as the government have announced £250 million package for england. the money for that is coming out of this £5 billion package to help the nhs through the winter. to a certain extent, some of this was already preannounced. we now know directly. lots of reaction from gps, not least because it happens to be the annual conference day of the royal college of gps which the health secretary sergeant was meant to give a value address but did not because of scheduling issues. we have had criticism coming through from the chair of the royal college saying he is particularly concerned at the stick approach, a bit of carrot and
5:09 pm
stick. the same time you have extra money, people are told there will be more data published on the proportion of face—to—face as a practice level, we have had the data at a regional level, now there will be this ability to rate your experience by text message after you have seen gps. gps are concerned, talking about the introduction of this arbitrary text message service, their big beef is really the number of gps in england. the government and its manifesto talked about an extra 6000 gps in england, the gp, the royal college say we have actually seen a drop in that time and they say this package today, although welcome, is tinkering around the edges and what they would like to see is more gps coming through. like to see is more gps coming throu~h. . ~ like to see is more gps coming throu~h. ., ~ i. , like to see is more gps coming throu~h. . ~ , . like to see is more gps coming throu~h. . ~ ,, , . ., through. thank you very much for
5:10 pm
now. lateral flow covid tests have been found to be much more effective than previously thought. new research from university college london says the tests, which are cheap and provide quick results, are more than 90% effective at detecting infection, and that positive results should be trusted. a police commissioner who sparked outrage with comments he made following the murder of sarah everard has resigned. philip allott has stepped down, saying he wanted to "restore confidence in the office". he had come underfire for saying during an interview that women should be more "streetwise" about the powers of arrest. after those comments were made, there was a huge backlash in the media, a petition of almost 11,000 signatures asking mr allott to resign.
5:11 pm
the prime minister himself saidhe had spoken... keir starmer said he should resign. after the meeting of the panel, his position was untenable, because there was that a vote of no—confidence, a unanimous vote of no confidence. it followed a letter yesterday from members of his own staff, almost all of his colleagues in that office saying that he had brought the office into distribute with misogynistic remarks and he lost the confidence of the members of the panel you heard this morning morning and about 800 complaints made to his office. during the panel meeting he was trying to say, "look, i am going to try and work really hard to regain people's confidence." he said he reached out to volunteer groups, victims groups and was undergoing, at his own expense, retraining and development.
5:12 pm
but really, this was the position he was faced with after that vote of no—confidence. he turned round to them and said, "if everybody resigned, nothing in the country would ever get done." but he has gone away after three hours of that meeting where members of the panel were saying to him, do the honourable thing, just go and go now, why haven't you resigned already? he has gone away, he's thought about his position and put out an open letter now. of the public and of the people that he works with, and the people that he represents, he said, "following this morning's meeting, it is clear to me the task to regain trust will be exceptionally difficult." "it will take a long time and a lot of my office under the many groups who do excellent
5:13 pm
work supporting victims. this is time the victims do not have." "there are women and girls suffering at the hands of men, victims and the groups who support them need to be heard. "they cannot be heard if the airwaves are filled with discussions about my future. and that is why i am doing the honourable thing and resigning and resigning as police, fire and crime commissioner." so in north yorkshire now, they are starting the process of looking for a temporary replacement for philip allott, and then of course a permanent one, all this five months after he took up the post. a bow and arrow attack which killed five people in norway is being treated as an act of terror, according to security services. a 37—year—old danish man was arrested, after four women and a man died last night in the southern town of kongsberg. police say the suspect had converted to islam and had shown
5:14 pm
signs of radicalisation. megan paterson has the latest. a single arrow in a wall. evidence of the brutal attack which left four women and a man dead, and wounded two others. a 37—year—old man arrested and charged, police had concerns about his radicalisation in the past. translation: we can't, - at the moment, go into the details of what those concerns were, however, we have, and continue to, follow—up on the information and tips that come in. we can also confirm the suspect converted to islam. officers were called to kongsberg's west side at around 6.15pm six yesterday evening. yesterday evening. witnesses described people running away from a man armed with a bow and arrows. his victims were all aged between 50 and 70, some inside a supermarket when the attack started. 0ne witness said he saw police firing a warning shot and the police have confirmed there was a warning shot fired during the apprehension.
5:15 pm
police told a norwegian news agency the attacker also used other weapons during the incident, but did not give further details. his parents, they say, are danish and norwegian. there have been several lone individual attacks in norway in the last decade, but this is the most fatalities since far—right extremist anders breivik murdered 77 people in 2011. the norwegian prime minister, in his first day on the job, said the country was in shock. translation: my thoughts go out to those relatives who have - been affected by this. i've been in touch with people i in kongsberg who witnessed this utterly surreal incident. my thoughts are with them as well. also, to the police and emergency services who are doing _ what they can to reassure people. norway's police are not routinely armed. after this attack, the police directorate has ordered all officers nationwide to carry firearms as an extra precaution. megan paterson, bbc news.
5:16 pm
the headlines on bbc news... gps in england are being told to see more patients face—to—face, as ministers unveil a £250 million winter rescue package. there's a warning the nhs in england is facing an "exceptionally difficult" winter, as the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high of 5.7 million. the north yorkshire police and crime commissioner, phillip allott, whose comments about the sarah everard case sparked outrage has resigned, after a no—confidence vote. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has told the bbc the government is doing "everything it can" to ease supply chain blockages. but businesses in industries from toys to construction to meat have warned that blockages at ports, caused by a shortage of lorry drivers, are still causing big delays. there are concerns about the impact on food prices, and the government has confirmed only 20 emergency visas for foreign drivers have been processed. 0ur economics correspondent
5:17 pm
andy verity reports. both the port of felixstowe and the government sought to reassure the country today that the logjam that's been preventing ships off—loading their goods was improving and that there wouldn't, as some retailers have warned, be a shortage of goods before christmas. i'm confident there will be a good amount of christmas presents available for everyone to buy. we're doing everything we can to mitigate some of these challenges. they are global in nature so we can't fix every single problem, but i feel confident that there will be good provision of goods for everybody and we are working our way to remove blockages where we can. as you've seen with hgv drivers, for example, where we've provided short—term visas, sped up the processing of tests,
5:18 pm
and things like that. the government is keen to portray the shortage of lorry drivers as a global problem caused by a surge in demand, as customers around the world open their wallets, making up for lost time. but hauliers say another big reason is brexit, and in industries from retail to construction, it's causing big delays and pushing up costs. we have got about 108 containers sitting outside felixstowe at the moment, sitting on about five ships, and those ships are constantly getting delayed and it's causing us a big problem because we really rely on those products coming in. costs are rocketing. this year we will see about a £6 million bill on shipping. we are having to pass that on to our customers, who are then having to pass it on to all the builders and electricians out there. facing shipping costs that have risen by 900%, this importer of british—themed toys, this importer of british—themed toys, such as harry potter dolls, can't cast a spell to make the problem go away. with 35,000 goods held up at ports, it's run out of wands. and its boss doesn't think the government has a magic solution. he can say things like, - "we will do everything we can,
5:19 pm
we're trying our best," but really, what does that mean _ for us on the ground? it means we still have to put up with the issues in the interim . and we are facing surges of pricing of bringing products in, _ so it's a really difficult situation that i don't think is going to be| solved by one single - government intervention. while the government has offered 5,000 temporary visas to foreign hgv drivers, it's also admitted that only 300 people have applied and thatjust over 20 have been processed. the specific british dimension of the problem we face is a lack of hgv drivers. there's a shortfall of 90,000 drivers and the reality is the visa scheme that's been announced is simply too little and it's been announced pretty late, and the government really needs to do more if it wants to see action taken swiftly. today, the uk's biggest seller of poultry warned that the price of chicken would have to rise. farmers were struggling to make any money, it said, squeezed by extra costs caused not just by the pandemic and labour shortages, but by brexit. the prospect of shortages and rising inflation is now a reality. andy verity, bbc news. i'm joined now by our global trade
5:20 pm
correspondent, dharshini david. when you see the figures for up on the screen, that is, it tells its story. 300 people have applied. how on earth the products get to our shelves? the things we're used to seeing? shelves? the things we're used to seeinu ? , ., , ., , ., seeing? these are questions we have not had to ask _ seeing? these are questions we have not had to ask before. _ seeing? these are questions we have not had to ask before. it _ seeing? these are questions we have not had to ask before. it has - seeing? these are questions we have not had to ask before. it has been - not had to ask before. it has been compounded by the global factors, there are shortages in factors in china, microchips for electronics, energy shortages over there. making the goods is hard enough. then you ship them across around the world. we are an island. because shipping containers are piling up, in the wrong places, apparently one in 12 are satin ports. normally that figure would be half as much. you can see the kind of congestion going on and we had the additional problem here of having the labour to actually unload the containers, get them on to trucks and get them across the country and that final leg is what we have been hearing
5:21 pm
about and that's where the real crunch point has come and that's why perhaps already we are starting to see not quite as much choice as we would like to see, but this is one of those things. it's chicken and egg. sorry about the pun. it's a case of the more you get concerned, the more panic buying, the worse the problem is get. it's a really delicate thing.— problem is get. it's a really delicate thin. _, problem is get. it's a really delicate thin. , delicate thing. the government says it is doinu delicate thing. the government says it is doing all — delicate thing. the government says it is doing all that _ delicate thing. the government says it is doing all that it _ delicate thing. the government says it is doing all that it can. _ delicate thing. the government says it is doing all that it can. if— it is doing all that it can. if no one is applying for the job, people watching will think, i don't know where the government goes from there, because what else needs to happen? what our country is doing right that we are doing wrong? there are many countries _ right that we are doing wrong? there are many countries are _ right that we are doing wrong? ti” are many countries are seeing a shortage of hgv drivers or the like. because of the pandemic, people have switched career or have not been training if you look at the degree of shortages across the world, we are suffering particularly badly. why? we have clamp—down on freedom
5:22 pm
of movement, otherwise known of brexit. that makes it harder to attract people over particularly when you are only offering short—term contracts and when wages and conditions elsewhere and communities might be better than the uk. it's really thoroughly and in the absence of the pandemic perhaps they would have not noticed to the same degree. they would have not noticed to the same degree-— they would have not noticed to the same degree. finally, i'm interested in what businesses _ same degree. finally, i'm interested in what businesses say. _ same degree. finally, i'm interested in what businesses say. it's - same degree. finally, i'm interested in what businesses say. it's not - in what businesses say. it's not just about us being able to buy what we might like to generally buy at the same of year. these are people's businesses, jobs, a lot on the line. it's notjust a bit christmas presents. if it's notjust a bit christmas presents-— it's notjust a bit christmas resents. ., ., , , ,, ., presents. if you are a business that shi -s presents. if you are a business that ships things — presents. if you are a business that ships things around _ presents. if you are a business that ships things around the _ presents. if you are a business that ships things around the world, - presents. if you are a business that ships things around the world, with more red tape because of the changes in arrangements with europe for example, you are looking at a situation where you make not be able to find the goods you need over and that's notjust to find the goods you need over and that's not just finished to find the goods you need over and that's notjust finished goods. garden furniture turning up in one port at the moment which is back in the spring. if you are a company
5:23 pm
trying to get that to a customer you can imagine the knock—on effects. the raw materials that go into things, what we keep hearing as this is a temporary problem. factories are gradually coming back up to speed and prices are heightened because we are demanding the same things at once. it's going to be a painfulfew months. if things at once. it's going to be a painful few months. if you are a business or consumer you may not be able to get what you want when you want it quite as easily as you are used to. the prices might be somewhat higher, but don't worry. this does not mean we are going to have empty shelves ahead of christmas. we mightjust have to think more creatively. in two interesting, thank you for now. six people have been killed and at least 30 have been injured in the lebanese capital beirut, during a protest against an investigation into last year's port explosion. supporters of the shia group, hezbollah, and its allies had been gathering to press for the removal of the judge who heads the inquiry.
5:24 pm
anna foster was on the streets, as the violence erupted. we started to hear gunfire and things escalated very quickly. the front line at the moment seems strange to call it a front line because we are in the middle of beirut, it'sjust a because we are in the middle of beirut, it's just a few streets that way. we have moved to an area of safety but let me show you what happened around here just a couple of hours ago. you can see over here motorbikes which have been torched and burnt out. there was heavy fighting in this area and you can see the debtor to surround me. down here, as huge pile of shattered glass because firing was happening
5:25 pm
indiscriminately. closer to where it was happening now, somebody�*s apartment window, completely shot out, glass falling and you might also notice the army. this is one of the points where they have been amassing. talking about snipers in the top of buildings, we definitely saw at least one person on top of the building firing down also we have heard the sound of rpgs, lots of rpg fire happening. the queen has officially opened the sixth term of the senedd in wales, on her first visit to the country in five years. 0ur wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff. the queen arrived in cardiff today, she came down on the royal train accompanied by the prince of wales, charles, and camilla, the duchess of cornwall. when she arrived, she came from the train station to the senedd, accompanied by a military parade, a procession, and then a 21—gun salute, signifying the arrival of the prince of wales and camilla to begin. the queen then went up to meet
5:26 pm
the first minister on the steps of the the senedd behind me here. she also met local schoolchildren from the local primary school, not far from the the senedd. she then went into the siambr, the debating chamber in the middle of the senedd, and for the first time during the pandemic, she was greeted by all 60 members of the senedd, the first time they have met since the pandemic. a few concerts and songs inside before giving a speech, where she congratulated the senedd after the election in may. the first minister also making a speech, saying how now, this term was in the shadow of the covid pandemic. the queen now has gone back to the royal train and will head back to london after opening officially the senedd for its sixth term.
5:27 pm
the olympic silver medallist sharron davies could be awarded a gold medal, 41 years after she took that silver in the pool at the moscow games. she came second in the 400 metres individual medley behind east german teenager petra schneider, who has since admitted she was part of a systematic doping programme. swimming's governing body fina is now set to investigate past doping problems, such as east germany's programme in the 1970s and 1980s. i'm pleased to say sharron joins me now. thank you for talking to us. goodness, 41 years later, your thoughts please, that you may finally get your gold medal? 0bviously finally get your gold medal? obviously a little bit next, it has been a very, very long time and it's not as if we did not know what was going on at the time. there has always been two groups of victims
5:28 pm
with this. people like myself that lost medals. people who came fourth behind three east germans and practically nobody knows her name. then of course the young east german girls who were picturing male puberty and are now incredibly ill because of the side—effects. they were let down by the ioc and fina. so it is next because it would be lovely justice after this time so it is next because it would be lovelyjustice after this time and that's the right message to send out a sport. if we tolerate cheats, that is not good and even if it takes time to get things done, that's what we should do. time to get things done, that's what we should dw— time to get things done, that's what we should do— we should do. people listening to ou will we should do. people listening to you will be _ we should do. people listening to you will be really _ we should do. people listening to you will be really struck _ we should do. people listening to you will be really struck that - we should do. people listening to you will be really struck that you | you will be really struck that you said we all knew what was going on. to what extent, what was said, what was talked about? was that within the british team, lots of team? explain the culture and atmosphere at the time. explain the culture and atmosphere at the time-— explain the culture and atmosphere atthetime. , ., at the time. absolutely. moscow for exam - le at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when _ at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when i _ at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when i won _ at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when i won my _ at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when i won my medal. - at the time. absolutely. moscow for example when i won my medal. of. at the time. absolutely. moscow for i example when i won my medal. of the example when i won my medal. of the 13 available gold medals in the swimming pull to women, 11 were one
5:29 pm
by east germans. the european championships between 74 and 89, i think it was 90 of the 102 available gold medals went to east germans. they totally dominated, came from nowhere if you look at the 1972 olympic games, there was hardly any presence and all of a sudden they dominated, only in the women's events. these women would turn up, have deep voices, five o'clock shadows, adam's apples, male physique, neverseen shadows, adam's apples, male physique, never seen them before competing in that swimming to, no junior programme, no results where they were growing and improving and they were growing and improving and they would arrive and break a world record. all of the evidence was there and my father who was my coach usedis there and my father who was my coach used is pivoted regularly and then he never got selected as an international coach, because he was talking out about it. this was allowed to go on for extraordinary injustice. allowed to go on for extraordinary in'ustice. ., ., , ., injustice. nothing was ever done? nothina. injustice. nothing was ever done? nothing. nothing _ injustice. nothing was ever done? nothing. nothing was _ injustice. nothing was ever done? nothing. nothing was ever - injustice. nothing was ever done? nothing. nothing was ever done. |
5:30 pm
injustice. nothing was ever done? - nothing. nothing was ever done. they even had east german athletes defect with a little blue pills and records of what they were going through and still be ioc did absolutely nothing and in 1989, the wall came down and there was access to all of the stasi files which prove exactly who was given what, what doses they were given what, what doses they were given on how much improvement it meant on average, they could make a 9% improvement for a female improvement which meant that petra would have been 16 seconds behind me if you took 9% off and they still did absolutely nothing. it was a huge dark period in sport, which at long last, maybe fina have decided they would like to do something about. ., ., , ., ., ., , about. you mentioned your dad was our about. you mentioned your dad was your coach- — about. you mentioned your dad was your coach. what _ about. you mentioned your dad was your coach. what would _ about. you mentioned your dad was your coach. what would it _ about. you mentioned your dad was your coach. what would it mean - about. you mentioned your dad was your coach. what would it mean to l your coach. what would it mean to him to see you get a gold that you so justly deserve? it him to see you get a gold that you so justly deserve?— him to see you get a gold that you so justly deserve? it would mean a lot. he is so justly deserve? it would mean a lot- he is 85 _ so justly deserve? it would mean a lot. he is 85 years _ so justly deserve? it would mean a lot. he is 85 years old, _ so justly deserve? it would mean a lot. he is 85 years old, my - so justly deserve? it would mean a lot. he is 85 years old, my family | lot. he is 85 years old, my family made massive sacrifices, went without holidays, my brothers went without holidays, my brothers went without school uniforms, my mum went without school uniforms, my mum went without a washing machine, no lottery in those days, my dad was a full—time coach, had to beg, steal
5:31 pm
and borrow to do it. give up his job. i end was never selected. in 2012 after the olympics in london which were such a huge success, my father and daughter grace who did track and field decided to have my 0lympic silver medal plated into gold and snuck it onto the christmas tree. so this one is kind of gold, you can rob but it would be nice to get the real one, wouldn't it? wouldn't it. will you ultimately, i could talk about this for hours. will you ultimately to bring it back to your specific case, do you, will this go through a formal process and you will receive a gold medal? is that going to happen? i you will receive a gold medal? is that going to happen?— that going to happen? i have no idea. that going to happen? i have no idea- this _ that going to happen? i have no idea. this is _ that going to happen? i have no idea. this is all— that going to happen? i have no idea. this is all quite _ that going to happen? i have no idea. this is all quite new, - that going to happen? i have noj idea. this is all quite new, craig lord has had this injustice brought to light, notjust for me, but for those young east germans as well. and for lots of people not recognised. someone like cathy cook who was a phenomenal british athlete on the track. 100, 200, 400 british
5:32 pm
record—holder, these people, most people have never heard of them. i would just love to see justice for many young women. two decades really we have missed out on having role models for lots of young people. i want to make sure that does not happen again ever. my want to make sure that does not happen again ever.— want to make sure that does not happen again ever. my final point, are thins happen again ever. my final point, are things so _ happen again ever. my final point, are things so different _ happen again ever. my final point, are things so different now? - happen again ever. my final point, are things so different now? drug| are things so different now? drug testing regime so different that something could not happen again? it's not that long ago that we talked about other countries and problems with drugs and steroids. we do have issues as you know we had issues for quite a long time now and they often passed the problem onto they often passed the problem onto the individual associations and i would like to see us come down tougher. as i say we have now got a new president and he seems to be wanting to create an independent body which is what we have to do and
5:33 pm
we had problems with china as well which has been a dark history and that has been selected out and i would like to see the associations putting athletes at the center and at the front and that they are there to look after the athletes and not the other way around.— to look after the athletes and not the other way around. thank you so much. i the other way around. thank you so much- i am — the other way around. thank you so much. i am sorry _ the other way around. thank you so much. i am sorry we _ the other way around. thank you so much. i am sorry we have _ the other way around. thank you so much. i am sorry we have to - the other way around. thank you so much. i am sorry we have to leave. the other way around. thank you so | much. i am sorry we have to leave it there. good to talk to you. i'm glad you had your meadow with you. she took that silver medal 41 years ago at the moscow 0lympics took that silver medal 41 years ago at the moscow olympics and may yet get her deserved gold. let's pause for a moment and catch up with the weather. we had outbreaks of rain across scotland, northern england and northern ireland continuing to push south through this evening and overnight. a few went to showers perhaps across the north of scotland but also clear skies. ahead of our band of cloud and patchy rain breezy mist and fog across the far south of
5:34 pm
england. it would be a mild night but not a further touch is possible for scotland at night in england as temperatures get close to freezing. sunshine around tomorrow. parts of wales, midlands, through the morning and the odd patch of light rain. most will be dry by sunshine returns into the afternoon but a cool day particularly for scotland and northern england with temperatures struggling to get into double figures. another cold night as he headed into the early hours of saturday morning and the cloud pushing in from the north and the west. that's a head of more cloud for the weekend but we will feel much milder again and there is a chance of rain. goodbye. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: gps in england are being told to see more patients face—to—face — as ministers unveil a £250m winter rescue package. there's a warning the nhs in england is facing an "exceptionally difficult" winter
5:35 pm
— as the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high of 5.7 million. the north yorkshire police and crime commissioner, phillip allott, whose comments about the sarah everard case sparked outrage — has resigned — after a no—confidence vote. in norway, a man who killed 5 people using a bow and arrow, was known to the police — who say they'd had concerns he'd been radicalised. new research suggests babies of black and asian origin are at higher risk of being stillborn or dying shortly after birth — a leading charity is calling for urgent action here is the latest sports news. we
5:36 pm
are reflecting on some figures released today by the home office which shows there were 92 football —related arrests at england's home match last season with 90 of those occurring at ua 2020. and it follows a review into the disturbances during the final with italy on the july the 11. 39 arrests were made at that game which was marred by scrimmage is at the stadium. ua for conducted their own investigation and could announce their findings early next week. the bournemouth milder said the club will rally around following his cancer diagnosis. the 24—year—old has staged ii hodgkin's lymphoma but revealed the prognosis is positive and credits the welsh medical team for helping detect bms when he was on international beauty last week. our process to be giving him all the time and support he needs. their
5:37 pm
main focus _ time and support he needs. their main focus now— time and support he needs. their main focus now is _ time and support he needs. tue: " main focus now is supporting time and support he needs. tte: " main focus now is supporting the family and getting through which is going to be a tough time which that is the main plan now and that's exactly what we want to do. the inmates, staff, all of us at a football club will rally around and get support mechanism around in and to give strength and help him pull through which is going to be difficult. �* . ., ., difficult. arceneaux face- hand in the lead tonight _ difficult. arceneaux face- hand in the lead tonight having _ difficult. arceneaux face- hand in the lead tonight having lost - difficult. arceneaux face- hand in the lead tonight having lost their| the lead tonight having lost their opening match last week they enjoyed a perfect start to get that ? domestic season and they are yet to drop a point and they are taking on thejamming drop a point and they are taking on the jamming side having lost heavily on the opening match day. for 2010 grand slam champion says he does not know when he will play tennis again. at 35—year—old last competed in august before announcing that the injury to his left foot him out for
5:38 pm
the rest of the year and struggled with back problems. he says ease clear on his objectives and trusting to follow a positive course. the ecb confirmed that championship will be 22 divisions and follows a vote by the cherries by the first—class counties and ten counties will compete in division i8 you will be in division 2 and daily be you up and to down promotion and medication and to down promotion and medication and the teens will be placed in the education that they qualify to competing at the 2020 championship taking place this season saw teens placed in the group stages. it will shatter the senior site on the upcoming tour of australia listening to. the batsman has been handed an anxious life rain and healers dropped from the main squad but travel and then folks who already kept test level and they were
5:39 pm
including 14 that would head down on the same day at the test match on november the 4th. sullivan has been knocked out of the night and aren't open and the rocket conceded that exciting frame of what was a tight contest of china who 14—3 and a 21—year—old moves into the quarterfinals. that's all for me for now they will be more to come and that's at half past six. a leading baby loss charity is calling on the government to fund an enquiry after research showed high stillbirth and neonatal death rates for babies of asian origin. research from the charity sands, shows asian and black babies are more at risk of perinatal death than babies of other ethnicities. the government has already commissioned an enquiry into black and black british baby deaths. let's speak to clea harmer chief executive at sands — the stillbirth and neonatal death charity and i'm also joined by priya vara whose son shayen
5:40 pm
was stillborn in august 2017. thank you for being with us. i do want to hear your story in a moment. i'm going to continue first because i'm going to continue first because i think it's important to have the clear statistics on this. they will be people who are shocked by this and explain what your research shows. what we have worked out from the day to that has been shared today is that the rates of babies dying from asian and black communities are so much higher than for white babies. that communities are so much higher than for white babies.— for white babies. that if those babies had — for white babies. that if those babies had had _ for white babies. that if those babies had had the _ for white babies. that if those babies had had the same - for white babies. that if those babies had had the same risk| for white babies. that if those - babies had had the same risk that white babies had over 430 fewer babies would've day in england and wales in 2019 alone. which shows you
5:41 pm
the scale of the inequalities which are worrying and really unjust and that's what we want to address today. do that's what we want to address toda . ,., that's what we want to address toda . , ., ., ., ,., today. do we understand enough about what drives that? _ today. do we understand enough about what drives that? we _ today. do we understand enough about what drives that? we do _ today. do we understand enough about what drives that? we do not. _ today. do we understand enough about what drives that? we do not. we - today. do we understand enough about what drives that? we do not. we know| what drives that? we do not. we know the inequalities — what drives that? we do not. we know the inequalities are _ what drives that? we do not. we know the inequalities are there _ what drives that? we do not. we know the inequalities are there are - the inequalities are there are compounded by other factors such as deprivation and age and if these come together the risks are even higher and female all of that but what we do not know his wife. that's why it's so important that a confidential inquiry looks into this and we really understand what is behind these figures and these inequalities and we can target actions and interventions in order to address them. so actions and interventions in order to address them.— actions and interventions in order to address them. so good of you to be willin: to address them. so good of you to be willing to _ to address them. so good of you to be willing to speak— to address them. so good of you to be willing to speak to _ to address them. so good of you to be willing to speak to us. _ to address them. so good of you to be willing to speak to us. explain . be willing to speak to us. explain what happened to your family and to you and your husband back in 2017. we lost our sun back in august of
5:42 pm
2017 _ we lost our sun back in august of 2017 and — we lost our sun back in august of 2017 and i— we lost our sun back in august of 2017 and i had a low—risk pregnancy. it 2017 and i had a low—risk pregnancy. it was _ 2017 and i had a low—risk pregnancy. it was completely normal. i have no complications and there was nothing to indicate _ complications and there was nothing to indicate anything was wrong. a wet into— to indicate anything was wrong. a wet into labor at home and neighbor overnight— wet into labor at home and neighbor overnight and having had one child and you're — overnight and having had one child and you're not to go into hospital too early — and you're not to go into hospital too early in — and you're not to go into hospital too early in the next morning again everything — too early in the next morning again everything seemed fine and i was ready— everything seemed fine and i was ready to — everything seemed fine and i was ready to go into the hospital and as we arrived — ready to go into the hospital and as we arrived they started to perform their regular check and at that point — their regular check and at that point they could not find a heartbeat. to say we were devastated is an understatement. any parents has actual— is an understatement. any parents has actual has been through something like this will know that nothing _ something like this will know that nothing prepares you see get us where _ nothing prepares you see get us where that your child is no more. i was full—time in my pregnancy and i did not— was full—time in my pregnancy and i did not think him and million euros
5:43 pm
it would _ did not think him and million euros it would be — did not think him and million euros it would be going through something like this _ it would be going through something like this |_ it would be going through something like this. ., .., like this. i have medical professionals, - like this. i have medical professionals, were - like this. i have medical| professionals, were they like this. i have medical- professionals, were they able at like this. i have medical— professionals, were they able at any point to understand what had happened? to explain what had happened? to explain what had happened? we happened? to explain what had happened?— happened? to explain what had ha ened? ~ . ., ., , happened? to explain what had ha ened? . . ., ., , ., happened? we decided as a family not to have a post — happened? we decided as a family not to have a post marking. _ happened? we decided as a family not to have a post marking. i— happened? we decided as a family not to have a post marking. i did - happened? we decided as a family not to have a post marking. i did not - to have a post marking. i did not think— to have a post marking. i did not think there — to have a post marking. i did not think there was anything they could tell me _ think there was anything they could tell me that would make me feel any better— tell me that would make me feel any better about the loss back to there. it's better about the loss back to there. it's a _ better about the loss back to there. it's a very— better about the loss back to there. it's a very personal present ? we did not— it's a very personal present ? we did not feel— it's a very personal present ? we did not feel it was something he wanted — did not feel it was something he wanted to— did not feel it was something he wanted to do. we would have rather 'ust wanted to do. we would have rather just grieved with the loss of a self — just grieved with the loss of a self in— just grieved with the loss of a self. in terms of the support i received — self. in terms of the support i received the hospital, i can't thank them _ received the hospital, i can't thank them enough because to this day we still keep— them enough because to this day we still keep in touch and the support was second to none. they cared for us, the _ was second to none. they cared for us, the active — was second to none. they cared for us, the active support, in every single _ us, the active support, in every single way— us, the active support, in every single way we were truly lucky. it�*s
5:44 pm
single way we were truly lucky. tt�*s extraordinary to hear you use the word lucky at all. you have been to a hellish experience and we are grateful and granularity statistics that outlined at the beginning, what goodis that outlined at the beginning, what good is still your mind? is this something you talk about as a family? something you talk about as a famil ? , ~ something you talk about as a famil ? , . ., , ., ., family? yes. we have been doing a lot ofwork— family? yes. we have been doing a lot of work to _ family? yes. we have been doing a lot of work to raise _ family? yes. we have been doing a lot of work to raise awareness - family? yes. we have been doing a lot of work to raise awareness and l lot of work to raise awareness and to help _ lot of work to raise awareness and to help to — lot of work to raise awareness and to help to keep the conversation going _ to help to keep the conversation going by— to help to keep the conversation going by sharing our story. what's surprising — going by sharing our story. what's surprising about these stats is it's not near. — surprising about these stats is it's not near, they've been around for a while _ not near, they've been around for a while now— not near, they've been around for a while now and we their there late in especially— while now and we their there late in especially in the ethnic groups so it's great— especially in the ethnic groups so it's great to see something is being done _ it's great to see something is being done to— it's great to see something is being done to really look into this and take _ done to really look into this and take the — done to really look into this and take the time to see if there's anything — take the time to see if there's anything more that we need to rectify — anything more that we need to recti . . ~ anything more that we need to recti . ., ,, ,., anything more that we need to recti . ., ,, y., anything more that we need to recti. ., ,, . anything more that we need to recti . ., ,, . ., rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize _ rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to _ rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to both _ rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to both of _ rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to both of you - rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to both of you we - rectify. thank you so much. i do apologize to both of you we are | apologize to both of you we are short of time but there is much to discuss. we are grateful you could share your story. all the best to you and your family
5:45 pm
share your story. all the best to you and yourfamily and to share your story. all the best to you and your family and to the chief executive of the charity. thank you so much. we had to cut that slightly short. it is quarter to six. we'll find out the winner of this year's stirling prize this evening, that's the search for britain's best new building. as our media and arts correspondent david sillito reports, this year's shortlist reflects how the environment has become a prime concern. kingston university's town house — a home for it library, its dance studios, and also a new social hub for students. wow, this is incredible. i'mjust like, "yeah, i go to uni there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels and natural cooling to create a building that is less energy hungry.
5:46 pm
this key worker housing in cambridge is also designed to encourage a low carbon house style. you seek more bike sheds here than parking. this year, six stirling buildings are about more than just beauty and clever ideas. care for the environment has become a prime concern. take this, windermere, and a museum to house a famous boat collection. the overriding concern, though, is don't spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to the concept of building. we have systems like the lake source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we have selected were ever possible local materials so that travel from source to site is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, a place connected with the stories of king arthur. a challenge to reconnect the eroded
5:47 pm
site and not damage the archaeology. and when it comes to ancient history, this building in london uses some ancient methods. lumps of stone are what is keeping these flats and offers up right, a sort of high—tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it is you will still find fossils within it. here you can see... this has come straight out of the ground? here is an ammonite shell. it is actually cheaper, faster and far greener to put stone buildings up. we found here that we saved 92% of the embodied carbon. had this been a steel framed building and clad in stone. this hasn't been simple. it exterior is not everyone's taste. at one point, the council was seeing to have it demolished.
5:48 pm
it was only saved after a two—year legal battle by its architect. was there a moment where you thought you wish you had never started this? of course. sorry, you want me to elaborate obviously. that's two and a half years of stress... it's difficult. and our final building swap steel and concrete for word. inspired by a garden of paradise, cambridge mosque is low carbon spirituality. six very different buildings but all reflecting a desire on the eve of a global climate summit to tread gently on the planet. 0ur media and arts correspondent david sillitojoins me now from coventry. it really is a prestigious prize in architecture but it's interesting to
5:49 pm
hear the extent to which the environment pays into the planning. especially as we are on the eve of the summit that everyone is thinking, how do you build something for the long term that is going to be not to energy hungry and not use a great deal of energy to produce it? as you saw with that building just to take it straight out of the ground rather than break or steel that requires furnaces but what we are now also thinking about is a post—pandemic world and i have been speaking to the chair this afternoon probably britain's most famous architect and a statements of choice for creating giants hq headquarters for creating giants hq headquarters for corporations and what's going to be happening for building gigantic airports and what's going to be happening to air travel and i asked him that he think this is a juncture or change and it's going to be that
5:50 pm
he think at that for a near future? if you look at singapore airport with its — if you look at singapore airport with its gardens it's much more like a kind _ with its gardens it's much more like a kind of— with its gardens it's much more like a kind of leisure center in la and it's not— a kind of leisure center in la and it's not humid and it's very large but it's— it's not humid and it's very large but it's broken down in scale and those _ but it's broken down in scale and those buildings which were already ahead _ those buildings which were already ahead of— those buildings which were already ahead of their time which provided really— ahead of their time which provided really good sporting facilities and i really good sporting facilities and i could _ really good sporting facilities and i could go back to buildings been involved — i could go back to buildings been involved with going back which in that sense those trends, if there is franch— that sense those trends, if there is french buildings like headquarters for apple — french buildings like headquarters for apple or been buried, that would become _ for apple or been buried, that would become much more mainstream. so people _ become much more mainstream. so people will— become much more mainstream. so people will be coming to the workplace to interact socially. the technology without question has demonstrated we can do far more remotely— demonstrated we can do far more remotely than we ever believe but it's also— remotely than we ever believe but it's also brought home the fact that
5:51 pm
it's also brought home the fact that it only— it's also brought home the fact that it only goes so far. you do need that— it only goes so far. you do need that contact. we are social animals. we're _ that contact. we are social animals. we're not _ that contact. we are social animals. we're not to— that contact. we are social animals. we're not to be it's like the paperless office ? office. just think— paperless office ? office. just think about the workplace. there are more _ think about the workplace. there are more people coming together around the idea _ more people coming together around the idea of— more people coming together around the idea of a congress to discuss and what — the idea of a congress to discuss and what they might be discussing is the end _ and what they might be discussing is the end of— and what they might be discussing is the end of the workplace but a chilly— the end of the workplace but a chilly they're all gathering together because people want to be together— together because people want to be together and you're seeing already at the _ together and you're seeing already at the resurgence of look at london, io at the resurgence of look at london, go to— at the resurgence of look at london, go to new_ at the resurgence of look at london, go to new york, go to the cities, they've _ go to new york, go to the cities, they've never been so alive and welt _ they've never been so alive and well. ., ., ., ,, ., well. norman foster talking about the future of _ well. norman foster talking about the future of architecture. - well. norman foster talking about the future of architecture. one - the future of architecture. 0ne building on that issue to stands out, kinston town house university which is all about getting students back together in the library, that ioy back together in the library, that joy of one—to—one connection. but
5:52 pm
also a strong theme of sustainability and also some of them ijust sustainability and also some of them i just overwhelmingly beautiful. when you walk into the mosque you are going from a residential street to garden and it's basically on the idea of the garden of paradise and there is that sense of quiet as you reach there and that's the one that's certainly had its impact on the public and the public already one the popular vote and it's the odds on favorite for tonight. the winner will be announced here on the channel at the ceremony and we begin to live at 7:30pm this evening. join us for a series of riba starting building of the year. that programme is coming up at 7:30 p.m.. researchers have developed a laser that fires droplets of liquid into
5:53 pm
the skin in a said to be almost painless. astrid is 31 years old. she's an actress and she is terrified of meals. so much so she's had to see therapy for a phobia that stretches back to her childhood. tt stretches back to her childhood. tit started during puberty when icy a meter or have to get a shot ijust want to leave, i'll tear the place down to it ? getting a shot. for astrid and _ down to it ? getting a shot. for astrid and millions of others like her, salvation may be at hand. this is the bubble garden. a high—tech alternative that uses lasers rather than needles to administer a back ? a shot. . . , , than needles to administer a back ? a shot. . ., , , ., than needles to administer a back ? ashot. ., ., , a shot. the class that contains the li . uid is a shot. the class that contains the liquid is heated _ a shot. the class that contains the liquid is heated by _ a shot. the class that contains the liquid is heated by laser— a shot. the class that contains the liquid is heated by laser and - a shot. the class that contains the liquid is heated by laser and a - liquid is heated by laser and a bubble is created in the liquid pushing the liquid out and we can
5:54 pm
see the jealousy pushing the liquid out and we can see thejealousy and pushing the liquid out and we can see the jealousy and how it penetrates about one mm. never has this seems more _ penetrates about one mm. never has this seems more relevant. _ penetrates about one mm. never has this seems more relevant. for- penetrates about one mm. never has this seems more relevant. for nearly| this seems more relevant. for nearly a year now injections and vaccinations have been taking place all around the world. with the bubble gun, said to be essentially pain—free encourages more reluctant to come for their shots? in pain-free encourages more reluctant to come for their shots?— to come for their shots? in my oinion to come for their shots? in my opinion this — to come for their shots? in my opinion this is _ to come for their shots? in my opinion this is a _ to come for their shots? in my opinion this is a good - to come for their shots? in my opinion this is a good solution | opinion this is a good solution since people often have this phobia of getting stung. here we only get a laser and they are vaccinated without suffering. {iii laser and they are vaccinated without suffering.— laser and they are vaccinated without sufferinu. .., , ,., without suffering. of course, some will never agree _ without suffering. of course, some will never agree to _ without suffering. of course, some will never agree to an _ without suffering. of course, some will never agree to an injection, . will never agree to an injection, phobia or otherwise. they may be several years until the bubble gun is available for widespread use but for now they needle is still the norm. let's take a look at the weather. forthe
5:55 pm
norm. let's take a look at the weather. for the next few nights it will be on the cold side and it comes courtesy of this front to persist in bringing outbreaks of ring bikes in scotland and northern england. it will continue south overnight but behind it we have got cold air and there are a few showers this evening across northern and eastern scotland. it could even be when terry and holding them out air across the far south of the uk. let's follow the progress of the frontal zone this evening and overnight sinking south and the rain becomes increasingly patchy. we could see the odd patch of mist and fog across the southern areas of the uk but north across scotland and northern england we could see a touch of frost for some remote areas as temperatures get close to freezing. it's a day with blue skies and sunshine tomorrow but the zone of cloud and rain in mailings and should break and abc cells of sunshine. cloud pushing back into the night but a cool day here and
5:56 pm
temperatures 8 or nine celsius across scotland and 9 or 10 the far north of england and south it could range from 12 to 15116 thousand yes but for all of us it will feel cool in the northwest wind. a fine and to the daily cloud pushing back in across scotland and northern ireland and resting areas of england and wales and the clear skies further east you are and once again we could see a touch of frost across eastern scotland and northeast england. a cold night. into that weekend things change once again because frontal persist in could be pushing east very slowly for saturday so most of us on saturday should have hiv but what it would be doing is pushing mild air back across the temperatures by day will be rising once again into the bank if not high teens. it's a cloudy day for most of us and cloudier then friday and outbreaks of rain and western parts of england and scotland in the afternoon. temperature back up to 14
5:57 pm
or16 afternoon. temperature back up to 14 or 16 celsius but still on the cool side afraid scotland and northern isles. it looks like sunday will be the unsettled day of the weekend. cloudy with rain pushing from west to east and some managed to stay dry but i game temperatures will be up into the middle or high teens. looking ahead briefly to the early part of next week we hold onto the mild air and it will be cloudy and some of us will see outbreaks of rain as well. goodbye.
5:58 pm
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
at six — gps in england are told to see more patients face to face amid a sharp rise in the number of people heading to a&e departments. the government directs £250 million to help surgeries bring in more temporary staff. but gps say the money offered doesn't match the crisis they face. we haven't got the locums to come in and work in practices, so the idea that this money is going to help with that is just pie in the sky. the government insists the money will make a difference. also tonight... police in norway say a bow and arrow attack that left five people dead appears to be an act of terrorism. a 37—year—old man is in custody. the government announces abattoir butchers from abroad can come to the uk as seasonal workers
6:01 pm
to combat shortages in the pig industry.

10 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on