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tv   Newsday  BBC News  October 13, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm mariko oi. the headlines: supply chain shortages and the inflation it causes become a global problem — president biden and finance ministers from around the world try to tackle it. star trek�*s william shatner — at the age of 90 — makes history as the oldest person to go into space. what you have given me... ..is the most profound experience that i could imagine.
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i'm so filled with emotion about whatjust happened. concerns that china may slash its emission reduction targets as it ramps up coal production to deal with an energy shortage. we'll be live in washington with an energy security and climate change expert. a warning from the un that north korea's most vulnerable children and elderly are at risk of starvation. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc news. it's newsday. it's 6am in the morning in singapore and 6pm in washington, where president biden has been addressing global supply chain problems. suppliers around the world are struggling to cope with a rise in consumer demand, as countries emerge from pandemic lockdowns.
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france's finance minister on wednesday told a meeting of the international monetary fund in washington that there were "shortages everywhere". and the big worry for consumers across the globe, the shortages are causing steep price rises in everything from food to energy to consumer goods. from washington, here's our economics editor faisal islam. one of the world's biggest parking lots. dozens of cargo ships just waiting in the pacific, full of goods from asia, unable to dock at full terminals in the ports of california, with containers piled high. the same now happening on the atlantic coast off georgia too and in other ports around the world, the plumbing of the world economy not functioning properly. at the white house today, president biden summoned us business bosses to work 24/7 to clear the backlogs. this is an across—the—board
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commitment to going to 21w. this is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods through our supply chain. the actions of the president show that this is a supply—chain crisis that affects many countries across the world. it arises out of the fact that after the pandemic, demand rebounded much faster than expected and much faster than the ability of the world economy to supply the goods required. that's led to shortages, it's led to price rises, and that's not going to be solved before christmas. in fields and airfields around the usa, there are tens of thousands of nearly finished cars and trucks, but they can't be sold because they lack the crucial microchips, the orders for which were cancelled at the start of the pandemic. the companies were too pessimistic about the rebound in demand. that's led to a change in view from the bank chief who, earlier this year, predicted an unprecedented british boom. we did predict a booming recovery in the economy. i think what we missed was
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it would be so strong that it would create these supply—chain problems, whether it's gasoline, whether it's chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, finance ministers attending international meetings are spilling out onto the streets and parks of washington, dc. one solution to all of this — producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france and all european countries to key technologies, to chips, to semiconductors, to all the products on which there are bottlenecks and shortages today. and that could lead to higher prices permanently, alongside other factors, from us—china tensions, post—brexit visa restrictions orfears over uk—eu trade. are you worried about a trade war with the uk over northern ireland? germany's most likely new chancellor, olaf scholz, wouldn't be drawn on that, but there are fears in germany of a parts shortage causing a bottleneck recession. it's a global economic challenge and it's not going away.
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faisal islam, bbc news, in washington, dc. we can cross live to new york and our business correspondent michelle fleury. thanks forjoining us, michelle. this new measure, to get the court to operate 21w, is that enough to help the situation? —— the port. should we assume some parents will be missing? i should we assume some parents will be missin: ? ~ , should we assume some parents will be missing?— be missing? i think every year around this — be missing? i think every year around this time, _ be missing? i think every year around this time, there - be missing? i think every year around this time, there is - be missing? i think every year. around this time, there is always be missing? i think every year- around this time, there is always a shortage of a couple of items, but this year is likely to be worse and prices are likely to be higher. this is an attempt to try and reduce some of that kind of shortfall and some of that kind of shortfall and some of the issues we are seeing with the plumbing of global trade, but the problem is it takes time, so even if they move to working around the clock, there is a shortage of workers, there's also a shortage of drivers to take the stuff once they make it to land to the retailers. it takes time to train new drivers and given new licenses both of the government is working with industry to try and speed up that process, but ultimately it really is going to
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take months, not weeks, to try and iron out these issues. we take months, not weeks, to try and iron out these issues.— take months, not weeks, to try and iron out these issues. we have been talkin: a iron out these issues. we have been talking a lot — iron out these issues. we have been talking a lot about _ iron out these issues. we have been talking a lot about concerns - iron out these issues. we have been talking a lot about concerns for - talking a lot about concerns for inflation, but this could start to affect the country, the us, but also the global economic recovery soon. yeah, finance ministers are gathered in washington for the annual meetings of the world bank and the imf, who issued just yesterday a report downgrading their forecast for the global economy. it was a moderate downgrade, but one of the things they cited was the supply chain disruption, and if lesson everyone is learning now is that global trade has been powered in the last few years by just in global trade has been powered in the last few years byjust in time manufacturing. we are starting to see the weaknesses of this idea of you on the order what you need when you on the order what you need when you need it. because when you have a pandemic and disruptions in the supply chain, suddenly getting things back up again is not quite so simple, and so each country is looking at how to deal with this.
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the fear of course is a good lead to protectionism. —— is that it could lead to. protectionism. -- is that it could lead to. ~ . , lead to. michelle fleury in new york, lead to. michelle fleury in new york. thank— lead to. michelle fleury in new york, thank you _ lead to. michelle fleury in new york, thank you so _ lead to. michelle fleury in new york, thank you so much - lead to. michelle fleury in new york, thank you so much for i lead to. michelle fleury in new. york, thank you so much for that update. the actor william shatner has made history as the oldest person to go into space. the 90—year—old went on a io—minute flight on board the blue origin rocket, built by a company owned by the amazon billionairejeff bezos. the man familiar to millions as captain kirk returned safely to earth describing his trip as a most profound experience. from texas, our correspondent sophie long reports. as the sun rose over one of the most desolate parts of the wild west, william shatner made his way to the new shepard suborbital spacecraft. william shatner. he wasn't leading the crew his alter ego commanded, but with three other
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passengers who would share what they few who've gone before say is a life—changing experience. two, one... more than 50 years after he first donned a spacesuit as captain kirk, william shatner is now on his way to the final frontier. and there they are, over 328,000 feet... minutes later, as the new shepard crossed the internationally recognised boundary of space, he became the oldest person in the world to float there, weightless. and the actor who, for decades, played an iconic space explorer became one. and capsule touchdown. welcome down, the newest astronauts! he emerged from the capsule visibly moved by the adventure he said he hopes he never recovers from. firmly back on planet earth,
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he told me the beauty of what he'd seen was more profound than any words he could find or world record he'd broken. i wish i had broken the world record in the io—yard dash or the 100—yard dash, but unfortunately it was how old i am! would you do it again, though? i am so filled with such an emotion and such a feeling of a novel experience, i don't want to dissipate by thinking of another journey. there may be debate about whether he can be called an astronaut, but he has gone where no nonagenarian has gone before. sophie long, bbc news, blue origin launch pad one. some breaking news to bring to you. at least five people have been killed — and two others wounded — in attacks in norway by a man armed with a bow and arrow. police say the suspect, who appears to have acted alone, is now in custody.
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let's bring in a reporter with tv two in oslo. think you so much for joining us. i understand that we only know that this happened a very short time ago, but talk us through what we know about this attack. let me 'ust what we know about this attack. let me just say that i am not reporting on this incident, i am doing this on my free time, buy am up—to—date with what is happening, and the latest from the police is that it confirmed that the five people have been killed and two have been injured. one of them was an off—duty police officer. the police have not disclose the age or the gender of the victims and they have not ruled out if this is a terror attack. it is clear this was a tragedy and a terrible thing to happen, unprecedented incident.
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indeed, because this kind of attack is extremely rare in norway, wouldn't you say? and i understand police usually don't even carry around guns. bi; police usually don't even carry around sauna-— police usually don't even carry around guns. by default, police don't carry _ around guns. by default, police don't carry guns. _ around guns. by default, police don't carry guns, but _ around guns. by default, police don't carry guns, but they - around guns. by default, police don't carry guns, but they have| don't carry guns, but they have special permission, so a lot of the time, police will be carrying guns anyway. but there is a low situation for violence. anyway. but there is a low situation forviolence. it anyway. but there is a low situation for violence. it is a very peaceful place. i was there just last weekend. i had a coffee on a street caf on the street where this violence was happening. i was here last weekend and it is a very peaceful place. some houses, some businesses, it is kind of terrible what happened there. find businesses, it is kind of terrible what happened there.— businesses, it is kind of terrible what happened there. and i guess as a result, what happened there. and i guess as a result. are —
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what happened there. and i guess as a result. are you _ what happened there. and i guess as a result, are you seeing _ what happened there. and i guess as a result, are you seeing a _ what happened there. and i guess as a result, are you seeing a lot - what happened there. and i guess as a result, are you seeing a lot of - a result, are you seeing a lot of surprise, shock reaction, especially on social media and so on? yes. and if --eole on social media and so on? yes. and if people are — on social media and so on? yes. and if people are shocked _ on social media and so on? yes. and if people are shocked about - on social media and so on? yes. and if people are shocked about this. - if people are shocked about this. there have been witnesses who described what they saw around town. as this person was on a rampage between one half an hour and an hour. it is not clear yet how long this was going on, but one witness said he saw a police firing a warning shot, and the police have confirmed there was a warning shot fired during the apprehension, because apparently the perpetrator tried to escape when confronted by the police. tried to escape when confronted by the olice. ~' , ., ., ~ the police. fredrik drevon, thank ou so the police. fredrik drevon, thank you so much _ the police. fredrik drevon, thank you so much for— the police. fredrik drevon, thank you so much forjoining - the police. fredrik drevon, thank you so much forjoining us - the police. fredrik drevon, thank you so much forjoining us on - you so much forjoining us on newsday.
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the european union has tried to break the deadlock in the long—running brexit dispute over northern ireland. the eu is proposing that in future most food products imported from england, scotland and wales into northern ireland will not need to be checked. our ireland correspondent emma vardy has the latest on the search for compromise. could this be the light at the end of the tunnel for businesses? bringing goods into northern ireland from great britain has become much more difficult under the brexit arrangements. if we went back to 2020, for a consignment of goods, that's the paperwork that we had to produce. under the protocol in 2021, this is the paperwork for four or five pallets. and there could be multiple loads of this on one lorry? the uk government argues the difficulties have become so serious that it doesn'tjust want changes to the protocol, but a whole new treaty. we're seeing fewer, if anybody, wanting to begin moving goods between great britain and northern ireland. gb companies that are supplying
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smaller quantities to northern ireland are simply saying, "why should i bother?" what a year! marks & spencer says it won't be sending some christmas products over the irish sea because of the red tape, and there's due to be a ban on the british banger being brought into northern ireland, as chilled meats can't be imported under the current rules. but the eu's now offering to ease these problems with a unique agreement to reduce checks on food and drink problems moving over the irish sea, an arrangement to allow the sale of chilled meats to continue, and the eu said it will change its laws to solve problems which pose a threat to the supply of medicines to northern ireland. with this robust package of practical, imaginative solutions, we can continue to implement the protocol on ireland, northern ireland, for the benefit of all committees on the ground. but this is an ideological battle, too. loyalist communities view any border in the irish sea as severing northern ireland's link with the uk,
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integral to unionist identity here. if we do not kill this protocol, it will kill the union. for the most staunch unionists, the eu's proposals don't go far enough. they still have fall far short of what is needed to make the fundamental change that is required. but we recognise there's a negotiating process that will happen now. it's threatening the fragile power—sharing government here. sinn fein says the uk should implement the deal it already agreed. it's our view that the protocol guarantees protections for the good friday agreement, the all—island economy and it ensures that there is no border imposed on the island of ireland. because of the tensions, the uk's brexit minister says without a significant shift from the eu, the stability of northern ireland is at stake. it's clear that the protocol, as it's being implemented in northern ireland, is not being implemented with this
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necessary sensitivity. we have to come back to these arrangements again if they don't enjoy consent across northern ireland. the uk government's also called for an end to the role of the european court ofjustice in the arrangements, but political leaders in the republic of ireland say the demands are an act of bad faith. this is a country that makes treaties, that strikes agreements and then intends to renege on them. and that message must now resonate around the world — "don't make any agreement with the british government, don't sign a treaty with the united kingdom until you can be confident that this is a country that can honour its promises." without a resolution, the uk could trigger a clause to override part of the brexit deal, sparking a potential trade war with northern ireland caught in the middle. emma vardy, bbc news. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme: china ramps up its coal production, despite its emission reduction targets. we'll be live in washington, asking what the move means for efforts
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to tackle climate change. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area, where most of the damage was done, they're more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he's gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, ripping a hole in the front of the building. this government will not weaken! democracy will prevail! it fills me with humility and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as a recipient of this foremost honour.
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this catholic nation held its breath for the men they call "the 33". and then... ..bells tolled nationwide to announce the first rescue, and chile let out an almighty roar. welcome back. you're watching newsday on the bbc. i'm mariko oi in singapore. our headlines: president biden and finance ministers from around the world try to tackle global supply chain shortages and the inflation it causes. star trek�*s william shatner has made history as the oldest person to go into space. the 90—year—old experienced three minutes of zero gravity in the ten—minute flight. china has sought to massively step up imports of coal in the face of soaring international fossil fuel demand, with domestic coal prices reaching record levels.
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analysis from reuters news agency found that chinese coal imports were up 73% last month, compared to the same time last year. beijing has also sought to ramp up domestic production, last week ordering coal mines in the inner mongolia region to boost production capacity by 100 million tonnes. does this mean china is turning away from its global climate goals? let's bring injane nakano, a senior fellow in the energy security and climate change program at the center for strategic and international studies. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. china has been trying to transition from fossil fuel to renewables by reducing coal production and so want, but it has not been so smooth, so will it commitment to climate change change this? ., ., , , , .,
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this? china has been trying to really shift — this? china has been trying to really shift its _ this? china has been trying to really shift its economy - this? china has been trying to really shift its economy away| this? china has been trying to - really shift its economy away from coal, but coal still accounts for roughly two thirds of the chinese energy supply as well as electricity supply, so it is not been a really easyjourney, and all these easy journey, and all these development easyjourney, and all these development you just described, they are all warning signs, as we have cop26 less than a month from now. i am quite concerned how china will try to really ultimately deliver its 2030 carbon emissions goal, as well as eventually the 2060, china hopes to achieve the carbon neutrality economy wide. but interestingly, china has also _ economy wide. but interestingly, china has also eased _ economy wide. but interestingly, china has also eased its - china has also eased its restrictions on australian coal despite its trade dispute. is this a
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sign that the situation is so bad that they are almost willing to lose face diplomatically?— face diplomatically? correct, yes, i think it is a — face diplomatically? correct, yes, i think it is a sign _ face diplomatically? correct, yes, i think it is a sign that _ face diplomatically? correct, yes, i think it is a sign that they - face diplomatically? correct, yes, i think it is a sign that they are - think it is a sign that they are really in a difficult place. china reportedly closed this unofficial ban on australian coal overjubilee potential vermis to your document introduce this. now the chinese are starting to get australian coal cargoes, tells me they can use any supply of cold that they can get a hold of to be able to keep factories running, and also heating the households as much as they can. but it's notjust china, is it, needing more coal? it is also india. and as you said, it is rather ironic to see
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coal making a comebackjust ahead of cop26, so what needs to be done for countries to actually quit this dirty fossil fuel? i countries to actually quit this dirty fossil fuel?— dirty fossil fuel? i think the switch away _ dirty fossil fuel? i think the switch away from _ dirty fossil fuel? i think the switch away from coal - dirty fossil fuel? i think the switch away from coal to i dirty fossil fuel? i think the l switch away from coal to gas dirty fossil fuel? i think the - switch away from coal to gas still is something important, needs to be done. obviously china is now one of the largest global importers of natural gas as well, having quite a bit of influence on natural gas supply in europe as well, but as far as the coal goes, i think in china's case, there's also the pricing reform the chinese government has been undertaken for quite a while and there has been quite a bit of distortion. the price has not been really working properly. but in many ways, i don't think this is a sign that coal is permanently back, i hope that this is just a little bump on the road. i think the investment
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into renewables will continue for some certainly china is one of the largest investors in renewables, but at the same time, whether you can keep the lights on... at the same time, whether you can keep the lights on. . .— keep the lights on... jane, apologies. _ keep the lights on... jane, apologies, we _ keep the lights on... jane, apologies, we have - keep the lights on... jane, apologies, we have run - keep the lights on... jane, | apologies, we have run out keep the lights on... jane, i apologies, we have run out of keep the lights on... jane, - apologies, we have run out of time, but thank you forjoining us on the programme on this very important topic. the un's special rapporteur on human rights in north korea has warned that the country's most vulnerable children and elderly are at risk of starvation. that's as international sanctions, coupled with extensive covid restrictions, leave ordinary north koreans struggling to live a life of dignity. i'm joined now by phil robertson, deputy director of the asia division at human rights watch in boston. thank you so much forjoining us on the programme. i guess with covid restrictions, the findings are not too surprising, but firstly that was
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your reaction on how things got so dire there? it your reaction on how things got so dire there?— dire there? it has really been a situation with _ dire there? it has really been a situation with these _ dire there? it has really been a situation with these extreme . situation with these extreme response to covid—i9 by north korea, when they shut down cross—border travel and when they shut down enter provincial travel, travel and when they shut down enter provincialtravel, it travel and when they shut down enter provincial travel, it is creating a situation where people have no way to live, because people have been relying on these informal markets that have sprung up in north korea forfood and that have sprung up in north korea for food and other basic necessities, and without the ability to travel, for people during these goods to the markets, with the severe limitation of freedom of movement, the reality is people are locked down without access to food and other basic supplies. so it is not terribly surprising this is coming out, but is a tragedy nonetheless and something needs to be done. this nonetheless and something needs to be done. �* . nonetheless and something needs to be done. a ,, nonetheless and something needs to be done. �* . ,, ., nonetheless and something needs to bedone. a .,, be done. as you said, china please a hue role be done. as you said, china please a huge role in — be done. as you said, china please a huge role in this after— be done. as you said, china please a huge role in this after years - be done. as you said, china please a huge role in this after years of i huge role in this after years of president moon of south korea trying, the north is finally showing a willingness to talk to them again,
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and it will be a new government in south korea. i and it will be a new government in south korea-— and it will be a new government in south korea. i think it is important for north korea _ south korea. i think it is important for north korea to _ south korea. i think it is important for north korea to speak— south korea. i think it is important for north korea to speak to - south korea. i think it is important for north korea to speak to south | for north korea to speak to south korea, and to take president moon up on offers to provide assistance and aid across the border, because the situation is so dire, however, so far, beyond some brief dialogue, talking across the hotline that was created between the two countries we have not had a significant movement forward on unitarian —— humanitarian assistance. and that is a problem. the next president of south korea may not look so positively on that engagement with north korea. phil positively on that engagement with north korea-— positively on that engagement with north korea. phil robertson, thank ou so north korea. phil robertson, thank you so much _ north korea. phil robertson, thank you so much for— north korea. phil robertson, thank you so much forjoining _ north korea. phil robertson, thank you so much forjoining us - north korea. phil robertson, thank you so much forjoining us on i you so much forjoining us on newsday today. and that's all we have time for for this addition of newsday. of course, you can get in touch with all of us on twitter.
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stay with bbc world news if you can. thanks for watching. good evening. i'm here with your sports news and chelsea got their women's champions league campaign back on track with a 2—1 win away tojuventus in group a. erin cuthbert put the londoners i—0 just after the half hour mark with a dazzling solo run and shot. italian international barbara bonansea levelled matters in turin six minutes later with a brilliant volley building the pressure on emma hayes's side. but it was once again pernille harder to the rescue, as she scored chelsea's second with around 20 minutes remaining. that means that chelsea are second in group a, trailing two—time winners wolfsburg
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on goal difference, the germans accounting for swiss side servette by 5—0, whilejuventus drop to third after that loss. bournemouth and wales midfielder david brooks has announced he has cancer. he's released a statement on social media to say he's been diagnosed with stage ii hodgkin lymphoma and will begin a course of treatment next week. brooks has played for bournemouth since 2018 and was part of the wales squad for euro 2020. his most recent game was in the championship at the end of september and he had withdrawn from the most recent wales squad through illness. this is the statement he's released this afternoon, and part of it reads... he goes on to...
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bournemouth have tweeted themselves to say, "we're all behind you, brooksy. an anti—racism campaign group has called for hungary to be banned from international football after their fans were once again involved in controversial scenes at a game against england. fifa have condemned the clashes between visiting fans and police during the world cup qualifier at wembley. a banner could be seen amongst the away fans prior to kick off in protest at england players taking the knee. shortly after, fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police which authorities say began with racial abuse aimed at a steward. on the pitch, hungary scored first beforejohn stones equalised. hungary have already been ordered to play two home matches behind closed doors following the racism england players experienced there last month, and anton ferdinand has echoed the view that hungary need to be punished. if uefa and fifa can get involved when there's... when the euro super league was coming about, and for them to go, "if you are involved in that,
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you will no longer play in these competitions, then why can't you do that with racial discrimination?" itjust doesn't make sense. if you really do condemn it and you really do want it out of the game the way you say you do, because you have a zero tolerance, by the way, then stop talking about it and actually have some action, which would be the punishment should be they should be nowhere near a tournament, they shouldn't be involved in international football until they sort themselves out. the swedish fa say manchester united forward anthony elanga was subjected to a racist comment by an opponent while playing for his country's under 21 side against italy yesterday. sweden have submitted a report to the match referee, following allegations made by the 19—year—old. the italian football federation said it denies the claims. the european under—21 championship qualifierfinished i—i. new watford manager claudio ranieri says he's very confident the club can avoid relegation from the premier league. they're on seven points after seven games — enough to get the previous manager, xisco munoz, the sack, but the former leicester boss says he's happy to be back in england,
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just a week before he turns 70. if i feel good, if i feel emotion, i want to continue. that's it. football for me is my life, from... when i was young, i think about playing football, and after, make a manager. and now! playing football, and after, make a manager. and now i have energy to give to my players and i want to continue. kenyan athlete agnes tirop has been found stabbed to death in her home in the country, with her husband being treated as a suspect by police. tirop was a two—time world championship medallist, finished fourth in the 5,000 metres at the tokyo olympics, and just last month set the world record for a women's only iokm road race in germany. athletics kenya say they are distraught at her untimely death. andy murray says he's not planning to play in next month's davis cup finals, suggesting he wouldn't be selected
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for the british team anyway. murray led the team to the trophy in 2015, but now believes

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