Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines: plan ahead for christmas says a shipping boss — amid delays at the uk's ports. a shortage of hgv drivers means around 50,000 containers are still waiting to be collected at felixstowe — the uk's biggest commercial port. retailers are warning it will have a knock on effect on their shelves. we still have toys to sarah but if you are looking for choice, don't expect to come in on december and see what you would normally experience in a toy store. the eu sets out its plans to try to resolve disagreements over post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland. two more cassualties of the global
8:01 pm
spike in gas prices — pure planet and colorado energy have ended trading. and star trek�*s william shatner — at the age of 90 — makes history as the oldest person to go into space for a 10 minute journey injeff bezo�*s capsule. what you have given me is the most profound experience i can have. and coming up —protestors are dragged away by angry motorists in essex this morning as they continue to block roads one of the uk's biggest toy retailers is warning that a backlog of shipping containers at ports — combined with a shortage
8:02 pm
of lorry drivers — could cause supply issues ahead of christmas. the entertainer toy store chain says shops are well stocked at the moment, but it's concerned demand will outstrip supply. the shortage of hgv drivers is having a knock on effect on ports around the uk. felixstowe is the biggest. it has 50,000 containers waiting to be collected — and ships are having to wait for up to 10 days to unload. the port has blamed several factors for the build—up including the impact of the pandemic. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies sent this report from felixstowe international shipping is a worldwide interconnected web and what we are seeing here in felixstow and beyond a when that web is disrupted. international trade is beginning to reawaken and as there is more demand for goods shipped over to the uk this system that gets them from the quayside to the shops is beginning to struggle. coming in but going out too slowly.
8:03 pm
felixstow is the busiest container port in the uk bringing goods from around the world. for months the situation both here and internationally has been getting worse as demand for goods grows after the pandemic. the situation is caused by a messy mix of global problems including covid—i9 disruption but here in the uk it's made worse by a shortage of hgv drivers to take that away and so they built up. there are around hundred thousand containers here at the port normally has around 60— 70,000 on average. they are not the only port in this position. this is the global issues that it's happening in ports around the world and it's obviously happening in all the container ports around the uk. because of the volume of traffic of containers and of imports at the moment which are coming into the uk
8:04 pm
as we come out of lockdown. as well as taking time to get goods to the right place, the cost of shipping goods is also going up. the freight rates have gone up massively. two years ago you paid about $3000 for a 40 foot from shanghai to felixstow. this month it's between 19 and $20,000. so you can if you see it's gone up six fold. and that has a knock on effects in our shops including on toys coming in before christmas. if i use this as an example, let's say it would've cost 70p 12 months ago to ship from the far east to the uk. it is now going to 7 cost £7 to ship. that puts it in perspective, we are selling this at £15. that is not going to happen when this new freight rate comes in. the government has reassured
8:05 pm
shoppers that they should shop normally this christmas and has said that while global capacity regularly fluctuates, it's beginning to work with the freight industry to tackle the challenges. the supply chain is stuck in a snarl and it could take months to unpick. we can speak now tojoel berkowitz, founder and director of the london toy company. they manufacture and import toys from around the world — including london underground train sets and harry potter figures. and being with us. i think you supply stories as they various as hayrides, algae, amazon, how much stock do you have compared to what you would like to have at this stage before christmas?— before christmas? generally at this time of year _ before christmas? generally at this time of year we _ before christmas? generally at this time of year we would _ before christmas? generally at this time of year we would love - before christmas? generally at this time of year we would love to - before christmas? generally at this time of year we would love to have | before christmas? generally at this. time of year we would love to have a high stock holding, the highest we have found throughout the entire year. the issue this year is the container issues and the shipping issues we have had which has blessed us with about 20% level of where we would like to be.—
8:06 pm
would like to be. what does that mean in the _ would like to be. what does that mean in the shops? _ would like to be. what does that mean in the shops? people - would like to be. what does that mean in the shops? people willl would like to be. what does that l mean in the shops? people will be able to get christmas presents for their kids and so on but maybe not quite a choice that they are used too, is that right?— too, is that right? absolutely. it is definitely _ too, is that right? absolutely. it is definitely going _ too, is that right? absolutely. it is definitely going to _ too, is that right? absolutely. it is definitely going to be - too, is that right? absolutely. it is definitely going to be a - too, is that right? absolutely. it i is definitely going to be a shortage of some setting lines but bear in mind there will be a large selection of supply than they are still goods coming in. what we need to make sure it is the put the products that sell the best going out as quickly as possible. the best going out as quickly as ossible. �* ., ., possible. and we were hearing from that re ort possible. and we were hearing from that report prices _ possible. and we were hearing from that report prices shooting - possible. and we were hearing from that report prices shooting up. - possible. and we were hearing from that report prices shooting up. for. that report prices shooting up. for example that toy truck was at 70p to ship and now £7 to ship. fix, example that toy truck was at 70p to ship and now £7 to ship.— ship and now £7 to ship. a huge chance. ship and now £7 to ship. a huge change- yes- — ship and now £7 to ship. a huge change. yes. absolutely. - ship and now £7 to ship. a huge change. yes. absolutely. the i ship and now £7 to ship. a huge i change. yes. absolutely. the cost ship and now £7 to ship. a huge - change. yes. absolutely. the cost of the goods coming in are reflected by the goods coming in are reflected by the price that we unfortunately have to pay to the shipping lines to bring in all these goods and containers from china. and that's at the moment without any intervention on a global level does not seem to be shifting. flan on a global level does not seem to be shifting-—
8:07 pm
on a global level does not seem to be shiftinu. ., ,, , , ., be shifting. can you sum up what we heard about — be shifting. can you sum up what we heard about the _ be shifting. can you sum up what we heard about the perfect _ be shifting. can you sum up what we heard about the perfect storm - be shifting. can you sum up what we heard about the perfect storm but i heard about the perfect storm but what are the various factors that have contributed to this situation? so of course as we all know, covid—i9 was the first part payment this week that clueless and staff and scattered across the world in limbo and what that meant if a knock on effect when he came out of lockdown if there was a rush to get things moving again and get lockdown in our past and that led to problems with port congestion and ships not being able to take containers and ships not being able to dock because of lack of staff and isolation set as a whole range of factors involved with this. the final part that plate is definitely brexit that we have seen a lot of the staff that will drive their trucks and working the ports and i decided to go back to the countries and there's not really being anything to address that at this stage. i being anything to address that at this sta . e. being anything to address that at this staue. ., , ,., ., this stage. i there any potential solutions that _
8:08 pm
this stage. i there any potential solutions that you _ this stage. i there any potential solutions that you would - this stage. i there any potential solutions that you would like i this stage. i there any potential solutions that you would like to i this stage. i there any potential- solutions that you would like to see or is this something that you are hoping will sort itself out over time? i hoping will sort itself out over time? ., ., hoping will sort itself out over time? ~ . , ., time? i think what we need is an international _ time? i think what we need is an international intervention - time? i think what we need is an international intervention to - international intervention to eradicate these unsustainable prices because it's notjust the industry facing this, it's a multi—industry issue and the government need to look at this and about my detail very quickly. look at this and about my detail very quickly-— look at this and about my detail very quickly. good to talk to you. good luck — very quickly. good to talk to you. good luck in _ very quickly. good to talk to you. good luck in the _ very quickly. good to talk to you. good luck in the run-up - very quickly. good to talk to you. i good luck in the run-up christmas. good luck in the run—up christmas. breaking news. police say several people have been killed and injured in an incident in southern norway. unconfirmed reports are suggesting that the suspect who has been arrested was carrying a bow and arrow during the attack in the town of greensburg. i think we can talk to a genetics in norway. who is based in oslo and canjoin us. thank you for being with us. what can you
8:09 pm
tell us in terms of details about this attack?— tell us in terms of details about this attack? ., , , this attack? there has been little information _ this attack? there has been little information so _ this attack? there has been little information so far. _ this attack? there has been little information so far. this - this attack? there has been little information so far. this tragic - information so far. this tragic incident happened a 50 that is 82 km southwest of oslo. it has about 26,000 people and this incident started around 30p.m. this evening. and there have been reports that have been confirmed by the police that a person with shooting with a bow and arrow in a supermarket and continued in the streets of that city shooting and they have been reports about several dead and wounded and it's called a tragedy. what sort of town is this? give us an idea how big it is and how many people live there. i an idea how big it is and how many people live there.— people live there. i was there last weekend and _ people live there. i was there last weekend and in _ people live there. i was there last weekend and in a _ people live there. i was there last weekend and in a supermarket. people live there. i was there last weekend and in a supermarket as| people live there. i was there last - weekend and in a supermarket as well and i went hiking in the forest. it is a beautiful city located in the
8:10 pm
valley next to a river and it has 26,000 people and it was in the 17th century the capital in the early due to its mining and now it has some successful industry and university and if the vibrant city and it's tragic that something like this would happen and it's reported that a pretty special forces and the delta force and military special forces have been mobilized. how unusual, obviously _ forces have been mobilized. how unusual, obviously an _ forces have been mobilized. how unusual, obviously an attack like this with a bow and arrow is highly unusual anyway but how unusual it is this sort of incident of mass violence like this in norway? it’s violence like this in norway? it's very rare- _ violence like this in norway? it's very rare- it— violence like this in norway? it�*s very rare. it happened a few years ago with a terror incident in oslo that was turned out to be an amateur suicide bomber but this report about
8:11 pm
parties shooting with automatic weapons in the essential part of town is something i have not heard about before so shocking and i hope that they have apprehended the right person and the police have been very laid back about the information here so i'm a bit disappointed about information coming out. so so i'm a bit disappointed about information coming out.- so i'm a bit disappointed about information coming out. so we don't have any numbers _ information coming out. so we don't have any numbers on _ information coming out. so we don't have any numbers on in _ information coming out. so we don't have any numbers on in terms - information coming out. so we don't have any numbers on in terms of. have any numbers on in terms of casualties and how many people, i think the police are confirming there have been some dead and injured and i think we still got you there, but we don't have numbers on how many casualties? ida. there, but we don't have numbers on how many casualties?— how many casualties? no. we don't have specific— how many casualties? no. we don't have specific numbers _ how many casualties? no. we don't have specific numbers but - how many casualties? no. we don't have specific numbers but the - how many casualties? no. we don't| have specific numbers but the police chief has given a statement so we have had confirmed that the events happened and that all the units have
8:12 pm
been mobilized and there seems to be an ongoing situation but these details are very unclear but i guess he looked at these updates later. thank you. i am sure more details will emerge in the evening and maybe we will be able to talk to you again later. he has recently been to discount rate is at that happen. a bow and arrow attack that left some people dead and injured. thank you for now. the european union has set out new proposals to try to cut red tape in the continuing row of trade from great britain into northern ireland. at the start of the year, a new post brexit agreement was introduced — it's called the northern ireland protocol. it means checks are needed on live animals and certain products like chilled meats which cross the irish sea from great britain. that's because as part
8:13 pm
of the post brexit agreement, northern ireland has remained in the eu's single market and that's angered unionists who say it undermines northern 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy reports from belfast. could this be the light at the end of the tunnel for businesses? bringing goods into northern ireland from great britain has become much more difficult under the brexit arrangements. going back to 2020, for a consignment of goods that's the paperwork that we had to produce. right. under the protocol in 2021 this is the paperwork for four or five pallets. and there could be multiple loads of this on one lorry. the uk government argues that difficulties are so serious that it now wants an entirely new treaty. we're seeing fewer — if anybody — wanting to begin moving goods
8:14 pm
between great britain and northern ireland. gb companies that are supplying smaller quantities to northern ireland are simply saying, "why should i bother?" cor! what a year! let's try to make christmas a little brighter, shall we? i marks & spencer said it won't be sending some christmas products over the irish sea because of the red tape and there was due to be a ban on the british banger being brought into northern ireland, as chilled meats cannot be imported under eu rules. but the eu has indicated it will now reduce the paperwork. the proposals are understood to include a unique agreement on food to reduce checks on food and drink products moving over the irish sea, an arrangement to allow the sale of chilled meats to continue and the eu said it will change its laws to solve the problems which are posing a threat to the supply of medicines in northern ireland. it is this robust package of practical, imaginative solutions we can continue to implement the protocol on ireland,
8:15 pm
northern ireland for the benefit of all communities on the ground. but logistics are only part of the problem. this is an ideological battle too. loyalist communities view any type of border in the irish sea as severing northern ireland's link with the uk, integral to unionist identity here. if we do not kill this protocol, it will kill the union. for the most staunch unionists, the eu's proposals won't go far enough. they still fall far short of what is needed to make the fundamental change that is required, but we recognise there is a negotiating process that will happen now. i would much rather that there was no brexit, i would much rather that there was no protocol. but we are now where we are and it is our view that the protocol guarantees to predictions for the good friday agreement, the all ireland economy and it ensures there is no border imposed on the island of ireland.
8:16 pm
the uk government has also called to an end of the role of the european court ofjustice in the arrangements, but political leaders in the republic of ireland say the demands are an act of bad faith. the uk going back on the deal that it signed up to. this is a country that makes treaties, that strikes agreements and then intends to renege on them. and that message must now resonate around the world. don't make any agreement with the british government, don't sign any treaty with the united kingdom until you can be confident that this is a country that can honour its promises. without a resolution the uk could trigger a clause to override part of the brexit deal, sparking a potential trade war with northern ireland caught in the middle. emma vardy, bbc news. we just wejust had a uk government statement and reaction to what statement and reaction to what statement has been failing at it
8:17 pm
says the eu publish their proposals and we are studying to be fed and we will look at them seriously and constructively in the next step should be intensive talks on both our sets of proposals and rapidly conducted to determine whether there is common ground to find a solution significant changes which chats over fundamental issues at the heart of the protocol must be made if we are to agree a settlement. that is the gist of that statement from the uk government. 0ur europe editor has been talking to us in that area from writing about what she thinks may happen next. ? from berlin. what happen next. ? from berlin. what ha--ens happen next. ? from berlin. what happens next _ happen next. ? from berlin. what happens next is — happen next. ? from berlin. what happens next is how— happen next. ? from berlin. what happens next is how much - happen next. ? from berlin. ibei�*ié�*if happens next is how much they happen next. ? from berlin. “ld'isgt happens next is how much they are waiting to band. they say they are in listening mode and they would like to come up with a mutually acceptable way forward on the northern ireland protocol but positioned at the beginning of very far a plate ? a part. if you listen to lloyd frost he says you will need a rewrite of the protocol to make it workable and he insists on removing
8:18 pm
the european court ofjustice oversight role. the eu says yes, it will refine the protocol but it will not redesign it. heard the proposal it wants to meet the day—to—day living more workable but it will not get rid of the european court of justice roll it says as long as northern ireland follows the rules of the european single market for good. so what does this mean? does it mean that it almost inevitable that the governmental trigger article 16. that's the ability to suspend part or parts of the northern ireland protocol. lloyd frost says he would rather not do with what he will if he thinks that peace in northern ireland is at stake and if talks collapse. the eu says that stability in northern ireland is at risk by trying to rewrite the protocol. it“s ireland is at risk by trying to rewrite the protocol. it's as if preparing for every eventuality and germany and france have asked for retaliatory measures by the european commission to prepare them in case article six is triggered. that's where talk of a possible trade were coming from and we are really not there yet.
8:19 pm
we can speak now to david phinnemore. he's a professor of european politics at queen's university belfast. to what extent do you think the eu and you have seen their proposals, have compromise on this? i think we have compromise on this? i think we have lost david. just as we were about to get his analysis but he will try to get back to him as soon as he can. let me tell you that another two energy companies have stopped trading today. pure planet limited and colorado energy limited are the latest casualties of the global spike in gas prices. pure planet supplies gas and electricity to around 235,000 domestic customers and colorado energy supplies gas and electricity to around 15,000 domestic customers. our business correspondent colletta smithjoins me now. just the latest casualty in a long line? , ., ,
8:20 pm
line? yes. over the last few weeks eo - le line? yes. over the last few weeks people have _ line? yes. over the last few weeks people have been _ line? yes. over the last few weeks people have been braced _ line? yes. over the last few weeks people have been braced by - line? yes. over the last few weeks people have been braced by this i line? yes. over the last few weeks i people have been braced by this went and many more smaller companies still looking vulnerable. 0f and many more smaller companies still looking vulnerable. of course this is because of the global gas price spike but today's company pr planets, the most significant one to cease trading interestingly have pointed the finger directly at the regulator and that the government for the fact that they say that business model is now on sustainable. that is because while global gas prices are spiking hugely at the moment, they are being forced to buy gas at the inflated price. they are not able to pass that charge onto us as customers because the regulator has put a price cap in place. that did increase a couple of weeks ago and stare unaffordable or certainly very high for a lot of customers. but the energy suppliers and say it's not high enough and should be higher in orderfor them to be able to continue trading. so, as you say, we are now seeing almost 2 million customers affected by this
8:21 pm
latest wave of companies to cease trading. that's latest wave of companies to cease trading. that“sjust latest wave of companies to cease trading. that's just since the beginning of september. so pr planets have around a quarter million customers and cover letter is much smaller, only 15,000 domestic customers. what's also interesting is pure planets where financially backed by bp. so the fact that they, as a really significant player in the global oil markets are looking at the gas price and saying it looks like we are not going to be able to make any money through this subsidiarity subsidiary company that we invested in cellular back away and not the point in anymore and it shows that they're expecting that gas prices to stay high for a lot longer. and that's a problem for all of us as customers whether you're on the past that were not. it looks like really pay much higher prices for our gas for the considerable future. and potentially more of the smaller companies may well go bust in the coming weeks. from the customer's point of view
8:22 pm
there was so much choice until quite recently. we were being urged constantly to shop around and switch and go get the best price and value copies shrinking number of suppliers. so it's almost impossible? ii suppliers. so it's almost impossible?— suppliers. so it's almost imossible? ., ., , ., suppliers. so it's almost imossible? ., ., �*, impossible? if not only that, it's actually that _ impossible? if not only that, it's actually that all _ impossible? if not only that, it's actually that all of _ impossible? if not only that, it's actually that all of the _ impossible? if not only that, it's actually that all of the suppliers | actually that all of the suppliers are offering similar prices. most of us would turn into switching websites to helping you find the best beer and even they are saying sit tight, we cannot situate select elements, there basically is not a better deal than the price cap which is that standard variable for the basic tariff that any company can offer. so, as you say we've been encouraged for so long to shop around and look for better deals and at the moment because of that spiking gas prices all companies are offering very similar offers at the moment. the regulator is now the companies that have ceased trading is trying to find a company that will take on those customers. so if you are a customer of pure planets
8:23 pm
or colorado you“re you are a customer of pure planets or colorado you're being told to sit tight and don't do anything at the moment and your gas and electricity will continue to be supplied and you will continue to be supplied and you will not be cut off and the advice is as usual to sit tight and wait for them to contact you and tell you who you are provider is and that should happen within the next two weeks and at that stage if you want to switch, if you want to change to a different company, you can do so but if you try to do so in the next couple of weeks that's when things get messy for a lot of customers. so the advice is to sit tight and wait till you have been transferred to a new provider and then switch if you cannot backstage and if you can find a better deal on the market. thank ou ve a better deal on the market. thank you very much- _ a better deal on the market. thank you very much. william _ a better deal on the market. thank you very much. william shatner . a better deal on the market. thank| you very much. william shatner has blasted off into space. star trek“s captain kirk fights was just ten minutes long on board the blue origin rocket built byjeff tazers“s company. back on earth he described
8:24 pm
it very emotionally as the most profound experience he could“ve imagined. 0ur correspondent reports. he was not leaving the acrylic, his alter ego commanded buts with three other passengers he would share what that if you look before say is a life changing experience. more than 50 years after the first on a spacesuit, william shatner is now on his way to bed the final frontier. and there they are.
8:25 pm
minutes later as it crossed the internationally recognized boundary of space he became the oldest person in the world to float their weakness. and to experience he said he would be entranced by. in the days before he laughed while saying he was terrified. but he said he is going to states with a miracle and it was extraordinary to be part of this new beginning of space travel. he emerged from the capsule clearly moved by the experience and he said he hopes he never recovers from. home he hopes he never recovers from. now ou are he hopes he never recovers from. now you are staring — he hopes he never recovers from. iirm-o you are staring into blackness. that's the thing. what you are ? what you have given me is the most profound experience i could imagine.
8:26 pm
i am so filled with emotion about whatjust happened. it“s what just happened. it“s extraordinary. whatjust happened. it“s extraordinary. there may be debate about whether he returned to earth and astronauts but he has gone where no nonagenarian has gone before. that is talked to doctor aaron mcdonald who is the same consultant on the star trek franchise and a mega fan, needless to say. she joins us from los angeles, thank you for being with us. i grew up watching star trek, being with us. i grew up watching startrek, ijust assumed, captain kirk spent his life in state at any rate, it“s kirk spent his life in state at any rate, it's weird to see him coming up rate, it's weird to see him coming up for the first time but he was so emotional wasn't he? it was really touching to see how much it affected him. i think the symbol for a lot of people of captain kirk finally going to space meant a lot for a lot of people. what does all this mean? we have got
8:27 pm
just days else and all these other billionaires pursuing the idea of space tourism and making space more accessible, is that a good thing do you think? accessible, is that a good thing do ou think? , , , ., ~ accessible, is that a good thing do ou think? , , , ., ,, ., ., accessible, is that a good thing do ou think? , ,, .,~ ., ., ., you think? they speak a lot about this and they're _ you think? they speak a lot about this and they're making _ you think? they speak a lot about this and they're making it - you think? they speak a lot about this and they're making it more i this and they're making it more accessible but it's important to note that right now it's still really is just reserved for their rich and famous. if you have to ask that price tag then you will not be able to go. and that's because a lot of internal conflict especially with star trek fans sell at the symbolism with captain kirk going to space means a lot and it comes full circle for so many people but at the same time we need to reflect on the fact that we're almost making it a bit more exclusive and it highlights this inequity that we have here on earth making paradise space right that's only reserved for a rich and famous people. he that's only reserved for a rich and famous people-— that's only reserved for a rich and famous people. he 'ust went up for a few minutes. _ famous people. he 'ust went up for a few minutes. he'd _ famous people. he just went up for a few minutes. he'd did _ famous people. he just went up for a few minutes. he'd did technically - famous people. he just went up for a few minutes. he'd did technically go | few minutes. he“d did technically go
8:28 pm
into space, didn“t few minutes. he“d did technically go into space, didn't he? that few minutes. he'd did technically go into space, didn't he?— into space, didn't he? that is certainly _ into space, didn't he? that is certainly a — into space, didn't he? that is certainly a matter— into space, didn't he? that is certainly a matter of- into space, didn't he? that is certainly a matter of debate. | into space, didn't he? that is i certainly a matter of debate. he into space, didn't he? that is - certainly a matter of debate. he did go beyond the line ricochets definitions dairy and 50 60 miles above the surface and it's a suborbital flight. above the surface and it's a suborbitalflight. it goes above the surface and it's a suborbital flight. it goes up and comes back down and it only about ten minutes so they call and blue origin is calling their space explorers astronauts and we as a society to figure out the difference between action on think the stories in which i don't think we landed on yet. in which i don't think we landed on et. “ , ., ~' , , ., yet. let's get to the key question. you are a saint _ yet. let's get to the key question. you are a saint consultant - yet. let's get to the key question. you are a saint consultant on - yet. let's get to the key question. you are a saint consultant on the. you are a saint consultant on the franchise. how much we are saying is there in star trek. yes, it always had this legacy of including hard science insane fiction and jean even famously would call his friends backing today to try to figure out the most technical ways to incorporate frames and that's where my wall continues on and they still
8:29 pm
want to tell their stories where that feature will take us but we want to inaccurate saints are that's really because star trek“s legacy has continued and for the last 55 years and inspired a generation after generation of. we years and inspired a generation after generation of.— years and inspired a generation after generation of. we have the doctor she _ after generation of. we have the doctor she was _ after generation of. we have the doctor she was the _ after generation of. we have the doctor she was the first - after generation of. we have the doctor she was the first black . after generation of. we have the - doctor she was the first black woman who traveled into space and she was inspired by the original series to become an astronaut and then of course she also acted on star trek the next generation in the cameo. this is not the first star trek actor that's been to space. share this is not the first star trek actor that's been to space. are you convinced there _ actor that's been to space. are you convinced there is _ actor that's been to space. are you convinced there is life _ actor that's been to space. are you convinced there is life on _ actor that's been to space. are you convinced there is life on other - convinced there is life on other planets and one day we will have a spaceship that the enterprise going around and going to visit all these planets with strange forms of life on them? ., “ , planets with strange forms of life on them? . �*, ., , �* planets with strange forms of life on them? ., �*, ., , “ on them? that's the dream, isn't it? there's lots — on them? that's the dream, isn't it? there's lots of _ on them? that's the dream, isn't it? there's lots of planets _ on them? that's the dream, isn't it? there's lots of planets out _ on them? that's the dream, isn't it? there's lots of planets out there - there's lots of planets out there and there is certainly reason to believe there is life on one of those many planets. the ability to actually go and visit and a long
8:30 pm
ways off for us but until then we have star trek and storytelling. find have star trek and storytelling. and what better way to have that storytelling and star trek, it“s storytelling and star trek, it's always been fabulous. thank you so much for being with us. good to talk to you. comedian robert webb has withdrawn from strictly come dancing due to health concerns. he had heart surgery two years ago — and says he can't keep up with the rigours of the competition. he says he "deeply regrets" letting down his dance partner, dianne buswell. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan. good evening. plenty of cloudiness out there at the moment. not bearing anything too significant in the way of rainfall. it will be some wet weather pushing them to scotland tomorrow and the wind will strengthen as well. here is the culprit moving in from the north. the weather front and as it pushes the rain into northern scotland by the rain into northern scotland by the end of the night the wind could
8:31 pm
reach scale forces for the night in aisles. 0vernight if a story of night winds and patchy cloud moving in a process. and enough cloudiness to hold the temperatures at the higher end of the single figures and double figures for some. 0n higher end of the single figures and double figures for some. on thursday daytime and this front is the story for scotland. strengthening lanes with 3m in the northwest in the morning. in the evening the rainbow pushed down into the central belt and not until after dark wet weather getting into the northern ireland. temperatures up to 17 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. iam ben i am ben brown. the headlines: plan ahead for christmas,
8:32 pm
says a shipping boss — amid delays at the uk“s ports. a shortage of hgv drivers means around 50,000 containers are still waiting to be collected at felixstowe — the uk“s biggest commercial port. retailers are warning it will have a knock on effect on their shelves. police in norway say a man armed with a bow and arrows has killed several people in the norwegian town of kongsberg. the eu sets out its plans to try to resolve disagreements over post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland. two more cassualties of the global spike in gas prices — pure planet and colorado energy have ended trading. and star trek“s william shatner — at the age of 90 — makes history as the oldest person to go into space for a ten—minute journey injeff bezos“ capsule. what you have given me... is the
8:33 pm
most profound experience that i could imagine. police have made 35 arrests after members of environmental group insulate britain blocked more roads today. demonstrators were dragged out of the way by angry motorists in essex, but immediately returned to join the protest again. jon donnison reports. move out of the way now! tempers at boiling point this morning as protesters blocked roads around the dartford crossing. my son is 11 and needs to get to school today, so move out of the way and let me get my son to school! mate, you've got to move out of the way. some drivers took matters into their own hands. this kind of direct action from insulate britain has been going on for more than a month, but today produced the ugliest scenes so far. excuse me! the activists, though, who are campaigning for homes to be heated more efficiently, say they have been left with
8:34 pm
no choice. it is impossible for us to do anything else because the government listens to nothing apart from disruption, and we are deeply sorry for the disruption to these people. it is just tragic, but we are left with no other option. nearby, the police had to free several protesters who had glued themselves to the road. 0verall, essex police say 35 people were arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to cause a public nuisance. the government has won a series of high court injunctions, meaning activists could face jail for blocking areas, including those around the m25 and the dartford crossing. insulate britain's tactics are certainly effective in terms of causing disruption. come on, come on! whether they are winning over much public support, though, is less clear. that's enough of that! jon donnison, bbc news.
8:35 pm
joining me now is sir peter fahy 0pm, who is a retired senior british police officer. and also i'm joined by dr 0scar berglund, a lecturer in international public and social policy at the university of bristol. sir peter fahy, if i can ask you first, how difficult is this kind of protest to police? have the police got their tactics right on this, do you think? i got their tactics right on this, do ou think? .. got their tactics right on this, do you think?— you think? i think the police are t in: you think? i think the police are trying everything _ you think? i think the police are trying everything they _ you think? i think the police are trying everything they can. - you think? i think the police are trying everything they can. and | trying everything they can. and there is a real worry here that we are going to see some serious public disorder and somebody being seriously injured because of the level of public anger, the anger from the drivers in these situations. i think the police are already deploying a lot of resources to try to cover where these people turn up. the only thing they can really do is put even more officers on these protests, which means those officers are not available to do other things, to investigate other crimes, to be on their beats, but
8:36 pm
really it is very difficult, the government has brought in injunctions. it is going to take weeks before those injunction hearings get to court, so i think the police are very frustrated about the police are very frustrated about the legal system. 0bviously the police are very frustrated about the legal system. obviously in other countries probably by now the police would be using water cannon or possibly tear gas. it is not the way we please in this country and i don't think most of the public won“t don't think most of the public won't want to see that, but the danger is most of these protests are actually strengthening the arm of the home office to bring in even more draconian legislation against the protests, which is going to harm anybody who wants to protest any lawful manner. idr anybody who wants to protest any lawful manner.— anybody who wants to protest any lawful manner. , ,.., �* lawful manner. dr oscar berglund, we are seeind lawful manner. dr oscar berglund, we are seeing growing — lawful manner. dr oscar berglund, we are seeing growing anger, _ lawful manner. dr oscar berglund, we are seeing growing anger, aren't - lawful manner. dr oscar berglund, we are seeing growing anger, aren't we, | are seeing growing anger, aren't we, against these protesters? at first they seem to be tolerated, but now real anger from they seem to be tolerated, but now real angerfrom drivers they seem to be tolerated, but now real anger from drivers and motorists taking it upon themselves to actually drag them out of the way, not waiting for the police, just doing it themselves and there is a risk, as we were hearing from the former chief constable there, of violence between protesters and
8:37 pm
motorists? ~ , , violence between protesters and motorists?— violence between protesters and motorists? ~ , ,., , ., motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why — motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why we _ motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why we see _ motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why we see this _ motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why we see this kind - motorists? absolutely. i mean, the reason why we see this kind of - reason why we see this kind of disruptive _ reason why we see this kind of disruptive protests is because disruptive protests is because disruptive protests is because disruptive protest works. what we have here — disruptive protest works. what we have here is we have a very small amount— have here is we have a very small amount of— have here is we have a very small amount of protesters who are very committed — amount of protesters who are very committed to their cause, better able to— committed to their cause, better able to cause this level of disruption and this level of news coverage — disruption and this level of news coverage week after week, like what you say, _ coverage week after week, like what you say, they have been going on for a month, _ you say, they have been going on for a month, so— you say, they have been going on for a month, so it is non—violent, but it is very— a month, so it is non—violent, but it is very disruptive. it divides the public _ it is very disruptive. it divides the public. the purpose of this kind of disruption that is aimed at general— of disruption that is aimed at general disruption is too divided public — general disruption is too divided public i— general disruption is too divided public. i mean, they have expressed some _ public. i mean, they have expressed some support of the bradford 25% of the british— some support of the bradford 25% of the british population, new levels were _ the british population, new levels were showing the other week, that is a quarter— were showing the other week, that is a quarter of— were showing the other week, that is a quarter of the population that actively— a quarter of the population that actively support this kind of disruption. but of course on the other— disruption. but of course on the other side — disruption. but of course on the other side there is a lot of stoked up other side there is a lot of stoked up anger— other side there is a lot of stoked up angeragainst that, other side there is a lot of stoked up anger against that, so yes, indeed — up anger against that, so yes, indeed it— up anger against that, so yes, indeed it has divided the public. and sir— indeed it has divided the public. and sir peter fahy, that is the point, anyway, isn“t and sir peter fahy, that is the
8:38 pm
point, anyway, isn't it? that the more these protests create violent scenes and create anger from the general public, in a sense the more successful they are because they are being talked about, they are on the media, getting coverage and that is exactly what the protesters want. well, the trouble is really all that is getting coverage is about protests and police tactics, about legislation, it is not really getting into the heart of this particular matter. i also happen to chair a housing association and all the housing associations are putting a great deal of effort into this whole issue about how to insulate homes and how to make them more environmentally friendly, all the complex issues around climate change, so i think the frustrating thing about this and a number of environmental protesters are now recognising this, is that this series of co—tests are damaging the cause because any protest causes a certain degree of inconvenience to the wider public, but this is causing a level of disruption and anger now that is really disproportionate, is putting pressure on the police, it will take more resources away from other
8:39 pm
activities, but also, as i say, it is also really defeating the cause and the proper public debate about this really important issue. but they were _ this really important issue. but they were to — this really important issue. but they were to say it is a democratic right to protest.— right to protest. absolutely, and that is absolutely _ right to protest. absolutely, and that is absolutely the _ right to protest. absolutely, and that is absolutely the policing i that is absolutely the policing style this country, that they will do all they can to allow protest to take part peacefully and with a minimum amount of disruption to the rest of the community, but this has been completely disproportionate. so it is a real challenge for the police to try to cover all the different roads and junctions, even on the m25, so all they can do is put even more officers out, so at least they can try to get there to prevent any serious disorder and obviously to try to remove the protesters as quickly as possible. dr 0scar berglund, isn“t protesters as quickly as possible. dr 0scar berglund, isn't there a danger, as sir peter fahy was suggesting, that they are alienating people from their cause? in other words, people are going to be less inclined to listen to what they have got to say about insulating homes
8:40 pm
and to support their policies? ida. and to support their policies? no, basicall , and to support their policies? no, basically. a _ and to support their policies? no, basically, a straight no to that question _ basically, a straight no to that question. in no way are people turning — question. in no way are people turning against action on climate change _ turning against action on climate change in — turning against action on climate change in this country. there was a huge _ change in this country. there was a huge survey— change in this country. there was a huge survey going out in the news i believe _ huge survey going out in the news i believe yesterday that showed immense support from the british public— immense support from the british public for— immense support from the british public for the kind of policies that insulate _ public for the kind of policies that insulate britain are after. and i mean _ insulate britain are after. and i mean insulating britain's homes is an absolute first step in really necessary cutting down the carbon emissions — necessary cutting down the carbon emissions of the uk, so this idea that people don't like extreme protesters, disruptive protesters and therefore turn against acting on climate _ and therefore turn against acting on climate change, there isjust no grounds — climate change, there isjust no grounds for that kind of claim, it isjust— grounds for that kind of claim, it isjust not— grounds for that kind of claim, it isjust not happening.— grounds for that kind of claim, it isjust not happening. good to talk to both of you- _ isjust not happening. good to talk to both of you. thank _ isjust not happening. good to talk to both of you. thank you - isjust not happening. good to talk to both of you. thank you for - isjust not happening. good to talk to both of you. thank you for your | to both of you. thank you for your perspectives, sir peter fahy and dr 0scar berglund of the university of bristol, thank you both. let“s ta ke take you back to the news tonight
8:41 pm
that the european union has said... let“s return to the news that the eu has said it's prepared to halve the amount of customs paperwork on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk — to try to end the row over post—brexit trade. brussels also plans to stop checks on most items of food coming into northern ireland. the controls were set up as part of efforts to avoid a hard border with the irish republic. but the government at westminster wants to scrap the process entirely. we can speak now to david phinnemore. he's a professor of european politics at queen's university belfast. we have heard the eu“s response to the british government position on all this. there appear to be some compromises. is that how you see it? do you think enough compromises to sort this out once and for? i do you think enough compromises to sort this out once and for?— sort this out once and for? i think that certainly _ sort this out once and for? i think that certainly the _ sort this out once and for? i think that certainly the hope _ sort this out once and for? i think that certainly the hope a - sort this out once and for? i think that certainly the hope a lot - sort this out once and for? i think that certainly the hope a lot of i that certainly the hope a lot of people involved and affected by the protocol. what we have seen from the eu side today is a set of reasonable proposals being put forward. i think they have tried to address a lot of they have tried to address a lot of the concerns that have been raised in their conversations with stakeholders in northern ireland.
8:42 pm
they certainly made that clear in what they have put forward. 0bviously what they have put forward. obviously the open question is the extent to which the uk government is willing to engage with those proposals and find some solutions because clearly what the uk has put forward is not necessarily addressing all issues which lord frost put forward in his paper over the summer. will frost put forward in his paper over the summer-— frost put forward in his paper over the summer. ~ ., ., ., , ., the summer. will follow now is a few weeks of negotiations? _ the summer. will follow now is a few weeks of negotiations? i _ the summer. will follow now is a few weeks of negotiations? i think - the summer. will follow now is a few weeks of negotiations? i think what i weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably _ weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably see _ weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably see first _ weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably see first is _ weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably see first is both i weeks of negotiations? i think what will probably see first is both side l will probably see first is both side sitting down and looking through the proposals in detail, looking through their ramifications, looking through what the implication will be for the uk and then also i think possibly exploring some other options as well because i think the eu has indicated there are other possible solutions in the uk will obviously have some ideas as well as to what it wants to do. i think what you will then see it both sides identifying those common ground to really move into its resolution to try to resolve the solutions and maros sefcovic said today he would like to see that done by the end of the year, but i think
8:43 pm
the first part will be reviewing what has been put forward. the eu are proposing _ what has been put forward. the eu are proposing fewer— what has been put forward. the eu are proposing fewer controls, i what has been put forward. the eu | are proposing fewer controls, fewer checks, a bit less paperwork. have they been, in your view, overzealous on the controls and checks on the paperwork? possibly, such as some have said, to punish britain and brexit? ., ., �* ~' have said, to punish britain and brexit? ., ., �* ,, brexit? no, i don't think so. i think the _ brexit? no, i don't think so. i think the expectation - brexit? no, i don't think so. i think the expectation always l brexit? no, i don't think so. i. think the expectation always was that the commitments the uk had entered into were going to be fully permitted. what we have actually seen is a higher expectation from the eu that the uk would meet its obligations, but the reality is a lot the checks and controls have simply not been implicated because we have had these grace periods. 0ne we have had these grace periods. one of the important points to raise is although there has been a significant reduction in checks and controls, that is based on full implementation of the protocol as it currently stands.— currently stands. what about this whole issue _ currently stands. what about this whole issue of _ currently stands. what about this whole issue of the _ currently stands. what about this whole issue of the european i currently stands. what about this| whole issue of the european court currently stands. what about this i whole issue of the european court of justice? to what extent does that remain ideological sticking point that maybe is going to be very difficult to find a way out of? i think it is very an ideological
8:44 pm
issue. and 0k, it was included in the command paper, but i think when a lot of people in northern ireland saw it coming through the command paper they were asking to what extent has business actually raised this is an issue and a concern? and it has been put there i think for political reasons. i think it is actually very difficult for the eu to counter any other arrangement than the court ofjustice. even in other forms on relations, than the court ofjustice. even in otherforms on relations, ultimately in the interpretation of eu law regarding the single market is undertaken by the court ofjustice. what they will also do is... the fact that boris johnson what they will also do is... the fact that borisjohnson came to power and put forward proposals to amend the protocol he signalled at that time that arrangements as originally proposed were acceptable and they will not need to change them, so it is very difficult i think for the uk generic back and say, we don't like the idea of the court ofjustice, when they seem to be public content with it back in 2019. �* , , ., 2019. and this is the eu argument, ou sinned 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up _ 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up to — 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up to this _ 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up to this in _ 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up to this in the - 2019. and this is the eu argument, you signed up to this in the first i you signed up to this in the first place, he went along with it, why
8:45 pm
are you trying to reopen this can of worms now?— worms now? yes, but i also think there is another _ worms now? yes, but i also think there is another dimension i worms now? yes, but i also think there is another dimension to i worms now? yes, but i also think| there is another dimension to this and that is when you are looking at the limitation of rules regarding freedom of goods, business basically once continuity, certainty about it and what wanted is a clear sense as to who is actually going to be taking decisions to resolve disputes and i think we had that in a very clear system here under the protocol. 0k, it does not mean a pure brexit for the uk because the court ofjustice will still have jurisdiction over certain legislation applicable in northern ireland, but it is very difficult to see the eu moving away from having the current arrangement under the protocol. i5 the current arrangement under the protocol. , ,. ., , ., protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements _ protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements that _ protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements that can _ protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements that can in _ protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements that can in the - protocol. is there, then, scope for agreements that can in the end i protocol. is there, then, scope for. agreements that can in the end keep everybody reasonably happy? you know, the government at westminster, all sides in northern ireland and brussels? i all sides in northern ireland and brussels? .. .. , all sides in northern ireland and brussels? ~' ~ , ., , brussels? i think the key word used there is reasonably. _ brussels? i think the key word used there is reasonably. all— brussels? i think the key word used there is reasonably. all sides i brussels? i think the key word used there is reasonably. all sides are i there is reasonably. all sides are going to have to compromise here. we have got a sense of that anyway the
8:46 pm
eu is willing to compromise on the current protocol. the question is to what extent it is proposing goes far enough as far as david frost and the uk government are concerned, as far as such an agreement can be reached. indications are at the moment that the proposals received had a very positive response from business interests and other stakeholders in northern ireland, but i think everybody is going to be reserving judgment until they have had a chance to really go through the fine detail of what has been proposed. very good to talk to you, thank you very much. david phinnemore there, professor of european politics at queen's university belfast, thank you. a shortage of care staff in the community is causing major problems for hospitals. the bbc has learned that nhs bosses in england are seriously worried by the number of elderly and vulnerable patients now stuck in hospital because of a lack of support at home and in care homes. some chief executives have described the current situation as dire. care companies say the problems they are facing recruiting and retaining staff are acute.
8:47 pm
0ur social affairs editor, alison holt, has this report. it's another extremely busy day for home care manager vicki and care supervisor charlotte. both are normally based in the office, but staff shortages mean they are out caring for people to cover the gaps in the rota. that meantjust five hours sleep for vicki last night. i“m shattered. iam tired! i have to keep going on with it, until i can recruit again, until we get more people through the door to support. it is not an option not to. the bandages were too tight, but they are all right now? they are here to help 103—year—old margaret with her lunch and personal care. she recently returned from hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. mm—hmm. but the shortage of care staff is making it increasingly difficult to get people out of hospital. you have perked up a lot.
8:48 pm
comments from hospital chief executives show the huge pressure this is already causing in england. there are a record number of people waiting for care, says one. we havejust tipped over the point where delayed discharges are a bigger problem than covid, says another. and a chief executive whose hospital has 140 patients waiting to be sent home says patients are dying in hospital, when their choice was home, hospice or nursing home, due to lack of care staff. we“re incredibly concerned about the coming winter. we know that hospitals, mental health trusts, ambulance services are all under huge pressure and we know that that pressure is linked to social care, who desperately need the support in order to expand their capacity. hiya! tracy is a nurse and manager at this sheffield care home. they, too, are struggling to find care workers, with staff exhaustion, compulsory vaccinations and better pay in other sectors all adding to the problems. so those are all from
8:49 pm
recruitment agencies? those are all from recruitment, yeah. and it is notjust onejob, there's two or three jobs hidden behind it. but she is also being bombarded byjob offers as other companies try to poach her. you're getting e—mails, you're getting text messages from companies that i've never even heard of. offering you to go for interviews, offering you jobs. what do you think of that? i've got a job. i'm looking after people to the best of my ability. right, we need three carers... and when they bring in agency staff to cover the gaps, they sometimes pay more in a day than the council pays them in a week for a resident's care. i think we should not be in this position, but i think social care, you know, is an integral part of the healthcare system with the nhs, but again it does not feel that we have had the necessary support and potentially it could be as though we have had the necessary
8:50 pm
support and potentially it could be bleak times ahead. the government says it has put extra money into social care and that it is running regular recruitment campaigns. alison holt, bbc news. an inquest has been hearing from friends of the first man murdered by the serial killer, stephen port, who believe police wrongly assumed he had overdosed because he was a gay sex worker. port went on to kill a further three young men. the inquests are examining whether any of them could have been saved, had police acted differently. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, was listening to the evidence at the hearings in barking. china dunning told the inquest how herfriend and china dunning told the inquest how her friend and fellow fashion student anthony will gate had been going to meet a man for six and was expecting it hundred pounds, which had worried friends because it was an unusually large about. anthony will gate even message won the frenzied details of the person who is going to meet, adding jokingly, in case i get killed. two days later
8:51 pm
his body was found outside the block of flats where stephen port lived and stephen port admitted lying to police about knowing anthony will gate and he was brieflyjailed, but never arrested on suspicion of murder. china dunning reported how she and herfriends repeatedly murder. china dunning reported how she and her friends repeatedly told metropolitan police detectives that stephen port was responsible for auntie will gate“s death, urging police to go through stephen port“s computer. when that was eventually done a year after anthony will gate“s body was found, the trainee detective, who had missed the fact that stephen port has made repeated searches for things like drug boys and rape, and in the meantime to more young men were killed with the date rape drug, ghb, and ultimately killed a fourth young man and finally arrested on suspicion of murder. more than 100 mps and peers are calling on the government to rethink plans
8:52 pm
to scrap many btecs in order to pave the way for new vocational qualifications for 16—18—year—olds in england — called t—levels. the government says it's important to avoid duplication and says t—levels will provide a good route into work and university. 0ur education editor, branwenjeffreys, has this report. i“m honestly not entirely sure what i'm going to do. three college students studying at the same level, but three different qualifications. t—level, a—levels and btecs. within a couple of years, many btecs could disappear. yasna told me she wanted to keep her options open with btecs. at the beginning of the year, i was not sure what i wanted to do, so i picked btec applied science, which means i can have a variety of choices at university. working with children. that is whatjess wanted to do aged 16, so she chose the more work—based t—level. i like the fact that it is, like,
8:53 pm
something i definitely want to do and it will definitely take me to where i want to be. after two years, jess will get one t—level — t for technical, worth the same as one or two btecs, or three a—levels. but t—levels have at least 45 days of work experience. so dna carries the instructions for making protein. to clear the way, some btecs could be scrapped, and here is the difference — btecs are studied by 250,000 students, t—levels, just a couple of thousand now. t—levels are absolutely central to the government's ambition for higher skills. designed with employers, they rely heavily on businesses being willing to provide work experience. but their introduction risks being overshadowed by a massive row about withdrawing the very popular btecs. at this college, they fear losing btecs will hit the most
8:54 pm
disadvantaged students hard. possibly tens of thousands of young people will not have a clear route. they are going to find it very difficult to come to college, to gain extra qualifications that will help them further in their life and i think that it is a very sort of risky scenario we are faced with at the minute. the minister insists students will have a choice, including using t—levels to go to university. one thing that you can be sure of is that we will ensure there is a good range of courses, there is high quality and that young people have those opportunities to go into whatever career they want. while students complete their current courses, the first list of those being scrapped in the future is expected within months. branwenjeffreys, bbc news, birmingham. let's bring you an update on that bow and arrow attack
8:55 pm
in the norwegian city of kongsberg. just south—west of oslo, as you can see there, a municipality is around 28,000 people. several people have been killed, others have been injured by a been killed, others have been injured bya man been killed, others have been injured by a man using a bow and arrows to carry out attacks. the police are saying the man has been apprehended and they are saying he has been taken to a police station in the nearby town. but no details of how many casualties there have been, other than that some people have been killed and others injured in that bow and arrow attack in norway. no more details on that throughout the evening, but first let“s throughout the evening, but first let's get a look at the latest weather forecast, here is susan powell. good evening. if you have seen some decent lenses of the sun today, you have done pretty well. for much of the uk, the skies were cloudy and there is going to be plenty of that cloud sticking round tomorrow as well. one change in our story will be strengthening
8:56 pm
winds for scotland. the big area of high pressure stays to south to the uk, but the slow starts to squeeze into the north and that will mean our winds across scotland start to strengthen, even as we head into the small hours of thursday. some showers feeding into western scotland as well on the strengthening breeze. elsewhere light winds, especially to the south of the uk, enough cloud around to keep our temperatures up towards the higher end of single figures, perhaps some double figures in some spots. in scotland as this web front starts to push into the north through thursday morning we could be talking about gales for the northern aisles and attacked for much of the day the winds could gust at 240 moles per hour and the stronger winds will work their way south, along with the band of rain. come the afternoon we will see that brain just fringing it to glasgow, perhaps for the end of school for the evening rush hour. that band of rain marks the boundary between relatively mild heir to the south of the uk and much colder air that will
8:57 pm
sweep across us for friday. perhaps not getting into the far south—west. elsewhere it would look brighter, more sunshine may give the impression that it should feel warmer, but actually with a northerly breeze and moving into more arctic air it will feel considerably cooler, temperatures across scotland perhaps 8—10 at best, so similar to the figures many will see here overnight and then further south 14, perhaps 15 degrees in the south—west with them while they're clinging on. clear skies in that cold air around friday will set us up for a patchy frost to the start of saturday, particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk, but coming in towards the western area of cloud and rain will mean a milder start here, but agree a day on saturday with some rain, particularly for northern ireland at the north—west of england, some showers down towards the south—west. some day it looks like the rain will be away towards the east. we should see a drier day, a brighter day as well once the early morning mist and
8:58 pm
fog clears and strengthening south—westerly wind. at the moment it looks like it will also be a warmer day.
8:59 pm
9:00 pm
this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. the european union has set out new proposals to slash the red tape on british goods entering northern ireland the bloc says the changes will eliminate 80 per cent of the border checks for animal products. we have completely turned our rules upside down and inside out to find a solid solution to an outstanding challenge. the international energy agency says the world needs to spend trillions of dollars more on clean energy if we are to meet the climate change targets we have set for 2050. the governors race in virginia is going to the wire which gives us a glimpse perhaps of what is to come in next year's all important midterm elections.

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on