Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 14, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

9:00 am
this is bbc news, with the latest headlines. the goverment wants gps in england to see more patients in person. ministers unveil a £250 million pound winter rescue package, following a sharp fall in face—to—face appointments during the pandemic. it's clear that the patient should be seen face—to—face, if that's what they want, and it's important that the patient is given a choice. this is the package that's going to help to do that. have you struggled to get a face—to—face gp appointment? do you think what are in effect league tables for gps are a good idea? or perhaps you prefer telephone and video—based consultations with your doctor? let me know what you think.
9:01 am
you can do that on twitter. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a logjam at the uk's biggest commercial port. the eu's ambassador to the uk says the european union has gone to the limits of what it can do to fix the row about trade in northern ireland. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. it's the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on the repair of this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. and where's wally? well, sort of. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses can be spotted, and where.
9:02 am
hello and welcome to bbc news this morning. gp surgeries in england are to receive an extra £250 million this winter to help them see more patients in person. the emergency funding is part of the extra £5 billion covid fund announced last month and will be used to prioritise the hiring of extra staff, and providing more on—the—day face—to—face appointments. it comes amidst mounting criticism following a sharp drop in the number of people being able to see their gp at the surgery. fewer than 60% of people were able to see their doctor in person in august — the first month after restrictions were eased. this compares with than 80% before the pandemic. league tables will also be used to show whether surgeries are doing enough
9:03 am
to see more patients on—site. the doctors�* union the bma has criticised the plans, saying it shows a government out of touch with the scale of the crisis on the ground, and warned patients will continue to struggle to book appointments. despite recruitment drives to bring more gps into the profession, numbers of family doctors have continued to fall, with fewer than 27,000 on the medical register. that's 2,000 less than five years ago. let's get more from our health correspondent, jim reed. so, i got your message just now about the pain in your knee, yeah? the pandemic has changed the way many of us access a gp. for some, telephone and online consultations have replaced face—to—face appointments. under these plans, the government says £250 million will be made available to boost access to family doctors in england. it's meant to pay for more temporary
9:04 am
or locum gps, as well as support staff like physiotherapists. there is a promise to cut some red tape, and more cash for security, at a time when doctors say they are dealing with high levels of abuse. social—distancing rules for gps are also being reviewed, which could allow more patients in waiting rooms. the patient in the first instance will call through to the surgery. there will be a discussion, and gps will make a decision with that patient and they will decide what's clinically appropriate. but in cases where it's clear that the patient should be seen face—to—face, if that's what they want, and it's important that a patient is given a choice, this is the package that's going to help to do that. the new cash for gps, though, is part of a £5 billion covid fund already announced by ministers to get the nhs through this winter. the doctors�* union says the package does not go nearly enough. it is very difficult
9:05 am
actually on the frontline, there are not enough doctors. there are 2,000 less gps than there were five years ago. and there actuallyjust isn't the workforce to see everybody face—to—face, and i think a lot of people have forgotten that _ pre—pandemic, if you rang to try and get through to your gp to get an appointment, you wouldn't actually be seen for two to three weeks. so actually having a telephone appointment within 48 hours is actually a lot more efficient. the extra support for gps in england comes as waiting times in hospital a&e units have also been rising across the whole uk. the group which represents nhs trusts is warning today of the most challenging winter yet for the health service. jim reed, bbc news. let's speak now to dr hussain gandhi, a gp from nottingham, currently in liverpool. thank you for your time today, give us an— thank you for your time today, give us an idea — thank you for your time today, give us an idea of— thank you for your time today, give us an idea of what it is like for you at— us an idea of what it is like for you at your— us an idea of what it is like for you at your surgery at the moment, how many— you at your surgery at the moment, how many patients as a percentage of the patients you see are you seeing face—to—face? the patients you see are you seeing face-to-face?_ the patients you see are you seeing face-to-face?— face-to-face? how many are being soken to face-to-face? how many are being spoken to on _ face-to-face? how many are being spoken to on the _ face-to-face? how many are being spoken to on the telephone - face-to-face? how many are being spoken to on the telephone or - spoken to on the telephone or online? ~ ., ., , ., ,
9:06 am
online? we have a telephone first s stem in online? we have a telephone first system in our _ online? we have a telephone first system in our practice _ online? we have a telephone first system in our practice and - online? we have a telephone first system in our practice and we - online? we have a telephone first system in our practice and we had that before covid and it worked really well. we have approximately 30% to 40% of patients seen face—to—face on the day and increasing numbers are being seen in advance face—to—face were needed to, but the first point of contact for urgent care is predominately telephone just so we can understand the needs of our patients and make sure it is the right person, at the right time. sure it is the right person, at the right time-— right time. and what sort of feedback — right time. and what sort of feedback are _ right time. and what sort of feedback are you _ right time. and what sort of feedback are you getting i right time. and what sort of. feedback are you getting from right time. and what sort of- feedback are you getting from your patients about that? more of them saying to you, we want to see you in person? are all some happy —— or person? are all some happy -- or some happy dealing person? are all some happy —— or some happy dealing with you online or on the phone?— or on the phone? generally, it has been quite — or on the phone? generally, it has been quite positive _ or on the phone? generally, it has been quite positive and _ or on the phone? generally, it has been quite positive and many - been quite positive and many appreciate the rapid access. and when they do need to see is face—to—face, we are able to see them with that. the challenge many have found is that intermediate access for those patients who don't necessarily need to be seen on the day but do need to be seen in the future, they may not get that at times they want, but absolutely they get that at the time they need and
9:07 am
thatis get that at the time they need and that is a key message we would like to give back. prioritising is really important and amazing, but if there isn't the resources to do that, it isn't the resources to do that, it isn't going to happen.— isn't the resources to do that, it isn't going to happen. some of the medical bodies _ isn't going to happen. some of the medical bodies have _ isn't going to happen. some of the medical bodies have said - isn't going to happen. some of the medical bodies have said that - isn't going to happen. some of the| medical bodies have said that there have been divisive and distorted claims about access to gps in some sections of the press, do you think thatis sections of the press, do you think that is the case that this has set patients and doctors against each other almost? patients and doctors against each otheralmost? i patients and doctors against each other almost?— patients and doctors against each other almost? i think it absolutely has. if other almost? i think it absolutely has- if you — other almost? i think it absolutely has. if you look _ other almost? i think it absolutely has. if you look back _ other almost? i think it absolutely has. if you look back at _ other almost? i think it absolutely has. if you look back at this - other almost? i think it absolutely i has. if you look back at this summer which has been the busiest some of the nhs and deputy general practice, in one of those months, general practice got more appointments in one month that you are able to have in all a&e departments across the whole country in the year, that is a significant increase. but many people still focus on the face—to—face when they want it rather than when they necessarily need it and that small percentage of people are unfortunately having a negative experience. i am not going to deny a small percentage have had
9:08 am
a negative experience and that is because we do not have the capacity to deal with the need to have less gps promise, a lot less coming through and lot messages from the secretary of state are not accurate and not a clear message of how many people are available. whilst resources are amazing, there needs to be the workforce to make sure that work is being done and that workforce is really hard to find and keep, particularly with the negative impression we are getting from the media on a daily basis. [30 impression we are getting from the media on a daily basis.— impression we are getting from the media on a daily basis. do you think the government _ media on a daily basis. do you think the government is _ media on a daily basis. do you think the government is saying _ media on a daily basis. do you think the government is saying it - media on a daily basis. do you think the government is saying it knows l the government is saying it knows best how to run gp surgeries? it best how to run gp surgeries? it seems to be. sajid javid earlier said patient should have the access they want not focused on what they need, and clinical decision isn't relevant. it is important to remember that breaches the gp contract in existence so is he rewriting the gp contract with the —— without the engagement of the gp workforce itself? so -- without the engagement of the gp workforce itself?— workforce itself? so you are saying if the health _ workforce itself? so you are saying if the health secretary _ workforce itself? so you are saying if the health secretary is _ workforce itself? so you are saying if the health secretary is pushing l if the health secretary is pushing for what patients wants rather than what they need to, that is a breach
9:09 am
of the gp contract in your opinion? so he said that patients can have face—to—face appointments if they want it. absolutely, we will try our best to accommodate that. however, face—to—face contact and all types of contact with general practice is based on need with the resources we have and if we don't have the resources, it is really nice to say people can have what they want, if we don't have the resources to provide that, how are we meant to do that? ., ,, . ., , ., that? the health secretary also said, we won't _ that? the health secretary also said, we won't be _ that? the health secretary also said, we won't be publishing i that? the health secretary also - said, we won't be publishing league tables, but there will be surgery specific data so others can compare and contrast. well, that sounds like and contrast. well, that sounds like a league table, frankly, what you make of that idea? is that sort of competition, pressure, useful in this current environment, the environment you talk about where you don't have enough resources? general ractice is don't have enough resources? general practice is already _ don't have enough resources? general practice is already a _ don't have enough resources? general practice is already a high-pressure - practice is already a high—pressure environment, many people are leaving because the pressure is so significant. in my practice, we see many doctors reduce or stop working because they find it too difficult to manage. having to add extra
9:10 am
pressure like league tables and let's be honest it is a league table, you may not be calling it that, but it is, isn't going to be hateful. also, those practices in the lower 20% will not receive as much support. —— helpful. if they are struggling where they are in that lower area, they need more support to fix themselves, not saying they are going to get less resources because they are not doing as well, that isn't helpful. your understanding _ as well, that isn't helpful. your understanding about _ as well, that isn't helpful. your understanding about this - as well, that isn't helpful. your understanding about this part of funding, this £250 million, is it your understanding that as a gp practice, you have to demonstrate that you are increasing capacity and in the health secretary's words offering patients more choice if that means face—to—face appointments, then that is what it is, is that what you are going to have to demonstrate as far as you are concerned, in order to access this funding? i'm not sure how much individual gp surgery really know about how to access that pot of money at the moment. i about how to access that pot of money at the moment.- about how to access that pot of money at the moment. i think at this oint, we money at the moment. i think at this point. we don't _ money at the moment. i think at this point, we don't know— money at the moment. i think at this point, we don't know those _ money at the moment. i think at this point, we don't know those details, l point, we don't know those details, they are not being covered in the
9:11 am
documents that have come out since last night. important to know that funding will be allocated to ccgs on the number of patients per area and that will filter down from there. how practices act says that, it is clear that money will not go to practices directly. the comet it is going to general practice isn't100% correct, it is going to wider services. also, the monitoring is going to come with this. let's be honest, nhs england love to monitor everything they do. how that will work in practice and how much extra work in practice and how much extra work that will be more importantly, my question is, what happens when that funding is no longer available from april next year? we expect one of the busiest winters on record and that isn'tjust of the busiest winters on record and that isn't just suddenly of the busiest winters on record and that isn'tjust suddenly going to stop in march. what is going to happen after this question as far as we are aware, it isn't recurrent funding so the extra workforce we get from it, how does that continue afterwards without the promise of more resources to help our patients?
9:12 am
really interesting to hear your perspective, hussain gandhi, thank you very much for your time. doctor hussain gandhi, a gp from nottingham. gpfrom nottingham. a gp from nottingham. a lot of you getting in touch. richard clare says, i have had better access to my gp with telephone sms and virtual triage since the pandemic. patients don't always need face—to—face, but feel they want it, that doesn't make it right and clogs the system. this is, gps are being blamed for a problem that isn't their fault, the pressure of their workload isn't sustainable. if i have needed a face—to—face appointments, i have been given one. this says, when the whole country is starting, there is no reason for gps to not see patients face—to—face. i recently spoke to a gp over the phone for my very sore throat, i was asked to take a selfie of my throat and upload, to a 25 attempts to get it. this one says, surgeries have become more businesses that healthcare —— than healthcare providers. i can
9:13 am
only discuss one issue and i only get ten minutes. ring for an appointment and you get told to go to a&e or ring 999 because there are no appointments left, ridiculous, says tony bassi. so you are seeing both sides of the opinion on the subject of access to gps. please keep getting in touch to give me a sense of what your experience has been, have you had difficulty getting face—to—face appointments or not? do you prefer online or phone consultations anyway and what you think of this idea of what would be in effect a league table for gps? you can do all of that on twitter using the hashtag bbc your questions. researchers say that positive lateral flow covid tests should be trusted, because they're more accurate than previously thought. scientists at university college london found the tests, which are cheap and quick, were more than 90% effective at detecting infectious people. the chancellor, rishi sunak, says british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a shipping
9:14 am
freight logjam at the uk's biggest commercial port, felixstowe. mr sunak said the government is doing all it can to keep supplies moving. he's attending a meeting of the leaders of the world's advanced economies in washington, where he spoke to our economics editor, faisal islam. for a second year, the government's having to talk about saving christmas. this year, it's the difficulties in global trade leading to tens of containers full of imports stuck off the coast of britain, with too few drivers available to drive them on the last leg of theirjourney. it's not unique to britain, but the chancellor, in washington, says the whole world can face up to the problems of an economy on the rebound from the pandemic lockdowns. well, i tell people to be reassured that we're doing absolutely everything we can to mitigate some of these challenges. they are global in nature, so we can't fix every single problem, but i feel confident that there will be good provision of goods for everybody. i'm confident there will be a good amount of christmas presents
9:15 am
available for everyone to buy. but it's notjust the container crisis. with energies prices surging too, more providers going bust and heavy industry begging for support, the chancellor was more guarded. if high gas prices put some heavy industry out of business, is that just the market working? do we have to accept that? are you going to accept that as chancellor? well, i think as people have seen over the past year, we're prepared to work with business and support them as required. it wouldn't be appropriate for me to comment on the particular situation of any individual company. but in general, i believe in a market economy. that's served us very well in this country. it's not the government's job to come in and start managing the price of every individual product. many of his problems are being faced by all the finance ministers of the major world economies, with the germans fearful of what they call a "bottleneck recession". from shipping lanes to restaurants to car factories, there are astonishing things happening in the world economy right now.
9:16 am
and not even here, with the world's most important finance ministers, are they truly sure how this is going to settle down. they hope that it will prove temporary and that the inflation, the rising prices, and the shortages, will stop, but they can't be sure. consumers will be protected, but the government can't stretch that promise to businesses. faisal islam, bbc news, in washington, dc. the european union's ambassador to the uk has described eu proposals to resolve the row about post—brexit trade in northern ireland as "unprecedented". this dispute is all about the northern ireland protocol, which was agreed and signed by the uk and the eu, and came into force at the start of this year. among other things, the protocol requires extra checks and paperwork on products like food and drink imported from britain. because northern ireland is still in the eu's single market for goods, there are no border checkpoints
9:17 am
between northern ireland and the republic of ireland — a crucial factor to avoid a return to the tensions and troubles of the past. the result is a trade border which falls between britain and northern ireland, which unionists say undermines northern ireland s place in the uk. adding to the tensions, the uk government now wants to reverse its previous agreement on the role of the european court ofjustice. the eu's ambassador to the uk, joao vale de almeida, told the bbc the new proposals were not concessions. we are not forced to propose this. we propose this because we realised that there are problems in northern ireland, and we care about northern ireland. we want the protocol to work. no renegotiation, that's what we said. and we are not renegotiating the protocol. we are adapting the protocol, and we are ready to enter tomorrow, the day after, next week, in talks with our british colleagues and friends to try to address these issues. we are focused on solutions. we went to northern ireland several times. i went there myself twice,
9:18 am
in spite of covid. maros sefcovic, the vice—president, was there, with me and other colleagues. with extensive contacts with everybody, we listened, we took notes. what we present today is a direct response to the problems that affect citizens and business. the headlines on bbc news: the goverment wants gps in england to see more patients in person — ministers unveil a two hundred and fifty million pound winter rescue package following a sharp fall in face—to—face appointments during the pandemic. the chancellor rishi sunak has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port. the eus ambassador to the uk says the european union has gone to the limits of what it can do to fix the row about trade in northern ireland.
9:19 am
the norwegian prime minister, erna solberg, says the country's been shaken by the murder of five people in a small town by a man armed with a bow and arrow. police believe he acted alone. and they had previously been in contact with him over fears and they had previously been in contact with him overfears he had become radicalised. police across the country have been told to arm themselves. russell trott reports. the attacks took place just after six in the evening, around the town a man — apparently armed with a bow and arrows — walked around the town centre and began at random to shoot at shoppers. his motive is not clear, say police, but they believe he acted alone. translation: i want to underline i that if it's terror-related, we i don't know if it's a political attack that has taken place, the police will have to investigate that. we know that in many countries over a long time, attacks have been prevented by good police work, but that the issue of lone
9:20 am
perpetrators is difficult. some of the casualties were in a supermarket, including an off—duty police officer, who's now in hospital. his colleagues were on the scene in minutes. as this person was on the rampage for between half an hour and an hour, it's not clear yet how long this was going on. but one witness said he saw police firing a warning shot. and the police have confirmed that there was a warning shot fired during the apprehension. images posted on social media show arrows stuck in the wooden walls of houses. the prime minister said the community had been hit hard. norway still remembers the events of 2011, when far—right extremist anders breivik killed 77 people. a man is in custody, as police try to piece together exactly what happened here. russell trott, bbc news. we've been hearing a lot about the latest blue 0rigin space
9:21 am
mission over the last few days, but the duke of cambridge has told the bbc that people should be focussing more on repairing this planet, not trying to find the next one to live on. he was speaking to our chief political correspondent adam fleming, in an exclusive tv interview — in the run—up to this weekend's inaugural earthshot prize, launched by prince william to find solutions for climate change. prince, presenter, prize—giver. the duke of cambridge created the earthshot and his tv programme to counter negative news about the planet. which is why fix 0ur climate is one of the five goals of the earthshot prize. you're losing people every single time you have those headlines. we all get that there's a really big, urgent message, and i'm not saying we shouldn't talk about the urgency or the big issues but, ultimately, if we want to tackle this, if we want to get on the front foot, we've got to bring people with us. people have got to feel like there's hope, there's a chance we can fix this. and that's what the earthshot prize is about, is providing the solutions to some of the world's biggest environmental problems.
9:22 am
what do you say to your children about this? i think they're living and growing up in a world where it's much more talked about than when we were growing up, so that has benefits and that has negatives as well. because we are seeing a rise in climate anxiety. young people now are growing up where their futures are basically being threatened the whole time. it's very unnerving and it's very anxiety—making. and i suppose, going in the other direction, your dad has been worried about this stuff for a very long time. and actually, people used to sort of take the mickey out of him a little bit for it. it's been a hard road for him. my grandfather started off helping out wwf a long time ago with its nature work and biodiversity, and i think that my father's progressed that on and talked about climate change a lot more — very early on, before anyone else thought it was a topic. so, yes, he's had a really rough ride on that, and i think he's been proven to be well ahead
9:23 am
of the curve, well beyond his time, in warning about some of these dangers. but it shouldn't be that there's a third generation now coming along, having to ramp it up even more. and for me, it would be an absolute disaster if george was sat here talking to you or your successor in another 30 years' time, or whatever, still saying the same thing. because by then, we'll be too late. if we are not careful, we are robbing from our children's future, what we do now, and i think that's not fair. so i'm trying to use my little bit of influence, my little bit of profile, to highlight some incredible people doing amazing things, and will genuinely help fix some of these problems. it's one small step for man. 0ne giant leap for mankind. the clue's in the name. the earthshot is inspired by the space race of the �*60s. but the future king has this message for the entrepreneurs heading for the heavens now. we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet,
9:24 am
not trying to find the next place to go and live. i wasjust coming back home from school and i noticed ironing vendors in my street using charcoal. the 15 finalists for the prize include solar—powered gadgets, apps, organisations and initiatives. prince william plans to take some of his winners to the big climate change conference in glasgow next month, to provide inspiration — and maybe a bit of pressure, too. we can't have more clever speak, clever words, but not enough action. and that's why the earthshot prize is so important, because we are trying to create action. the prize itself will stimulate solutions and action. that a lot of people haven't necessarily produced yet. and so i'm hoping the prize will galvanise a lot of people in positions of responsibility too, you know, go further, bigger, and actually start to deliver.
9:25 am
retailers are warning that logjams at uk ports and a lack of lorry drivers could lead to a shortage of popular toys over christmas. we can speak to gary grant, founder and chair of the entertainer toy company. we know toy shops are absolutely one of the most important shops in the run—up to christmas. what is stock like at the moment? 50 run-up to christmas. what is stock like at the moment?— like at the moment? so at the moment. _ like at the moment? so at the moment, there _ like at the moment? so at the moment, there is _ like at the moment? so at the moment, there is absolutely l like at the moment? so at the. moment, there is absolutely no problems with stock in stores right now. the entertainment stores and many toy shops throughout the country are well stocked. what we are experiencing in the supply itself, what i would really say is, don't panic. albeit we are seeing people buying early for christmas, but we are not seeing petal type queues outside toy shops and that is absolutely fine. we won't run out of toys. —— petrol type. but we are seeing delays in toys being released through the ports so containers are now getting through to the uk and it is taking longer to retrieve the containers from the ports to go into
9:26 am
warehouses to be distributed to stores. ., ., , ., ., stores. how many weeks away from christmas are _ stores. how many weeks away from christmas are we _ stores. how many weeks away from christmas are we now? _ stores. how many weeks away from christmas are we now? i _ stores. how many weeks away from christmas are we now? i am - stores. how many weeks away from christmas are we now? i am sure i stores. how many weeks away from i christmas are we now? i am sure you have the figure. ten weeks. i knew you had the figure on the tip of your tongue. you had the figure on the tip of your tongue-— you had the figure on the tip of ourtonaue. ,, ,, , ., ., your tongue. stocking pots for about three weeks- — your tongue. stocking pots for about three weeks. three _ your tongue. stocking pots for about three weeks. three weeks _ your tongue. stocking pots for about three weeks. three weeks mid - your tongue. stocking pots for about three weeks. three weeks mid of. three weeks. three weeks mid of october isn't a problem, all those 0ctober isn't a problem, all those toys will be on the shop shelves by christmas. but containers arriving later this month and early november, a three week delay with those containers going through the ports, that will cause big problems because christmas is a fixed date, and you know it, the 25th of december. we do, indeed. if you are the type of person who likes to do your christmas shopping rather more last—minute than very early, you might run into problems, then? you will not be might run into problems, then? mt, will not be going into a toy shop on christmas eve and finding empty shelves. that, iam not christmas eve and finding empty shelves. that, i am not predicting. but you might not get the choice you want? . , but you might not get the choice you want? ., , .,. , ,., want? that is exactly the point we are making- _
9:27 am
want? that is exactly the point we are making. 25% _ want? that is exactly the point we are making. 25% of— want? that is exactly the point we are making. 2596 of the _ want? that is exactly the point we are making. 2596 of the entire - want? that is exactly the point we l are making. 2596 of the entire year's are making. 25% of the entire year's toy business is in the month of december, a quarter of all toys sold in the uk are sold in december. 8% of all toys sold in the uk are sold christmas week. so the nearer we get to christmas week, the narrower the range, you probably won't get even running into early to mid november, you might not get as wide a range, all the selection you would have expected from a toy shop for that typer expected from a toy shop for that type, for that time of year. you have already — type, for that time of year. you have already paid _ type, for that time of year. you have already paid for— type, for that time of year. you have already paid for this stock, if you don't get the stock you would be expecting closer to christmas, before christmas itself, is that a big issue for you going into january? big issue for you going into janua ? ~ , big issue for you going into janua 7~ , ., ., , january? well, it is. containers that are released _ january? well, it is. containers that are released late - january? well, it is. containers that are released late from - january? well, it is. containers that are released late from the j that are released late from the ports, orwhere that are released late from the ports, or where we haven't strives to bring them from the ports to warehouses or from warehouses to the shops, those toys that don't end up on shop shelves or are being sold through our website, they will be left in the new year. the problem is that we are currency ? and are
9:28 am
currently experiencing in china are not christmas problems now, but they will influence the toys leaving china in december and january. a lot of factories in china at the moment are running on a two—day week because of electricity shortages and many of the items which we would normally receive shipments of within about 120 days, some of those shipments are now being drawn out to 180, even 210 days. so that isn't this christmas�*s problem. so if we do get left with stock because it comes in late for christmas, it will probably put is in a good position for the first quarter of next year so i don't see that as a problem. what i do see is a problem, and i have seven grandchildren so i know how important christmas is and i know how important it is to bring a smile to children's faces, i have said it for a0 years and sold toys for a0 years, so i try to give children toys on the top of their christmas list and we don't want a massive panic with parent spending days and weeks having to drive
9:29 am
around the country trying to find that must have toy. find around the country trying to find that must have toy.— around the country trying to find that must have toy. and do you take any reassurance _ that must have toy. and do you take any reassurance from _ that must have toy. and do you take any reassurance from the _ that must have toy. and do you take any reassurance from the chancellorj any reassurance from the chancellor speaking in washington saying the government is doing all it can to fix the supply chain issue? thea;r fix the supply chain issue? they miaht be fix the supply chain issue? they might be doing _ fix the supply chain issue? they might be doing all _ fix the supply chain issue? they might be doing all they - fix the supply chain issue? tie: might be doing all they can. 0n fix the supply chain issue? tierg might be doing all they can. 0n the ground, we still have got problems. so your advice to parents and anybody else who might be by —— buying toys is to perhaps plan ahead a little and do it earlier, rather than doing a santa rush at the last minute? �* . , ., ., ., , minute? don't panic, plan ahead, try and net minute? don't panic, plan ahead, try and get those _ minute? don't panic, plan ahead, try and get those christmas _ minute? don't panic, plan ahead, try and get those christmas lists - minute? don't panic, plan ahead, try and get those christmas lists to - and get those christmas lists to santa as soon as they can so parents and grandparents know what children are thinking might be in their stocking. and if parents have the money available and have somewhere to hide things, buying sooner rather than later it's probably a wise thing. than later it's probably a wise thin. ., ~' ,, , than later it's probably a wise thin. ., , . ., than later it's probably a wise thin. ., ~ , . ., thing. thank you very much for your time today- — thing. thank you very much for your time today- gary — thing. thank you very much for your time today. gary grant. _
9:30 am
let's focus on the weather right now. carol, how is the weekend looking? it's fairly mixed, actually. we have some fog in the south, some of that will be late to lift. and a lot of cloud generally across the board. we will see some sunshine. some of us have started off with it. but it will be fairly limited. and we also have a weather front coming in across the north of scotland, introducing some rain and some strong winds. gale force across the far north of scotland. some showers could be wintry on the higher ground. it is chilly behind this band of rain, and ahead of it still relatively mild. the cold air follows this weather front as it continues to push southwards overnight, taking its cloud and rain with it. tonight, we could well see some frost across northern scotland, the north of england and also
9:31 am
northern ireland. in the south, we are hanging on to the milder conditions. i will have more in half an hour. hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines... the goverment wants gps in england to see more patients in person — ministers unveil a £250 million pound winter rescue package following a sharp fall in face—to—face appointments during the pandemic. the chancellor rishi sunak has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a log—jam at the uk's biggest commercial port. the eus ambassador to the uk says the european union has gone to the limits of what it can do to fix the row about trade in northern ireland. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. and where's wally — well, sort of.
9:32 am
the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses can be spotted — and where. mike is that the bbc sport centre with all the latest. good morning. we start with tennis, because the rise of cameron norrie continues, and he will become the british number one later, if he beats diego schwartzman at the indian wells masters. the brit made it through to the quarterfinals for the first time at a masters 1000 tournament, after beating american tommy paul, 6-a, a-6, 6-2. the win was his aath on the atp tour this year, and, as well as replacing dan evans, a the british number one — a win tonight could see him break into the world's top 20 for the first time in his career. chelsea claimed their first win
9:33 am
in this season's women's, champions league after a 2—1victory overjuventus in turin. erin cuthbert put her side in the lead with this solo effort, just after the half hour mark — only forjuventus draw level just a few minutes later. but pernille harder slammed home the winner in the second half — that's her 32nd champions league goal in a0 appeaences. the win means, chelea have four points from their opening two group matches. what a great place to come and play. a team that is improving in europe, a tough crowd. the game was quite scrappy but for us we showed once again the ability to adapt to the demands of the game. and the performance from the team was mixed, but i felt we were resilient enough and took our chances when they mattered. and that's why we were the winning team.
9:34 am
there's been lots of messages of support for the wales international david brooks, who has been diagnosed with cancer. the 2a—year—old says, he has stage 2 hodgkin lymphoma, but that "the prognosis is a positive one" and treatment will start next week. brooks, who has won 21 wales caps, was on international duty just last week, and credits the wales medical team for helping detect the illness. since brooks made the annoucement yesterday, he has received a lot of messages of support — the middlesbrough defender, sol bamba who has recovered from cancer himself, said "you've got this champ..." wales teammate ethan ampadu wished him all the best and england defender tyrone mings has told brooks to "stay strong". one of the premier league's great characters, claudio ranieri, is back, and the man who masterminded leicester's premier league title says he's now confident his new club, watford, can avoid relegation from the premier league. they're on seven points after seven games, enough to get the previous manager the sack. ranieri turns 70 next week, but that's no issue. i want to continue. that's it.
9:35 am
football for me is my life. from when i was young, i think about playing football, and after, make a manager. and now i have a lot of energy to give to my players and i want to continue. ronnie 0'sullivan claimed he was bored in his last match at the northern ireland 0pen. hopefully the rocket�*s victory over alfie burden will have provided some stimulation. 0'sullivan won by four frames to one to reach the last 16 in belfast. he's only dropped two frames this week, and will face china's yan bingtao next. it's hoped he will give him a bit more competition. that's all the sport for now. let's get more now on northern ireland and brexit.
9:36 am
the eu has released its plan for reducing checks on goods and medicines arriving into northern ireland from the rest of the uk. the plan would remove about 80% of spot checks, the eu says. the uk government said it is studying the detail of the proposals. i'm joined by roger pollen, head of external affairs at the federation of small businesses, northern ireland. give us your reaction and the broad reaction from the businesses that you work with to these proposals from the eu? i you work with to these proposals from the eu?— from the eu? i think the first reaction is — from the eu? i think the first reaction is that _ from the eu? i think the first reaction is that we _ from the eu? i think the first reaction is that we are - from the eu? i think the first reaction is that we are glad l from the eu? | think the first| reaction is that we are glad to from the eu? | think the first - reaction is that we are glad to see both sides have come forward this week and recognise that the protocol as operating at the moment is causing immense difficulties and something needs to change, and they are both bringing forward proposals and ideas about how that could happen. that is the first reaction. i don't think anyone is getting too excited about the trailers that we heard in advance of what was going to be in it, because i think the reality is what we see published yesterday is not perhaps as exciting as we had heard being trailed the days before that. everyone is sitting back to see the negotiation begin now and focusing on where it needs to get you at the end of that
9:37 am
process, ratherthan needs to get you at the end of that process, rather than getting too excited about things just now. do excited about things 'ust now. do ou excited about things just now. do you think there is a mismatch between the political rhetoric and what is needed on the ground to make trade flow smoothly? yes. what is needed on the ground to make trade flow smoothly?— trade flow smoothly? yes, i think that is very _ trade flow smoothly? yes, i think that is very much _ trade flow smoothly? yes, i think that is very much the _ trade flow smoothly? yes, i think that is very much the case, - trade flow smoothly? yes, i think that is very much the case, but i that is very much the case, but there are a lot of different political rhetoric is in play here, both locally within the northern ireland assembly, and then also between brussels and westminster. everyone is positioning saying what they would like to see, but if you strip all of that brought away, i think what is quite good is that both sides recognise it is not working as is and they are both getting very strong signals that they are about to do something significant about that to make it work better for us. fine significant about that to make it work better for us.— significant about that to make it work better for us. one area that still seems _ work better for us. one area that still seems to _ work better for us. one area that still seems to be _ work better for us. one area that still seems to be problematic - work better for us. one area that i still seems to be problematic from everything i have read and seen and heard is the role of the european court ofjustice in terms of oversight of the northern ireland protocol. the uk government does not want that to be the case. from what i know about business in northern ireland, that is not a big issue for
9:38 am
businesses there? i ireland, that is not a big issue for businesses there?— businesses there? i think you're absolutely _ businesses there? i think you're absolutely right _ businesses there? i think you're absolutely right in _ businesses there? i think you're absolutely right in thinking - businesses there? i think you'rej absolutely right in thinking that. it is not an issue that has come to the floor for anybody. to it is not an issue that has come to the floorfor anybody. to be it is not an issue that has come to the floor for anybody. to be fair, it is not an issue that has come to the floorfor anybody. to be fair, i think it is also, in the same way that when you go to buy your car you don't think about the road traffic act, i think businessjust don't think about the road traffic act, i think business just hasn't needed to look at that part of it, whereas the politicians clearly have thought that is more relevance to them. so i think there is a bit of a dislocation there between business and politics. we are really not getting caught up in that part of it. what we are focused on is the framework we need to operate within to avoid any disputes to go to any arbitration anywhere. if to avoid any disputes to go to any arbitration anywhere.— to avoid any disputes to go to any arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks, arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks. about _ arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks, about 8096 _ arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks, about 8096 of— arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks, about 8096 of these - arbitration anywhere. if these spot checks, about 8096 of these spot l checks, about 80% of these spot checks, about 80% of these spot checks, were removed as a result of these eu proposals. give us a sense of what difference that would make in practice for businesses in northern ireland? and how quickly... 0bviously northern ireland? and how quickly... obviously you want this sorted yesterday, and several months ago in fact, but how quickly do you want
9:39 am
the two sides to focus on getting a deal, a deal that is workable and will last? ~ ., , ., will last? well, there are several thins will last? well, there are several things there- _ will last? well, there are several things there. i— will last? well, there are several things there. i was _ will last? well, there are several things there. i was talking - will last? well, there are several things there. i was talking to - will last? well, there are several things there. i was talking to a l things there. i was talking to a business yesterday that since the start of the year has had to do a supplementary declaration is for a lot of their products coming in. they have had to do a15 of those so far this year, each one takes about three quarters of an hour. you can see the vast bureaucracy they are having to put up with just to bring goods into northern ireland because some of those megos out the border into the single market. i think you have to look at the fine print, and what we are being told is that the fine print may go south of the border into the single market. i think you have to look at the fine print, and what we are being told is that the fine that apply to businesses more generally? in terms of the timescale of when we need to get this started, yesterday would have been very nice, but i think there is a sense from both sides of there is a sense from both sides of the negotiation that we are looking at a sense from both sides of the negotiation that we are looking at
9:40 am
the small numbers of. mid to late november. from everything we are hearing, if that were to happen and we were to get it done this side of christmas, i think businesses would breathe a sigh of relief. goad christmas, i think businesses would breathe a sigh of relief.— breathe a sigh of relief. good to talk to you- _ ijust want i just want to take time to read out some more of the about gps asking you if you have been able to access appointments. what you think about proposals from the government which would amount to, in effect, two league tables for gps? do you prefer online, face to face... "as always, it depends on your surgery. i have had several face—to—face appointments this year, some following triage calls and some urgent after speaking to a receptionist. very happy with the system but my dad added a different surgery cannot get a internet appointment, let alone a face to face." ,.
9:41 am
appointment, let alone a face to face." " i call all dayjust to get through for a phone appointment in two weeks. no appointment time is given. so busy at work, when doctor rings, tough, start again." sarah, "gps are working very hard and still struggling with capacity. i see patients with primary care issues in a&e every day, often only providing a temporary fix before referring back to their gp. it is inefficient and a poor service for all." and dorothy, "i think they are doing a good job considering the shortage. my good job considering the shortage. my husband is 89 and has had both telephone and face—to—face when needed. i would like to point out the number of appointments of patients they did not turn turn up to, wasting the time of gps." i think dorothy is suggesting that if people do not keep those appointments and they should not be afforded a face to going forward. i will try to read out some more in a little while. keep your thoughts
9:42 am
coming in on this story. it is obviously something that affects all of us. it is a very important story for you all. you can get in touch on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions. women are being forced to take time off work or even leave theirjobs because of a lack of support with menopause symptoms, new research says. a poll of almost a,000 women in the uk found that most felt the menopause — or the months and years leading up to it — had had a huge impact on their careers. the research was carried out for menopause medic dr louise newson, who runs the not—for—profit newson health research and education. with me is victoria palfrey, who first experienced menopause symptoms in her a0s. and menopause expert, dr louise newson herself. thank you very much forjoining us. just tell us a little bit more about this research. is there fundamentally a lack of understanding about menopause
9:43 am
symptoms, and a lack of conversation about those symptoms, leading to these difficult scenarios for women who either have to take time off or indeed even leave theirjobs? absolutely. we undertook the research — absolutely. we undertook the research because i really wanted to explore _ research because i really wanted to explore more about the numbers of women _ explore more about the numbers of women leaving the workplace. we see and hear— women leaving the workplace. we see and hear women all the time who are experiencing symptoms such as fatigue. — experiencing symptoms such as fatigue, memory loss, anxiety, and they are _ fatigue, memory loss, anxiety, and they are a _ fatigue, memory loss, anxiety, and they are a direct result of hormones in the menopause and perimenopause. what was really shocking _ and perimenopause. what was really shocking for me was that half of them _ shocking for me was that half of them resigned or took early retirement as a direct consequence of their— retirement as a direct consequence of their symptoms. women were reducing — of their symptoms. women were reducing their hours, they were not going _ reducing their hours, they were not going for— reducing their hours, they were not going for promotion, and we know there _ going for promotion, and we know there is— going for promotion, and we know there is obviously a gender pay gap,
9:44 am
less women— there is obviously a gender pay gap, less women in senior positions, and women _ less women in senior positions, and women are — less women in senior positions, and women are haemorrhaging away from theirjobs— women are haemorrhaging away from theirjobs actually. for me, as a health— theirjobs actually. for me, as a health care _ theirjobs actually. for me, as a health care professional, we know that 40% — health care professional, we know that a0% of health care professional, we know that ao% of nhs health care professional, we know that a0% of nhs employees are menopausal women. that a0% of nhs employees are menopausalwomen. if women that a0% of nhs employees are menopausal women. if women are leaving _ menopausal women. if women are leaving theirjobs, we know that in the nhs, — leaving theirjobs, we know that in the nhs, which is already stressed, we are _ the nhs, which is already stressed, we are losing people from all across the board _ we are losing people from all across the board of nhsjobs. tell we are losing people from all across the board of nhsjobs.— the board of nhs “obs. tell us a little bit more — the board of nhsjobs. tell us a little bit more about _ the board of nhsjobs. tell us a little bit more about the - the board of nhsjobs. tell us a - little bit more about the symptoms. tell us about the range of symptoms of someone going through perimenopause or the menopause might be experiencing? perimenopause or the menopause might be exoeriencing?— be experiencing? oestrogen and testosterone _ be experiencing? oestrogen and testosterone are _ be experiencing? oestrogen and testosterone are needed - be experiencing? oestrogen and testosterone are needed in - be experiencing? oestrogen and | testosterone are needed in every single _ testosterone are needed in every single cell in the body, so the psychological symptoms, low mood, memory _ psychological symptoms, low mood, memory fog, reduced stamina, overwhelming fatigue, just generally feeling _ overwhelming fatigue, just generally feeling very flat, are very common symptoms — feeling very flat, are very common symptoms. i have spoken to women who have given _ symptoms. i have spoken to women who have given up _ symptoms. i have spoken to women who
9:45 am
have given up physicaljobs because they have _ have given up physicaljobs because they have joint pains, migraines are very common, urinary symptoms are very common, urinary symptoms are very common — very common, urinary symptoms are very common. we all know about the hot flushes _ very common. we all know about the hot flushes and sweats, but it is these _ hot flushes and sweats, but it is these myriad of symptoms. a lot of women _ these myriad of symptoms. a lot of women are — these myriad of symptoms. a lot of women are not recognising the symptoms. we found that only 5% of these _ symptoms. we found that only 5% of these women had actually had menopause as the reason for giving up menopause as the reason for giving up work. _ menopause as the reason for giving up work, although all were having time off— up work, although all were having time off work because of menopausal symptoms _ time off work because of menopausal symptoms. there were more likely to have anxiety— symptoms. there were more likely to have anxiety or depression put on their— have anxiety or depression put on their sick— have anxiety or depression put on their sick note. these women are being _ their sick note. these women are being mislabelled, actually, which rcatty— being mislabelled, actually, which really worries me. we found that 30% of women _ really worries me. we found that 30% of women had been given antidepressants. we know that antidepressants. we know that antidepressants don't work for low mood _ antidepressants don't work for low mood associated with hormone levels. it is important that women get the i’ili'it it is important that women get the right treatment as well.— right treatment as well. victoria, aood right treatment as well. victoria, good morning — right treatment as well. victoria, good morning to _ right treatment as well. victoria, good morning to you. _ right treatment as well. victoria, good morning to you. thank - right treatment as well. victoria, good morning to you. thank you | right treatment as well. victoria, i good morning to you. thank you for joining us. tell us your story. you went into perimenopause quite early, following surgery? yes.
9:46 am
went into perimenopause quite early, following surgery?— following surgery? yes, i think in hindsiaht following surgery? yes, i think in hindsight i _ following surgery? yes, i think in hindsight i was _ following surgery? yes, i think in hindsight i was experiencing - following surgery? yes, i think in| hindsight i was experiencing some perimenopausal symptoms before my surgery. i have started to get quite severe mood swings in my cycle, there are days where ijust didn't want to talk to anybody, including my kids and my husband. ijust wanted to sit on my own in a room, stare blankly into space, felt very flat, didn't see the point in life. but then the next day i might be really happy and giddy and full of energy. and it was very confusing because i thought it was her mogul, but because i was so young perimenopause was never mentioned. i had not heard it as a term. i was put on antidepressants and it wasn't until... i had a prolapse, so my symptoms got a lot worse, which is why i let it hysterectomy. it was only after that i started to get very overwhelmed, anxious, could not
9:47 am
hold on a thought. you had lots of thoughts going through your head but could not grasp them. very hazy. i couldn't remember things. i would go to the shop and just forget the most important thing. completely not workable. i'm a freelance events manager which is a very high pressurejob and you manager which is a very high pressure job and you have to remember lots of things. i was having panic attacks at work. it was only then that i started to think i can't go on like this. i went on to google, did a bit of research, came across doctor newson's website, the word perimenopause kept cropping up. and that ticked a box for you? when i was reading the background to your story, victoria, that before the surgery you were told that that might accelerate or lead to menopausal symptoms, but you were
9:48 am
not told what those symptoms might be or what you might do about them. you are freelance, we have been talking about the number of women leaving employment because of menopausal or perimenopausal symptoms, but you didn't have an hr department to turn two or to perhaps negotiate with? so that must have been especially tough.— negotiate with? so that must have been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely _ been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely no _ been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely no way _ been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely no way that _ been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely no way that i - been especially tough. yeah, there is absolutely no way that i could i is absolutely no way that i could have told anyone what i was experiencing, because as a freelancer you are just as good as your previous job. freelancer you are just as good as your previousjob. it freelancer you are just as good as your previous job. it is your reputation. it is about networking and word of mouth. if i had said, if i had labelled myself as menopausal, i had labelled myself as menopausal, ijust i had labelled myself as menopausal, i just wouldn't have i had labelled myself as menopausal, ijust wouldn't have got i had labelled myself as menopausal, i just wouldn't have got any work. you don't willingly resign, you would just be pushed out of the industry. confidence is so low. you kind of accepted and think, "well, i cannot do thejob kind of accepted and think, "well, i cannot do the job anymore." it's really hard, especially if you don't know what it is.—
9:49 am
really hard, especially if you don't know what it is. victoria, i want to net back know what it is. victoria, i want to get back to _ know what it is. victoria, i want to get back to doctor _ know what it is. victoria, i want to get back to doctor newson, - know what it is. victoria, i want to get back to doctor newson, but i get back to doctor newson, but briefly, what has helped the symptoms?— briefly, what has helped the symptoms? briefly, what has helped the s mtoms? �* ., �* ., symptoms? i'm on hrt, i'm on oestrogen — symptoms? i'm on hrt, i'm on oestrogen and _ symptoms? i'm on hrt, i'm on oestrogen and testosterone, i symptoms? i'm on hrt, i'm on i oestrogen and testosterone, which really helps. it's hard to get hold of, it's hard to get a gp to prescribe it for someone so young, but it is hugely helpful. much more clearer, much more energy and, yes, i highly recommend it.— i highly recommend it. doctor newson. _ i highly recommend it. doctor newson, back— i highly recommend it. doctor newson, back to _ i highly recommend it. doctor newson, back to you. - i highly recommend it. doctor newson, back to you. on i i highly recommend it. doctor newson, back to you. on a i i highly recommend it. doctor. newson, back to you. on a much i highly recommend it. doctor- newson, back to you. on a much more structural level, what would you like to see happening with employers in order to understand the symptoms of menopause and how they can help their employees who are going through menopause to stay in work? the most important thing is talking about— the most important thing is talking about it _ the most important thing is talking about it and knowing what is going on. about it and knowing what is going on i_ about it and knowing what is going on i don't— about it and knowing what is going on. i don't think employers should be able _ on. idon't think employers should be able to— on. i don't think employers should be able to be making diagnosis themselves, i don't think they should — themselves, i don't think they should be treating women, it's
9:50 am
really— should be treating women, it's really important that the conversation starts so women know what is _ conversation starts so women know what is going on, and then they can access— what is going on, and then they can access evidence—based treatment. we don't have _ access evidence—based treatment. we don't have a _ access evidence—based treatment. we don't have a broken arm policy at work, _ don't have a broken arm policy at work, because ifi don't have a broken arm policy at work, because if i had a broken arm someone _ work, because if i had a broken arm someone would direct me to the nearest — someone would direct me to the nearest accident and emergency department to get it fixed. if we recognise — department to get it fixed. if we recognise menopausal or a pair in the workplace, we should be enabling people _ the workplace, we should be enabling people to _ the workplace, we should be enabling people to get treatment. as an employee myself, i don't want menopausal staff that work with me to reduce _ menopausal staff that work with me to reduce their hours. i want them to reduce their hours. i want them to be _ to reduce their hours. i want them to be treated with the appropriate evidence—based treatments so that they can _ evidence—based treatments so that they can come back and not only enjoy— they can come back and not only enjoy their— they can come back and not only enjoy theirjobs but improve their jobs. _ enjoy theirjobs but improve their jobs. they— enjoy theirjobs but improve their jobs, they can choose the life that they want — jobs, they can choose the life that they want. and we know that only about _ they want. and we know that only about 10% — they want. and we know that only about 10% of women are given hrt, which _ about 10% of women are given hrt, which is _ about 10% of women are given hrt, which is the — about 10% of women are given hrt, which is the most obvious treatment for a hormone deficiency. we know from _ for a hormone deficiency. we know from the _ for a hormone deficiency. we know from the guidelines that the majority of women benefit from taking _ majority of women benefit from taking hrt, and certainly someone young _ taking hrt, and certainly someone young like — taking hrt, and certainly someone young like victoria, it is essential
9:51 am
that she — young like victoria, it is essential that she is — young like victoria, it is essential that she is given hrt. so actually employers should be engaging with education so it is notjust for women, _ education so it is notjust for women, it— education so it is notjust for women, it is for anyone who works there _ women, it is for anyone who works there. because anybody in the workplace knows women. if we recognise — workplace knows women. if we recognise symptoms then we can be more _ recognise symptoms then we can be more open _ recognise symptoms then we can be more open about it, in the same way we are _ more open about it, in the same way we are with _ more open about it, in the same way we are with mental health. if someone _ we are with mental health. if someone is diagnosed with depression in the _ someone is diagnosed with depression in the workplace, we can signpost them _ in the workplace, we can signpost them to— in the workplace, we can signpost them to the right information and we would _ them to the right information and we would enable them to have treatment. sadly it _ would enable them to have treatment. sadly it is _ would enable them to have treatment. sadly it is very difficult for a lot of women — sadly it is very difficult for a lot of women to receive the right treatment, but they can get help. we have our— treatment, but they can get help. we have our free balance app, which has a lot of— have our free balance app, which has a lot of information that women can download, — a lot of information that women can download, read and share. that a lot of information that women can download, read and share.- download, read and share. that is really important. _ download, read and share. that is really important. we _ download, read and share. that is really important. we must- download, read and share. that is really important. we must leave l download, read and share. that is| really important. we must leave it there, we are out of time. thank you very much for talking to us today, and also to you, victoria. thank you for your time as well. the time is 9:51am.
9:52 am
if you didn't take up enough new hobbies during lockdown, here's another one for you. walrus counting. the british antarctic survey is asking for our help to study satellite images of around 15,000 square miles, to see how many walruses can spot — and where. as our global science correspondent rebecca morelle explains, it's not as easy as you might think. huge, blubbery and a bit grumpy. walruses are easy enough to spot. but thanks to their remote arctic location, they're hard to count, and we don't know how many of these giant beasts there are. now, using satellite images, the plan is to locate every atlantic walrus. and scientists say this is essential because climate change means these animals are under threat. the sea ice on which they live most of the year is rapidly diminishing and they're having to change their behaviour and come out onto land much more often. that has almost certainly got some detrimental effects. we are not sure how much their population is being affected by that. hopefully this project will tell us
9:53 am
that important information. we've been taking images of the earth from space for more than 60 years, but our view has changed dramatically. in the 1980s, satellites could only see objects 30 metres in size. but they quickly improved and a few years later they could see features ten metres across. today, though, the most advanced imaging satellites can see details down to just 30 centimetres, and this has transformed our view of the natural world. even at that resolution, counting walruses is still a challenge. so the scouts in east molesey have been drafted in to help. the firstjob, scouring through a search area of 25,000 square kilometres to find any images that have a walrus in. it's quite hard because there is rusty barrels and rocks that look really similar. we're helping people find the walruses because they're endangered.
9:54 am
it's kind of a challenge as well as they're all hidden and you have to try and search for them and stuff. if it's a little bit blurry then it's harder because sometimes it's rocks. and they're the same colour as a walrus. and then sometimes it's quite easy because it's black in the background and they're kind of highlighted. i really do like the environment, so i want to save the world. i so this is really helping me. but the project is going to need a lot more people to help with the count. we've loaded up more than 600,000 images onto the walrus from space platform. you can access it through the wwf uk website. and we're calling on at least half a million people to help us search for and then count walrus on the platform. the future is uncertain for this icon of the arctic. their icy home is changing faster
9:55 am
than anywhere else on the planet. but now with satellite technology, and the help of the public, we should finally find out how many walruses there are and see how they fare in the years to come. rebecca morelle, bbc news. where's wally, to get involved. that sounds like a really interesting project. channel a has apologised to its viewers who can't watch their programmes because it is currently unable to offer subtitles, audio description or sign language support. in a statement, the broadcaster said that it can't currently provide access services because of the severity of an incident last month when an emergency back—up system failed. channel a says it's doing everything it can to fix the problem. with me now is liam 0 dell, bake 0ff fan and deaf freelance journalist and campaigner. liam describes himself as moderately
9:56 am
deaf and relies on subtitles to enjoy content. welcome. more than two weeks now since the loss of subtitles. what is the latest on the situation and when it might be fixed?— the latest on the situation and when it might be fixed? good morning. the latest statements _ it might be fixed? good morning. the latest statements have _ it might be fixed? good morning. the latest statements have been - it might be fixed? good morning. the latest statements have been quite i latest statements have been quite vague in terms of a timescale and deadline to really implement changes to get subtitles back. there has been an acknowledgement from red bee media, who are the providers of subtitles, who experienced a triggering of the fire suppression system in the london base that then effected channel four and other channels. they are aware of the issue, they know that the issue is there, but they haven't set any sort of timeframe. and the communication has been really sporadic and all over the place. the issue that we haveis over the place. the issue that we have is that it's notjust that these programmes are inaccessible,
9:57 am
it's the fact that the communication around why they are so inaccessible or what they are doing to fix it is also nonexistent. that is two sets of really distressing and isolating experiences kind of coexisting. giee experiences kind of coexisting. give us an idea. — experiences kind of coexisting. give us an idea, then, _ experiences kind of coexisting. give us an idea, then, liam, of the backlog of material that you are now waiting to catch up on while trying to avoid spoilers, of course. absolutely, and i think that is the real issue that deaf people now have with this subtitling issue is that they are actually playing catch up and are having to take time out of their day to now catch up on content when they should have been able to access it at the same time as the majority of viewers. my case, for example. there are episodes of taskmaster on channel four as well asjoe taskmaster on channel four as well as joe lycett�*s taskmaster on channel four as well asjoe lycett�*s got taskmaster on channel four as well as joe lycett�*s got your taskmaster on channel four as well asjoe lycett�*s got your back. and other programmes. people are fans of great british bake 0ff. other programmes. people are fans of great british bake off. i think you called me a day of fun. i haven't
9:58 am
watched this series yet because it is not really been my show but also because subtitles have prevented me from doing so. i have already calculated that there is about seven hours of shows that i need to catch up hours of shows that i need to catch up on, which might not sound like much. it might sound like the perfect day of binge watching your favourite programmes. but when you consider the fact that deaf people also need busy lives and tv is there downtime where it is usually an hour in the evening. if they are having to dedicate seven hours or find seven hours in a day to catch up on shows they've missed, it's impossible. it shows they've missed, it's impossible.— shows they've missed, it's imossible. , ., ., ., impossible. it is far from ideal. liam, impossible. it is far from ideal. liam. thank — impossible. it is far from ideal. liam, thank you _ impossible. it is far from ideal. liam, thank you for _ impossible. it is far from ideal. liam, thank you for talking i impossible. it is far from ideal. liam, thank you for talking to l impossible. it is far from ideal. i liam, thank you for talking to us. channel four has offered its apologies to liam and says it hopes they will be able to fix the problem as soon as possible. it is time now for a look at the weather forecast with carol. i don't think you noticed my mistake last time when i
9:59 am
asked how the weather was looking at the weekend. we are only on thursday. this is actually my weekend. i didn't actually notice. the weekend is just around the corner. you can see the extent of the cloud, but it will not be cloudy all the time. there will be some sunshine. we have a better front thinking south, bringing rain with it as it does so. behind it, we are looking at showers which could be wintry on higher ground. and strong winds on this weather front as well. tonight, the weather front continues its descent southwards with its cloud and rain. it will remain mild in southern areas, but behind it is going to turn much cooler. they will be frost across parts of scotland, northern ireland and the north of england. tomorrow, we hang onto a lot of cloud in southern areas, but
10:00 am
for the rest of us a lot of sunshine. wherever you are, it will feel cooler. this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. police in norway say a man who killed five people with a bow and arrow had shown signs of radicalisation. the number of people in england waiting to start routine hospital treatment has risen to a new record high, latest figures show. the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, has said british shoppers should be confident there will be enough presents on the shelves for christmas — despite a logjam at the uk's biggest commercial port. prince william tells space entrepreneurs to stop trying to reach new planets, and focus on solving the problems here on earth instead. it's the idea that we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on the repair of this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live.

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on