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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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�*usa lot of for the rest of us a lot of sunshine. wherever you are, it will feel cooler. this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a logjam at the uk's biggest commercial port. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. it's the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on the repair of this planet, not trying to find
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the next place to go and live. and where's wally? well, sort of. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles — to see how many walruses can be spotted, and where. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. police in norway say a suspect accused of killing five people with a bow and arrow had converted to islam and showed signs of radicalisation. a spokesman said police had been in contact with him over his views. the suspect is a 37—year—old dane, living in kongsberg, the south—eastern norwegian town where the attacks took place on wednesday.
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he is now in custody, and his lawyer says he's cooperating. reports say he shot at anyone he came across. arrows hit several houses. norway's new prime minister has called the murders a "gruesome and brutal act". in the last hour, police in norway have been holding a press conference about the killings. here's what they said. translation: there had been concerns about his radicalisation _ translation: there had been concerns about his radicalisation in _ translation: there had been concerns about his radicalisation in the _ about his radicalisation in the past. we can't at the moment to go into the details of what those concerns were. however, we have and continue to follow up on the information and tips that come in. we can also confirm the suspect converted to islam. journalistjohnjo devlin has been following the story closely and hejoins us now from 0slo. let's go back to the incident itself. what more do we know about the circumstances and how this unfolded? ~ h, the circumstances and how this unfolded? ~ ., ~ ., ., unfolded? well, so far, we know that
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at around quarter— unfolded? well, so far, we know that at around quarter past _ unfolded? well, so far, we know that at around quarter past six _ unfolded? well, so far, we know that at around quarter past six local - at around quarter past six local time, a report came in to police that a man was attacking people with a bow and arrow. half an hour later, he was apprehended. and of course, in its wake, a number of people have been killed and several have been injured. we now know that it was not just a bow and arrow that the perpetrator used. police have confirmed that he did use another weapon, or perhaps several other weapons, but they will not confirm which and how he did make the attack, which started in the local supermarket and spread out to a local area. we know a bit more about the victims as well. there are four women and one man amongst those killed. they are all aged between 50 and 70 years old. police had reconfirmed that they believe he acted alone. it is unclear when police knew and were informed of his presence. he was definitely, though, on their radar. find
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presence. he was definitely, though, on their radar.— on their radar. and that is my next cuestion. on their radar. and that is my next question- i — on their radar. and that is my next question. i mean, _ on their radar. and that is my next question. i mean, people- on their radar. and that is my nextj question. i mean, people naturally are asking if this individual was on the radar of police, what concerns did they have about him, to what extent did they have those concerns and could this have been prevented? well, it is as yet unclear whether or not it could have been prevented. 0f or not it could have been prevented. of course, the chief of police in the southeastern police district where kongsberg is located said the man had converted to islam, that they had received several reports of concerns about his radicalisation and that police had been in contact with him, the 37—year—old man, before. however, none of these reports of his radicalisation came in 2021. so perhaps there is a question of whether or not this should have been followed up on. it is at this point hard to say. qm. is at this point hard to say. ok, kroner is at this point hard to say. ok, kroger macro. _ is at this point hard to say. ok, kroger macro, thank _ is at this point hard to say. ok, kroger macro, thank you for bringing us up to date with the latest on that attack in norway —— johnjo
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devlin. the latest monthly nhs figures for hospital waiting times in england, which look at a&e attendance numbers and waiting times for cancer treatment, ambulance and elective surgery, have been released in the last half an hour. they show that a total of 5.7 million people were waiting to start treatment at the end of august this year, the highest number since records began. the number of patients having to wait more than a year to start treatment was 292,138 in august — which is down slightly on the previous month, but more than double the number waiting a year ago. and nearly 470,000 patients who visited a&e in september waited more than four hours to be treated — its worst performance since 200a. let's get more on this from our health correspondent, jim reed. put these figures into more context, clearly showing a picture of continuing and significant pressure on the nhs. continuing and significant pressure on the nhs-— continuing and significant pressure onthe nhs. , ., ., ., , , on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers,
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but i want — on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers, but i want to _ on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers, but i want to focus _ on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers, but i want to focus on _ on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers, but i want to focus on two - on the nhs. yes, a lot of numbers, but i want to focus on two in - but i want to focus on two in particular that have come out in the last half an hour, these figures just for england, although other parts of the uk are facing similar pressures. if we look at a&e, people going into hospital, accident and emergency, with a kind of short—term vital problem to be seen. so in september, the monthjust released, around 2 million people went into an a&e in england and one in four of those had to wait to be seen for more than four hours, which is the target the fibre cassette. about 470,000 people, the highest level ever since that target was introduced in —— introduced. so they had to wait four hours or longer. of that group you ended up being admitted into hospital because they had something very serious this is something we call trolley waits. 0f
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something we call trolley waits. of that 470,000, 386,000 had to wait again in hospitalfor more than four hours until they were seen. 5000 had to wait more than 12 hours. so again, it is painting and in picture 7 again, it is painting and in picture ? might painting a picture of increased pressure across england. across the uk, on hospital admissions, a&e and people being seen on a ward. the admissions, a&e and people being seen on a ward.— admissions, a&e and people being seen on a ward. the government says it has ut seen on a ward. the government says it has put extra _ seen on a ward. the government says it has put extra money _ seen on a ward. the government says it has put extra money into _ seen on a ward. the government says it has put extra money into tackling i it has put extra money into tackling waiting lists. i wonderfrom it has put extra money into tackling waiting lists. i wonder from your contacts, are they saying that is making any difference yet? and also taking into account the rising number of covid cases, how is that translating into hospital admissions for covid and other winter pressures to fact in as well?— to fact in as well? exactly, doctors are talking — to fact in as well? exactly, doctors are talking about _ to fact in as well? exactly, doctors are talking about a _ to fact in as well? exactly, doctors are talking about a perfect - to fact in as well? exactly, doctors are talking about a perfect storm l are talking about a perfect storm this winter. the government in england has put an extra £5 billion into this winter fund to pay not just for hospital pressures, but things like gp pressures as well. this is kind of yourfront—line family doctors. what doctors are saying is they are facing these problems because you have got
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increased covid cases. yesterday, we had another 42,000 covid cases in the uk. 0n had another 42,000 covid cases in the uk. on top of that, you have this backlog of waiting times and treatment caused by lockdown over the last year so you are now seeing people who may be delayed treatment because of the pandemic coming through and needing hospital treatment instead, so a lot of pressure facing hospitals, probably this winter. including potentially raising flu cases as well. so across the board, doctors say it could be a very tough time for the health service this winter. find very tough time for the health service this winter. and briefly, the other big — service this winter. and briefly, the other big health _ service this winter. and briefly, the other big health story - service this winter. and briefly, the other big health story we i service this winter. and briefly, i the other big health story we have been talking about today is the role of gps, access to gps for patients. the government saying it wants them to do more face—to—face appointments. presumably, this is all part of the cycle of pressure within the nhs because we have been hearing that some patients have been turning up at a&e departments for example if they can't get a face—to—face appointment with their gp. it
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face-to-face appointment with their gp. , ., , , . face-to-face appointment with their gp. , ,. ., gp. it is a complex picture and ressure gp. it is a complex picture and pressure works _ gp. it is a complex picture and pressure works both _ gp. it is a complex picture and pressure works both ways. - gp. it is a complex picture and pressure works both ways. we j gp. it is a complex picture and - pressure works both ways. we noticed more people having to go to their gp because the waiting times in a&e are quite high and doctors in a&e say they see more patients coming through that would ordinarily see their gp and finding that hard. it is the pressure both sides. the government in england today announcing another £250 million support package for gps, family doctors on the frontline, but gps say the problems here or more longer term and what they need is more doctors to be employed over the next five, ten years. doctors to be employed over the next five. ten veere— five, ten years. thank you very much for that. five, ten years. thank you very much for that- jim — five, ten years. thank you very much for that. jim reed. _ the government has said it will look at the latest proposals from the eu to change the northern ireland protocol "seriously and constructively". the protocol keeps northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods, but has led to some supply problems with the rest of the uk. the european union's ambassador to the uk has described eu proposals to resolve the row about post—brexit trade
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as �*unprecedented'. i'm joined by dawn mclaughlin, president of the londonderry chamber of commerce. an overview of what we have heard from the uk government and the eu to sort out this issue of trade. are you hopeful and accommodation can now be reached after so much pretty angry words really?— angry words really? well, thank you for invitin: angry words really? well, thank you for inviting me _ angry words really? well, thank you for inviting me this _ angry words really? well, thank you for inviting me this morning. - angry words really? well, thank you for inviting me this morning. i- for inviting me this morning. i suppose i am always an optimist and i think we have to be optimistic. we consider this to be a positive first step in the process. we haven't been privy to the full detail yet at this stage. so we really do have two reservejudgment on it. but really, our members are from a wide variety of sectors impacted in different ways by the protocol. and those that i have been speaking to believe that anything that costs the costs, reduces their administrative burden and stops the delays will be good
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for their business —— that cuts their costs. the one thing they do have in common is uncertainty must be replaced by clear rules around trade. i be replaced by clear rules around trade. , , ., ., , ., trade. i guess one at they wanted it a lona trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time — trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time ago _ trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time ago and _ trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time ago and they _ trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time ago and they are - trade. i guess one at they wanted it a long time ago and they are still. a long time ago and they are still looking for it. they want an agreement that works and that will last. , ., agreement that works and that will last. ,, last. yes, our businesses need clari , last. yes, our businesses need clarity. they — last. yes, our businesses need clarity, they need _ last. yes, our businesses need clarity, they need certainty, i last. yes, our businesses need l clarity, they need certainty, and most of all, they need political stability. this will offer the best trading conditions for any businesses going forward. you have got to understand that not only do they have the worry of brexit before it was signed, but they have come through such horrible times in terms of the pandemic and now they are back into that situation where the spiralling costs, they are having a really hard time at the minute. so what we need is for everybody to sit down, put every effort into making this work and create a business environment that helps our members move on. ion environment that helps our members move on. ., ,, , ., move on. can you give us an illustration _ move on. can you give us an illustration just _ move on. can you give us an illustration just for— move on. can you give us an
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illustration just for our - move on. can you give us an l illustration just for our viewers move on. can you give us an - illustration just for our viewers to explain what it means to have these checks in place at the moment, and thenif checks in place at the moment, and then if they were removed, what sort of difference that would make to the businesses you work with in derry and surrounding areas?— and surrounding areas? well, the thins and surrounding areas? well, the things that _ and surrounding areas? well, the things that we — and surrounding areas? well, the things that we are _ and surrounding areas? well, the things that we are hearing - and surrounding areas? well, the things that we are hearing is - and surrounding areas? well, the things that we are hearing is the l things that we are hearing is the spiralling costs, those costs obviously, our members can't observe —— absorb those totally. so the issue there is the consumer may end “p issue there is the consumer may end up finding price increases along the way. up finding price increases along the wa _ , ., up finding price increases along the wa . , ., , , , up finding price increases along the wa. , ., , ,,., way. sorry to interrupt, this is to do with extra _ way. sorry to interrupt, this is to do with extra bureaucracy, - way. sorry to interrupt, this is to - do with extra bureaucracy, paperwork about the businesses have to carry out? , , �* about the businesses have to carry out? , , ~ ., , out? yes, it is. and it all is havin: out? yes, it is. and it all is having an _ out? yes, it is. and it all is having an inflationary - out? yes, it is. and it all is. having an inflationary effect. out? yes, it is. and it all is - having an inflationary effect. the cost of rates is going up phenomenally. but the administrative burden as well is taking a toll on them. and then because of the checks, there is delays in getting goods here. so again, our businesses want to do business, they are trying
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to do business, but they have to tell the consumer that they don't have the products in some cases. no, we do have members that in other sectors are not impacted at all. so it is across the board and it is different for each one of them. but we are all suffering from those additional costs. find we are all suffering from those additional costs.— we are all suffering from those additional costs. and some of the business relationships _ additional costs. and some of the business relationships that - additional costs. and some of the business relationships that have l business relationships that have been long—standing relationships between northern ireland businesses and businesses in great britain, have some of those now ended and perhaps businesses in northern ireland are looking for new trading relationships with businesses in the republic of ireland? ijust wonder how much that is a factor where you are? ~ ., ., how much that is a factor where you are? .,., ,, are? well, we do have businesses that are still _ are? well, we do have businesses that are still trading _ are? well, we do have businesses that are still trading with - are? well, we do have businesses that are still trading with gb. - are? well, we do have businesses that are still trading with gb. we l that are still trading with gb. we do have businesses that may have supply dried up or slowed because gb haven't really got their processes into place as quickly as maybe they could have or should have. and we do have other businesses that are
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looking to other areas, such as the republic of ireland, for their supply chain. republic of ireland, for their sunply chain-— republic of ireland, for their supply chain. republic of ireland, for their su--l chain. ~ ., ,, , supply chain. well, thank you very much for explaining _ supply chain. well, thank you very much for explaining the _ supply chain. well, thank you very much for explaining the situation i much for explaining the situation there. dawn mclaughlin, president of there. dawn mclaughlin, president of the londonderry chamber of commerce. and the time is 10:14am. the headlines on bbc news... police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas, despite a logjam at the uk's biggest commercial port. president biden has announced longer hours at america's largest port — los angeles — to try to help ease supply chain blockages in the run—up to the black friday and christmas shopping seasons.
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suppliers around the world are struggling to cope with a rise in consumer demand, as countries emerge from pandemic lockdowns. the shortages are causing dramatic price rises in everything from food to energy, to consumer goods. from washington, here's our economics editor, faisal islam. one of the world's biggest parking lots. dozens of cargo ships just waiting in the pacific, full of goods from asia, unable to dock at full terminals in the ports of california, with containers piled high. the same now happening on the atlantic coast off georgia too, and in other ports around the world. the plumbing of the world economy not functioning properly. at the white house, biden summoned us business bosses to work 24/7 to clear the backlogs. this is across—the—board commitment to go into 24/7. this is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods through our supply chain.
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the actions of the president show that this is a supply chain crisis that affects many countries across the world. it arises out of the fact that after the pandemic, demand rebounded much faster than expected, and much faster than the ability of the world economy to supply the goods required. that's led to shortages, it's led to price rises, and that's not going to be solved before christmas. in fields and airfields around the usa, there are tens of thousands of nearly—finished cars and trucks, but they can't be sold because they lack the crucial microchips, the orders for which were cancelled at the start of the pandemic. the companies were too pessimistic about the rebound in demand. that's led to a change of view from the bank chief who, earlier this year, predicted an unprecedented british boom. 0h, we did predict a booming recovery in the economy. i think what we missed was, it would be so strong that it would create the supply chain problems. whether it's gasoline,
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whether its chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, finance ministers attending international meetings are spilling out onto the streets and parks of washington, dc. one solution to all of this — producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france and _ all european countries to key technologies, to chips, to. semiconductors, to all the products | on which there are bottlenecks and | shortages today. and that could lead to higher prices permanently. alongside other factors — from us—china tensions, post—brexit visa restrictions, or fears over uk—eu trade. it's a global economic challenge, and it's not going away. faisal islam, bbc news, in washington, dc. let's speak to our business correspondent tadhg enright, who's with me now. how would you describe the situation around the world? in the uk, the government has spoken about the supply chain issues and said that is a global problem, to what extent is that the case? fin a global problem, to what extent is
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that the case?— that the case? on shipping, many issues have _ that the case? on shipping, many issues have been _ that the case? on shipping, many issues have been emanating - that the case? on shipping, many issues have been emanating from j issues have been emanating from china, which is the factory of the world. ports have been forced to close entirely because of staff testing positive for covid—19 and that has caused a ripple effect across the world. the backlogs have been growing for some time now, but as we all know, we are approaching the key christmas shopping season and therefore a big season for shipping too. in recent days, we have heard about ships being diverted away from uk ports because they are too busy towards ports on they are too busy towards ports on the continent and that is causing build—ups and some of the big european ports. rotterdam, antwerp reported they are now working to full capacity and they are beginning to have problems. the pictures you saw in that report of the queue of ships waiting to get into some of the american ports on the west coast, we heard from president biden the port of los angeles is now going to be running 24 hours a day. but other elements of the supply chain are also trying to ramp up their capacity to make—up for these
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issues. delivery firms in the us such as ups, fedex also agreeing to work longer hours to try to clear the backlog, and even the biggest retailers over there. walmart are chartering their own ships to get an advantage as they try to keep stuff on their shelves coming up to christmas. on their shelves coming up to christmas-— on their shelves coming up to christmas. ., , , , , , christmas. that is the shipping side of this, christmas. that is the shipping side of this. there _ christmas. that is the shipping side of this, there is _ christmas. that is the shipping side of this, there is also _ christmas. that is the shipping side of this, there is also the _ christmas. that is the shipping side of this, there is also the hdv - christmas. that is the shipping side of this, there is also the hdv side, | of this, there is also the hdv side, that part of the transport chain, if you like. is anyone daring to take a guess at how long it will take to sort all of this out?— guess at how long it will take to sort all of this out? some are and it isn't good _ sort all of this out? some are and it isn't good news. _ sort all of this out? some are and it isn't good news. it _ sort all of this out? some are and it isn't good news. it won't - sort all of this out? some are and it isn't good news. it won't be - it isn't good news. it won't be cured in time for christmas. there are expectations from industry analysts it could continue until the middle or late next year. one of the most alarming analyses i have read suggests it could continue until 2023. and one of the issues here is this shortage of goods is itself contributing to inflation. we have been talking so much in recent weeks about the rising cost of energy and staff wages contributing to price
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rises because it is pushing up costs for businesses. but economics 101 is when you cut supply of something, people are willing to pay more for it so it is the shortage itself which could be contributing to that. thank you very much for that, tadhg enright, our business correspondent. gp surgeries in england are to receive an extra £250 million this winter to help them see more patients in person. the emergency funding is part of the extra £5 billion covid fund, and will be used to prioritise the hiring of extra staff, and providing more on—the—day face—to—face appointments. gp surgeries in england are to receive an extra £250 million it comes amidst mounting criticism following a sharp drop in the number of people being able to see their gp at the surgery. fewer than 60% of people were able to see their doctor in person in august, the first month after restrictions were eased. this compares with than 80% before the pandemic. the doctors' union the bma has criticised the plans saying it shows a government out of touch with the scale of the crisis on the ground, and warned patients will continue to struggle to book
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appointments. let's speak to dr krishna kasaraneni in sheffield. he's the gp committee executive workforce lead at the british medical association. thank you so much for your time today. do you feel you are stuck between your patients and the government and there is a lot of rhetoric flying around? ida. government and there is a lot of rhetoric flying around? no, where we are at the moment _ rhetoric flying around? no, where we are at the moment is _ rhetoric flying around? no, where we are at the moment is dismayed - rhetoric flying around? no, where we are at the moment is dismayed at - rhetoric flying around? no, where we| are at the moment is dismayed at the government announcement today about the support package that has been announced for general practice. most of our patients and gps had very positive relationships but, yes, there has absolutely been a problem with decreasing numbers of gps and many finding it frustrating as gp services. and we call on the government to remove the bureaucracy so we have more time with our patients, but unfortunately, this package delivers exactly the opposite. it package delivers exactly the o- osite. ., , package delivers exactly the ouosite. ., , , opposite. it does exactly the o- osite opposite. it does exactly the opposite can _ opposite. it does exactly the opposite can explain - opposite. it does exactly the opposite can explain what i opposite. it does exactly the l opposite can explain what you opposite. it does exactly the - opposite can explain what you mean by that. 50 opposite can explain what you mean b that. ., ., , by that. so one of the things we wanted the _ by that. so one of the things we wanted the government - by that. so one of the things we wanted the government to - by that. so one of the things we wanted the government to do . by that. so one of the things we wanted the government to do is by that. so one of the things we i wanted the government to do is to remove the contractual metrics that would free up our time from kick
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boxing exercises so we can have more patient time. whereas what this package does is introduce even more metrics, more box ticking exercises that pushes people away from this even further. even a £250 million announcement the secretary of state said will improve access, he needs to recognise there are no extra gps so we have lost 1800 over the last five years, simply throwing money at it without looking at the fundamental problems with access issues, and the bureaucracy elements of it, will not magically conjure up gps that don't exist. share of it, will not magically con'ure up gps that don't existfi of it, will not magically con'ure up gps that don't exist. are you saying when the health _ gps that don't exist. are you saying when the health secretary - gps that don't exist. are you saying when the health secretary talks - when the health secretary talks about this money being used to improve more staff, do you think that demonstrates a lack of understanding on the part of the government of the reality of the situation and the availability of staff? , , , ., ., 4' situation and the availability of staff? , , , ., , staff? gps will be looking at this in dismay at _ staff? gps will be looking at this in dismay at how— staff? gps will be looking at this in dismay at how this _ staff? gps will be looking at this. in dismay at how this government thinks this will help improve access to general practice services. the first thing that has to happen is to free up ourtime
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first thing that has to happen is to free up our time from bureaucratic elements, kick boxing exercises and the contractual aspects which take precious time away from general practice. —— kick boxing. in this package, the secretary of state has announced it will increase face—to—face appointments. at the same time, the main contractual requirement asks gps to increase the number of online appointment so how can that happen, increasing online while seeing more patients face—to—face. we want to provide patients with what they need and we need the government to remove these contractual barriers, protect general practice so we can spend more time with our patients, whether it is online, face—to—face, telephone, because the reality is patients need their care and we want to provide all of that and this package won't address any of those problems. package won't address any of those roblems. ~ ., , ., ., ., package won't address any of those roblems. ~ ., , ., ., problems. what proportion of your atients problems. what proportion of your patients are _ problems. what proportion of your patients are using _ problems. what proportion of your patients are using face-to-face - problems. what proportion of your patients are using face-to-face at | patients are using face—to—face at the moment versus those online or phone appointments and what kind of feedback have you been getting from
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patients about that system, do more of those want the face—to—face appointments back again? it of those want the face-to-face appointments back again? it really does depend _ appointments back again? it really does depend on — appointments back again? it really does depend on the _ appointments back again? it really does depend on the individual - does depend on the individual patient and the clinical representation and we can't be looking at it as physical problems versus other issues that dictate what this is. ifind patients who are extremely low in their mood and depressed over the phone and i need to see them face—to—face. from a clinical perspective, that may not add a great deal, but from a relationship perspective, being able to hold their hand and talk them through the difficulties they are facing, they will need face—to—face appointments and we will do that. the problem here isn't face—to—face versus online and telephone, we just don't have enough gps to provide whichever model of care your patients require because the gp numbers continue to drop. in the last five years, each gp now has 5% more patients to be dealing with, so probably more than 2000 patients per gb. what we are therefore asking to remove us from these barriers and kick boxing exercises. ——
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box—ticking exercises. find kick boxing exercises. -- box-ticking exercises. and this doesnt box-ticking exercises. and this doesn't help — box-ticking exercises. and this doesn't help with _ box-ticking exercises. and this doesn't help with that. - box-ticking exercises. and this doesn't help with that. so - box-ticking exercises. and this doesn't help with that. so it. doesn't help with that. so it doesn't help with that. so it doesn't reflect the growth in population and the number of patients at gp has to deal with? sajid javid, the health secretary, said this morning, we won't be publishing league tables, but there will be at surgery specific data. so others can compare and contrast. do you think that will lead inevitably to league tables and what do you make of that idea?— to league tables and what do you make of that idea? providing data when ou make of that idea? providing data when you haven't _ make of that idea? providing data when you haven't fixed _ make of that idea? providing data when you haven't fixed the - when you haven't fixed the underlying problem is completely meaningless. when you look at what the secretary of state says they will look at the bottom 20% of gp practices, when you look at averages, there will always be somebody in the bottom 20%, completely and utterly meaningless. what we need is more gps, a lot more. the promise of extra 5000 gps in 20 7 more. the promise of extra 5000 gps in 20 ? in more. the promise of extra 5000 gps in 20 7 in 2015 more. the promise of extra 5000 gps in 20 ? in 2015 has failed, the promise of more now, there is nothing in the support package that shows how that will be achieved. so what we are failing here with this
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package to address the fundamental issues with general practice, to remove the contractual barriers that we need so that we can spend more time with patients and i am afraid this package does not do that at all. ., , ., ., ., ., all. doctor krishna kasaraneni, from the british medical— all. doctor krishna kasaraneni, from the british medical association, - the british medical association, thank you very much for your time today. let me read out your comments on this proposal from the government saying it wants gp surgeries to see more patients face—to—face, the idea of publishing surgery specific data. jackie farmer has been in touch to say, my husband had to wait two weeks for a telephone appointment with a doctor despite having a consistent car for six weeks and when you try to call the surgery, there is a 30 minute 40 minute wait time in a queue. ? consistent cough. margot says, i am happy to have a telephone appointment most of the time, this is sufficient, and when it was determined to face—to—face appointment was needed, i had one. not everyone needs a face—to—face appointment, this to me is more efficient use of time. what the government are proposing will not
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solve it. need more staff. sasha says, we need a mix of both, as many things can't be diagnosed over the phone and passing people over to amd isn't right. so thank you for those comments coming in, so many of them -- a&e. i will comments coming in, so many of them —— a&e. i will try to read out more and you can get in touch with me on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions. researchers say that positive lateral flow coronavirus tests should be trusted, because they're more accurate than previously thought. scientists at university college london found the tests, which are cheap and quick, were more than 90% effective at detecting people infected with covid—19. we've been hearing a lot about the space missions that have taken william shatner, jeff bezos and others into space. now britain's prince william has told the bbc that people should be focusing more on repairing this planet, not trying to find the next one to live on. he was speaking to our chief political correspondent
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adam fleming, in an exclusive tv interview in the run—up to this weekend's inaugural earthshot prize — launched by prince william to find solutions for climate change. prince, presenter, prize—giver. the duke of cambridge created the earthshot and his tv programme to counter negative news about the planet. which is why fix 0ur climate is one of the five goals of the earthshot prize. you're losing people every single time you have those headlines. we all get that there's a really big, urgent message, and i'm not saying we shouldn't talk about the urgency or the big issues but, ultimately, if we want to tackle this, if we want to get on the front foot, we've got to bring people with us. and people have got to feel like there's hope, there's a chance we can fix this. and that's what the earthshot prize is about, it's providing the solutions to some of the world's biggest environmental problems.
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what do you say to your children about this? i think they're living and growing up in a world where it's much more talked about than when we were growing up, so that has benefits and that has negatives as well. because we are seeing a rise in climate anxiety. young people now are growing up where their futures are basically being threatened the whole time. it's very unnerving and it's very anxiety—making. and i suppose, going in the other direction, your dad has been worried about this stuff for a very long time. and actually, people used to sort of take the mickey out of him a little bit for it. it's been a hard road for him. my grandfather started off helping out wwf a long time ago with its nature work and biodiversity, and i think that my father's progressed that on and talked about climate change a lot more — very early on, before anyone else thought it was a topic. so, yes, he's had a really rough ride on that, and i think he's been proven to be well ahead of the curve, well beyond his time, in warning about some of these dangers. but it shouldn't be that there's a third generation now coming along, having to ramp it up even more. and for me, it would be
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an absolute disaster if george was sat here talking to you or your successor in another 30 years' time, or whatever, still saying the same thing. because by then, we'll be too late. if we're not careful, we're robbing from our children's future, what we do now, and i think that's not fair. so i'm trying to use my little bit of influence, my little bit of profile, to highlight some incredible people doing amazing things, and will generally help fix some of these problems. it's one small step for man. 0ne giant leap for mankind. the clue's in the name. the earthshot is inspired by the space race of the �*60s. but the future king has this message for the entrepreneurs heading for the heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. i wasjust coming back home from school and i noticed the ironing vendors
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in my street using charcoal. the 15 finalists for the prize include solar—powered gadgets, apps, organisations and initiatives. prince william plans to take some of his winners to the big climate change conference in glasgow next month, to provide inspiration — and maybe a bit of pressure, too. we can't have more clever speak and clever words, but not enough action. and that's why the earthshot prize is so important, because we're trying to create action. the prize itself will stimulate solutions and action. that a lot of people haven't necessarily produced yet. and so, i'm hoping the prize will galvanise a lot of people in positions of responsibility to, you know, go further, bigger, and actually start to deliver. we will be going live to bangladesh injust a few we will be going live to bangladesh in just a few minutes to talk to one of the finalists for the earthshot prize. i want to show you some
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pictures that are coming into us from beirut, and gunfire has killed at least one person in beirut as supporters and allies have gathered to protest against the judge investigating the huge port explosion in beirut. at least two explosions were heard in the area as the lebanese army deployed to the scene. you can see smoke rising there in the pictures that have just come into us in the last few minutes. so we are going to keep an eye on the situation there. protests ljy supporters of his brother.
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the headlines on bbc news... police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. well, as the problems with the global supply chain intensify, getting goods into britain is not as simple as it used to be — thanks in part to blocked ports and a shortage of lorry drivers. by the end of this week, there could be an extra challenge — a blockade by french fishermen, who are angry about not being given licences to fish in british waters. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson has been talking to some of them.
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for laurent, british waters are as familiar as the rusting docks back home in boulogne—sur—mer. his family has fished there for generations. now, without a licence to enter british waters, he is fishing the young catch around the french coast. but fishermen like him are angry, he says, and if there is no progress by friday they plan to hit back. translation: we will create as much disru tion translation: we will create as much disruption as — translation: we will create as much disruption as we _ translation: we will create as much disruption as we can _ translation: we will create as much disruption as we can by _ translation: we will create as much disruption as we can by blocking - disruption as we can by blocking primary goods, the things britain needs the most. we saw the gas shortage we will try to create a shortage we will try to create a shortage of something else. we are ready to block everything, calais, dunkirk, the channel tunnel, we need this fishing license and will do anything to get it.— anything to get it. france is drawin: anything to get it. france is drawing the _ anything to get it. france is drawing the support - anything to get it. france is drawing the support of - anything to get it. france is| drawing the support of other anything to get it. france is - drawing the support of other eu nations, but has also promised a response of its own, including a possible reduction of electricity
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supplies to jersey. possible reduction of electricity supplies tojersey. fishermen themselves are targeting christmas deliveries. we themselves are targeting christmas deliveries. ~ . �* themselves are targeting christmas deliveries. ~ ., �* , deliveries. we haven't even blocked et and deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there _ deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there is _ deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there is already _ deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there is already lots - deliveries. we haven't even blocked yet and there is already lots of - yet and there is already lots of food _ yet and there is already lots of food and — yet and there is already lots of food and petrol, lack of staff. we are going — food and petrol, lack of staff. we are going to make things worse? maybe _ are going to make things worse? maybe as— are going to make things worse? maybe. as i said, there is a lot of frustration — maybe. as i said, there is a lot of frustration in the community here. so if— frustration in the community here. so if enough. in frustration in the community here. so if enough-— so if enough. in parliament last week, so if enough. in parliament last week. the _ so if enough. in parliament last week, the french _ so if enough. in parliament last week, the french prime - so if enough. in parliament last| week, the french prime minister called the row a matter of principle that went beyond fishing. he said it was about getting britain to keep its word. that is a loaded comment here at the moment. the eu is in a stand—off with britain about a post brexit deal for northern ireland, and france is complaining that when it comes to illegal migration, the uk is not paying what it owes. in calais last weekend, france's interior minister said that france had not received a penny of the £54
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million promised by the uk injuly. translation: we million promised by the uk in july. translation:— translation: we would like the british government _ translation: we would like the british government to _ translation: we would like the british government to respect - translation: we would like the british government to respect its| british government to respect its promise. the quicker it gives us the means to carry out the action it once, the more efficient we can be. of course we can do better if the of course we can do better if the british help us instead of squabbling with us. the british help us instead of squabbling with us. the uk has threatened _ squabbling with us. the uk has threatened to _ squabbling with us. the uk has threatened to withhold - squabbling with us. the uk has threatened to withhold funding | squabbling with us. the uk has i threatened to withhold funding if france doesn't stop more migrant boats from crushing the channel. —— crossing the channel. whether driven by principles, pragmatism or political power. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. let's get more on the first—ever earthshot award — which recognises ingenuity in solving environmental problems. the first of the prizes is to be handed out this weekend here in the uk. the awards have been created by prince william,
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as a way to reward the best solutions to help repair the planet. i'm joined now by salma islam — she works for solbazaar, the world s first peer—to—peer energy exchange network and one of the finalists for the prize. congratulations on being one of the finalists. tell us a little more about what solbazaar does. thank you for havin: about what solbazaar does. thank you for having me- — about what solbazaar does. thank you for having me- i— about what solbazaar does. thank you for having me. i am _ about what solbazaar does. thank you for having me. i am honoured - about what solbazaar does. thank you for having me. i am honoured and - for having me. i am honoured and thrilled to be one of the finalists of the earthshot prize. basically, the solbazaar is a platform that has both ict infrastructure, which is basically a wi—fi tower, and it helps households and micro businesses that can buy and sell electricity through our peer to peer network. the households are basically interconnected by cables and we have a little device which is
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called a sol box. it allows people to buy and sell electricity. the reason we have this platform is so that if you have additional electricity you can sell it, and thenif electricity you can sell it, and then if you need electricity you can buy it as well. and for households that previously had absolutely no access to electricity, so were reliant on fossil fuels like diesel or fire wood or kerosene, they are now able to access clean, affordable, reliable electricity. so how many of the businesses, the homes who are involved with solbazaar, how many of them have their own solar panels? i presume thatis their own solar panels? i presume that is how they are generating their own electricity to either use or sell the excess?— or sell the excess? yes, we are usin: or sell the excess? yes, we are using existing _ or sell the excess? yes, we are using existing infrastructure. i or sell the excess? yes, we are | using existing infrastructure. so these are households that basically
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got solar systems through a government programme several years ago. so it's about, i would say, 50 - 60% of ago. so it's about, i would say, 50 — 60% of these households that have solar systems, and then the other 40-50% don't. solar systems, and then the other 40—50% don't. brute solar systems, and then the other 40-5096 don't-— 40-50% don't. we have been discussing — 40-50% don't. we have been discussing a _ 40-50% don't. we have been discussing a lot _ 40-50% don't. we have been discussing a lot on _ 40-50% don't. we have been discussing a lot on bbc - 40-50% don't. we have been discussing a lot on bbc news| 40-50% don't. we have been i discussing a lot on bbc news in recent weeks the subject of energy, where supplies come from, whether gas from russia, norway, elsewhere. ijust gas from russia, norway, elsewhere. i just wonder how a programme gas from russia, norway, elsewhere. ijust wonder how a programme like the one you have devised works in terms of ensuring reliable supplies of energy at a more local level. so when of energy at a more local level. sr when you of energy at a more local level. 5r when you say at a more local level... �* ., . ., ., level. .. i'm not clear what geographical— level... i'm not clear what geographical area - level... i'm not clear what geographical area you - level... i'm not clear what | geographical area you work level... i'm not clear what - geographical area you work across. perhaps you can explain that for us. that i can explain. in areas that are remote, off grid, so they are
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not connected to the national grid. through this community network that all the households are equally able to access electricity. 0therwise to access electricity. otherwise they wouldn't have that access. say, for someone with a solar home system, they are still limited to only electricity that your system is producing. but when you are connected within a network, if you need more electricity than what your system can produce, you can still buy it through that network. 50 buy it through that network. so obviously your focus is on renewable energy, clean energy. what would the prize money mean to the company? what would you do with it? i mean, basically we want to continue expanding our work here in bangladesh, and that goes beyond our peer to peer that form. because here we are incubating other services and
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solutions. we have 1.75 million electric three wheeled vehicles in bangladesh, and this is where we would continue expanding our services and are also looking to integrate our solar resources, so integrating the solbazaar with the national grid. there is a lot of exciting things happening here in bangladesh. and also to expand beyond our borders in the next two to three years. the prize money for an organisation like this would really go a long way to help us continue to expand the work that we are doing, expand beyond bangladesh, as well as continue to inspire other organisations to come up with new and innovative solutions, to really make that push for renewables, the
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uptake of renewables.— uptake of renewables. really interesting — uptake of renewables. really interesting to _ uptake of renewables. really interesting to talk _ uptake of renewables. really interesting to talk to - uptake of renewables. really interesting to talk to you. - uptake of renewables. really i interesting to talk to you. thank you so much for your time. we will watch with interest this weekend to find out which of the finalists wins. good luck to you. one of the uk's biggest film industry events, the london film festival continues — at a time when many cinemas have been struggling to attract audiences, since the lifting of covid restrictions — last year's event was largely held online because of the pandemic. director eva husson has filmed screenwriter alice birch's adaptation of graham swift's novel about a secret love affair that takes place after world war i and how this affair is remembered later in life. herfilm, mothering sunday, is part of the festival and shejoins me now. great to have you with us. perhaps you could begin by telling our reviewers a little bit more about this story and how you became
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involved with that?— this story and how you became involved with that? well, i was presenting _ involved with that? well, i was presenting a — involved with that? well, i was presenting a film _ involved with that? well, i was presenting a film called - involved with that? well, i was presenting a film called girls i involved with that? well, i wasj presenting a film called girls of the sun, — presenting a film called girls of the sun, and my producer, just happen— the sun, and my producer, just happen to _ the sun, and my producer, just happen to be at the same time at the toronto _ happen to be at the same time at the toronto film — happen to be at the same time at the toronto film festival as she was giving _ toronto film festival as she was giving a — toronto film festival as she was giving a masterclass and being a mentor— giving a masterclass and being a mentor to — giving a masterclass and being a mentor to some students. i connected with her. _ mentor to some students. i connected with her. and — mentor to some students. i connected with her, and when she sent me that script— with her, and when she sent me that script and _ with her, and when she sent me that script and the novel i felt deeply, deeply— script and the novel i felt deeply, deeply moved by them. i fell itjust opened _ deeply moved by them. i fell itjust opened a _ deeply moved by them. i fell itjust opened a frequency in me. it felt that this — opened a frequency in me. it felt that this story of a young maid who freed _ that this story of a young maid who freed herself from a lot of societal constraints to become a hugely successful writer in the 19405 and
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1990s _ 5ucce55ful writer in the 19405 and 1990s by— 5ucce55ful writer in the 19405 and 19905 by telling her own stories, owning _ 19905 by telling her own stories, owning up — 19905 by telling her own stories, owning up to her own stories, wa5 19905 by telling her own stories, owning up to her own stories, was an incredible _ owning up to her own stories, was an incredible 5tory owning up to her own stories, was an incredible story to tell. it was an opportunity as a film—maker to really— opportunity as a film—maker to really dive _ opportunity as a film—maker to really dive into what it means to be a female _ really dive into what it means to be a female creator, a creator per 5e. to talk— a female creator, a creator per 5e. to talk about — a female creator, a creator per 5e. to talk about this great tragedy and wonder— to talk about this great tragedy and wonder how you survive l055, 5urvive chaos. _ wonder how you survive l055, 5urvive chaos, how _ wonder how you survive l055, 5urvive chaos, how you make sense of it. how do you _ chaos, how you make sense of it. how do you keep _ chaos, how you make sense of it. how do you keep on retaining the beauty and the _ do you keep on retaining the beauty and the joy— do you keep on retaining the beauty and the joy and never get jaded about— and the joy and never get jaded about all— and the joy and never get jaded about all these things? i think that's, — about all these things? i think that's, in— about all these things? i think that's, in a nutshell, watch the movie — that's, in a nutshell, watch the movie is — that's, in a nutshell, watch the movie is about. we that's, in a nutshell, watch the movie is about.— that's, in a nutshell, watch the movie is about. ~ ., , ., ., movie is about. we are showing our viewers some _ movie is about. we are showing our viewers some of— movie is about. we are showing our viewers some of the _ movie is about. we are showing our viewers some of the pictures - movie is about. we are showing our viewers some of the pictures from | viewers some of the pictures from the film now. everyone will recognise 0livia colman, colin firth, josh 0'connor, recognise 0livia colman, colin firth, josh o'connor, who played prince charles in the crown. there's
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quite a few. you could give us a long list, i imagine. as we mentioned, it is set quite a couple of decades ago, but it has more a feel and of today. why did you choose to film it in that way? i have a fascination with history and the representation of past times. i the repre5entation of past times. i think— the representation of past times. i think people never feel when they are contemporaries to their era that they are _ are contemporaries to their era that they are from the past. i think there — they are from the past. i think there is— they are from the past. i think there is a _ they are from the past. i think there is a modernity in every era. and that — there is a modernity in every era. and that is — there is a modernity in every era. and that is what i was trying to convey — and that is what i was trying to convey. when i was looking at the pictures. — convey. when i was looking at the pictures, colour picture 5tarted convey. when i was looking at the pictures, colour picture started in picture5, colour picture started in 1907 _ picture5, colour picture started in 1907 and — picture5, colour picture started in 1907 and i— picture5, colour picture started in 1907 and i found a lot of candid pictures— 1907 and i found a lot of candid pictures of— 1907 and i found a lot of candid pictures of people that were very far away— pictures of people that were very far away from the rigid representations we had of them, and i 'u5t representations we had of them, and iju5t wanted to explore that. they
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had a _ iju5t wanted to explore that. they had a way— iju5t wanted to explore that. they had a way to see the world, a relationship to 5en5uality that was quite _ relationship to 5en5uality that was quite different, very free in a way, and that— quite different, very free in a way, and that we — quite different, very free in a way, and that we could relate to that was very modern. i felt i could help put that on— very modern. i felt i could help put that on screen. find very modern. i felt i could help put that on screen.— that on screen. and i understand that on screen. and i understand that ou that on screen. and i understand that you thought _ that on screen. and i understand that you thought a _ that on screen. and i understand that you thought a lot _ that on screen. and i understand that you thought a lot about - that you thought a lot about classical paintings and how those were composed when you were thinking about this movie. tell us a bit more about this movie. tell us a bit more about that. to about this movie. tell us a bit more about that-— about that. to start with, the format, which _ about that. to start with, the format, which is _ about that. to start with, the format, which is 166, - about that. to start with, the format, which is 166, which l about that. to start with, the | format, which is 166, which is about that. to start with, the l format, which is 166, which is a format, which i5166, which is a very— format, which i5166, which is a very square _ format, which i5166, which is a very 5quare format. it is a format that really— very square format. it is a format that really reminds you of classical paintings — that really reminds you of classical paintings i— that really reminds you of classical paintings. i thought that was very helpful— paintings. i thought that was very helpful to — paintings. i thought that was very helpful to help us get a window into a world _ helpful to help us get a window into a world that is not our world anymore _ a world that is not our world anymore. we have very different formats — anymore. we have very different formats to — anymore. we have very different formats to look at things. and yet, when _ formats to look at things. and yet, when they— formats to look at things. and yet, when they grew up, there are references, their visual references were _ references, their visual references were classical paintings. when you look at _ were classical paintings. when you look at the — were classical paintings. when you look at the photography at the beginning of the 20th century, it is
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very heavily influenced by those conversations. my cinematographer and i conversations. my cinematographer and i we _ conversations. my cinematographer and i we really worked on that to -et and i we really worked on that to get a _ and i we really worked on that to get a very— and i we really worked on that to get a very natural light, which is very— get a very natural light, which is very contemporary, and yet very pictorial— very contemporary, and yet very pictorial stuff and bring back some compositions that are not necessarily the ones you see today. so it gives — necessarily the ones you see today. so it gives you a strange feeling of closeness. — so it gives you a strange feeling of closeness, and yet you dive into a world _ closeness, and yet you dive into a world that — closeness, and yet you dive into a world that is definitely not yours. it world that is definitely not yours. it was _ world that is definitely not yours. it was very— world that is definitely not yours. it was very much in fusing the whole film, _ it was very much in fusing the whole film. i_ it was very much in fusing the whole film, i would say, with that light of that— film, i would say, with that light of that very sunny day in spring. because — of that very sunny day in spring. because sun can be absolutely amazing — because sun can be absolutely amazing in england. we because sun can be absolutely amazing in england.— because sun can be absolutely amazing in england. we are not seeinr so amazing in england. we are not seeing so much _ amazing in england. we are not seeing so much of _ amazing in england. we are not seeing so much of it _ amazing in england. we are not seeing so much of it at - amazing in england. we are not seeing so much of it at the - amazing in england. we are not - seeing so much of it at the moment, but really fascinating to hear of the processes and how you went about your work in producing and directing mothering sunday. director ava hudson there, whose film will be showing at the london film festival.
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the headlines on bbc news... police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port. we will find out the winner of this year's stirling prize today. that's the search for britain's best new building. as our media and arts correspondent david sillito reports, this year's shortlist reflects how the environment has become a prime concern. kingston university's town house — a home for it library, its dance studios, and also a new social hub for students.
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wow, this is incredible. i'mjust like, "yeah, i'm just like, "yeah, i i'mjust like, "yeah, i go i'm just like, "yeah, i go to uni there" — i'm just like, "yeah, i go to uni there" it's_ i'm just like, "yeah, i go to uni there." it's so cool. but i'mjust like, "yeah, i go to uni there." it's so cool.— i'mjust like, "yeah, i go to uni there." it's so cool. but it's also a lace there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of _ there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar _ there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels - there." it's so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels and - there." it's so cool. but it's also i a place of solar panels and natural cooling to create a building that is less energy hungry. this key worker housing in cambridge is also designed to encourage a low carbon house style. you seek more bike sheds here than parking. this year, six stirling buildings are about more thanjust six stirling buildings are about more than just beauty and clever ideas. care for the environment has become a prime concern. take this, windermere, and a museum to house a famous boat collection. the overriding concern, though, is don't spoil the view. overriding concern, though, is don't spoil the view-— spoil the view. sustainability has been really _ spoil the view. sustainability has been really central _ spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to _ spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to the - spoil the view. sustainability has| been really central to the concept of building. we have systems like the lake source heat pump that heats the lake source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we have selected were ever possible local materials
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so that travel from source to site is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, _ is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, a _ is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, a place - is as short as possible. this bridge i in north cornwall, a place connected with the stories of king arthur. a challenge to reconnect the eroded site and not damage the archaeology. and when it comes to ancient history, this building in london uses some ancient methods. lumps of stone are what is keeping these flats and offers up right, a sort of high—tech stonehenge. flats and offers up right, a sort of high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending _ high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on _ high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how- high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old - high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it i high-tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it is you will— rock, and depending on how old it is you will still— rock, and depending on how old it is you will still find fossils within it. you will still find fossils within it here — you will still find fossils within it. here you can see... this has come straight _ it. here you can see... this has come straight out _ it. here you can see... this has come straight out of _ it. here you can see... this has come straight out of the - it. here you can see... this has i come straight out of the ground? here is an ammonite shell. it is actually— here is an ammonite shell. it is actually cheaper, faster and far greener— actually cheaper, faster and far greener to put stone buildings up. we found — greener to put stone buildings up. we found here that we saved 92% of the embodied carbon. had this been a
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steel framed building and clad in stone _ steel framed building and clad in stone. , �* steel framed building and clad in stone. , , , , stone. this hasn't been simple. it exterior is — stone. this hasn't been simple. it exterior is not _ stone. this hasn't been simple. it exterior is not everyone's - stone. this hasn't been simple. it exterior is not everyone's taste. i stone. this hasn't been simple. it| exterior is not everyone's taste. at one point, the council was seeing to haveit one point, the council was seeing to have it demolished. it was only saved after a two—year legal battle by its architect. was there a moment where you thought you wish you had never started this? riff where you thought you wish you had never started this?— never started this? of course. sor , never started this? of course. sorry. you _ never started this? of course. sorry. you want _ never started this? of course. sorry, you want me _ never started this? of course. sorry, you want me to - never started this? of course. i sorry, you want me to elaborate obviously. sorry, you want me to elaborate obviousl . . v sorry, you want me to elaborate obviously-— obviously. that's two and a half ears of obviously. that's two and a half years of stress... _ obviously. that's two and a half years of stress... it's _ obviously. that's two and a half years of stress... it's difficult. i years of stress... it's difficult. and our final _ years of stress... it's difficult. and our final building - years of stress... it's difficult. and our final building swap i years of stress... it's difficult. i and our final building swap steel and concrete for word. inspired by a garden of paradise, cambridge mosque is low carbon spirituality. six very different buildings but all reflecting a desire on the eve of a global climate summit to tread gently on the planet. and we will be
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live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tonight at 7:30pm pst, where we'll be looking at the six shortlisted entries and finding out the winner. if you didn't take up enough new hobbies during lockdown, here's another one for you. walrus counting. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses we can spot — and where. as our global science correspondent rebecca morelle explains, it's not as easy as you might think. huge, blubbery and a bit grumpy. walruses are easy enough to spot. but thanks to their remote arctic location, they're hard to count, and we don't know how many of these giant beasts there are. now, using satellite images, the plan is to locate
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every atlantic sea walrus. and scientists say this is essential because climate change means these animals are under threat. the sea ice on which they live most of the year is rapidly diminishing and they're having to change their behaviour and come out onto land much more often. that's almost certainly got some detrimental effect on them. we're not sure how much their population is being affected by that. hopefully this project will tell us that important information. we've been taking images of the earth from space for more than 60 years, but our view has changed dramatically. in the 1980s, satellites could only see objects 30 metres in size. but they quickly improved and a few years later they could see features ten metres across. today, though, the most advanced imaging satellites can see details down to just 30 centimetres, and this has transformed our view of the natural world. even at that resolution, counting walruses is still a challenge. so the scouts in east molesey have
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been drafted in to help. the firstjob, scouring through a search area of 25,000 square kilometres to find any images that have a walrus in. it's quite hard because there is rusty barrels and rocks that look really similar. we're helping people find the walruses because they're endangered. it's kind of a challenge as well as they're all hidden and you have to try and search for them and stuff. if it's a little bit blurry then it's harder because sometimes it's rocks. and they're the same colour as a walrus. but then sometimes it's quite easy because it's black in the background and they're kind of highlighted. i really do like the environment, so i want to save the world. - so this is really helping me. but the project is going to need a lot more people to help with the count. we've loaded up more than 600,000 images onto the walrus
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from space platform. you can access it through the wwf uk website. and we're calling on at least half a million people to help us search for and then count walrus on the platform. the future is uncertain for this icon of the arctic. their icy home is changing faster than anywhere else on the planet. but now, with satellite technology and the help of the public, we should finally find out how many walruses there are and see how they fare in the years to come. rebecca morelle, bbc news. bbc news has been told that the uk government will not be relaxing the language rules forforeign butchers. it comes amid reports that ministers are planning to announce a package of measures to address shortages
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of abattoir workers, with farmers already having to destroy healthy pigs. the national pig association has been calling for the requirement for butchers from overseas to speak fluent english to be dropped. but a government source said the idea was no longer being considered. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. for many of us today, it's going to be another cloudy day with limited sunshine. it's also going to be windy across scotland, and here too we've got some rain which is slowly slipping southwards through the day. and that will eventually get in by the end of the afternoon to southern scotland, fringing into northern england and also northern ireland. and behind it, we see some hefty showers coming our way, and strong winds. some of those showers could be wintry on higher ground. gales across the northern isles and the far north of mainland scotland. for the rest of england and wales, we're looking at a lot of cloud
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around, limited sunshine, but still mild. temperatures 15—17 degrees. but cooler conditions follow on behind this weather front, as it continues to sink southwards. and tonight, across parts of scotland, northern ireland and the far north of northern england, we're expecting some frost. whereas, where we've got the cloud and the rain in the south, temperatures still hanging on. so a milder night in the south, compared to the north. as we go through tomorrow, here's the weather front that will continue to move southwards. high pressure builds in across the north of the country, so things will be comparatively settled. a lot of sunshine for many of us tomorrow, with some cloud just across the north and the west of scotland. but you can see, where we've got our weather front in southern areas, we'll have more cloud and, at times, the odd spot of rain, particularly in the south—west of england. now, temperatures — as we go through tomorrow — holding up in the south. still quite mild, but the cold air filtering in after a cold start. so on friday night into saturday, the high pressure moves away,
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opening the doors to this clutch of fronts coming in from the atlantic, bringing wetter and windier conditions. but note on friday how we still have the cool blues. and then, as this clutch of fronts come in, the milder ambers and yellows push across all but the far north of scotland. we'll have to wait till sunday to get milder air. so on saturday, we're looking at a fair bit of cloud. thick enough for the odd spot of rain here and there. then this next weather front comes in from the atlantic, introducing strengthening winds and some rain. temperature—wise — well, they are climbing compared to friday, but still low across the far north—east of scotland. and into sunday, that rain pushes across scotland. for most of us, it will be dry and it will be milder. but the new week is looking more unsettled, and it's likely to be wet and windy and, by the end of the week, cooler again.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. gps in england are being given an extra £250 million from existing budgets to spend on locum doctors — with the aim of increasing the number of face—to—face appointments. it's clear that the patient should be seen face—to—face if that is what they want, and it is important that the patient is given a choice. this is the package that is going to help to do that. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the chancellor rishi sunak has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents
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on the shelves for christmas, despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. it's the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair of this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. and where's wally? well, sort of. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses can be spotted — and where. good morning. the number of people waiting routine hospital treatment in england has risen to another record high.
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the figures show a total of 5.7 million people were waiting for treatment at the end of august. waiting times at accident and emergency departments have also deteriorated, with almost one in four patients waiting almost four hours to be treated. nearly 300,000 patients were waiting more than a year to start treatment in august — which is down slightly on the previous month but more than double the number waiting this time last year. and nearly 470,000 patients who visited a&e in september waited more than four hours to be treated — that's the worst performance since the target was introduced in 2004. meanwhile, the government has announced an £250 million for gp surgeries in england this winter to help with more face—to—face patient appointments. it comes amidst mounting criticism following a sharp drop in the number of people seeing their gp in person, with fewer than 60% of people able to see their doctor in this way in august — the first month after
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restrictions were eased. this compares with more than 80% before the pandemic. despite recruitment drives to bring more gps into the profession, numbers of family doctors have continued to fall with less than 27,000 on the medical register. 2000 less than five years ago. let's get some reaction from patricia marquis, the england director of the royal college of nursing. thanks so much forjoining us. just on this waiting list growth, what you put it down to? what is your reaction to the news? we have had these figures today. it is reaction to the news? we have had these figures today.— these figures today. it is obviously wor in: these figures today. it is obviously worrying when _ these figures today. it is obviously worrying when you _ these figures today. it is obviously worrying when you see _ these figures today. it is obviously worrying when you see the - these figures today. it is obviously | worrying when you see the figures. there is some good news in there that waiting treatments are reducing due to the hard work of the staff in the nhs. but it clearly paints a worrying picture. it is partly as a result of the pandemic, but we know waiting times were already starting to rise before the pandemic. the pandemic has worsened it and now we
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are trying to manage a recovery period while still dealing with the remains of the pandemic and facing a probably very difficult winter. in terms of nursing staff in hospitals, are you seeing people leave? do we need more immigrant nurses to be brought in? immigration has been a keyissue brought in? immigration has been a key issue across many industries including this health service. absolutely, and we have a huge number of vacancies, 40,000 for nursing staff in the nhs across england, so everything that can be done to recruit people into working in the services is vital, including those from overseas who are always really welcome and have been a vital part of nhs service delivery since the beginning of the nhs. but what we need is the government to look after the start it has got at the moment as well as looking for new recruits stop the staff are already exhausted, they have worked really hard through the pandemic. they are
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physically and mentally tired and we need to understand that everything that can be done to look after and keep those staff must be done. they need breaks, they need holidays, psychological support locally, and we do need extra recruitment. we also need the government to pay what is needed. it is a slap in the face of nhs staff to be offered a 3% rise when their salaries have fallen way behind what they were ten years ago. in terms of immediate action as we head into winterflu in terms of immediate action as we head into winter flu and with covid still out there, what could government do immediately to stem this crisis we are seeing with waiting times and the lack of care? it needs to look after its staff, thatis it needs to look after its staff, that is the prime issue. things will only get worse if it continues to treat the staff with the contempt that it has done in recent months and years. it is really vital the government and all the employers
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look after their staff, do what they can to recruit, including from overseas, and as the new bill comes forward, we also want to see the government being held accountable for ensuring there is a sustainable workforce plan that avoids getting into the situation in the future. when you say recruit from overseas, where in particular? are you talking about european countries or further afield? . ., ., , ., , afield? recruitment from europe has become more _ afield? recruitment from europe has become more difficult _ afield? recruitment from europe has become more difficult since - afield? recruitment from europe has become more difficult since brexit, i become more difficult since brexit, of course, but europe and further afield. wherever it is appropriate and ethical to recruit from, and a lot of that is already happening. those new nurses from overseas are very welcome into the system, but we cannot rely last forever. we must start looking after our own and growing our domestic supply through supporting our students.— supporting our students. patricia, thank ou supporting our students. patricia, thank you very — supporting our students. patricia, thank you very much _ supporting our students. patricia, thank you very much indeed - supporting our students. patricia, thank you very much indeed for i supporting our students. patricia, i thank you very much indeed for your
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time. let's speak to our health correspondentjim reed. we have had these new numbers, jim, and obviously there was always going to be a problem of catch up after covid, but this report... we to be a problem of catch up after covid, but this report. . .- covid, but this report... we get these numbers _ covid, but this report... we get these numbers every _ covid, but this report... we get these numbers every month, i covid, but this report... we get i these numbers every month, and covid, but this report... we get - these numbers every month, and there were an awful lot of them, and i think it is important useful to pick out two this morning, because both illustrate the pressure on the health service in england. first of all, a&e, people going in with bumps and scrapes. there was a target set in 2004 to see those people within four hours. we can see today it is the worst figures ever september, one in four, that is 470,000 people, were not seen in less time. the worst performance since the target was brought in. then a second measure, others people going into a&e, most get patched up and sent home, but a certain number will need
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to be admitted to award the more complex treatments. that was 386,000 people in september. of that group, almost 400,000, about a quarter had to wait more than four hours to get a bed a ward. in health service jargon, that is called a trolley wait. 5000 of those 386,000 had to wait. 5000 of those 386,000 had to wait more than 12 hours. it is worth pointing out that these figures offer england, but scotland and wales are also seen record waits for a&e at the moment. in northern ireland, they published data on an hourly basis online so you can see the average weight at the main hospital in belfast was 254 minutes to be seen at a&e, that is getting on five hours. this pressure is everywhere across the uk at the moment. in everywhere across the uk at the moment. , ., ., ., , , moment. in terms of what has been announced — moment. in terms of what has been announced today _ moment. in terms of what has been announced today on _ moment. in terms of what has been announced today on gps, _ moment. in terms of what has been announced today on gps, because i moment. in terms of what has been i announced today on gps, because a&e waiting list are linked to gps, people going to a&e when they cannot
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get a gp appointment quickly enough, there is a lot of criticism from nursing bodies, general practices, that the government is not really gripping this problem. government's roblem is gripping this problem. government's problem is it — gripping this problem. government's problem is it takes _ gripping this problem. government's problem is it takes awhile _ gripping this problem. government's problem is it takes awhile for - gripping this problem. government's problem is it takes awhile for them i problem is it takes awhile for them to turnaround these problems. this money given to gps this morning has been welcomed. that money given to gps this morning has been welcomed.— been welcomed. that is part of an existin: been welcomed. that is part of an existing announcement. _ been welcomed. that is part of an existing announcement. yes, - been welcomed. that is part of an | existing announcement. yes, they already announced _ existing announcement. yes, they already announced £5 _ existing announcement. yes, they already announced £5 billion - existing announcement. yes, they already announced £5 billion for i existing announcement. yes, they. already announced £5 billion for the nhs this winter and that £250 million has come out of that budget, important point to make. that will primarily be used to pay for more temporary doctors at gp services. gps say that is welcome but they need more longer term planning. in his last manifesto, the conservative party, they said they would put in place 6000 extra gps for england. we have not seen that yet, and the numbers are falling. the problem is,
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you train new gps and that takes the best part of ten years to go from starting medical school to completely qualifying as a gp. it does take a while to tennis problems around. , , ., ., . around. jeremy hunt announced the trainin: of around. jeremy hunt announced the training of new _ around. jeremy hunt announced the training of new doctors _ around. jeremy hunt announced the training of new doctors years - around. jeremy hunt announced the training of new doctors years ago, i training of new doctors years ago, and the shortage in labour in home—grown british doctors has been known for a long time. yes. home-grown british doctors has been known for a long time.— known for a long time. yes, that is the second — known for a long time. yes, that is the second target _ known for a long time. yes, that is the second target in _ known for a long time. yes, that is the second target in 2019 - known for a long time. yes, that is the second target in 2019 the - the second target in 2019 the government put in place, but the royal college of gps, the bma are saying the government missed an earlier target before that to also put in place more gp places. it's notjust put in place more gp places. it's not just about the number of put in place more gp places. it's notjust about the number of gps, it is about the complexity of the cases they are looking at. one of the criticisms is that because people are finding it more difficult to get are finding it more difficult to get a new treatment, they are arriving at gp surgeries instead and some cases are more in depth, they are longer, more complex, so it is not just about numbers, but the type of people going into a&e as well. gps
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orah rate people going into a&e as well. gps oprah rate -- _ people going into a&e as well. gps 0prah rate —— operate by their own rules, so is there room for them, capacity for them to work through the weekend is? to work more overtime in terms of seeing more patients with or alleged choosing not to? . , patients with or alleged choosing not to? ., , ., ., not to? that is one of the criticisms _ not to? that is one of the criticisms that _ not to? that is one of the criticisms that has - not to? that is one of the criticisms that has been i not to? that is one of the i criticisms that has been made not to? that is one of the - criticisms that has been made of gps, that they would strongly resist that. in places around the country, so i was speaking to gps in leeds, they have this new system where there is more out of hours and specialist gps available at weekends and on fridays or mondays, so that takes the pressure off gps in the week and allows them to see more complex cases much face—to—face. that is one of the things the government will be keen on in the next couple of years, putting in place and more flexible gp service, so those who want a telephone conversation can, but if you want to be seen face—to—face, the messages he should be seen face-to-face, the messages he shoulr . ~ be seen face-to-face, the messages he shoulr ., ~ i.
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the chancellor rishi sunak has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port, felixstowe. mr sunak said the government is doing all it can to keep supplies moving. he's attending a meeting of the leaders of the world's advanced economies in washington, where he spoke to our economics editor, faisal islam. one of the world's biggest parking lots. dozens of cargo ships just waiting in the pacific, full of goods from asia, unable to dock at full terminals in the ports of california, with containers piled high. the same now happening on the atlantic coast off georgia too, and in other ports around the world. the plumbing of the world economy not functioning properly. at the white house, biden summoned us business bosses to work 24/7 to clear the backlogs. this is across—the—board commitment to go into 24/7. this is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods through our supply chain. the actions of the president show that this is a supply chain crisis that affects many countries across the world. it arises out of the fact
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that after the pandemic, demand rebounded much faster than expected, and much faster than the ability of the world economy to supply the goods required. that's led to shortages, it's led to price rises, and that's not going to be solved before christmas. in fields and airfields around the usa, there are tens of thousands of nearly—finished cars and trucks, but they can't be sold because they lack the crucial microchips, the orders for which were cancelled at the start of the pandemic. the companies were too pessimistic about the rebound in demand. that's led to a change of view from the bank chief who, earlier this year, predicted an unprecedented british boom. 0h, we did predict a booming recovery in the economy. i think what we missed was, it would be so strong that it would create the supply chain problems. whether it's gasoline, whether it's chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, finance ministers attending international meetings are spilling out onto the streets
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and parks of washington, dc. one solution to all of this — producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france and all european countries - to key technologies, - to chips, to semiconductors, to all the products on which there i are bottlenecks and shortages today. and that could lead to higher prices permanently. alongside other factors — from us—china tensions, post—brexit visa restrictions, orfears over uk—eu trade. it's a global economic challenge, and it's not going away. faisal islam, bbc news, in washington, dc. we can speak to ewan macdonald—russell from the british retail consortium. thanks forjoining us. the chancellor says the government is doing everything they can possibly to try and address the problem is that we're facing here in the uk. do you agree? are they? i that we're facing here in the uk. do you agree? are they?— that we're facing here in the uk. do you agree? are they? i think all you can miaht you agree? are they? i think all you can might be _ you agree? are they? i think all you can might be possibly _ you agree? are they? i think all you can might be possibly gilding - you agree? are they? i think all you can might be possibly gilding the i can might be possibly gilding the lily a little. the government has
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done something like a sped up hgv driver test, done something like a sped up hgv drivertest, it done something like a sped up hgv driver test, it has brought in some visas for hgv drivers, but the reality is, the specific british dimension of the problem we face is a lack of hgv drivers, shortfall of 90,000 drivers, and the reality is the visas given out to little and it is late. the government must do more if they want action taken quicker. if it says politically it is deciding not to allow for increased immigration because of brexit voters and wanting to increase terms and conditions or working conditions the british people, doing notjust have to accept that it is going to be bumpy and difficult across a range of fronts sometime? that bumpy and difficult across a range of fronts sometime?— bumpy and difficult across a range of fronts sometime? that might be the case the _ of fronts sometime? that might be the case the government _ of fronts sometime? that might be the case the government might i the case the government might decide, bumpy is the right way to put it. but what we can say is if we do not see action in the short—term, and we are talking about a short—term fix, until it is possible for retailers to train up the hgv
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drivers we need, it is a specific trade, you cannot get an hgv driver trained up in weeks, it takes months, that can happen in the next year. it certainly cannot happen before christmas, so the government does not want to see the set structuring over the next couple of months, it has the ability to change it and should have done so earlier, and we're starting to run out of time. �* , ., , ., time. and it is not 'ust about eo - le time. and it is not 'ust about peoprewanting_ time. and it is not 'ust about people wanting to i time. and it is notjust about people wanting to buy - time. and it is notjust about people wanting to buy lovely j time. and it is notjust about - people wanting to buy lovely things for christmas, it is about peoplejobs. for christmas, it is about peoplejobs— for christmas, it is about peoplejobs. for christmas, it is about --eole'obs. , , ., peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole su -l peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole supply chain — peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole supply chain ecosystem - peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole supply chain ecosystem behind | peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole i supply chain ecosystem behind it peoplejobs. yes, it is the whole - supply chain ecosystem behind it and we can talk about what happened for shops and retailers are food and non—food, but the supply chain behind every part of our economy relies on road freight, and without capacity, we are seeing these problems picking up. there was a problems picking up. there was a problem with fuel being delivered a few weeks ago, and these issues will worsen unless we see more hgv
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drivers on the road, and in the short—term, that means allowing more people into the country from europe. are you worried about essential goods we will need, whether that is a medicine saw food or household goods being stuck in short supply and if so, how long?— and if so, how long? hopefully essential goods _ and if so, how long? hopefully essential goods are _ and if so, how long? hopefully essential goods are the - and if so, how long? hopefully essential goods are the one i and if so, how long? hopefully i essential goods are the one thing that will be relatively safe and secure. the retailers are able to prioritise certain product ranges but not the choice in it. so there will always be passed on the shelf, but it might not be the pasta were used to, but the same products will still be there, but we might not just have the choice we would love to offer, and that rationalisation is how supermarkets are managing the challenge they face. if is how supermarkets are managing the challenge they face.— challenge they face. if you could ask the government _ challenge they face. if you could ask the government for - challenge they face. if you could ask the government for a - challenge they face. if you could ask the government for a couple challenge they face. if you could i ask the government for a couple of specific things to ease things now, what would you say?— specific things to ease things now, what would you say? biggest things are to no what would you say? biggest things are to go back— what would you say? biggest things are to go back to _ what would you say? biggest things are to go back to the _ what would you say? biggest things are to go back to the drawing i what would you say? biggest things are to go back to the drawing board | are to go back to the drawing board on short—term visas for hgv drivers, get more for grocery retailers, and
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they need more than the 5000 offered, and the second part is the budget, and must think about looking at a cost of living for ordinary consumers because customers must pay the price if we cannot control costs. . ~ the price if we cannot control costs. ., ~' , ., , the price if we cannot control costs. . ~ , ., , . the european union's ambassador to the uk has described eu proposals to resolve the row about post brexit trade in northern ireland as 'unprecedented'. this dispute is all about the northern ireland protocol, which was agreed and signed by the uk and the eu, and came into force at the start of this year. among other things the protocol requires extra checks and paperwork on products like food and drink imported from britain. because northern ireland is still in the eu's single market for goods, there are no border checkpoints between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, a crucial factor to avoid a return to the tensions and troubles the result is a trade border which falls between britain and northern ireland, which unionists say
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undermines northern ireland's place in the uk. the uk government now wants to reverse its previous agreement on the role of the european court ofjustice. the eu's ambassador to the uk, joao vale de almeida, told the bbc the new proposals were not concessions. we are not forced to propose this. we propose this because we realised that there are problems in northern ireland, and we care about northern ireland. we want the protocol to work. no renegotiation, that's what we said. and we are not renegotiating the protocol. we are adapting the protocol, and we are ready to enter tomorrow, the day after, next week, in talks with our british colleagues and friends to try to address these issues. we are focused on solutions. we went to northern ireland several times. i went there myself twice, in spite of covid. maros sefcovic, the vice—president, was there, with me and other colleagues. with extensive contacts with everybody, we listened, we took notes. what we present today is a direct
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response to the problems that affect citizens and business. dawn mclaughlin, president of the londonderry chamber of commerce, gave her reaction to the morning's developments. i suppose i'm always an optimist and i think we have to be optimistic. you know, we consider this chamber to be a positive first step in the process. we haven't been privy to the full detail yet at this stage, so we really do have to reserve judgment on it. but our members are from a wide variety of sectors and have been impacted in different ways by the protocol, and those that i've been speaking to believe that anything that cuts the cost, reduces their administrative burden and stops the delays will be good for their business. i suppose the one thing that they do have in common is that uncertainty must be replaced by clear rules around trade.
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bbc news has been told that the uk government will not be relaxing the language rules forforeign butchers. it comes amid reports that ministers are planning to announce a package of measures to address shortages of abattoir workers, with farmers already having to destroy healthy pigs. the national pig association has been calling for the requirement for butchers from overseas to speak fluent english to be dropped. but a government source said the idea was no longer being considered. 0ur political correspondent, peter saull has been following this. another controversy, about the whole question of immigration. what seems to be the decision at the moment? you will remember outside the conservative party conference, a big protest involving pig farmers and there have been discussions between there have been discussions between the industry and the government in recent weeks to come to some form of a solution here. the national pig association has been calling for a relaxation of immigration rules so they can get more butchers, more abattoir workers into the country, but they said the major block is a
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current requirement for butchers to speak a good level of english. environment secretary has intimated in interviews that that was something that is seriously being considered. i'm told now by sources within the department of environment, food and rural affairs thatis environment, food and rural affairs that is not being considered and they will not drop the high level of english requirement that is currently there for foreign butchers. now, it may well be that they do other things, there are reports today that there could be some form of a package of measures announced today, it may well be that abbey is a scheme is brought in, that has been under consideration. but in terms of that central core from the industry to drop language requirement, that, i'm told, will be rejected by ministers. there is a question in the house of lords scheduled to happen any minute now with an environment minister responding to the government on this issue of low shortages within the
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pig farming sector. that would be a perfect opportunity to make announcement on this, so we will wait to see what happens there. we will come back to you if that is coming our way. as the government indicated why they do not want to relax those rules on language requirements? —— has the government. we also know if pigs have been called and if so, how many? —— do we also know. called and if so, how many? -- do we also know-— also know. the latest figure is 6000 have been called _ also know. the latest figure is 6000 have been called that _ also know. the latest figure is 6000 have been called that would - also know. the latest figure is 6000 have been called that would have i have been called that would have been butchered and gone into our food suppliers. that has clearly already —— that is already clearly a big amount of pigs and the risk is that number could go up. the report says that there are recruits ready to come over immediately and there have been recruited out in south america and the far east sounding people out and they think they have got people to come in fairly imminently and that is something they can do. if you talk about the
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hgv driver shortage, the real problems, even with visa scheme having been announced, encouraging people to go over and do the scheme, the pig sector says they are confident that will happens. in terms of relaxing the english language requirement, there's been a justification for that yet from the government. this feeds into the wider feeling, government. this feeds into the widerfeeling, the government. this feeds into the wider feeling, the wider reluctance at top levels of government to allow in a lot of cheap foreign labour. borisjohnson stressing repeatedly over the past week or so that he wants to fundamentally change the way our economy works, to move away from that reliance on cheap foreign labour towards a high wage, high economy, but they have announced temporary visa schemes other sectors. this is something that is certainly being looked at the pig farming sector.— certainly being looked at the pig farmina sector. . ~ , ., , . let's bring you some live pictures now from the tayouneh district of beirut.
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this is the scene where the protest had been taking place. you can see signs there of what has been going on. you can see signs there of what has been going on. sounds of gunfire are continuing, and the lebanese army has deployed in force to try to contain the situation. reuters has reported that the death toll has reached four people, four killed, including a woman who died from a bullet wound in her house, according to a military source. we cannot confirm those details but that has been reported from reuters, and you can see those pictures there. we know these protests have been taking place with supporters of his—brother—word—mac —— of an organisation. and is on the ground for us. we are seeing this unfold at the moment. for us. we are seeing this unfold at the moment-— the moment. that is right, it all
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escalated quickly _ the moment. that is right, it all escalated quickly this _ the moment. that is right, it all escalated quickly this morning i the moment. that is right, it all- escalated quickly this morning from what began as a protest organised about the investigation into a bomb blast, they want to see the judge removed as the investigating judge because they feel he is disproportionately targeting she at politicians when he has come people to give evidence. thejudge has politicians when he has come people to give evidence. the judge has the support of the families, but what has happened here this morning, the protest, there was chanting, jostling happening outside the justice palace, and then we started to hear gunfire a few streets away and this has swept through beirut this morning. where saint you might hear while we are talking in the background some gunfire, because it is happening, it is happening a few streets away from us, but this is where things were happening earlier. you can probably see the detritus of what went on earlier, a burned—out motorbike, broken glass, you can see where windows had been shot out of
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buildings. 0ne residential building, a floor—to—ceiling window had been shut out and was in the street. what you will also notice is the lebanese armed forces. they are trying to bring the situation under control and have tweeted and said to people here in beirut, do not come out onto the streets. they want people to stay indoors while they try to contain the situation and work out where the fire is coming from and what they can do about it. it is very fluid. _ what they can do about it. it is very fluid. it — what they can do about it. it is very fluid, it must _ what they can do about it. it is very fluid, it must be - what they can do about it. it is very fluid, it must be very alarming for those who are caught up in this immediately. it for those who are caught up in this immediately-— for those who are caught up in this immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic _ immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic pictures - immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic pictures and i some very graphic pictures and videos on social media this morning. pictures of children in a school, and there were some schools that decided to close this morning when they knew the protest was happening and we were told that the protest was being scaled down accordingly because of that. we have seen pictures of children cowering under desksin pictures of children cowering under desks in classrooms, cowering in corridors, which brings back difficult memories for their
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parents, many of whom lived through the civil war here in lebanon. it is a fluid situation in terms of the number of people killed, and we have seen the red cross on the streets, they are a steel with injured people, but this is one of those situations that will take time to work out quite how it escalated, and also write how they will bring it to also write how they will bring it to a close. brute also write how they will bring it to a close. ~ .., also write how they will bring it to a close. ~ .. ., ,., also write how they will bring it to aclose.~ ., , .,, a close. we can hear some shots behind you _ a close. we can hear some shots behind you and _ a close. we can hear some shots behind you and i _ a close. we can hear some shots behind you and i hope _ a close. we can hear some shots behind you and i hope it - a close. we can hear some shots behind you and i hope it is i a close. we can hear some shots behind you and i hope it is safer| behind you and i hope it is safer you to keep talking to us at the moment. can you give us an idea of where you are at the moment? shah moment. can you give us an idea of where you are at the moment? an area on the edge — where you are at the moment? an area on the edge of — where you are at the moment? an area on the edge of pastor _ where you are at the moment? an area on the edge of pastor beirut, _ where you are at the moment? an area on the edge of pastor beirut, and i on the edge of pastor beirut, and the gunfire is happening and it echoes off the tall buildings here in this residential area, so it sounds a lot closer than it is. —— on the edge of beirut. —— on the edge of a part of beirut. the scenes you are seeing marks a new step in
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what is happening in lebanon right now. they have been shortages and protests over the last investigation, but what happens next is crucial. things are so tense, people are frustrated, they feel they have been through an awful lot over the last year also, and since the protest, the uprising of 2019, when people took to the streets to protest against what they saw as a corrupt ruling class, political mismanagement, lebanon has a new government in place. but at the moment, because they are split over what to do with the judge and the investigation, they are not even meeting at the moment. but it is worth saying this is the centre of beirut, this is where they live and work and go to school and people have seen the army on the streets again in a combat role, they have seen and heard running gun battles, they had heard sound of rpgs, along way away but it will sound louder to you thanks to those buildings, and it suggested it is closer than it is. do not worry, we are a long way
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away. it is all concerning an upsetting and frustrating for those who live in beirut to live through. thank you for the reassurance about you and the team, and it is obviously very difficult for all of those caught in it. thank you very much indeed. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. for most of us today, it is going to be a fairly cloudy day with limited sunshine, and for some of us, we have got some rain in the forecast. that rain coming in across the north of scotland, slowly slipping southwards, eventually, later in the day, getting into the far north of england and also northern ireland. strong winds coming in behind with some gales across the far north, but as we come further south, we are still in the milder conditions despite the cloud, with highs of 16 or 17. it will all start to feel fresher from the north. you can see how our weather front sinks southwards through the course of the night. some clear conditions follow on behind. we're looking at some frost in parts of scotland and northern ireland, and the far north of england overnight, but we hang on to the milder air in the far south of england and also south
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wales. tomorrow we start off with that weather front still producing some cloud, the odd spot of rain, and it will linger for much of the day across some southern areas. but a lot of sunshine for the rest of the uk, with cloud flirting across the north and west, but feeling cooler wherever you are.
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hello, this is bbc news with geeta guru—murthy. the headlines... gps in england are being given an extra 250 million pounds, from existing budgets, to spend on locum doctors — with the aim of increasing the number of face—to—face appointments. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the chancellor rishi sunak has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam
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at the uk's biggest commercial port. two people have been shot dead in beirut as armed clashes break out during a protest against the judge investigating last year s massive blast in the city 5 port. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. it's the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair of this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. and where's wally — well, sort of. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses can be spotted — and where. ijust want i just want to let you know that we are hearing the climate action group can intimate britain had announced it is going to suspend its campaign of civil resistance. that has been
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reported by pe at the moment. they have also been involved in protesting on the m25. there has been some mixed reaction to people supporting the colours, but a bit frustrated by the disruption. that is all we have got on the moment but we are well update you as soon as we can. let's speak to our correspondent mark easton. i don't think you are talking about insulate britain. tell me about babies. ~ ., , insulate britain. tell me about babies. ., , ., babies. we got some figures from the ons that show _ babies. we got some figures from the ons that show the _ babies. we got some figures from the ons that show the number _ babies. we got some figures from the ons that show the number of - babies. we got some figures from the ons that show the number of babies. 0ns that show the number of babies born in england and wales last year, so 2020, was just under 614,000 and that has pushed the total fertility rate in england and wales to its
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lowest level since records began in 1938. why does all this matter? what is going on? we have seen the number of babies born in england and wales following for the last five years and the 0ns suggest it is women tending to delay motherhood until later, and also the success of contraception and so on. that is what they think is causing the fall. the effect is to reduce the total fertility rate in england and wales to 1.58. that is 1.58 children per woman. now, it doesn't take rocket science to realise that is not enough. three babies support to women. the consequence is that we are not put reproducing, if you don't produce two children the number goes down. this has a number
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of applications. some people would say it is good news because the country is already overpopulated, the planet is overpopulated, fewer people is good. the counterargument is if your total fertility rate is below too, and it is a long wait below too, and it is a long wait below too, and it is a long wait below to now, that will mean that in the future you will have a larger proportion of your population who are no longer working, they are retired or elderly, and it puts enormous pressure on younger people to actually provide for them. that is the other part of the problem. the interesting things within the figures we can see is that the total fertility rate among women who were born outside the uk, so foreign born mothers, who now represent almost 30% of all births, the highest ever, is almost too. so they are reproducing at a rate which would retain the population. it is uk born mothers whose fertility rate is 1.5.
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so, if it wasn't for the foreign—born mothers are a fertility rate would be even lower. the implications are very significant in terms of school places, in terms of maternity care, maternity nurses, what kind of size of the services do we need to? really interesting none the less that we are seeing in england and wales, a story developing of the following baby numbers, following fertility rate thatis numbers, following fertility rate that is going to have big implications for decades to come. absolutely. along with an ageing population. nothing to do with climate, but really important. weill. climate, but really important. well, it is. we climate, but really important. well, it is- we can't _ climate, but really important. well, it is- we can't go — climate, but really important. well, it is. we can't go into _ climate, but really important. well, it is. we can't go into that - climate, but really important. well, it is. we can't go into that right i it is. we can't go into that right now but maybe _ it is. we can't go into that right now but maybe next _ it is. we can't go into that right now but maybe next time. i good morning. we start with tennis, and well a name that might not be familiar to everyone,
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cameron norrie and his excellent run at indian wells... so much so, he'll become the british number one later, if he beats diego schwartzman in the quarter finals the brit made it through to the last eight, for the first time at a masters 1000 tournament, after beating american tommy paul, 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. the win was his, 44th on the a.t.p tour this year, and, as well as replacing dan evans, a the british number one, a win tonight could see him break into the world's top 20 for the first time in his career. it underlines how well the season has been going for him. chelsea claimed their first win in this season's women's champions league after a 2—1victory overjuventus, in turin. erin cuthbert put her side in the lead with this solo effort, just after the half hour mark, only forjuventus draw level, just a few minutes later. but pernille harder, slammed home the winner, in the second half — that's her 32nd champions league goal in 40 appeaences. the win means chelsea have 4 points from their opening two group matches. what a great place to come and play.
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this is an iconic stadium. a team that is improving in europe, a tough crowd. —— a brilliant crowd, a tough atmosphere. i think the game had everything. the game was quite scrappy but for us we showed once again the ability to adapt to the demands of the game. and the performance from the team was mixed, but i felt we were resilient enough and took our chances when they mattered. and that's why we were the winning team. arsenal are in action tonight in the women's champions league. hoping to continue their brilliant league form 100% record so far, and scoring some excellent goals, katie mccabe with the pick against everton last weekend. they face hoffenheim having lost heavily to the champions chelsea in their opening match. we wa nt we want to win every game we play and do our best, so nothing changes. we have played one game, we have five games more to go at the group
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stage and we need to have five solid performances. we need to start with one tomorrow. theres been lots of messages of support for the wales international david brooks, who has been diagnosed with cancer. the 24—year—old says he has stage 2 hodgkin lymphoma, but that "the prognosis is a positive one" and treatment will start next week. brooks, who has won 21 wales caps, was on international duty just last week, and credits the wales medical team for helping detect the illness. the middlesbrough defender, sol bamba who's recovered from cancer himself, said "you've got this champ..." wales team mate ethan ampadu wished him all the best and england defender tyrone mings has told brooks to "stay strong". just some of those messages of goodwill following that diagnosis yesterday. over on 5 live sports extra the womens big bash league has just got under way. melbourne stars have been put into bat by the sydney sixes
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in what is now an 11 overs side game. england player maia bouchier is making her wbbl debut for the stars. for the time being, that is all. i will be back around quarter past 12 with another update. police in norway say a suspect accused of killing five people with a bow and arrow had converted to islam and showed the archer shot many arrows — several of them hitting houses. reports say he shot at anyone he came across. the suspect is a thirty—seven year—old dane living in kongsberg, the south—eastern norwegian town where the attacks took place on wednesday. norway's new prime minister, jonas gahr stoere, has called the murders a gruesome and brutal act. in the last hour, police in norway have been holding a press conference about the killings... translation: there had been concerns about his medicalisation _ translation: there had been concerns about his medicalisation in _ translation: there had been concerns about his medicalisation in the - about his medicalisation in the past. we can't at the moment go into
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the details of what those concerns were —— radicalisation. however, we have and continue to follow up on the information and tips that come in. we can also confirm the suspect converted to islam. we are going to chase and pictures wejust had in of her we are going to chase and pictures we just had in of her majesty the queen, just arriving in wales to open the welsh parliament encourages. these images havejust come into us. 0pening encourages. these images havejust come into us. opening the welsh accompanied in the car and a formal opening. we have seen her majesty turn up at formal occasions in recent days. the queen just stepping out of the car. we will bring you further coverage of that.
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forty six people are now known to have died in a fire in a run down building in southern taiwan. residents were trapped inside their flats on the upper floors of the thirteen storey block in the city of kaohsiung. firefighters said piles of unused items on lowerfloors had made the rescue more difficult. the building's lower section had once housed restaurants, karaoke bars and a cinema — but those units had been abandoned. many of the people who lived in the building were old or had disabilities. the indonesian holiday island of bali has reopened to some international holidaymakers. however tourists still have to quarantine for five days at their own expense. those who can visit are fully—vaccinated and from countries with low infection rates such as china, new zealand and japan. the uk isn't included on the list. we are going to take you back to cardiff. these are live images now,
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i understand, with her majesty, we can see the prince of wales and camilla following behind her as they walk in for the formal opening their of the welsh parliament. that is insight as those gathered stand to welcome the royal party. if you didn't take up enough new hobbies during lockdown, here's another one for you. walrus counting. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses you can spot — and where. huge, blubbery and a bit grumpy. walruses are easy enough to spot. but thanks to their remote arctic location, they're hard to count,
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and we don't know how many of these giant beasts there are. now, using satellite images, the plan is to locate every atlantic walrus. and scientists say this is essential because climate change means these animals are under threat. the sea ice on which they live most of the year is rapidly diminishing and they're having to change their behaviour and come out onto land much more often. that has almost certainly got some detrimental effects. we are not sure how much their population is being affected by that. hopefully this project will tell us that important information. we've been taking images of the earth from space for more than 60 years, but our view has changed dramatically. in the 1980s, satellites could only see objects 30 metres in size. but they quickly improved and a few years later they could see features ten metres across. today, though, the most advanced imaging satellites can see details down to just 30 centimetres,
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and this has transformed our view of the natural world. even at that resolution, counting walruses is still a challenge. so the scouts in east molesey have been drafted in to help. the firstjob, scouring through a search area of 25,000 square kilometres to find any images that have a walrus in. it's quite hard because there is rusty barrels and rocks that look really similar. we're helping people find the walruses because they're endangered. it's kind of a challenge as well as they're all hidden and you have to try and search for them and stuff. if it's a little bit blurry then it's harder because sometimes it's rocks. and they're the same colour as a walrus. and then sometimes it's quite easy because it's black in the background and they're kind of highlighted. i really do like the environment, so i want to save the world. i
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so this is really helping me. but the project is going to need a lot more people to help with the count. we've loaded up more than 600,000 images onto the walrus from space platform. you can access it through the wwf uk website. and we're calling on at least half a million people to help us search for and then count walrus on the platform. the future is uncertain for this icon of the arctic. their icy home is changing faster than anywhere else on the planet. but now with satellite technology, and the help of the public, we should finally find out how many walruses there are and see how they fare in the years to come. rebecca morelle, bbc news. we are going to take you back now to wales because the opening is under way. these are the pictures coming
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into us. the queen is attending the six ceremonial opening of the the senedd today. the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall are also listening into the opening speeches. this whole event was supposed to start after the election in may, it was delayed because of the pandemic. the queen is due to be making a speech in the chamber and there will be an address from the welsh first minister mark drakeford, and is going to be a mixture of recorded and live performances from welsh artists. the theme is your voice. mark drakeford has said the queen opening this parliamentary moment
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marks the significance of the parliament in the nation. he has been saying that decisions are made for different parliaments and the queen is always taking it very seriously, she doesn't miss the opening of a new term, and they are clearly delighted that despite her age that she is making that effort again. members of the royalfamily there, of course, in attendance as that new the senedd begins officially. we will go back to that... we are going to stay with it as we hear her majesty the queen making her address. first minister and members _ making her address. first minister and members of _ making her address. first minister and members of the _ making her address. first minister and members of the senedd. it i making her address. first minister and members of the senedd. it is| making her address. first minister| and members of the senedd. it is a pleasure to be with you today and i congratulate you on your recent election. you have been entrusted to
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be the voice of the people of wales, to represent their interests when decisions that affect their everyday lives are debated and decided within these walls. when i was here for the last opening in 2016, i noted that the fifth assembly would mark a significant development in the history of devolution in wales. since then, further measures have been taken to strengthen the foundations of your parliamentary democracy. the wales act 2017 established this parliament on a new basis, and you have used this legislation to help the public better understand your work and to include more people in the democratic process. as a result, this parliament is now recognised in
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law as the welsh parliament. the name reflects this institution's evolution over its 22 years into one with lawmaking powers, over a wide range of areas that are central to welsh life and the ability to vary taxes. it demonstrates your status as a national parliament, working on behalf of the people of wales. you are also reaching out to every generation and the establishment of the first welsh youth parliament has provided another opportunity for the voices of young people to be heard. enabling them to make a valuable contribution to the senedd's work. you're also to be commended for your innovation. this was the first of
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the united kingdom's legislators to hold a formal virtual meeting. the fact that all parties showed a determination that he should continue to meet is commendable. and testament to your commitment to scrutinise the government on behalf of the people of wales. i have spoken before about how recent times have,in spoken before about how recent times have, in many ways, brought us closer together. we all owe a debt of gratitude to those who have risen so magnificently to the challenges of the last 18 months. from key workers to volunteers, who have done so much to serve their communities. they are shining examples of the spirit of which the welsh people are so renowned, a spirit which i have personally encountered so many times. it is a source of pleasure
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that both the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall, together with the duke and duchess of cambridge, i've had homes in wales and experienced its very special sense of community. the welsh people have much to be proud of and over the next five years, i am sure you will continue to be inspired by their indomitable spirit, as you represent the interest of wales and its people. makes laws for wales and holds the welsh government to account. there are many challenges ahead as we work together to promote the well—being of the people of wales and support the recovery effort. the prince of wales, the duchess of cornwall and i extend our warmest good wishes to you for the sixth session of this parliament and
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hope you have every success with your endeavours. applause her majesty the queen opening the six ceremonial opening of the senedd in cardis, talking about the indomitable spirit of the welsh people. also seeing everyone owes a huge debt of gratitude to so many people over the last 18 months during the pandemic, key workers and volunteers and many others. she talked about the unique spirit of the welsh people, also accompanied by her son the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall. she mentioned the duke and duchess of cambridge, all of them had homes in wales and said the welsh people had
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much to be proud of. she said the parliament was very important, representing the people of wales and holding the welsh government, it is a labour led government there, to account. and talked of the history of devolution, which of course is relatively recent. this is the first time i believe in five years the queen has been in wales, attending the six ceremonial opening of the senedd, with that opening address. let's go back to the walrus numbers — being counted now by satellite. peter fretwell is from the british antarctic survey and joins me now. thanks for your time today. just tell us what exactly you are trying to do and why. why do walruses matter? ~ ., , .,
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to do and why. why do walruses matter? , ., ., , to do and why. why do walruses matter? ., , ., matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic — matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic and _ matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic and we _ matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic and we note _ matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic and we note the - matter? morris are any iconic animal in the artic and we note the arctic. in the artic and we note the arctic ocean is changing. the walrus usually live on the sea ice in the arctic ocean and that ice is rapidly diminishing with climate change. so, the walrus are moving onto the beaches which we believe it's probably not very good for them because they have to travel further to the grounds where they eat, and also when they get together on the beaches, they are prone to trampling and disturbance from people and pull the base and things like that. —— polar bears. 0ne the base and things like that. —— polar bears. one of the problems we haveis polar bears. one of the problems we have is that the places where waris live a very remote and not accessible, our knowledge is not great of them but we have estimates of how many they are. we're not about that. we have no idea of how the population is reacting to climate change. so, our plan is to
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really be able to first do a really accurate census of walrus numbers and to be able to do that over a long period. we set up a monitoring programme where we can count all the atlantic waris using the public. in terms of the response you've had so far, because you are asking for a lot of help, what sort of interest is there? ., , , ., ., is there? there has been a great deal of interest. _ is there? there has been a great deal of interest. we _ is there? there has been a great deal of interest. we are - is there? there has been a great deal of interest. we are looking | is there? there has been a great i deal of interest. we are looking for about half a million people around the world to be able to engage, citizen scientists, on the web platform we have developed. it is a 2—step process. first of all, because the walrus moved around are not always in the same place, we have to find them. it is a bit like finding a needle in a haystack, looking through lots and lots of
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images to see which have walrus on them. when we have got those images when we know we have them on them, we can describe the other ones and ask the members of the public, the citizen scientists, to go and count all of the walrus. when they are really zoomed into about 200 metres. it sounds like a fascinating project. i am sure you are going to get even more interest now. the very with it. —— are the very best with it. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole kirkwood. .. hello again. for most of us today, it is going to be a fairly cloudy day with limited sunshine, and for some of us, we have got some rain in the forecast. that rain coming in across the north of scotland, slowly slipping southwards, eventually, later in the day, getting into the far north of england and also northern ireland. strong winds coming in behind with some gales across the far north, but as we come further south, we are still in the milder
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conditions despite the cloud, with highs of 16 or 17. it will all start to feel fresher from the north. you can see how our weather front sinks southwards through the course of the night. some clear conditions follow on behind. we're looking at some frost in parts of scotland and northern ireland, and the far north of england overnight, but we hang on to the milder air in the far south of england and also south wales. tomorrow we start off with that weather front still producing some cloud, the odd spot of rain, and it will linger for much of the day across some southern areas. but a lot of sunshine for the rest of the uk, with cloud flirting across the north and west, but feeling cooler wherever you are.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. gps in england are being given an extra £250 million from existing budgets to spend on locum doctors — with the aim of increasing the number of face—to—face appointments. today's package is all about support, about providing gps with ever more support so they can do more of what they love doing, which is seeing their patients. it is about having more appointments, more appointments and allowing patients to have more choice in the way they are seen. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. two people have been shot dead in beirut as armed clashes break out
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during a protest against the judge investigating last year's massive blast in the city's port. and the queen officially opens the sixth term of the welsh senedd in cardiff — a ceremony that had been delayed due to the pandemic. hello. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to another record high. figures just released shows it stood at 5.7 million at the end of august. waiting times at accident and emergency departments have also deteriorated, with nearly one in four patients waiting longer than four hours to be treated. nearly 300,000 patients were waiting more than a year to start treatment in august — which is down slightly on the previous month but more
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than double the number waiting this time last year. and nearly 470,000 patients who visited a&e in september waited more than four hours to be treated — the worst performance since the target was introduced in 2004. meanwhile, the government has announced an extra £250 million for gp surgeries in england this winter to help with more face—to—face patient appointments. it comes amidst mounting criticism following a sharp drop in the number of people seeing their gp in person, with fewer than 60% of people able to see their doctor in this way in august — the first month after restrictions were eased. this compares with than 80% before the pandemic. despite recruitment drives to bring more gps into the profession, numbers of family doctors have continued to fall, with less than 27,000 on the medical register. 2000 less than five years ago. the health secretary, sajid javid, said the government was doing everything it possibly can to provide support to all areas of the health service.
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of course there is pressure across the health system because of the pandemic, and that pressure is also on primary care, including on our gps. there were many people that understandably stayed away from the nhs, they were asked to stay away because of the pandemic, and now many of them are coming forward, especially as society starts to reopen. it is a big challenge — a big challenge throughout the nhs, and it is ourjob in government to provide whatever support we can. so, for example, this year we have given an extra £34 billion to the nhs. last year it was £45 billion to the nhs and the care system combined. and we're going to keep providing that support in every way that we possibly can. how bad are the pressure currently facing accident and emergency departments? to answer that, we can speak to doctor ian higginson, vice president of the royal college of emergency medicine. thanks forjoining us. how difficult is it? what feedback i get in from
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around the country? the feedback confirms what _ around the country? the feedback confirms what data _ around the country? the feedback confirms what data is _ around the country? the feedback confirms what data is telling i around the country? the feedback confirms what data is telling us, i confirms what data is telling us, and that is that patients and staff in emergency departments are frequently having an awful time at the moment. 0ur frequently having an awful time at the moment. our staff are seeing patients who have had to wait for a long time in ambulances before even getting into our departments, they have been waiting a long time when in our departments, and once we decide they need to come into hospital, they face further weight to get into a hospital bed. iarufhat hospital, they face further weight to get into a hospital bed. what are the main causes _ to get into a hospital bed. what are the main causes of _ to get into a hospital bed. what are the main causes of this? _ the main causes of this? unquestionably, the long—term underfunding of emergency care system, including social care. so if hospitals are full because of patients requiring treatments, they cannot be discharged to a safe place, so we can get them from emergency apartments into hospitals, and if our emergency department is full, we can't get patients from our ambulances into hospitals. these are long—term problems that have not been addressed for a few years. is
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its not inevitable at on the back of the pandemic and society reopening, there was always going to be a bit of a crunch, difficult for any government to force a? ida. of a crunch, difficult for any government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. _ government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. there _ government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. there was - government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. there was a - government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. there was a lot i government to force a? no, it was not inevitable. there was a lot of i not inevitable. there was a lot of talk of how we could do things differently in the health service and much of that has not come to pass. we are going back to the same old, same old, and the same old has been a picture of deterioration in performance and a deteriorating experience for patients and staff in emergency departments across the country. emergency departments across the count . , . . emergency departments across the count . , ., ., ., country. given a large ageing population. _ country. given a large ageing population, the _ country. given a large ageing population, the nhs - country. given a large ageing population, the nhs has i country. given a large ageing i population, the nhs has always country. given a large ageing - population, the nhs has always been called a bottomless pit of money, is that what it is? ida. called a bottomless pit of money, is that what it is?— that what it is? no, it takes an admission _ that what it is? no, it takes an admission that _ that what it is? no, it takes an admission that there _ that what it is? no, it takes an admission that there is - that what it is? no, it takes an admission that there is a i admission that there is a significant problem and a willingness to take it on, and then it takes proper serious strategic
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planning that is based on data and not aspiration. then it will take long—term investment. along with seeing how we can use technology to help us do things differently, but also things like designing new hospitals and thinking about how we might use different staff rooms so we are doing everything as efficiently as possible. the most important part gun question is workforce, and that is the between must invest properly in and develop properly. —— the most important question is. —— what can the government do heading into winter, a difficult time always for the nhs, because we are seeing these problems in gp because we are seeing these problems in g' , ,., because we are seeing these problems ing, ., _ in gp surgeries? go to emergency departments- _ in gp surgeries? go to emergency departments- -- _ in gp surgeries? go to emergency departments. -- they _ in gp surgeries? go to emergency departments. -- they go - in gp surgeries? go to emergency departments. -- they go to i in gp surgeries? go to emergency i departments. -- they go to emergency departments. —— they go to emergency departments. —— they go to emergency departments. the departments. -- they go to emergency departments-— departments. the truthful answer is it is difficult — departments. the truthful answer is it is difficult to — departments. the truthful answer is it is difficult to do _ departments. the truthful answer is it is difficult to do things _ departments. the truthful answer is it is difficult to do things now - it is difficult to do things now because you are dealing with
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problematic not been adequately addressed for many years. one answer would be that what we cannot keep doing is chucking money at problems every winter, because we had not planned adequately for the fact that winter happens every year. the answers must be what we can do now is start planning effectively and investing effectively for the long—term future of the nhs. haifa long-term future of the nhs. how much money _ long-term future of the nhs. how much money is — long—term future of the nhs. how much money is needed? when you say workforce, precisely what is needed? within the emergency care sector, we know care homes are understaffed at the moment and from an emergency medicine point of view, we know that we are thousands of consultants short, we are many nurses assured, i don't know the precise figures, and also, the professionals who help us run our departments, such as hca supporters, researchers, those sort of elements of the workforce, need investment in. these are long—term problems. what we can now do is do our best to retain those members of
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staff who are still with us whilst we look at long—term workforce solutions, because at the moment, the risk to the workforce continuing to leave in ever—increasing numbers is making problem worse. to leave in ever-increasing numbers is making problem worse.— to leave in ever-increasing numbers is making problem worse. thank you ve much is making problem worse. thank you very much indeed. _ is making problem worse. thank you very much indeed. we _ is making problem worse. thank you very much indeed. we will _ is making problem worse. thank you very much indeed. we will take i is making problem worse. thank you very much indeed. we will take you | very much indeed. we will take you back briefly to cardiff, where the queen is leaving the senedd and you can see her majesty there greeting key members there, and she is accompanied by the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall. she made sure to dress just a few minutes ago praising —— a short address. praising the indomitable spirit of those in wales, saying everyone and people are huge debt of gratitude to key workers involved, volunteers, in the last 18 months in particular. she said the welsh parliament was an incredibly
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important institution there, paraphrasing, if i can little, but basically saying it was important for them to be representing the people of wales and holding the welsh covenant to account. mark drakeford, first minister, has been giving an address, we understand, and she mentioned the history of devolution in wales and this is the first visit of the queen to wales in five years, but she looks very much as if she is enjoying their visit, and also the duchess of cornwall and prince of wales accompanying her on that ceremonial visit. back to our top story and the news today on waiting list and problems with gps that the government is trying to address at the moment. with gps that the government is trying to address at the moment. i'm joined nowjonathan ashworth, shadow health & social care secretary, in leicester. thank you forjoining us. we are hearing that the government is aware of the problems, it was inevitable after the pandemic, as society opens
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up, that there is increased pressure on the nhs and that is what you're seeing. on the nhs and that is what you're seeina. ,, , , , ., seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis. and _ seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, and this _ seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, and this is _ seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, and this is now _ seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, and this is now the i seeing. the nhs is in desperate crisis, and this is now the 50th | crisis, and this is now the 50th that i have been on the bbc and other news outlets to talk about crises at the state —— and the state of the nhs. —— fifth year. we have had a decade of underfunding in the health service and we went into that covid pandemic short of 40,000 nurses after years of cutting thousands of beds, we don't have enough diagnostic equipment compared to comparable countries, and hospitals themselves face £9 billion in repair bills. this is a long—term problem. what is left today is a waiting list close to 6 million, more people. go to the private sector to pay for an operation, to pay for a neo— hip replacement, a
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hernia operation, because the weights are so unbearable. —— a knee replacement. and of course there is a situation of people having to see a situation of people having to see a gp face—to—face, well, sajid javid promises 6000 extra gps in 2019, but where are they? the plan today is unravelling, and it won't be more gps in local doctors surgeries. it works out as something like £33,000 per gp surgery, and that is a lot of money to recruit and extra doctor to provide more appointments. the announcement today is like chasing headlights, but it is completely unravelling. headlights, but it is completely unravelling-— headlights, but it is completely unravellinu. ~ ., , ., , ., unravelling. what is the labour plan on this? when _ unravelling. what is the labour plan on this? when labour— unravelling. what is the labour plan on this? when labour was - unravelling. what is the labour plan on this? when labour was last - unravelling. what is the labour plan on this? when labour was last in i on this? when labour was last in government. _ on this? when labour was last in government, we _ on this? when labour was last in government, we put _ on this? when labour was last in government, we put up- on this? when labour was last in government, we put up national| government, we put up national insurance, but uncovered that increase with serious long—term for the nhs and brought waiting times down from 18 months to 18 weeks. what we have now is a punishing
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unfair tax rise yet we do not have a serious credible reform plan for the national health service. where is the plan to recruit the nurses and doctors we need? but the plan to recruit the nurses and doctors we need?— doctors we need? but it takes a decade to _ doctors we need? but it takes a decade to train _ doctors we need? but it takes a decade to train a _ doctors we need? but it takes a decade to train a medical - doctors we need? but it takes a i decade to train a medical student doctors we need? but it takes a - decade to train a medical student up and get them... this government has beenin and get them... this government has been in powerfor over a decade, but that means labour also should have been training doctors at least once the end of your time in office. but beware. the end of your time in office. but beware- we _ the end of your time in office. iemi beware. we increased the end of your time in office. elf beware. we increased the numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs, but what this government did is actually cut training places, got rid of the training bursary for nurses, so when the crisis hit, after ten years of cutbacks across health care, we were short of nurses and beds, short of doctors. as i said, this is the fifth year i have been coming on programme such as yours to highlight problems in the nhs. if that long—term workers plan, thatis nhs. if that long—term workers plan, that is why we are now left in this
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desperate situation. == that is why we are now left in this desperate situation.— that is why we are now left in this desperate situation. -- if they had a long-term _ desperate situation. -- if they had a long-term plan. _ desperate situation. -- if they had a long-term plan. if— desperate situation. -- if they had a long-term plan. if people - desperate situation. -- if they had a long-term plan. if people are . a long—term plan. if people are worried about catch—up care, what should government do? should they have another visa scheme to get more international doctors, nurses and support staff in? part international doctors, nurses and sunport staff in?— support staff in? part of the roblem support staff in? part of the problem is _ support staff in? part of the problem is there _ support staff in? part of the problem is there is - support staff in? part of the | problem is there is shortage worldwide doctors and nurses, and the problem has now exacerbated by —— has now been exacerbated by brexit and covid, but i want to recommend two things to the government. they should be more flu jabs and covid jabs. in terms of teenagers who we know can now get thejob, after emma's coming up, let them go to walk in centres to get jabbed, ourjab rate among teenagers is still worryingly low. —— half term is coming up. and fix social care. one of the big problems as you
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often have people trapped in a hospital bed not being able to be discharged. i’m hospital bed not being able to be discharued. �* , hospital bed not being able to be discharged-— discharged. i'm 'ust going to into ru:b discharged. i'm 'ust going to into rugby because — discharged. i'm just going to into rugby because we _ discharged. i'm just going to into rugby because we have _ discharged. i'm just going to into rugby because we have to - discharged. i'm just going to into rugby because we have to say - discharged. i'm just going to into - rugby because we have to say goodbye to our viewers on bbc two, but we will stay with jonathan ashworth on the bbc news channel. sorry about that, miss ashworth. ourviewers the bbc news channel. sorry about that, miss ashworth. our viewers on bbc two left us. —— mr ashworth. to follow—up on that, picking up on the whole question of international staff and brexit, and there has been crossed number of sectors including health care us staff. is the government right ultimately to maintain its position that it is not just going to open borders and fix all of these problems bringing in people the british people firmly said they were against, by voting for brexit? ., , ., , , ., for brexit? doctors and nurses are often on the _ for brexit? doctors and nurses are often on the lists _ for brexit? doctors and nurses are often on the lists of— for brexit? doctors and nurses are often on the lists of professionals| often on the lists of professionals who come to work in the united kingdom, but the problem is the
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international situation around covid and brexit has made us less attractive destination to be frank. we have a separate problem of social care workers, priti patel seems to think social care workers are not valuable to the nhs, not as valuable as a nurse or doctor. but we must invest in workforce planning here, we need a decent training bursary for nurses and midwives, and we must look at the numbers of medical training places in this country. are long—term problems, they will not fix the crisis we are in it now. so ou fix the crisis we are in it now. so you would not bring in extra international staff right now to get us through winter? we international staff right now to get us through winter?— international staff right now to get us through winter? we were allowed to take an international _ us through winter? we were allowed to take an international staff- to take an international staff anyway for the aspect of health care, so the issue is not whether the government will allow it, but if we are considered an attractive destination any more, and there is a local shortage of clinical staff anyway. in the end, you will only fix the workforce issues by
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retaining the workforce you have got, and today's announcement has gone down badly with gps, and investing in them, so investing in their training, investing in them, so investing in theirtraining, and investing in them, so investing in their training, and you must provide more opportunities to train and recruit more in future. because across health care, we are looking at around 210,000 vacancies at the moment, and that is sustainable. thank you very much indeed for your time. you are watching bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. gps in england are being given an extra £250 million, from existing budgets, to spend on locum doctors — with the aim of increasing the number of face—to—face appointments.
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and the queen officially opens the sixth term of the welsh senedd in cardiff — a ceremony that had been delayed due to the pandemic. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. we are reflecting on this brilliant run from cameron norrie at indian wells, who is set to be the british number one if he wins the quarterfinals at the tournament. he made it through to the first time —— quarterfinals for the first time. this win was his 44th in the atp tour this year, and as well as replacing dan evans as british number one, a win tonight would see him break into the world's top 20 for the first time in his career. figures released today by the home office show there were 92 football —related arrests at england home matches during the 2020—21 season, most occurring at euro 2020. england played six out of seven matches at
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wembley, which saw them into final, and there were further arrests involving international teams playing at the tournament at wembley, with all six arrests at the italy and spain semifinal. after chelsea's victory last night, arsenal are in action tonight in the women's champions league hoping to continue their excellent league form. hoping to continue their brilliant league form, 100 percent record so far, and scoring some excellent goals, katie mccabe with the pick against everton last weekend. they face hoffenheim having lost heavily to the champions barcelona in their opening match. we want to win every game we play and do our best, so nothing changes. we have played one game, we have five games more to go at the group stage and we need to have five solid performances. we need to start with one tomorrow. there's been lots of messages of support for the wales international david brooks, who has been diagnosed with cancer. the 24—year—old says he has stage 2 hodgkin lymphoma,
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but that "the prognosis is positive" and that treatment will start next week. brooks, who's won 21 wales caps, was on international duty just last week, and credits the wales medical team for helping detect the illness. lots of tributes have come, as i was saying. lots of tributes have come, as i was saying. the middlesbrough defender, sol bamba who's recovered from cancer himself, said... wales team mate ethan ampadu wished him all the best, and england defender tyrone mings has told brooks to "stay strong". that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories, including the opening match of the womens big bash league between sydney sixers and melbourne stars on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. at least five people are reported dead in heavy gunfire in the lebanese capital, beirut. it happened near a protest against an investigation into last year's port explosion.
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supporters of the shia militant group hezbollah and its allies had been gathering to press for the removal of the judge who heads the inquiry. it's not clear exactly who was firing or why. huge tension surrounds the investigation into the accidental blast, which killed more than 200 people. hebollah says the inquiry is biased. but victims of the explosion and many other lebanese want to see it continue and hold those responsible for what happened to account. our correspondent anna foster is on the ground in beirut. this all escalated very quickly this morning from what began as a protest by his brother and supporters and they want to see the judge removed as investigating judge because they feel he is disproportionately targeting ten three mac politicians when calling people to give evidence. —— shia. but this protest, there were some chanting, some jostling happening outside the
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justice palace and then we started to hear gunfire a few streets away, and this has really swept through beirut this morning. it's worth saying you might hear while talking in the background some gunfire, but it is a few streets away from us. but this is where things were happening earlier, new can probably see the detritus of what went on earlier. there are burned—out motorbikes, there is broken glass, you can see where the windows had been shut out of buildings. there was residential building where the floor—to—ceiling window had been shut out and was dropping down into the street. you will also notice in great number here the lebanese armed forces. they are trying to bring the situation under control, they have been saying to people in beirut, do not come out onto the streets, they want people to stay indoors while they try to contain the situation and work out where the fire is coming from and what they can do about it. it
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coming from and what they can do about it. , .,, ., , , coming from and what they can do about it. , ., _ , about it. it is obviously very fluid and it must _ about it. it is obviously very fluid and it must be _ about it. it is obviously very fluid and it must be very _ about it. it is obviously very fluid and it must be very alarming - about it. it is obviously very fluid and it must be very alarming for| and it must be very alarming for those who are caught up in this immediately. it those who are caught up in this immediately.— those who are caught up in this immediatel . , ., , immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic _ immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic pictures - immediately. it is. there have been some very graphic pictures and - some very graphic pictures and videos on social media this morning. pictures of children in a school. there were some schools have decided to close when they head this protest was happening and we were told protest is being scaled down accordingly because of that. but we have seen pictures of children cowering under desks in classrooms, cowering under desks in classrooms, cowering in corridors, which brings back difficult memories for their parents, frankly, many of whom lived through the civil war here in lebanon. it is a very fluid situation. in terms of the number of people killed and injured, we have seen the red cross out on the streets dealing with injured people, but it is a situation that will take time to work out how it escalated and how they will bring it to a close. ~ u. and how they will bring it to a close. ~ .. ., and how they will bring it to a close. ~ ., and how they will bring it to a close. ., , ., , , close. we can hear some shots behind ou, i close. we can hear some shots behind you. i hope — close. we can hear some shots behind you. i hope it— close. we can hear some shots behind you. i hope it is _ close. we can hear some shots behind you, i hope it is safe _ close. we can hear some shots behind you, i hope it is safe for— close. we can hear some shots behind you, i hope it is safe for you _ close. we can hear some shots behind you, i hope it is safe for you to - you, i hope it is safe for you to keep talking to us at the moment. can you give us an idea where
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exactly you are at the moment? we are in an exactly you are at the moment? , are in an area on the edge —— we are on the edge of an area in beirut. you can hear the gunfire, but in this residential area, it echoes off the building so it sounds like we are closer than we are, but i can reassure you, it is happening a long way that way. we have taken a safe position to speak to you. but these scenes that you are seeing, it marks a new step in what is happening in ii a new step in what is happening in 11 on right now. they have been shortages, there have been protest over the last investigation, but what happens next is crucial. things are so very tense, people are frustrated and feel like they have gone through an awful lot here in the last year also. in the uprising 2019, people took to the streets to protest against what they saw as a corrupt ruling class, political mismanagement, since then lebanon has a new government in place, but
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because they are split over what to do with the judge and the port investigation, they are not meeting at the moment. it is worth mentioning this is the centre of beirut and this is where people live and work and to school and this morning, they have seen the army back on the streets again in a combat role. they have seen and heard running gun battles. they have heard running gun battles. they have heard the sound of rpgs, a long way away, but of the buildings it will sound louder to you, and it will suggest it is closer to us, but it is a long way away. it is all very concerning. is a long way away. it is all very concerning-— is a long way away. it is all very concerninu. .., , ~ ., concerning. our correspondent anna foster on the _ concerning. our correspondent anna foster on the ground _ concerning. our correspondent anna foster on the ground speaking - concerning. our correspondent anna foster on the ground speaking to - concerning. our correspondent anna | foster on the ground speaking to me a short time ago. these are live pictures we are getting on the ground at the moment, feed just returned. let'sjust ground at the moment, feed just returned. let's just listening to what is going on at the moment. lots of sounds of gunfire, as you can
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see, some people with protection and emergency services there. not clear how close the gunfire is to wear pictures are coming from. —— two the pictures are coming from. —— two the pictures are coming from. —— two the pictures are coming from. we know there is a death toll of about five people, we understand, including a woman who died from a bullet wound in her house, because this is a residential area, as we heard from anna foster, as gunfire continues in the lebanese capital. army units are in the area and we know hezbollah has been involved in these protests. but gunfire continuing in beirut at the moment. the european union's ambassador to the uk has described eu proposals
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to resolve the row about post brexit trade in northern ireland as 'unprecedented'. this dispute is all about the northern ireland protocol, which was agreed and signed by the uk and the eu, and came into force at the start of this year. among other things, the protocol requires extra checks and paperwork on products like food and drink imported from britain. because northern ireland is still in the eu's single market for goods, there are no border checkpoints between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, a crucial factor to avoid a return to the tensions and troubles of the past. the result is a trade border which falls between britain and northern ireland, which unionists say undermines northern ireland's place in the uk. the uk government now wants to reverse its previous agreement on the role of the european court ofjustice. the eu's ambassador to the uk, joao vale de almeida, told the bbc the new proposals were not concessions. let's speak to lisa whitten, a research fellow at queen's university belfast, who specialises in the northern ireland protocol. what is your view of what has been announced so far? thank you for
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joining us. announced so far? thank you for joining us— announced so far? thank you for 'oinin: us. ., ~' i. ., joining us. thank you for letting me be here. joining us. thank you for letting me be here- the _ joining us. thank you for letting me be here. the package _ joining us. thank you for letting me be here. the package of— joining us. thank you for letting me be here. the package of measuresl be here. the package of measures that the eu announced yesterday go further in addressing operational challenges experienced by businesses here with consequential implications for goods in specific areas, particularly. while the outcome of talks between the uk and eu remains to be seen, whether a compromise can be agreed and the legal integrity and details will need to be coming forward on that, it should be said that from a northern ireland perspective, this latest development is positive. there are gaps between the two sides, but in setting out proposals, they are recognising the particular position of northern ireland and the operational challenge of implementing an untested set of provisions, which the protocol is. the unique position of northern ireland. and the uk and
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eu restating their commitment to reaching a resolution that benefits people of northern ireland goes as far as possible to promote stability here in the still fragile —— and the still fragile peace that we live in. but isn't this ultimately going to involve one party or another effectively turning a blind eye? because you're trying to square a circle. ., . , because you're trying to square a circle. ., ., , .., , because you're trying to square a circle. ., ., , , , circle. you are, it is complex place and arrangement _ circle. you are, it is complex place and arrangement and _ circle. you are, it is complex place and arrangement and northern - circle. you are, it is complex place - and arrangement and northern ireland is essentially situated between the uk and the eu markets and that does create complexity. i think we have seen so far the protocol in itself is a compromise. it is a delicate balance and it seeks to protect the belfast good friday agreement, which is also a delicate balance, the history of this place and suggest
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that compromises can be found, square circles, even when it does not look feasible. as i say, there are gaps between the two sides in particular on the ecj governance issue you raised, and the proposal set out by the eu outline a number of measures that would involve northern irish involvement in the process. but that idea of removing ecj jurisdiction on the application, continued application of the eu law, thatis continued application of the eu law, that is something we won't see the eu compromise on, because it is an existential issue on single market dissertation. —— single market. what dissertation. -- single market. what is at stake a? _ dissertation. -- single market. what is at stake a? it _ dissertation. -- single market. what is at stake a? it is _ dissertation. -- single market. what is at stake a? it is complex - is at stake a? it is complex legally, but it is about day—to—day life, business, trade and security,
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isn't it? it life, business, trade and security, isn't it? ., ., ., , isn't it? it would have to be said that the new _ isn't it? it would have to be said that the new arrangements, - isn't it? it would have to be said that the new arrangements, the i that the new arrangements, the majority of businesses here have been adapting to the new landscape, as is the case with the challenges here. we have seen adaptation with the unforeseen issues, technical issues and specific sectoral issues that have come about in implementing this. they feature in the proposal set out and there is willingness to address specific problems in relevant areas. the more challenging prospect is the political one. so less practical and more political, and that sense of being an identity of unionists and loyalists being undermined. on that, there has been
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some positive reactions. we saw the dup leader in response to the eu's proposals, describing them as a starting point, and that sense a message that we wait to see what comes about from the eu and uk talks. the real challenge at stake is stability. there are practical issues are now easier to address, easier to adjust and political stability here, and that is really difficult, and is the most fragile aspect of post brexit northern ireland at the minute. so it is always going to be harder to secure stability. always going to be harder to secure stabili . ., ~ , ., , . now it's time for a look at the weather, here's chris.
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thank you, as far as the weather goes, we have got a big mixture of weather across the uk. for many it is pretty cloudy with some bright or sunny spells, but broken cloud in the south of england where it is going to stay largely sunny. scotland sees this vein and brisk winds pushed southwards this afternoon, the arena trickling its way into northern ireland. for most, a mile today. temperatures reaching a mile today. temperatures reaching a high of 18 in london, should be about 1k degrees which is the october average. the rain is turning lighter and catchier as it reaches wales in midlands. behind that, we see much cooler conditions spreading into corbynites eventually for northern england, northern ireland and scotland but at least here it will be a fine and sunny start to the day on friday as the front continues to push southwards, just a strip of cloud across the south of england and wales and the odd spot of rain. temperatures will be coming down and quite cool. even further
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south across the likes of london and cardiff, temperatures tomorrow afternoon around 1a or 15 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. gps in england are being given an extra 250 million pounds, from existing budgets, to spend on locum doctors — with the aim of increasing the number of face—to—face appointments. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. two people have been shot dead in beirut as armed clashes break out during a protest against the judge investigating last year s massive blast in the city s port. trumpets. and the queen officially opens the sixth term of the welsh senedd in cardiff — a ceremony that had been delayed
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due to the pandemic. possibly up to five deaths, the latest figures coming out of lebanon but we will keep up on those numbers for you. the queen has officially opened the sixth term of the senedd in wales, on her first visit to the country in five years. in her speech, she commended law makers for their recent achievements, including establishing a youth parliament and for their innovation during the pandemic. she said 'the welsh people have much to be proud of and over the next five years�*. the queen was seen using a walking stick for the second time this week. we can speak to our correspondent tomos morgan who is in cardiff. first time in five years, extraordinary.- first time in five years, extraordinary. first time in five years, extraordina . ., , , ., , extraordinary. the last time she was here was 2016 _ extraordinary. the last time she was here was 2016 to _ extraordinary. the last time she was here was 2016 to open _ extraordinary. the last time she was here was 2016 to open the _ extraordinary. the last time she was here was 2016 to open the fifth - here was 2016 to open the fifth session after that election back then. she wasjoined
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session after that election back then. she was joined today by her son the prince of wales, charles and camilla, the duchess of cornwall. the queen wearing a rose petal pink coat and also camilla wearing a bright red dress. charles was in his suit and a blue tie. as they arrived first, the prince of wales and camilla, there was a 21 gun salute and a few hundred gathered to see the royals arrived here today. after they went in, the queen arrived. she met some schoolchildren from a local primary school after shaking hands with the first prime minister drake fred, she then went on in for the first time during the pandemic, all members was that in the debating chamber. and for the first time as well there was a performance by the welsh national youth opera. they performed the first time live in 18 months, another performance as well
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by the royal harpists. he mentioned it was a bit about the speech she gave within the chamber. she used it to congratulate the recent election in may. this official opening delayed due to coronavirus. she said it would be a challenging term due to coronavirus, it will be focused on the recovery of the pandemic and said as well, as you mentioned, as is the last time she was here there has been further devolution in wales, the assembly turning into a parliament with more lawmaking powers. she then congratulated the assembly as well for their work. the first minister gave a speech and he spoke about how it was now time to look at the future. although 60 members would disagree at times, they would have the heart of the people of wales at the heart of everything they do. he closed his speech by saying he would be looking beyond the pandemic, saying that all members who do all the powers to
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promote prosperity, equality and well—being of everyone in wales. the queen has now gone back to the royal train in cardiff central as the prince of wales and camilla still speak to some of the members. some of the covid community champions have been here today to speak to the royals. they are members of societies across wales that have gone above and beyond to help communities and bring a smile to people's faces. the royals coming to cardiff today to officially open the sixth session of the senedd in wales. ., ~ sixth session of the senedd in wales. . ~' , ., , sixth session of the senedd in wales. ., ~ , ., , . climate group insulate britain says it will suspend its road—blocking protests for the next 11 days. the organisation, which has caused major disruption on the m25 motorway and other major roads, acknowledges the impact its protests have had over the past five weeks and urged the prime minister to make a "meaningful statement" on plans for insulating and retrofitting homes.
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the uk birth rate has fallen to its lowest in nearly 20 years. the latest figures show that the number of children born in england and wales continues. there were 613,936 live births — a decrease of 4.1 per cent since 2019. the total fertility rate is now 1.58 children per woman. the number of women giving birth fell across all age groups — including mothers over 40, for the first time since the early 1980s. police in norway say a suspect accused of killing five people with a bow and arrow had converted to islam and showed signs of radicalisation. the archer shot many arrows — several of them hitting houses. reports say he shot at anyone he came across. the suspect is a 37—year—old dane living in kongsberg, the south—eastern norwegian town where the attacks took place on wednesday. norway's new prime minister, jonas gahr stoere, has called the murders a gruesome and brutal act.
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in the last hour, police in norway have been holding a press conference about the killings. translation: there had been concerns about his i radicalisation in the past. we can't at the moment go into the details of what those concerns were. however, we have and continue to follow up on the information and tips that come in. we can also confirm the suspect converted to islam. the chancellor has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presence on the shelves for christmas, despite a logjam at uk's biggest commercial port. he says the government is doing all it can to keep supplies moving. he is attending a meeting of the world's advanced economies in washington. this book to our economics editor. —— he spoke. one of the world's biggest parking lots, dozens of cargo ships waiting
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in the pacific full of goods from asia, unable to dock at terminals in parts of california, with containers piled high. the same now happening on the atlantic coast of georgia and in other parts around the world. the plumbing of the world economy not functioning properly. at the white housejoe biden summoned us business bosses to work 20 47 to clear the backlog. bosses to work 20 47 to clear the backlor. , , ., bosses to work 20 47 to clear the backlor. , _, , bosses to work 20 47 to clear the backlo.. , ,., backlog. this is an across the board commitment _ backlog. this is an across the board commitment to _ backlog. this is an across the board commitment to go _ backlog. this is an across the board commitment to go into _ backlog. this is an across the board commitment to go into 20 - backlog. this is an across the board commitment to go into 20 47. - backlog. this is an across the board commitment to go into 20 47. this| backlog. this is an across the board | commitment to go into 20 47. this is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods to our supply chain. the movement of materials and goods to our supply chain-— our supply chain. the actions of the president show _ our supply chain. the actions of the president show this _ our supply chain. the actions of the president show this is _ our supply chain. the actions of the president show this is a _ our supply chain. the actions of the president show this is a supply - president show this is a supply chain crisis that affects many countries across the world. it arises out of the fact that after the pandemic, demand to much faster than expected much faster than the ability of the world economy to supply the goods required. that has led to shortages, price rises and thatis led to shortages, price rises and that is not going to be solved before christmas. in fields and airfields around the usa, there are
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tens of thousands of newly finished cars and trucks, but it can't be sold because they lack the crucial microchips, the orders for which were cancelled at the start of the pandemic. the companies were too pessimistic about the rebound in demand. that has led to a change of view from the bank chief who earlier this year predicted an unprecedented british bean. we this year predicted an unprecedented british bean. ~ , . ., british bean. we predicted a booming recove in british bean. we predicted a booming recovery in the _ british bean. we predicted a booming recovery in the economy. _ british bean. we predicted a booming recovery in the economy. i _ british bean. we predicted a booming recovery in the economy. i think - recovery in the economy. i think what we missed was it would be so strong it would create supply chain problems, whether it is gasoline, chips, whatever it is.— chips, whatever it is. because of andemic chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, _ chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, finance i pandemic restrictions, finance ministers attending international meetings are spilling out onto the streets and parks of washington, dc. one solution to all of this is producing more locally. to reduce the dependence _ producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of— producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france - producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france and - producing more locally. to reduce l the dependence of france and other european countries to chips, semiconductors, two of the products in which there are shortages and
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bottlenecks today. that in which there are shortages and bottlenecks today.— in which there are shortages and bottlenecks today. that could lead to hiuher bottlenecks today. that could lead to higher prices — bottlenecks today. that could lead to higher prices permanently, - to higher prices permanently, alongside otherfactors to higher prices permanently, alongside other factors from us china tensions,. exit visa restrictions and fears of eu uk trade. it is a global economic challenge and it is not going away. humans have been enjoying blue cheese and beer for up to 2700 years — that's according to a new study which examined ancient faeces from a salt mine in austria. scientists say that the miners�* faeces contain the first molecular evidence of beer consumption on the continent at that time. i can now speak to frank maixner, the lead author of the study. thank you forjoining us and i guess you are glad that the remains are that old if you are studying them in detail. tell us what did you find. thank you for your interest in our studies. actually, it is a very unique site which covers the last
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millennia, around 3000 years of mining activity. it is still nowadays used as a salt mine. it's deposits, it's palio faeces, provided unique insights into the dietary section and gut microbes. the unique conditions in this mine preserved biomolecules extremely well, so there is the salt and this constant temperature throughout the year, which then resulted in an extraordinary preservation, including dna and proteins. what including dna and proteins. what exactl did including dna and proteins. what exactly did you — including dna and proteins. what exactly did you find _ including dna and proteins. what exactly did you find that leads you to conclude they were drinking beer and eating blue cheese? in to conclude they were drinking beer and eating blue cheese?— and eating blue cheese? in one of these palio _ and eating blue cheese? in one of these palio faeces, _ and eating blue cheese? in one of these palio faeces, we _ and eating blue cheese? in one of these palio faeces, we analysed i and eating blue cheese? in one of. these palio faeces, we analysed for in total, there was a high amount of fungal dna. this fungal dna belonged to a tape of penicillin, which is
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involved in the cheese fermentation, and the other fungal dna was the least dna. it was identified to be very similar to the beer least now use. ,.,, ,., very similar to the beer least now use. , use. gosh, in some ways, things haven't changed _ use. gosh, in some ways, things haven't changed very _ use. gosh, in some ways, things haven't changed very much. - use. gosh, in some ways, things haven't changed very much. is i use. gosh, in some ways, things haven't changed very much. is it| haven't changed very much. is it surprising to see this was their diet? it surprising to see this was their diet? , , , , , diet? it is definitely surprising because initially _ diet? it is definitely surprising because initially we _ diet? it is definitely surprising because initially we thought i diet? it is definitely surprising - because initially we thought about having fun those which come from the environment, but when we looked more closely into the genome, we saw in the genome adaptations, it showed us the genome adaptations, it showed us the fungus were used several times and the already showed signatures of domestication. this shows us there was already a beer culture, something the brewers intentionally used the yeast to grow beer. this
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something the brewers intentionally used the yeast to grow beer.- used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria. — used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria. it — used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria, it is _ used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria, it is fairly _ used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria, it is fairly famous - used the yeast to grow beer. this is in austria, it is fairly famous for - in austria, it is fairly famous for the beer brewing, isn't it? how does it reflect other patterns of consumption across europe at that time, do you know? it is consumption across europe at that time, do you know?— time, do you know? it is known at that time already _ time, do you know? it is known at that time already fermenting - time, do you know? it is known at that time already fermenting of i that time already fermenting of foods was a tradition, so wine, for example. the is different archaeological evidence. we had here the chance to look from a different perspective, so we used the dna to get indications for this consumption of fermented foods, and this is quite unique. it really supports this sophisticated usage of food fermentation, to not only gain a new product but also to maybe make it... to change the taste, like in the case of the blue cheese, and this is quite surprising, i would say. bier? quite surprising, i would say. very interesting- _ quite surprising, i would say. very interesting. all _ quite surprising, i would say. very interesting. all the _ quite surprising, i would say. very
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interesting. all the best. thank you so much. ., ., by by the end of this week that could be an extra challenge, a blockade by french fishermen who are angry about not being given licences to fish in british waters. our paris correspondent lucy williamson has been talking to some of them. we arejust we are just trying to get that report for you if we can. we might have to come back to that report. let us move on to another story that we have got at the moment whilst we try and find that report on french fishing. we can bring you more on the problems in the nhs, the government announcing £250 million to try and help with the gp practice and lack face—to—face appointments. and the leader of the opposition sir keir starmer has been on a trip to a steel meal in sheffield today and responded to that government plan to try increase gp appointments. i
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think it is very important that people can see their gp face—to—face if that is what they want to do. that requires a robust plan. what the government has put in place is not a robust plan. the problem here is lack of gps. in the election in 2019, the prime minister promised a 6000 new gps, that was his great pledge. we have now got less than we had in 2019. it is the same old pattern, a promise made in an election, broken and undelivered two years later. we have got the crisis we have got with gps. this isn't enough, the government needs to take responsibility and deliver what they promised at the election, more gps. north yorkshire s police fire and crime panel has unanimously passed a vote of no confidence in the commissioner philip allott, following comments he made about the sarah everard case. ms everard was raped and murdered by pc wayne couzens in march. after his sentencing, the conservative commissioner mr allott said "women need to be
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streetwise about when they can be arrested and that sarah should never had submitted to that. he has apologised for his comment. researchers say that positive lateral flow covid tests are more accurate than previously thought and should be trusted. scientists at university college london found the tests, which are cheap and quick, were more than ninety percent effective at detecting infectious people. they are currently given out free by the government. researchers in the netherlands say they've developed a way to carry out injections without using needles. they've developed a laser — called a 'bubble gun' — that fires droplets of liquid into the skin — in a process said to be virtually painless. the bbc�*s tim allman explains. astrid nijsen is 31 years old. she's an actress and she is terrified of needles. so much so, she has had to seek therapy for a phobia that stretches back to her childhood. translation: it started during puberty. -
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when i see a needle or have to get a shot, ijust want to leave. i'll tear the place down just to avoid getting a shot. but for astrid and millions of others like her, salvation may be at hand. this is the bubble gun, a high—tech alternative that uses lasers rather than needles to administer a jab. within a millisecond, the glass that contains the liquid is heated by a laser, a bubble is created in the liquid, pushing the liquid at velocities in the order of 100 kilometres per hour, and we can see how it penetrates about one millimetre. never has this seemed more relevant. for nearly a year now, injections and vaccinations have been taking place all around the world. could the bubble gun, said to be essentially pain—free, encourage the more reluctant to come forward for their shot? translation: in my opinion, - this is a good solution since people
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often have this phobia of getting stung. here, we only get a laser and we are vaccinated without suffering. usa! of course, some will never agree to an injection, phobia or otherwise. and it may be several years until the bubble gun is available for widespread use. for now, the needle is still the norm. tim allman, bbc news. the indonesian holiday island of bali has reopened to some international holidaymakers. however tourists still have to quarantine for five days at their own expense. those who can visit are fully—vaccinated and from countries with low infection rates such as china, new zealand and japan. the uk isn't included on the list. we'll find out the winner of this year's stirling prize today — that's the search for britain's best new building. as our media and arts correspondent david sillito reports, this year's shortlist reflects how the environment has become a prime concern. kingston university's town house —
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a home for its library, its dance studios, and also a new social hub for students. wow, this is incredible. when i what pattern people from home, _ when i what pattern people from home, and i sayi when i what pattern people from home, and i say i to uni there, they are like_ home, and i say i to uni there, they are like that — home, and i say i to uni there, they are like that is where you study? i am like _ are like that is where you study? i am like yeah, it isjust so cool. but it's also a place of solar panels and natural cooling to create a building that is less energy hungry. this key worker housing in cambridge is also designed to encourage a low carbon life style. you see more bike sheds here than parking. this year, six stirling buildings are about more than just beauty and clever ideas. care for the environment has become a prime concern. take this, windermere, and a museum to house a famous boat collection. the overriding concern,
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though, is don't spoil the view. sustainability has been really central to the concept of building. we have systems like the lake source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we have selected wherever possible local materials so that travel from source to site is as short as possible. this bridge in north cornwall, a place connected with the stories of king arthur. a challenge to reconnect the eroded site and not damage the archaeology. and when it comes to ancient history, this building in london uses some ancient methods. lumps of stone are what is keeping these flats and office up right, a sort of high—tech stonehenge. sedimentary rock, and depending on how old it is you will still find fossils within it. here you can see... this has come straight out of the ground? here is an ammonite shell. it is
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actually cheaper, faster and far greener to put stone buildings up. we found here that we saved 92% of the embodied carbon had this been a steel framed building and clad in stone. this hasn't been simple. its rough hewn exterior is not everyone's taste. at one point, the council was seeing to have it demolished. it was only saved after a two—year legal battle by its architect. was there a moment where you thought you wish you had never started this? of course. sorry, you want me to elaborate even after you when you are obviously _ even after you when you are obviously relieved for that two and half year _ obviously relieved for that two and half year of stress structures you anyway. — half year of stress structures you anyway, so — half year of stress structures you anyway, so it is difficult. and our final building swap steel and concrete for word. inspired by a
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garden of paradise, cambridge mosque is low carbon spirituality. six very different buildings but all reflecting a desire on the eve of a global climate summit to tread gently on the planet. and we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tonight at 7:30pm pst, where we'll be looking at the six shortlisted entries. and finding out who the lucky winner is. dojoin us for and finding out who the lucky winner is. do join us for that. three years after it was partially shredded a banksy artwork is to be put up for auction at sotheby�*s again later today. the iconic image of a girl with a balloon was partially shredded live in front of an audience just seconds after it sold for 1.4 million dollars in 2018. the work was renamed love in a bin by the artist himself and is expected to fetch between 5
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and 8 million dollars. you could say it is extremely clever, lots and lots of theories about what exactly had gone on with this incredibly famous image but we will see what happens. in a moment, the bbc news at one with jane hill, but now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. september was the second warmest on record here in the uk and that one has continued into the first half of october with temperatures well above the seasonal average. today we have got rain across northern scotland, cloud elsewhere with some breaks here and there. we have got some sunshine, especially across parts of the south and underneath those sunny skies, it has been a very different —looking weather picture impacts of dorset, barely a cloud in the sky. plenty of sunshine and the wind is pretty light. contrast that with the rain in scotland which is accompanied by brisk winds and rain
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will trickle its way to northern ireland. the in chain stays with us across southern counties and there will be breaks in the cloud elsewhere. very mild for most of us, temperatures reaching a height of 18 celsius, above the october average. overnight tonight and through friday the cold front will push southwards, eventually introducing cooler and fresher air for all parts of the country for a time at least. overnight that when the front moves southwards across england and wales. as it does so, it will be weakening so there will not be much rain as it works and wales. as it does so, it will be weakening so there will not be much rain as it works into wales and the midlands later in the night. with clearing skies at entry for scotland, northern ireland and the north of england, but you're a fine start to the day on friday. friday sees that weather front pushing southwards, it was a bit of cloud and some rain but nothing significant. fresherair and some rain but nothing significant. fresher air moving in for all of us and through the afternoon, temperatures in aberdeen just eight degrees, ten in newcastle. further southwards across england and wales, not as one as it has been, 14 or 15 for london and
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cardiff. a court friday night, patches of rust in the countryside in the north—east. this weekend, some reasonable weather to come for any of us. it will be turning milder as we go through the course of saturday and sunday for many of us. there will be a lot of dry and bright weather around on saturday with some sunny spells. temperatures will be lifting, so eventually we should see highs of around 16 or 17 degrees, so turning milder. it is still pretty cool across central and northern scotland with temperatures around nine or 10 degrees. milder air artworks and for sunday. there will be a lot of cloud around, is a mist and fog patches and the cloud of thick enough for rain, but as seenin of thick enough for rain, but as seen in recent days, there will probably be some cloud breaks and sunny spells. very mild, highs up to 18.
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the number of people waiting for routine hospital operations reaches a record high in england. 5.7 million people need procedures like hip and knee replacements and waiting times in a&e are also up. and amid concern that it's difficult for patients to see a gp face to face, the government pledges money to help. there is a huge demand on our fantastic gps and how can we help with that is by providing the financial support, getting rid of red tape and helping to shift some of that demand to other more sensible places. we'll ask how the increasing pressures on the nhs can be dealt with. also this lunchtime: in norway, a man who killed five people using a bow and arrows was known to the police, who say they'd had concerns
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he'd been radicalised. gunfire.

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