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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 13, 2021 10:30pm-10:46pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: the eu vice—president has set out plans — to deal with the row over northern ireland's border post brexit. the measures include reducing checks on goods between the british mainland and northern ireland. president biden has announced longer hours at america's largest port — los angeles — as part of an effort to ease supply chain blockages in the run up to the busy christmas shopping season. president putin says european countries should not blame russia for high gas prices, saying they failed to replenish their stocks during the summer when costs were lower. he denied russia was using energy as a weapon. the star trek actor william shatner has blasted off into space — along with three other crew members — on board the blue origin spacecraft. at the age of 90, he's become the oldest person to fly to the edge of space.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benjamin butterworth — the late editor and senior reporter at the i — and aubrey allegretti — a political correspondent for the guardian. lets just give you a flavour of tomorrow's front pages, starting off with the financial times. the financial times leads with the eu's offer to scrap most of the customs checks on goods heading into northern ireland, but reports that this is brussels' final offer. the metro splashes on comments made by prince william to the bbc. he says the effort going into the new space race would be better directed at solving climate change. the yorkshire post reports
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that the local police and crime commissioner is under pressure to resign following comments he made about the murder of sarah everard. the independent has more on brexit — they've been told the uk government believes the offer from the eu is not good enough. the guardian has a similar story — saying the eu is preparing for borisjohnson to reject their new plan. the sun leads with robert webb quitting strictly because of heart problems. and the daily star features a supposed feud between paul mccartney and mickjagger. more and any moment. let us start off, then, with the eu's offer to scrap most northern ireland cheques. that is the front—page lead in the financial times. is the front—page lead in the financialtimes. benjamin, why is the front—page lead in the financial times. benjamin, why don't you kick us off? what do you make of that? do you think this is an offer from the eu that could lead to a
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compromise, a new deal and settle all the differences they have been between the westminster government and brussels? i between the westminster government and brussels?— and brussels? i mean, i think both sides want— and brussels? i mean, i think both sides want to _ and brussels? i mean, i think both sides want to get _ and brussels? i mean, i think both sides want to get this _ and brussels? i mean, i think both sides want to get this agreement. | and brussels? i mean, i think both| sides want to get this agreement. i don't think the eu has a great appetite, especially at this stage, for a great trade war with the uk. i think they want to get this text, but borisjohnson and lord frost throughout this process have felt like they can just push and push and push to see how good a deal they can get. the ft says 80% of the cheques that were going to happen are going to be stopped as part of this agreement that lord frost and the eu have come to, but i think the instinct from borisjohnson instinct from boris johnson throughout this has to be just keep pushing and i think with a change of guard in the eu leaders coming up in the next few months with angela merkel i think they are wondering how far they can get with this. i think people will hope it is an agreement, but the instinct of what is coming out of downing street as they are not going to accept what has been offered today. bud
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they are not going to accept what has been offered today. and aubrey alleuretti, has been offered today. and aubrey allegretti, some _ has been offered today. and aubrey allegretti, some people _ has been offered today. and aubrey allegretti, some people will- has been offered today. and aubrey allegretti, some people will say - has been offered today. and aubrey allegretti, some people will say if. allegretti, some people will say if the eu is prepared to drop these checks why did they ever need these checks why did they ever need these checks in the first place? all the paperwork, people now saying they didn't need so much that. yes. paperwork, people now saying they didn't need so much that. yes, there is with a bit — didn't need so much that. yes, there is with a bit of— didn't need so much that. yes, there is with a bit of diplomatic _ is with a bit of diplomatic wrangling, isn't there, when both sides— wrangling, isn't there, when both sides say— wrangling, isn't there, when both sides say there is absolutely no red lines and _ sides say there is absolutely no red lines and then they absolutely sort of renege — lines and then they absolutely sort of renege on those of the course of the next _ of renege on those of the course of the next few months. i think people will he _ the next few months. i think people will be wondering what the eu were so resistant to this proposal before _ so resistant to this proposal before. brussels believes it was because — before. brussels believes it was because the facilitation agreement is used _ because the facilitation agreement is used for checks on the goods using _ is used for checks on the goods using technology was basically using technology that didn't exist, people were using fanciful thinking, so now they think— were using fanciful thinking, so now they think that technology is more accessible and available, so that is why it _ accessible and available, so that is why it is _ accessible and available, so that is why it is more likely enable to used pragmatically. whether or not we actually _ pragmatically. whether or not we actually get to a situation by the end of— actually get to a situation by the end of the year, which is when maros sefcovic— end of the year, which is when maros sefcovic wants this new agreement to come _ sefcovic wants this new agreement to come into_ sefcovic wants this new agreement to come into force, i think it is difficult _ come into force, i think it is difficult because we'll see quite a lot of—
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difficult because we'll see quite a lot of wrangling over the next three months _ lot of wrangling over the next three months. �* ., �* ., months. ben'amin butterworth, the eu araument is months. benjamin butterworth, the eu argument is a — months. benjamin butterworth, the eu argument is a waste _ months. benjamin butterworth, the eu argument is a waste of— months. benjamin butterworth, the eu argument is a waste of boris _ months. benjamin butterworth, the eu argument is a waste of boris johnson . argument is a waste of borisjohnson and his government, well, you signed up and his government, well, you signed up to this in the first place. yes. up to this in the first place. yes, exactl , up to this in the first place. yes, exactly. and _ up to this in the first place. yes, exactly. and i — up to this in the first place. yes, exactly, and i think— up to this in the first place. yes, exactly, and i think there - up to this in the first place. yes, exactly, and i think there will. up to this in the first place. is: exactly, and i think there will be a lot of people in europe you don't just look at britain reneging on its own agreement for northern ireland, they will look at britain and they will think, can we trust this country as a partner, as a country we do trade with? even though we left the eu, it will always be integral to our economy, even more to the —— than it is to the economies of eu nations and i think the risk here is that may be boris johnson thinks he can push this a bit further, get more compromise from the eu, but at what expense in the medium to long term because i think a lot of governments will be wondering in the eu whether britain is a trustworthy ally. let’s wondering in the eu whether britain is a trustworthy ally.— your paper, guardian, the same lead, actually, the eu offers a response on its offering to northern ireland, saying the eu is going to scrap 80%
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of czechs. in some ways do you think it is going to suit borisjohnson to keep this row going with the eu? electorally, does it do him no harm? i'm sure he probably quite likes to be seen _ i'm sure he probably quite likes to be seen to— i'm sure he probably quite likes to be seen to continue the tussle with the eu, _ be seen to continue the tussle with the eu, hut— be seen to continue the tussle with the eu, but he has been in it for decades— the eu, but he has been in it for decades as _ the eu, but he has been in it for decades as a politician and as a journalist, _ decades as a politician and as a journalist, but i think he also got elected _ journalist, but i think he also got elected to— journalist, but i think he also got elected to office on a manifesto pledge — elected to office on a manifesto pledge to get brexit done and she's quite strange for his electoral coalition— quite strange for his electoral coalition he got together, particularly the brexit party voters who wanted him to get brexit done, who wanted him to get brexit done, who look_ who wanted him to get brexit done, who took at— who wanted him to get brexit done, who look at this five years on from the referendum and think, why are we still talking _ the referendum and think, why are we still talking about this? you know, we wanted — still talking about this? you know, we wanted no deal and yet we are still sort _ we wanted no deal and yet we are still sort of — we wanted no deal and yet we are still sort of these discussions and arguments. why are we still sort of hung _ arguments. why are we still sort of hung up _ arguments. why are we still sort of hung up on — arguments. why are we still sort of hung up on all these things? sol actually— hung up on all these things? sol actually think some people look at him and _ actually think some people look at him and think, we wish this were over, _ him and think, we wish this were over. we — him and think, we wish this were over, we wish you would sort of... you _ over, we wish you would sort of... you know. — over, we wish you would sort of... you know. got— over, we wish you would sort of... you know, got a good deal be first time, _ you know, got a good deal be first time, rather— you know, got a good deal be first time, ratherthanjust you know, got a good deal be first time, rather thanjust got us over
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the line _ time, rather thanjust got us over the line and — time, rather thanjust got us over the line and then we are having to sort of— the line and then we are having to sort of tweak around the edges with a deal— sort of tweak around the edges with a deal that— sort of tweak around the edges with a deal that lots of businesses in northern— a deal that lots of businesses in northern ireland are clearly very unhappy— northern ireland are clearly very unhappy with. northern ireland are clearly very unhappy with-— northern ireland are clearly very unhau with. �* . , ., ., unhappy with. ben'amin, the guardian also talks about — unhappy with. benjamin, the guardian also talks about how— unhappy with. benjamin, the guardian also talks about how lord _ unhappy with. benjamin, the guardian also talks about how lord frost - unhappy with. benjamin, the guardian also talks about how lord frost has i also talks about how lord frost has said... about the european court of justice being the final arbiter of eu law in northern ireland. they don't want that. there is a kind of ideological disputes, isn't there, of the ecj? is that going to be one of the ecj? is that going to be one of the ecj? is that going to be one of the key sticking points? it is very likely. _ of the key sticking points? it is very likely. and _ of the key sticking points? it 3 very likely, and you're absolutely right to say that what we have here are largely ideological questions. borisjohnson and lord frost laid out their stall so clearly about what they think of things like the european court ofjustice, of cheques on the borders. they made that clear years ago and so i think they want israel to going. aubrey allegretti makes a very good point, that they were elected to get brexit done, and elected with the most thumping 80 seat majority. i was seeing pulling on the yugo of pulser chris curtis today saying that the
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less brexit looks done, the less people are likely to trust brunson. however there is a caveat that goes for all leaders and it will increase near to an election and rumour has it that could be as early as next year but if he is arguing with other nations trying to tug thumb for britain than what prime minister doesn't benefit from that? i think there might be a certain amount of showmanship about this process, while in private they will be a lot more practical.— while in private they will be a lot more practical. aubrey allegretti, at the end of— more practical. aubrey allegretti, at the end of the _ more practical. aubrey allegretti, at the end of the day _ more practical. aubrey allegretti, at the end of the day is _ more practical. aubrey allegretti, at the end of the day is it - at the end of the day is it possible, do you think, that we can have a final agreement on this that is going to be reasonably satisfying, not only to the westminster government and boris johnson, but brussels and all the parties in northern ireland? is it possible to square that circle? we saw how difficult that was the last time, didn't we? it saw how difficult that was the last time, didn't we?— time, didn't we? it took a prime minister falling _ time, didn't we? it took a prime minister falling on _ time, didn't we? it took a prime minister falling on their - time, didn't we? it took a prime minister falling on their swords. | minister falling on their swords. the ruhik— minister falling on their swords. the rubik cube of brexit has so many sides and _ the rubik cube of brexit has so many sides and i_ the rubik cube of brexit has so many sides and i doubt everyone is going to end _ sides and i doubt everyone is going to end up _ sides and i doubt everyone is going to end up completely happy. sol severely — to end up completely happy. sol severely doubt it is the honest
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answer. — severely doubt it is the honest answer, but it will be a question of who is— answer, but it will be a question of who is shaft — answer, but it will be a question of who is shaft of the most. you know, fishermen— who is shaft of the most. you know, fishermen complained so much in the aftermath_ fishermen complained so much in the aftermath of the trade deal being signed _ aftermath of the trade deal being signed on boxing day last year about how nruch— signed on boxing day last year about how much they were shafted, so yes, there _ how much they were shafted, so yes, there will_ how much they were shafted, so yes, there will certainly be someone who loses _ there will certainly be someone who loses out _ there will certainly be someone who loses out on all this. all there will certainly be someone who loses out on all this.— loses out on all this. all right, let's move on to the yorkshire post, and there is not huge prominence to this, but there is an important story. it is the whole concern, really, that they could be shortages at christmas and been particular to at christmas and been particular to a retailer is warning of the shortages, partly because of what is going on in the shortages, partly because of what is going on in reports, felixstowe and so on, and huge sort of backlogs there are shipping containers at felixstowe, which could have a knock—on effect for those stockings and how many presents our kids get on christmas day. should we be worried, do you think, benjamin? i day. should we be worried, do you think, benjamin?— think, ben'amin? i think based on the ast think, benjamin? i think based on the past few— think, benjamin? i think based on the past few months, _ think, benjamin? i think based on the past few months, let - think, benjamin? i think based on the past few months, let alone i think, benjamin? i think based on | the past few months, let alone the past few years, we seem to lurch from panic, from disaster to
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disaster. there is evidence today that some retailers are bringing forward their christmas sales because they are worried that not everything will be able to get on the shelves. my newspaper, the i newspaper, reported yesterday that ships are getting into the country and there is likely to be a shortage of toys by christmas. —— ships are not getting into the country. i think the danger we run here, especially as media, newspapers and telly, is that we tell people that might be a panic and then they will go out and panic and buy toys and that becomes a self—fulfilling prophecy. right now shelves look fairly 0k prophecy. right now shelves look fairly ok with this, but i wouldn't be surprised if the idea that there is a danger becomes a reality, simply because they are anxious and who wants their kids to wake up on christmas day without a toy? i still remember not getting the spice girls album i look wanted as a kid and it lives with you so long i think there might be some worried parents
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there! did you get it in the end? i eventually saw them live - there! did you get it in the end? i eventually saw them live at - there! did you get it in the end? i - eventually saw them live at wembley a few years ago that made up for it. there you go, all is well that ends well. aubrey allegretti, what you make of this? it is an interesting question for the media, isn't it? do you report the issue of potential issue of shortages? because as benjamin was saying it can become a self—fulfilling prophecy. we saw that a bit with petrol. 0r self—fulfilling prophecy. we saw that a bit with petrol. or should be media just sort of pretend this is not happening? i media just sort of pretend this is not happening?— media just sort of pretend this is not happening? i absolutely agree with ben, it _ not happening? i absolutely agree with ben, it is— not happening? i absolutely agree with ben, it is absolutely - not happening? i absolutely agree with ben, it is absolutely a - with ben, it is absolutely a possibility, but i think we can draw distinctions— possibility, but i think we can draw distinctions between various degrees of responsible journalism, reporting facts that— of responsible journalism, reporting facts that is happening is one thing. — facts that is happening is one thing, but inciting people to buy is another— thing, but inciting people to buy is another uncertain media outlets were more _ another uncertain media outlets were more guilty— another uncertain media outlets were more guilty of that than others, so i more guilty of that than others, so i don't _ more guilty of that than others, so idon't think— more guilty of that than others, so i don't think there is any danger in communicating risks that industry figures _ communicating risks that industry figures and business owners are putting — figures and business owners are putting out there and obviously it is partially in some people's interests to encourage more people to buy— interests to encourage more people to buy earlier rather than later as welt _ to buy earlier rather than later as welt but, — to buy earlier rather than later as well. but, you know, we should distinguish that from much more
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irresponsible inciting people to panic— irresponsible inciting people to panic buy. people are very sensible with what _ panic buy. people are very sensible with what we saw with the loo roll hoarding — with what we saw with the loo roll hoarding and the fuel holding we saw this year— hoarding and the fuel holding we saw this year and the waterfall of stories. _ this year and the waterfall of stories, even if unintended, and create _ stories, even if unintended, and create a — stories, even if unintended, and create a very sort of long lasting effect _ create a very sort of long lasting effect. �* .., , create a very sort of long lasting effect. , ._ ., , , effect. because actually what seems to be the warning, _ effect. because actually what seems to be the warning, that _ effect. because actually what seems to be the warning, that there - effect. because actually what seems to be the warning, that there mightl to be the warning, that there might be not so much shortages, but less choice. you know, you can still get your kids' presents and toys, but maybe not do the exact toy they want. but going back to your point about the spice girls album, if it is not the toy you want i think it is not the toy you want i think it is a pretty miserable christmas! absolutely, i think anyone who is a parent knows the pressure that is on when they get those lists for santa clause. 0liver dowden, the chair of the conservative party, he promised young people and kids today that santa claus will get everything to them in time. i think that may be optimistic thinking, given the challenges that seem to be in place and the challenges we have had with
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various other things, but there have been reports in the papers in the last day or two of parents going out and buy lots of toys and the desire to read that i think most people as we have discussed may end up causing the shortage themselves, so don't buy ten toys for your one kid though and there are ten kits out there who might end up without a toy when we do have a shortage.— let's talk about william shatner going off into space, captain kirk, onjeff bizos's travel company, blue origin. it is a great story, isn't it? because it is the sort of thing... you sort of think william shatner has been his face all your life. i grew up watching star trek, you kinda think he was always in space, but here are years in, he went up for ten minutes.- space, but here are years in, he went up for ten minutes. yes, sort of shattering _ went up for ten minutes. yes, sort of shattering the _ went up for ten minutes. yes, sort of shattering the fourth _ went up for ten minutes. yes, sort of shattering the fourth wall, - went up for ten minutes. yes, sortj of shattering the fourth wall, when we come _ of shattering the fourth wall, when we come to face to face with the fiction— we come to face to face with the fiction we — we come to face to face with the fiction we always pretend it was reai~ _ fiction we always pretend it was reai~ i_ fiction we always pretend it was real. i thought it was really beautiful what he said when he was asked _ beautiful what he said when he was asked about whether he would do it
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again. _ asked about whether he would do it again, when he said, it was so wonderfui— again, when he said, it was so wonderful i_ again, when he said, it was so wonderful i never want to replace that memory. and that made it all the more — that memory. and that made it all the more understandable to me. i 'ust the more understandable to me. i just thought that is absolutely brilliant. yes. a fantastic experience for him.- brilliant. yes. a fantastic experience for him. brilliant. yes. a fantastic exerience for him. �* ,., . experience for him. and some nice ublici experience for him. and some nice publicity for _ experience for him. and some nice publicity for amazon _ experience for him. and some nice publicity for amazon and _ experience for him. and some nice publicity for amazon and jeff - experience for him. and some nice| publicity for amazon and jeff bizos, benjamin? publicity for amazon and jeff bizos, ben'amin? .. , , , ., publicity for amazon and jeff bizos, ben'amin? , , , ., ., ben'amin? exactly, this is a reason it benjamin? exactly, this is a reason it was william _ benjamin? exactly, this is a reason it was william shatner _ benjamin? exactly, this is a reason it was william shatner who - benjamin? exactly, this is a reason it was william shatner who was - it was william shatner who was gripped it this really a trip into space because we all know him as playing captain kirk in star trek, so this is going to... for generations this will ignite their imaginations. i have to say, i have never watched the star trek or star wars shows, it is not really my thing, but even i got emotional as i saw that go up into the air. you know, it is the ingenuity of humanity to be able to just send someone to space for ten minutes and back down, in a similar way to which you might get on the tube or the bus, so straightforward, seemingly, in terms of the trip. and then when he got off, as aubrey allegretti says, he was welling up, saying he
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had never seen anything like it before and all of us should go there. i think the price at the moment if you are not william shatner is $28 million, so i don't know about you, but i need to check my euromillions ticket from last night because that is the only hope for most of us going there. we were “ust seeinr for most of us going there. we were just seeing there — for most of us going there. we were just seeing there any _ for most of us going there. we were just seeing there any metro - for most of us going there. we were just seeing there any metro prince l just seeing there any metro prince william having a go at this billionaire space race, saying maybe we need to think about fixing our planet instead. aubrey allegretti, has he got a point?— planet instead. aubrey allegretti, has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream — has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream for _ has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream for the _ has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream for the rest _ has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream for the rest of - has he got a point? yes, absolutely. it is a dream for the rest of us, - it is a dream for the rest of us, but think— it is a dream for the rest of us, but think about how much money is spent on _ but think about how much money is spent on something like that and there _ spent on something like that and there is— spent on something like that and there is also some issues, particularly criticised for its place — particularly criticised for its place in _ particularly criticised for its place in the uk, sol particularly criticised for its place in the uk, so i think it is something _ place in the uk, so i think it is something that is probably going to make _ something that is probably going to make it _ something that is probably going to make it quite popular, having that opinion, _ make it quite popular, having that opinion, because there is a serious side to— opinion, because there is a serious side to the — opinion, because there is a serious side to the fun stuff as well. speaking of the fun stuff, let us end with the beatles and the stones. this is the beatles and the stones. this is the daily star, a feud, a slightly better headline, perhaps, butjust talking about an alleged feud after
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