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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 14, 2021 1:00pm-1:30pm BST

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the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high in england. 5.7 million people need procedures like hip and knee replacements and waiting times in a&e are also up. and amid concern that it's difficult for patients to see a gp face to face, the government pledges money to help. there is a huge demand on our fantastic gps and how can we help with that is by providing the financial support, getting rid of red tape and helping to shift some of that demand to other more sensible places. we'll ask how the increasing pressures on the nhs can be dealt with. also this lunchtime: in norway, a man who killed five people using a bow and arrows was known to the police, who say they'd had concerns he'd been radicalised.
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gunfire. heavy gunfire in beirut. at least five people are believed dead, following protests about the investigation into last year's massive port explosion. tributes to an 18—year—old student after he was stabbed to death in south west london. the queen praises the spirit of the welsh people during the pandemic, as she officially opens the new term of parliament, the senedd. and chris martin tells us exclusively how coldplay are making their new world tour carbon neutral. and coming up on the bbc news channel, cameron norrie sets his sights on becoming the new british number one as he reaches the last eight at indian wells.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the increasing pressure on the nhs is underlined by new figures this lunchtime which show a record number of people waiting to start routine hospital treatment in england. 5.7 million people were waiting at the end of august for procedures such as hip replacements and cataract removals — the highest since records began. waiting times in accident and emergency departments are also at their worst since the four—hour target was introduced in 200a.
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the answers have to be what we can do now is start planning effectively and investing effectively for the
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long—term future of the nhs. it’s long-term future of the nhs. it's not “ust long—term future of the nhs. it's notjust pressure on hospitals. gps say they are also struggling to cope with the workload. i got say they are also struggling to cope with the workload.— with the workload. i got your message- — with the workload. i got your message. doctors _ with the workload. i got your message. doctors say - with the workload. i got your - message. doctors say telephone consultations _ message. doctors say telephone consultations mean _ message. doctors say telephone consultations mean they - message. doctors say telephone consultations mean they can - message. doctors say telephone i consultations mean they can speak message. doctors say telephone - consultations mean they can speak to many more patients. face—to—face appointments have fallen from 80% before the pandemic to nearly 60%. many gps feel the drive to return to more in—person appointments is unhelpful. many patients can be dealt with much more efficiently over the phone. and gp surgeries are currently under siege _ gp surgeries are currently under siege we — gp surgeries are currently under siege. we are unbelievably busy. and we are _ siege. we are unbelievably busy. and we are kind _ siege. we are unbelievably busy. and we are kind of being expected, being driven— we are kind of being expected, being driven to _ we are kind of being expected, being driven to be — we are kind of being expected, being driven to be superhuman. the government — driven to be superhuman. the government set _ driven to be superhuman. tie: government set out a {250,000,000 government set out a £250,000,000 package for gps in england from new nhs funding announced last month. it should allow practices to hire more locums than other health care professionals. there is a promise to cut some red tape and improve security because doctors say they
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are dealing with high levels of abuse. and social distancing rules are being reviewed which could allow more patience in waiting rooms. there is a huge amount of demand on our fantastic there is a huge amount of demand on ourfantastic gps, and how there is a huge amount of demand on our fantastic gps, and how can we help with that is through providing the financial support, getting rid of red tape and helping to shift the demand to other more sensible places. demand to other more sensible laces. �* :, ,:, demand to other more sensible laces. �* :, , demand to other more sensible laces. �* places. but labour says the package doesnt places. but labour says the package doesn't solve _ places. but labour says the package doesn't solve the _ places. but labour says the package doesn't solve the bigger— places. but labour says the package doesn't solve the bigger picture. - doesn't solve the bigger picture. the core problem here is lack of gps: _ the core problem here is lack of gps, and — the core problem here is lack of gps, and in _ the core problem here is lack of gps, and in the election 2019, the prime _ gps, and in the election 2019, the prime minister promised 6,000 new gps, his— prime minister promised 6,000 new gps, his great pledge. we now have less than— gps, his great pledge. we now have less than 2019. this gps, his great pledge. we now have less than 2019.— less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and _ less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and tests _ less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and tests in _ less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and tests in some - less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and tests in some of- less than 2019. this walk-in centre for scans and tests in some of 40 l for scans and tests in some of a0 being set up around england. the government says extra investment and measures like this will help the nhs tackle the growing backlog of care but with 5.7 million patients in england now waiting for routine operations, the legacy of the pandemic will be felt for many years to come.
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our health editor hugh pym is with me. so many issues facing the nhs and we are not even at the peak of winter yet. are not even at the peak of winter et. , , , :, , , yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid illustration _ yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid illustration of _ yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid illustration of the _ yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid illustration of the pressures - yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid illustration of the pressures on i yet. yes, this is a very, very vivid l illustration of the pressures on the nhs that you've got record numbers of attendances at a&e units in england, four september, a record low seen within the four hours treated or assessed within the four hour benchmark and we haven't even got to winter because this was september. so what's going on? well, as we have been hearing there, people struggled to get a gp appointment is in some cases, so they go into a&e, adding to the pressure there. there are more people coming forward with health conditions who maybe haven't done so during earlier lockdowns because they were more cautious about going to gps or into hospitals. and then you've got a backlog of work needing to be done for people needing
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routine treatment, routine operations, and that figure of 5.7 million on the waiting list in england. so will this package of measures for gps in england make any difference? talking to one or two doctors today they think, yes, it's helpful to have some of the bureaucracy cut down for clearer rules on infection control and, yes, some money for the winter bringing in locums, it could help, but equally they say they are absolutely working flat out already, so how you fit in extra appointments and find people to do that will be extremely difficult. they feel there is a suggestion they are not doing enough to see patients. they rejected that argument and say many patients like speaking on the phone and they are doing as many face—to—face as they possibly can and ultimately, this is a workforce issue that you can't train gps injust a year or two. it does take time. the government says no more being trained in england,
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the workforce will grow, but that's all in the future. you're talking now about this winter and this extreme pressure building thank you. a bow and arrow attack which killed five people in norway is being treated as an act of terror, according to security services. a 37—year—old danish man was arrested after four women and a man died last night in the southern town of kongsberg. police say the suspect had converted to islam and had shown signs of radicalisation. megan paterson has the latest. a single arrow in a wall. evidence of the brutal attack which left four women and a man dead and wounded two others. a 37—year—old man arrested and charged. police had concerns about his radicalisation in the past. translation: we can't - at the moment go into the details of what those concerns were. however, we have, and continue to, follow—up on the information and tips that come in. we can also confirm the suspect
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converted to islam. officers were called to kongsberg's west side at a quarter past six yesterday evening. witnesses described people running away from a man armed with a bow and arrows. his victims were all aged between 50 and 70, some inside a supermarket when the attack started. one witness said he saw police firing a warning shot and the police have confirmed there was a warning shot fired during the apprehension. police told a norweigian news agency the attacker also used other weapons during the incident but did not give further details. his parents, they say, are danish and norwegian. there have been several lone individual attacks in norway in the last decade, but this is the most fatalities since far right extremists anders brevik murdered 77 people in 2011. the norwegian prime minister in his first day on the job said the country was in shock. translation: my thoughts go out to those relatives who have -
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been affected by this. i've been in touch with people in kongsberg who witnessed this utterly surreal incident. my thoughts are with them as well. also, to the police and emergency services who are doing what they can to reassure people. norway's police are not routinely armed. after this attack, the police directorate has ordered all officers nationwide to carry firearms as an extra precaution. megan paterson, bbc news. the chancellor rishi sunak has told the bbc the government is doing everything it can to ease supply chain blockages. but businesses in industries from toys to construction to meat have warned that blockages at ports, caused by a shortage of lorry drivers, are still causing big delays. there are concerns about the impact on food prices, and the government has confirmed only 20 emergency visas for foreign drivers have been processed. our economics correspondent
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andy verity reports. both the port of felixstowe and the government sought to reassure the country gave a logjam has been preventing ships off—loading their goods and it was improving. they wouldn't come as some retailers have warned, be a shortage of goods before christmas. i’m warned, be a shortage of goods before christmas.— before christmas. i'm confident there will be _ before christmas. i'm confident there will be a _ before christmas. i'm confident there will be a good _ before christmas. i'm confident there will be a good amount - before christmas. i'm confident there will be a good amount of| there will be a good amount of christmas presents available for everyone to buy and we are doing everything we can to mitigate some of these challenges. they are global in nature so we can't fix every single problem, but i feel confident there will be good provision of goods for everybody and we are working our way to remove blockages where we can. as you've seen with hgv drivers for example, where we provide short—term visas, sped up the processing of tests and things like that. the the processing of tests and things like that. :, , ,, :, like that. the government is keen to ortra the like that. the government is keen to portray the shortage _ like that. the government is keen to portray the shortage of _ like that. the government is keen to portray the shortage of lorry - portray the shortage of lorry drivers is a global problem caused by a surge in demand as customers open their wallets making up for lost time but hauliers say another big reason is brexit. in industry of causing big delays and pushing up
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costs. irate causing big delays and pushing up costs. ~ :, :, :, '::j~ :, costs. we have got about 108 contain sittin: costs. we have got about 108 contain sitting outside _ costs. we have got about 108 contain sitting outside felixstowe _ costs. we have got about 108 contain sitting outside felixstowe at - costs. we have got about 108 contain sitting outside felixstowe at the - sitting outside felixstowe at the moment. sitting on five ships. those ships are constantly getting delayed. it's causing a big problem because we rely on those products coming in. are rocketing. this year we will see about a £6,000,000 bill on shipping. we are hoping to pass that on to our customers were then having to pass it on to all the bill and electricians out there. facing shi -|n~ and electricians out there. facing shipping costs — and electricians out there. facing shipping costs which _ and electricians out there. facing shipping costs which have - and electricians out there. facing shipping costs which have risen l and electricians out there. facing | shipping costs which have risen by 900%, this importer of toys such as harry potter dolls can't cast a speu harry potter dolls can't cast a spell to make the problem go away. with 35,000 goods held up at ports, it's one out of ones. and its boss doesn't think the boss has a magic solution. :, , ~ solution. you can say things like we can do anything _ solution. you can say things like we can do anything we _ solution. you can say things like we can do anything we can, _ solution. you can say things like we can do anything we can, trying - solution. you can say things like we can do anything we can, trying our. can do anything we can, trying our best, _ can do anything we can, trying our best. but— can do anything we can, trying our best, but what does that mean for us on the _ best, but what does that mean for us on the ground? it means we have to put on the ground? it means we have to out up _ on the ground? it means we have to put up of— on the ground? it means we have to put up of the — on the ground? it means we have to put up of the issues in the interim and are _ put up of the issues in the interim and are facing stages of pricing bringing — and are facing stages of pricing bringing products in, so it's a
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really— bringing products in, so it's a really difficult situation and i don't — really difficult situation and i don't think it's going to be solved by one _ don't think it's going to be solved by one single government intervention.— by one single government intervention. ~ :, intervention. while the government has offered 5,000 _ intervention. while the government has offered 5,000 temporary - intervention. while the government has offered 5,000 temporary visas| intervention. while the government l has offered 5,000 temporary visas to foreign hgv drivers, it also admitted only 300 people have applied. and just over 20 have been processed. applied. and “ust over 20 have been rocessed. . applied. and “ust over 20 have been rocessed. , , , : . applied. and “ust over 20 have been rocessed. , ,, : : : , processed. these specific british dimension of _ processed. these specific british dimension of the _ processed. these specific british dimension of the problem - processed. these specific british dimension of the problem we . processed. these specific british l dimension of the problem we face processed. these specific british - dimension of the problem we face is a lack of hgv drivers. a shortfall of 90,000 drivers and the reality is the visa scheme announced is simply too little and it's been announced pretty late, and the government needs to do more than once to the action taken swiftly.— action taken swiftly. today the uk is bi est action taken swiftly. today the uk is biggest seller— action taken swiftly. today the uk is biggest seller of _ action taken swiftly. today the uk is biggest seller of poultry - action taken swiftly. today the uk is biggest seller of poultry warned of the price of chicken would have to rise. farmers were struggling to make any money squeezed by extra costs because notjust by the pandemic and labour shortages, but i brexit. the prospect of shortages and rising inflation is now a reality. andy verity, bbc news. at least five people are reported to have died in heavy gunfire in the lebanese capital beirut. it happened near a protest against an investigation into last year's huge port explosion.
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but as that we began to hear gunfire from a few streets away and things escalate very quickly. there is a cautious calm here in beirut at the moment but there's been bowling gunfire, the boom of rpg is for hours. you will see over my shoulder the lebanese army are all over the place at the moment. they've told people not to come out on the streets at the moment and overhear this is why, this was the front line area in beirut a couple of hours ago. you will see the broken glass and twisted metal. that was a guardmight hurt that was outside one of these residential buildings that was
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smashed and broken. motorbikes have been torched. there was heavy fighting here, heavy gunfire in the streets between the christian and sheer macro areas. what happens now is the leaders, the political leaders, the sectarian leaders, have called for calm. lebanon for a long time has been a country in frustration, the tensions have been simmering and there is a hope they can bring this to an end very soon. and foster in beirut. escalated tributes have been left for a teenager who was stabbed to death on a playing field in south—west london. 18—year—old hazrat vali was killed near a school in twickenham yesterday. jon donisson reports. hazrat vali, the latest teenager to be stabbed to death in london. police say the 18 —year—old, who is believed to have arrived in the uk from afghanistan, several years ago, was attacked on these playing fields in broad daylightjust before five o'clock on tuesday afternoon. people living nearby in this leafy suburb
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has been left shocked. brute living nearby in this leafy suburb has been left shocked.— living nearby in this leafy suburb has been left shocked. we have not had an incident _ has been left shocked. we have not had an incident like _ has been left shocked. we have not had an incident like this _ has been left shocked. we have not had an incident like this in - has been left shocked. we have not had an incident like this in the - had an incident like this in the immediate area.— had an incident like this in the immediate area. total disbelief. we've lived _ immediate area. total disbelief. we've lived here _ immediate area. total disbelief. we've lived here for _ immediate area. total disbelief. we've lived here for many - immediate area. total disbelief. we've lived here for many years| immediate area. total disbelief. - we've lived here for many years and you just _ we've lived here for many years and you just feel it kind of changed for the moment anyway, all around here because _ the moment anyway, all around here because we _ the moment anyway, all around here because we live so near here. and obviously. — because we live so near here. and obviously, the obvious thing is it's totaiiy— obviously, the obvious thing is it's totally tragic. it�*s obviously, the obvious thing is it's totally tragic— totally tragic. it's believed the attack may — totally tragic. it's believed the attack may have _ totally tragic. it's believed the attack may have been - totally tragic. it's believed the l attack may have been witnessed totally tragic. it's believed the - attack may have been witnessed by some young boys from a nearby school who were playing rugby on the field. a teacher apparently tried to give first aid. but hazrat vali died later that evening in hospital. forensic officers remain at the scene. police say they believe a number of people may have thrown the attack on their mobile phones and are urging them to come forward but not to post on social media. hazrat vali was a student at richmond upon thames college, just a few minutes' walk away. mr; thames college, “ust a few minutes' walk awa . g :, , :, , thames college, “ust a few minutes' walk awa . y :, ,:, , : walk away. my thoughts are very much with the college _ walk away. my thoughts are very much with the college community, _ walk away. my thoughts are very much with the college community, at - walk away. my thoughts are very much with the college community, at this . with the college community, at this time, and i know that they are, both
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students and staff there are getting the support and the counselling they need but also with the local school next door, we know there were school pupils and teachers who witnessed the incident and teachers who came to his aid when he was injured, and so my huge thanks to them. tudor; so my huge thanks to them. today friends have _ so my huge thanks to them. today friends have been _ so my huge thanks to them. today friends have been leaving - so my huge thanks to them. today friends have been leaving tribute at the scene. i hope you find a better life, one wrote, wherever you are. john donnison, bbc news, twickenham. the time is 1.17. our top story this lunchtime... the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high in england — 5.7 million people need procedures like hip and knee replacements. and coming up — the duke of cambridge tells the bbc there should be more focus on repairing the planet, as he discusses the upcoming earthshot prize. coming ea rthshot prize. up coming earthshot prize. up on the bbc news channel,
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the coming up on the bbc news channel, the women's super league leaders arsenal are back in champions league action tonight hoping to continue their brilliant domestic form as they take on hoffenheim. two years ago, coldplay said they wouldn't tour again unless they could do so in a carbon neutral way. today, the band has unveiled a 12—point action plan detailing how they'll make their new world tour sustainable. it includes the first ever rechargeable battery which can power a whole show, and a special floor that turns theirfans dancing into energy. coldplay s lead singer, chris martin, has been talking exclusively to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. coldplay back on stage in london this week and today they've announced a 2022 world tour, but one with a difference. two years ago, their lead singer chris martin told me they wouldn't tour again until they could do
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so in a carbon neutral way. we are taking time over the next year or two to work out how can, not only our tour be sustainable, but how can it be actively beneficial? and it turns out that interview was a game changerfor the band. well, last time we spoke, i sort of made that up when we were talking. really? i was trying to think of something cool to say, and then it sort of became a headline and then we thought, well, that's actually what we really feel. within a couple of weeks, the band employed two people dedicated to working out how to tour in a cleaner way. today, coldplay have revealed their 12—point action plan, including working with bmw to develop the first—ever mobile rechargeable concert battery. the whole show is powered from
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renewable energy, which is amazing. then, in terms of offsetting people being there, we are able to plant a tree for every ticket sold. and that's a lot of trees. their last tour was seen by 5.a million people. other ideas include a kinetic floor, allowing the audience to provide power by dancing along. you know when a front man says, "we need you tojump up and down?" when i say it, i literally really need you tojump up and down. when rock stars speak about the environment, there are always cries of hypocrisy, especially when private jets are being used. are you ready for the inevitable backlash? yeah, i don't mind any backlash at all. we are trying our best and we haven't got it perfect. and the people that give us backlash for that kind of thing, forflying, they are right. how do you tally that with yourself then? i'd rather we were trying and doing our best and actively putting it out there like we would really like to know when is the first solar aeroplane available? we'll take it. i don't know, i don't mind criticism at all. it's ok because sometimes criticism
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leads to improvement. so far, coldplay�*s ideas have been well received. it's neverjust down to the artist alone. it's down to the venues and all the other businesses in the industry, but it sends a really, really strong signal, not just that we can change but also that we have to change. and it's clear chris martin believes coldplay concerts are now green enough that he can once again go around the globe singing yellow. we wouldn't be announcing a tour unless we felt like we're far enough along that it's ok in our hearts, but we're definitely not finished. colin paterson, bbc news. this year has seen some of the world's richest men making forays into space tourism. but the duke of cambridge has told the bbc that he thinks there should be more focus on repairing this planet, than finding another to live on. his comments come in
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the run—up to this weekend's inaugural earthshot prize, which prince william is launching to try to find solutions to climate change. he's been speaking to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. prince, presenter, prize—giver. the duke of cambridge created the earthshot and his tv programme to counter negative news about the planet. which is why fix our climate is one of the five goals of the earthshot price. you are losing people every single time you have those headlines. we all get that there is a really big urgent message and i'm not saying we shouldn't talk about the urgency or the big issues, but ultimately if we want to tackle this, we want to get on the front foot, we've got to bring people with this. people have to feel there is hope, there's a chance we can fix this, and that's what the earthshot prize is about, is about providing solutions to some of the world's biggest environmental problems. what do you say to your children about this? i think they are living and growing up in a world where it's much more talked
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about than when we were growing up, so that has benefits and that has negatives as well because we are seeing a rise in climate anxiety. young people now are growing up where their futures are basically threatened the whole time. it's very unnerving. it's very anxiety making. if we are not careful we are robbing from our children's future what we do now and i think that's not fair, so i'm trying to use my little bit of influence, my little bit of profile, to highlight some incredible people doing amazing things and will generally help fix some of these problems. one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. the clue is in the name. the earthshot is inspired by the space race of the 60s, but the future king has this message for the entrepreneur is heading for the heavens now. we entrepreneur is heading for the heavens now.— entrepreneur is heading for the heavens now. ~ ,:, :,
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heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest _ heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest brains _ heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest brains and - heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds l world's greatest brains and minds fixed on repairing this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. i trying to find the next place to go and live. :. . trying to find the next place to go and live. :, , , trying to find the next place to go and live. :,, , ::, trying to find the next place to go and live. , and live. i was “ust coming back home from — and live. iwasjust coming back home from school— and live. i wasjust coming back home from school and - and live. i wasjust coming back home from school and i - and live. i wasjust coming back home from school and i noticed j and live. i wasjust coming back - home from school and i noticed the ironing _ home from school and i noticed the ironing vendor is in my street using charcoab _ ironing vendor is in my street using charcoal. ' :, , , . charcoal. the 15 finalists include solar powered — charcoal. the 15 finalists include solar powered gadgets, - solar powered gadgets, apps, initiatives, prince william plans to take some of his winners to the big climate change conference in glasgow next month to provide inspiration and may be a bit of pressure too. we can't and may be a bit of pressure too. 9 can't have more clever speak, clever words but not enough action. that's why the earthshot prize is so important because we are trying to create action. the prize will stimulate solutions and action that a lot of people haven't necessarily produced yet, so i'm hoping the prize will galvanise a lot of people in positions of responsibility to go further, biggerand in positions of responsibility to go further, bigger and actually start to deliver. , ,, further, bigger and actually start to deliver. , ~' :, further, bigger and actually start
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to deliver. , ,, :, :, , to deliver. the duke of cambridge s-ueakin to deliver. the duke of cambridge speaking exclusively _ to deliver. the duke of cambridge speaking exclusively to _ speaking exclusively to adam fleming. lateral flow covid tests have been found to be much more effective than previously thought. new research from university college london says the tests, which are cheap and provide quick results, are more than 90% effective at detecting infection, and that positive results should be trusted. the queen has officially opened the sixth term of the senedd in wales, on her first visit to the country in five years. our wales correspondent tomos morgan is in cardiff. talk us through what's been seen and heard today?— heard today? well, the queen arrived in cardiff today. _ heard today? well, the queen arrived in cardiff today, she _ heard today? well, the queen arrived in cardiff today, she came _ heard today? well, the queen arrived in cardiff today, she came down - heard today? well, the queen arrived in cardiff today, she came down on i in cardiff today, she came down on the royal train accompanied by the prince of wales, charles, and camilla, duchess of cornwall. when she arrived she came from the train station to the senedd accompanied by a military parade, a procession, and then the 21 gun salute signifying then the 21 gun salute signifying the arrival of the prince of wales
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and camilla to begin. the queen went up and camilla to begin. the queen went up to meet the first minister on the steps of the senedd behind me here, she also met local schoolchildren from the local primary school not far from the senedd here. from the local primary school not farfrom the senedd here. she from the local primary school not far from the senedd here. she went in to the debating chamber in the middle of the senedd and for the first time during the pandemic she was greeted by all 60 members of the senedd, the first time they've met since the pandemic. a few concepts and songs inside before giving a speech, where she congratulated the senedd after the election in may. the first minister also making a speech, saying how now this term was in the shadow of the covert pandemic. the queen has gone back to the royal train and will head back to london after opening officially the senedd for its six term. thomas mort an, the senedd for its six term. thomas morgan. thank _ the senedd for its six term. thomas morgan, thank you. _ what do a jetty museum, a mosque and a bridge to a mediaeval castle have in common? they are three of this year's nominees for the riba
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stirling prize for architecture — which rewards the country's best new building of the last year. others on the shortlist include key—worker accommodation — and one block that faced demolition. our arts correspondent david sillito has more. kingston university's town house — a home for its library, its dance studios, and also a new social hub for students. wow, this is incredible. i walk past, i'm like, i go to uni there — i walk past, i'm like, i go to uni there they— i walk past, i'm like, i go to uni there. they are like, it's where you study _ there. they are like, it's where you study. yeah. — there. they are like, it's where you study. yeah, it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels and natural cooling to create a building that is less energy hungry. this key worker housing in cambridge is also designed to encourage a low carbon house style. you see more bike sheds here than car parking. this year's six stirling buildings are about more than just beauty and clever ideas. care for the environment has
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become a prime concern. take this — windermere, and a museum to house a famous boat collection. the overriding concern, though, is don't spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to the concept of building. we have systems like the lake source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we have selected wherever possible local materials so that travel from source to site is as short as possible. or this bridge in north cornwall, a place connected with the stories of king arthur. the challenge to reconnect the eroded site and not damage the archaeology. and when it comes to ancient history, this building in london uses some ancient methods. lumps of stone are what is keeping these flats and office upright, a sort of high—tech stonehenge.
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sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it is you will still find fossils within it. here you can see... this has come straight out of the ground? here is an ammonite shell. it is actually cheaper, fasterand far greener to put stone buildings up. we found here that we saved 92% of the embodied carbon. had this been a steel framed building and clad in stone. this hasn't been simple. its exterior is not everyone's taste. at one point, the council was seeking to have it demolished. it was only saved after a two—year legal battle by its architect. was there a moment where you thought you wish you had never started this? of course. sorry, you want me to elaborate obviously.
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you are obviously relieved but that two and a half years of stress structures you in a way, so it's difficult. and our final building swaps steel and concrete for wood. inspired by a garden of paradise, cambridge mosque is low carbon spirituality. six very different buildings, but all reflecting a desire on the eve of a global climate summit to tread gently on the planet. david sillito, bbc news. and we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tonight at 7.30pm on the bbc news channel. we'll be looking at the six shortlisted entries, and find out which project is named best new building. time for a look at the weather. he is chris fawkes. across scotland we have thick cloud, quite windy and rain pushing
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southwards at the moment. for

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