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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  October 13, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten: the eu tries to break the deadlock on the long—running brexit dispute involving northern ireland. it's proposed that, in future, most food products arriving in northern ireland from england, scotland and wales will not need to be checked. we have completely turned our rules upside down and inside out to find a solid solution to an outstanding challenge. but for some businesses in northern ireland, the dispute between the uk and the eu has gone unresolved for too long. gb companies that are supplying smaller quantities to northern ireland are simply saying, "why should i bother? "it's too difficult, it's too cumbersome." we'll be asking what happens if, as seems likely, the uk government says it's not enough. also tonight...
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toy retailers and other businesses are warning that delays at uk ports will result in shortages this christmas. a lack of care staff in the community is causing major problems for hospitals, with elderly patients unable to be discharged. and a safe return to earth for william shatner, alias captain kirk — the oldest person ever to visit space. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel. chelsea are away to juventus as they look to pick up their first win in this season's women's champions league. good evening. the european union has tried to break the deadlock on the long—running brexit dispute involving northern ireland. it says the new plan would halve the customs paperwork needed.
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this dispute is all about the northern ireland protocol, which was agreed and signed by the uk and the eu, and came into force at the start of this year. among other things, the protocol requires extra checks and paperwork on products like food and drink imported from britain. because northern ireland is still in the eu's single market for goods, there are no border checkpoints between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, a crucial factor to avoid a return to the tensions and troubles of the past. the result is a trade border which falls between britain and northern ireland, which unionists say undermines northern ireland's place in the uk. adding to the tensions, the uk government now wants to reverse its previous agreement on the role of the european court ofjustice. our ireland correspondent emma vardy has the latest on the search for compromise. could this be the light at the end
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of the tunnel for businesses? bringing guns into northern ireland from great britain has become much more difficult under the brexit arrangements. iii more difficult under the brexit arrangements.— more difficult under the brexit arrangements. if we went back to 2024 a consignment _ arrangements. if we went back to 2024 a consignment of _ arrangements. if we went back to 2024 a consignment of goods, i arrangements. if we went back to i 2024 a consignment of goods, that arrangements. if we went back to - 2024 a consignment of goods, that is the paperwork we had to produce. under the protocol of 2021, this is the paperwork. under the protocol of 2021, this is the paperwork-— the paperwork. they could be multile the paperwork. they could be multiple loads _ the paperwork. they could be multiple loads of _ the paperwork. they could be multiple loads of this - the paperwork. they could be multiple loads of this on - the paperwork. they could be multiple loads of this on one | the paperwork. they could be - multiple loads of this on one lorry? the uk government argues the difficulties have become so serious that it doesn'tjust want changes to the protocol, but a whole new treaty. the protocol, but a whole new trea . ~ ., , treaty. we are seeing fewer, if an one treaty. we are seeing fewer, if anyone wanting _ treaty. we are seeing fewer, if anyone wanting to begin - treaty. we are seeing fewer, if. anyone wanting to begin moving treaty. we are seeing fewer, if - anyone wanting to begin moving goods between great britain and northern ireland. gb companies supplying smaller quantities to northern ireland or simply saying, why should ireland or simply saying, why should i bother? . ireland or simply saying, why should ibother? . , i bother? marks & spencer says it won't be sending _ i bother? marks & spencer says it won't be sending some _ i bother? marks & spencer says it won't be sending some christmas| won't be sending some christmas products over the irish sea because of the red tape and there is due to be a ban on the british banger being brought into northern ireland. chilled meats cannot be imported
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under the current rules. but the eu is now offering to ease these problems with the unique agreement to reduce checks on food and drink problems moving of the irish sea and an arrangement to allow the sale of needs to continue and change laws to solve problems to solve threat of supply of medicines to northern ireland. we supply of medicines to northern ireland. ~ u, supply of medicines to northern ireland. ~ _, ., ireland. we can continue to implement _ ireland. we can continue to implement the _ ireland. we can continue to implement the protocol- ireland. we can continue to implement the protocol in i ireland. we can continue to - implement the protocol in ireland, northern ireland for the benefit of all communities on the ground. but this is an ideological battle, too. loyalist communities and view any border in the irish sea as severing northern ireland's link with the uk, integra to unionist identity here. if we do not kill this protocol, it will kill the union. for if we do not kill this protocol, it will kill the union.— will kill the union. for the most staunch unionist, _ will kill the union. for the most staunch unionist, the _ will kill the union. for the most staunch unionist, the eu - will kill the union. for the most. staunch unionist, the eu proposals do not go far enough. the?
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staunch unionist, the eu proposals do not go far enough.— do not go far enough. they still have full short _ do not go far enough. they still have full short of _ do not go far enough. they still have full short of what is - do not go far enough. they still. have full short of what is needed do not go far enough. they still- have full short of what is needed to make the _ have full short of what is needed to make the fundamental change that is required _ make the fundamental change that is required. we recognise that as a negotiating process that will happen now. negotiating process that will happen now it _ negotiating process that will happen now. , ., ., now. it is threatening the fragile power-sharing _ now. it is threatening the fragile power-sharing government - now. it is threatening the fragile - power-sharing government here. sinn power—sharing government here. sinn fein says the uk should implement the deal it already agreed. it is our view that _ the deal it already agreed. it is our view that the _ our view that the protocol guarantees protections for the good friday agreement, the all ireland economy and ensures there is no border imposed on the island of ireland. �* , ., , ireland. because of the tensions, the uk brexit _ ireland. because of the tensions, the uk brexit minister _ ireland. because of the tensions, the uk brexit minister says - ireland. because of the tensions, l the uk brexit minister says without a significant shift from the eu, the stability of northern ireland is at stake. it stability of northern ireland is at stake. , ~ . stability of northern ireland is at stake. , . ., ., stability of northern ireland is at stake. ,. ., ., stake. it is clear that the protocol as it is being _ stake. it is clear that the protocol as it is being implemented - stake. it is clear that the protocol as it is being implemented in - as it is being implemented in northern ireland is not being implemented with this necessary sensitivity. we have to go back to these arrangements again if they don't enjoy consent across northern ireland. don't en'oy consent across northern ireland. , ., ., , ireland. the uk government has called for an end _ ireland. the uk government has called for an end to _ ireland. the uk government has called for an end to the - ireland. the uk government has called for an end to the role - ireland. the uk government has called for an end to the role of. ireland. the uk government has l called for an end to the role of the european court ofjustice in the arrangements. but political leaders in the republic of ireland say the demands are an act of bad faith.
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this is a country that makes treaties and strikes agreements and then intends to renege on them. that message will resonate around the world. don't make any agreement with the british government, don't sign a treaty with the united kingdom until you can be confident that this is a country that can honour its promises. country that can honour its promises-_ country that can honour its romises. ., ., ., promises. without a resolution, the uk could trigger— promises. without a resolution, the uk could trigger a _ promises. without a resolution, the uk could trigger a clause _ promises. without a resolution, the uk could trigger a clause to - uk could trigger a clause to override part of the brexit deal, sparking a potential trade war with northern ireland caught in the middle. emma vardy, bbc news. our europe editor katya adler is in berlin. if, as seems likely, the uk government says this latest offer is not enough, what happens next? first, we have to let the two sides get together, get their competing versions of the future of the protocol together and see if they can find common ground. today they were in london and at the end of the week they will be meeting in brussels. the eu says the raft of
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measures are proposed today go a long way to allaying uk concerns about the protocol. but a very big stumbling block remains, what will be the role of the european court of justice? the two sides cannot decide on that. if ultimately, this new round of talks dissolves quickly, david frost says he is ready to trigger article 16 of the protocol and that would suspend parts of the protocol to protect peace in northern ireland, he says. the eu says that kind of action could threaten the stability of northern ireland. even before this new round of talks, you have countries like germany who have asked the european commission to prepare a range of possible retaliatory measures against the uk if article 16 is triggered. that feels talks of a possible trade war all these are hard—nosed negotiating tactics from the beginning. hard-nosed negotiating tactics from the beginning-— one of the uk's biggest toy retailers is warning that delays
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at uk ports will result in shortages this christmas. with thousands of containers stuck at ports, including felixstowe, and a serious shortage of hgv lorry drivers, there's widespread concern in the business community about future stocks. our transport correspondent caroline davies has the latest. coming in but going out too slowly. felixstowe is the busiest container port in the uk, bringing in goods from around the world. but for months, the situation at ports here and internationally has been getting worse as demand for goods grows after the pandemic. the situation is caused by a messy mix of global problems, including covid disruption, but here in the uk it is made worse by a shortage of hgv drivers to take the goods away, and so they build up. there are around 100,000 containers here. the port normally has around 60,000 to 70,000 on average. they aren't the only
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port in this position. well, this is a global issue, so it's happening in ports around the world, and it's obviously happening in all the container ports around the uk because of the volume of traffic, of containers, and of particularly imports at the moment, which are coming into the uk as we come out of lockdown. as well as taking time to get goods to the right place, the cost of shipping goods is also going up. the freight rates have gone up massively. two years ago you paid about $3000 for a 40 foot from shanghai to felixstowe. this month, it is between $19,000 and $20,000 so, as you can see, they have gone up sixfold. and that has a knock—on effect in our shops, including on the price and availability of toys coming in before christmas. at this point in time it is while stocks last. if you see it, i would be buying it.
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i'd be looking at it rather than looking for it, because i have no doubt that, come december, there are going to be a lot of disappointed shoppers looking for items thatjust cannot be got. the government has reassured shoppers that they should shop normally this christmas and has said that while global capacity regularly fluctuates, it is continuing to work with the industry to tackle the challenges at ports. the supply chain is stuck in a snarl up and it could take months to unpick. caroline davies, bbc news. problems with supply chains are not just affecting the uk. france's finance minister, speaking at a meeting of the international monetary fund in washington earlier today, said there were �*shortages everywhere', with suppliers struggling to cope with the rise in consumer demand, as countries emerge from the pandemic. from washington, our economics editor faisal islam reports. one of the world's biggest parking lots. dozens of cargo ships just
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waiting in the pacific, full of goods from asia, unable to dock at full terminals in the ports of california, with containers piled high. the same now happening on the atlantic coast off georgia too and in other ports around the world, the plumbing of the world economy not functioning properly. at the white house today, president biden summoned us business bosses to work 24/7 to clear the backlogs. this is an across—the—board commitment to going to 24/7. this is a big first step in speeding up the movement of materials and goods through our supply chain. the actions of the president show that this is a supply—chain crisis that affects many countries across the world. it arises out of the fact that after the pandemic, demand rebounded much faster than expected and much faster than the ability of the world economy to supply the goods required. that's led to shortages, it's led to price rises, and that's not going to be solved before christmas. in fields and airfields around
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the usa, there are tens of thousands of nearly finished cars and trucks, but they can't be sold because they lack the crucial microchips, the orders for which were cancelled at the start of the pandemic. the companies were too pessimistic about the rebound in demand. that's led to a change in view from the bank chief who, earlier this year, predicted an unprecedented british boom. we did predict a booming recovery in the economy. i think what we missed was it would be so strong that it would create these supply—chain problems, whether it's gasoline, whether it's chips, whatever it is. because of pandemic restrictions, finance ministers attending international meetings are spilling out onto the streets and parks of washington, dc. one solution to all of this — producing more locally. to reduce the dependence of france and all european countries to key technologies, to chips, to semiconductors, to all the products on which there
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are bottlenecks and shortages today. and that could lead to higher prices permanently, alongside other factors, from us—china tensions, post—brexit visa restrictions orfears over uk—eu trade. are you worried about a trade war with the uk over northern ireland? germany's most likely new chancellor, olaf scholz, wouldn't be drawn on that, but there are fears in germany of a parts shortage causing a bottleneck recession. it's a global economic challenge and it's not going away. faisal islam, bbc news, in washington, dc. two more energy suppliers have collapsed as a result of the soaring cost of gas. a total of a quarter—of—a—million customers of pure planet and colorado energy will be switched to a new supplier chosen by the regulator ofgem. in norway, a man has killed several people and injured others after using a bow and arrow to attack them. police cordoned off large parts of the town of kongsberg, south—west of the capital oslo, after the incident this evening. police say the suspect has been caught and appears to have acted alone.
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the latest official coronavirus figures show there were 42,776 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — the highest number since the middle ofjuly. the average number of cases per day in the past week now stands at 39,073. more than 7000 people were in hospital with covid yesterday. another 136 deaths have been recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test — which means on average there were 113 deaths per day in the past week. on vaccinations, 85.6% of the population aged 12 and over, have had their first dose of a vaccine, and 78.7 have been double jabbed. a shortage of care staff in the community is causing major problems for hospitals. nhs leaders in england are concerned about the number of elderly
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and vulnerable patients stuck in hospital, because of a lack of support at home and in care homes. currently there's a shortfall of more than 112,000 people working in care, and chief executives are describing the situation as dire. our social affairs editor alison holt reports. it's another extremely busy day for home care manager vicki and care supervisor charlotte. both are normally based in the office, but staff shortages mean they're out caring for people to cover gaps in the rota. that meantjust five hours' sleep for vicki last night. i have to keep going on with it, until i can recruit again, until we get more people through the door to support. it's not an option not to. the bandages were too tight, but they're all right now? they are here to help 103—year—old margaret with her lunch and personal care. she recently returned from hospital. oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away.
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mm—hm. but the shortage of care staff is making it increasingly difficult to get people out of hospital. but you have perked up a lot. comments from hospital chief executives show the huge pressure this is already causing in england. "there are a record number of people waiting for care," says one. "we havejust tipped over the point where delayed discharges are a bigger problem than covid," says another. and a chief executive whose hospital has 140 patients waiting to be sent home says "patients are dying in hospital, when their choice was home, hospice or nursing home," due to lack of care staff. we're incredibly concerned about the coming winter. we know that hospitals, mental health trusts, ambulance services are all under huge pressure and we know that that pressure is linked to social care, who desperately need the support in order to expand their capacity. hiya, carol! tracy is a nurse and manager at this sheffield care home. they, too, are struggling
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to find care workers, with staff exhaustion, compulsory vaccinations and better pay in other sectors all adding to the problems. so those are all from recruitment agencies? those are all from recruitment, yeah. and it's notjust onejob, there's two or three jobs hidden behind it. but she is also being bombarded byjob offers as other companies try to poach her. you're getting e—mails, you're getting text messages from companies that i've never even heard of. what do you think of that? i've got a job. i'm looking after people to the best of my ability. right, we need three carers... and when they bring in agency staff to cover the gaps, they sometimes pay more in a day than the council pays them in a week for a resident's care. i think we should not be in this position, but i think social care, you know, is an integral part of the healthcare system with the nhs, but again it does not feel that we have had the necessary support and i think potentially it could be bleak times ahead.
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the government says it has put extra money into social care and that it is running regular recruitment campaigns. alison holt, bbc news. nearly a third of the uk's gas supply comes from norway, and soaring prices have exposed europe's dependence on fossil fuels. but with the arctic circle now warming at twice the rate of the global average, norwegian activists are taking their government to the european court, to try to prevent more drilling. but norway's government today announced a new round of contracts to explore its oil reserves. as world leaders prepare for the cop26 global climate summit in just over two weeks, our europe correspondent nick beake travelled to the far north of norway, to find out more. beside the fjords of northernmost norway, they formed their own arctic circle of solidarity. climate change campaigners have travelled from across the country and set up camp, to try to stop the opening of a cobalt mine.
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they say it would do yet more damage to an environment already under severe threat. ella marie haetta isaksen is one of norway's biggest young stars, a winner of their x factor style competition. the climate crisis is definitely here, and it has started, and it is dramatic already. she's one of six young norwegians taking her government to the european court of human rights, arguing that plans to drill for more oil is depriving them of theirfuture. i really do believe that norway has a big part of the responsibility to solve the climate crisis, because we have been such a big oil producer. scientists say these are already the scars of climate change in norway. hotter conditions have attracted moths, which decimate trees in their path.
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we don't want this fish in the river. and warmer rivers mean pink — or humpback — salmon are thriving where they shouldn't be. they often carry disease and are a threat to the native atlantic salmon that so many of us eat. other changes are even more striking. they call these the norwegian alps. but the ice here in lyngen municipality is melting, contributing to rising sea levels. in 1998, the glacier reached all the way back to here. but in just four years, it had retracted to where i'm standing now. and in the years that followed, the ice continued to melt, and you can see what has happened. so much has been lost injust 23 years, a landscape redrawn. norway is a country
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of contradictions. most cars sold here are electric, the vast majority of domestic energy used is renewable, yet it continues to produce billions of barrels of oil as well as gas, fossil fuels blamed for damaging the planet. but not all young norwegians have the same outlook. electrician kim and his family rely on oil production for their livelihoods. he works on a rig, and if drilling stopped, he'd fear for their future. probably my children are also going to work at the same place as i do. it's very important. we don't have any other place to work. so ifjobs were lost and companies were to close, what would that mean for you, yourfamily, your community? it will be a ghost city with no industry and no... nothing. this new generation of climate activists will have to convince the new norwegian government to give
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up the addiction to oil, and any european court ruling could be years away, so the campaigners say they'll keep on appealing to the world's conscience, to protect the planet and theirfuture. nick beake, bbc news, norway. the information commissioner's office, the body that regulates data privacy in the uk, has asked the facebook whistle—blower, frances haugen, to provide documents to support her allegations that the social media platform harms children's mental health. facebook firmly denies such claims but the information commissioner, elizabeth denham, wants to see if the company has breached uk law. she's been talking to our media editor amol rajan. she's the former facebook employee turned whistle—blower whose revelations are reverberating around the world. earlier this month, frances haugen handed over internal company documents to us lawmakers which she claimed were evidence that the trillion—dollar company harms children's mental health,
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stokes division and puts profits before people. the company intentionally hides vital information from the public, from the us government and from governments around the world. the information commissioner has just introduced a children's code, legally requiring companies to design sites to protect children. and frances haugen�*s revelations have piqued her interests. so we're looking at that publicly available information, but i've also written to her today to ask her for access to the full reports of her allegations, because what i want to do with that evidence is analyse it from the uk's perspective. are these harms applicable in the uk, especially through the lens of children? and i want to see if these allegations point to any contravention of uk law, and then i will take action. in a statement on his facebook page, mark zuckerberg said of the allegations
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by his former employee... he went on to say... it's been an intense five years for the information commissioner, who regulates breaches of data privacy, such as that with cambridge analytica. she steps down in a few weeks but has big concerns about the mismatch between her budget and those of the tech giants. she's also worried about the government's plans to reform her office. an independent regulator is really important to trust and confidence. my work on data in political campaigns would have been almost impossible to do if i had to take my marching orders from government. regulators regulate,
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but if there is to be a new settlement between the tech giants and modern democracy, it's ultimately up to elected officials to turn years of chatter into action. amol rajan, bbc news. the actor william shatner has made history today as the oldest person to go into space. the 90—year—old went on a 10—minute flight on board the blue origin rocket, built by a company owned by the amazon billionairejeff bezos. the man, familiarto millions as captain kirk, returned safely to earth — describing his trip as a most profound experience. from texas, our correspondent sophie long reports. as the sun rose over one of the most desolate parts of the wild west, william shatner made his way to the new shepard suborbital spacecraft. —— fully automated spacecraft. william shatner. he wasn't leading the crew his alter
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ego commanded, but with three other passengers would share a life—changing experience. more than 50 years after he first donned a spacesuit as captain kirk, william shatner is now on his way to the final frontier. and there they are, over 328,000 feet... minutes later, as the new shepard crossed the internationally recognised boundary of space, he became the oldest person in the world to float there, weightless. and the actor who, for decades, played an iconic space explorer became one. and capsule touchdown. welcome down, the newest astronauts! he emerged from the capsule visibly moved by the adventure he said he hopes he never recovers from. firmly back on planet earth,
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he told me the beauty of what he'd seen was more profound than any words he could find or world record he'd broken. i wish i had broken the world record in the 10—yard dash or the 100—yard dash, but unfortunately it was how old i am! would you do it again, though? i am so filled with such an emotion and such a feeling of a novel experience, i don't want to dissipate by thinking of another journey. there may be debate about whether he can be called an astronaut, but he has gone where no nonagenarian has gone before. sophie long, bbc news, blue origin launch pad one. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello. there was plenty of cloud across the uk yesterday and most of it is still sticking around for today. there will be some sunny spells, but i think never
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widespread blue skies. for scotland, the cloud is going to bring some quite meaningful rain in through the day as this weather front sinks its way south. and as the rain arrives, the winds will strengthen as well. gales for the northern isles, the rain getting down into the central belt of scotland in time for the evening rush hour. to the south, temperatures still up to 16 or 17 degrees. behind the weather front, much colder air arriving, though, temperatures in the low teens. and we'll see that colder air following the weather front south across the uk overnight thursday into friday. it makes way for much more sunshine on friday. but behind this weather front, it will feel considerably chillier. perhaps the southwest of the uk clinging onto something a bit milder, a bit more cloudier. elsewhere, though, temperatures in the low teens.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: the eu vice—president has set out plans — to deal with the row over northern ireland's border post brexit. the measures include reducing checks on goods between the british mainland and northern ireland. president biden has announced longer hours at america's largest port — los angeles — as part of an effort to ease supply chain blockages in the run up to the busy christmas shopping season. president putin says european countries should not blame russia for high gas prices, saying they failed to replenish their stocks during the summer when costs were lower. he denied russia was using energy as a weapon. the star trek actor william shatner has blasted off into space — along with three other crew members — on board the blue origin spacecraft. at the age of 90, he's become the oldest person to fly to the edge of space.

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