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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 13, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. president biden is meeting us port officials to help prevent key supply the eu sets out its plans to deal with northern ireland's border issue post brexit — after the uk demands a rewriting of the protocol. there proposed the package of creating practical solutions to deal with the consequences of brexit. will talk about president putin, they have only themselves to blame for their high energy prices and deny that russia's using natural gas. it deny that russia's using natural as. , deny that russia's using natural as, , , , , ., deny that russia's using natural gas. it is rubbish and politically motivated. _ gas. it is rubbish and politically
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motivated, non- _ gas. it is rubbish and politically motivated, non- justified - gas. it is rubbish and politically i motivated, non- justified blather. motivated, non— justified blather. look_ motivated, non— justified blather. look at— motivated, non— justified blather. look at this. star trek actor has become the oldest person to go into space. this is what he made of its. with you have given me is the most profound experience that i can imagine. let's begin with the european union. setting up these new proposals to solve the post brexit trade route. the uk and is unhappy with how the flow of goods from great britain into northern ireland is being managed. here's the european commission vice president. today, the european mission has a practical solution designed to help northern ireland deal with the consequences of brexit while for the
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benefiting and if i were to label this proper solution, i would dubbed them the package of in—house opportunities. them the package of in-house opportunities.— them the package of in-house opportunities. them the package of in-house ouortunities. , , . ., opportunities. this is connected to the northern _ opportunities. this is connected to the northern ireland _ opportunities. this is connected to the northern ireland protocol. - negotiated by both sides, and signed by both sides. it was in theory a solution to one of the biggest problems uk and eu negotiators faced. they wanted to avoid a hard border between the republic of ireland, which is in the eu, and northern ireland, which is in the uk. the solution was keeping northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods. that created a new trade border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. what the eu is proposing is reducing checks on some products being shipped to northern ireland from great britain. here's one example.
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importing products of animal origins like yoghurt, cheese or chickens from great britain. more than 80% of the identity and physical cheques required will now be removed. this is all happening because the uk isn't happy with the northern ireland protocol. but the eu hasn't accepted the uk's key demand, that the eu withdraws the oversight role of the european court ofjustice. this is the uk brexit minister speaking yesterday. the fundamental difficulties will be announced to run a full external boundary of the eu through the centre of our country to play eu law without consent in one part of it and have any dispute arising from these ranges in the course of other parties. these ranges in the course of other arties. ., these ranges in the course of other arties. ._ , , these ranges in the course of other arties. , , . , , parties. the way this is happening is it's disrupting _ parties. the way this is happening is it's disrupting all— parties. the way this is happening is it's disrupting all of— parties. the way this is happening is it's disrupting all of the - parties. the way this is happening is it's disrupting all of the large i is it's disrupting all of the large and small businesses and causing
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serious turbulence to the institutions of the northern ireland. , , ., remember — the uk both negotiated and signed the northern ireland protocol. and there has been some frustration about the uk's stance from the eu. here's france's former europe minister. what kind of partnership is it that someone who says yes and then says no, we need to have trust. we need to build something, we need to provide citizens, businesses with visibility, predictability so that they can rely on the political decision—makers. jessica parker in brussels. are you hearing that frustration from the eu? i are you hearing that frustration from the eu?— from the eu? i think there is frustration _ from the eu? i think there is frustration here. _ from the eu? i think there is frustration here. bear- from the eu? i think there is frustration here. bear in - from the eu? i think there is l frustration here. bear in mind, we're talking about member states, we're talking about member states, we're talking about commissioners who say there might be a wide variety of views but broadly, there
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has been some concern about the uk but this particular demand that you highlighted before but the removal of the european court ofjustice from oversight of the treaty. the european union view on that is if northern ireland is to have access to the farmers market, the single market is governed by the arbiter of those rules and that is the european court ofjustice. and as you probably know, the european union put a lot of stock in its rules and its laws and so it really seems to be a redline for brussels although interesting earlier, when they were talking at the press conference, they're quite keen to move away from rat lines but ultimately, both sides do seem to have them. {iii do seem to have them. of the eumpean _ do seem to have them. of the european union _ do seem to have them. of the european union eventually - do seem to have them. of the i european union eventually goes do seem to have them. of the - european union eventually goes 0k, european union eventually goes ok, if you do not accept this the northern ireland cannot have access to the single market for good, that would if you follow it through would end up being a border between
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northern ireland and the republic of ireland which is the thing everyone is trying to avoid.— ireland which is the thing everyone is trying to avoid. everyone remains determined — is trying to avoid. everyone remains determined that _ is trying to avoid. everyone remains determined that outcome _ is trying to avoid. everyone remains determined that outcome and - is trying to avoid. everyone remains determined that outcome and the i is trying to avoid. everyone remains l determined that outcome and the two sides are going to talk intensively and they revealed that lord frost are going to have lunch on friday and so, we expect a few weeks of intense talks to see where this agreement can go, if they can reach an agreement but there would be concerned about the eventual outcomes of what she described and at this stage, the fi side wanting to overhaul the entire treaty and rewrite it and get a new protocol. and some don't want to do that, they want to work within the protocol within the treaty and find new flexibilities as the european union would put it. you have two sides can't even quite agree on what to do
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with the bit of paper that they are talking about in terms of whether to be rewritten or fleshed out a little bit. this seems to be quite a ways to go. i bit. this seems to be quite a ways to to. ~' ., bit. this seems to be quite a ways toao. ~ ., . , bit. this seems to be quite a ways to to. ~ ., . , . to go. i know there are people that are scratching _ to go. i know there are people that are scratching their— to go. i know there are people that are scratching their heads - to go. i know there are people that are scratching their heads and - are scratching their heads and remember you will be talking about this in westminster thinking hold on, i thought all of this was thrashed up before the deal was signed? thrashed up before the deal was sinned? , ., thrashed up before the deal was sinned? , . . signed? yes and something that --eole signed? yes and something that peeple are _ signed? yes and something that peeple are at — signed? yes and something that people are at pains _ signed? yes and something that people are at pains to _ signed? yes and something that people are at pains to point - signed? yes and something that people are at pains to point out| signed? yes and something that. people are at pains to point out and you mentioned a moment ago is that both sides, the uk and the european union signed up to this. what has happened is, since the end of the transition period in these new post brexit arrangements of come to force, problems have arisen and both sides admit problems have arisen. from lord frost's point of view, the treaty was essentially signed in haste at a time of the uk government was in a relatively weak position and suggests that this is an example of eu overreach and these issues need to be resolved and that they
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have been too rigorous in supplying a protocol that i think that has raised a few eyebrows here but the executive of the european union do acknowledge the problems have been caused in terms of disruption to businesses and of course there is deep concern in the community as well as northern ireland and what they're saying is they want to present these practical solutions in their arguments this idea that they put forward is causing serious and what they're saying is, if you reopen the protocol and negotiations and the thing that, they argue will lead instability. william shatner has gone into space. he played captainjames kirk in the tv series star trek ? and at 90 he's become the oldest person to go into orbit. he did so on board a rocket
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owned byjeff bezos. this is blue origin rocket lifting off in texas. william shatner was one of five on board — the being a former nasa engineer and three executives from different companies. and then as you can see the parachutes deployed safely — and the crew were back on earth 12 minutes later. for 3 of those minutes, they'd experienced weightlessness as they up around 100 kilometres and beyond the boundary of space. here's william shatner, speaking tojeff bezos, minutes after returning to earth. what you have given me is the most profound experience i can imagine. i am so filled with emotion about what just happened. ijust, it's
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just happened. ijust, its extraordinary. extraordinary. for more on the technology that makes this type of short flight possible, here's one space expert. the really big breakthrough here is the reusable rocket technology. for most of the history of space flights. rockets have been one and done, you use it and you throw away and you never for use done, you use it and you throw away and you neverfor use it. so the fact that we are able to recover most, if not all of these rockets is really what has brought the cost down and has made this a little bit more affordable. certainly, it is not affordable for somebody like me. but still, a good chunk of cash but this is far more accessible or cheaper than what we have experienced historically with space flight. big moment for william shatner, big moment for star trek fans. dr erin macdonald is an astro—physicist — and a science consultant on the star trek franchise. you talk about legacy of star trek, it made people think that they could go to space from this so the make—up
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of the original bridge 55 years ago and the privatisation of space is still reserved for the rich and famous and well—connected, but things are changing and hopefully we can start to feel that unfold. here's rich handley, a columnist on star trek explaining what today's flight meant to star trek fans. star trek brings a sense of optimism. the idea that the world that we live in may not necessarily be the ideal place we would like to be the ideal place we would like to be living but some day, there could be living but some day, there could be a better place. we are not defined by your gender or your skin colour or your religion or your class in society. the utopian future that star trek aspires to his one in which people in the future live in harmony. william shatner might be the oldest person to go to space, but he's not the first canadian. here's canada s most famous astronaut, chris hadfield,
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on why he thinks these space flights are so important. people may focus on william shatner flying today, but they should look at this technology. it is opening up space commerce like we've never seen before. and notjust tourism, but access to space at a much cheaper and hopefully safer level that we've ever seen. when we see this, is amazing to see him fly, but the real interesting part is how soon we will not decipher earth and near space, will have an earth moon economic system coming in the next couple of decades and that is where this is truly headed. well when rocket returned to the texas desert, our correspondent sophie long was there to watch. extraordinary day for the future space tourism, this is only the second flight carrying human passengers. people are shouting, there they are. can see the parishes
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have been deployed in the capsule making its way back down to the earth surface. so, it appears somewhere standing to be moving quite slowly. this whole journey, this lasting lesson of ii quite slowly. this whole journey, this lasting lesson of 11 minutes. remarkably he can go up to the edge of space and experience the weightlessness and look back at planet earth and looked back down in less than a quarter of an hour. let's turn to syria now. thousands of wives and children of islamic state group's foreign fighters are currently held in camps in the north of the country. the kurdish authorities which run them are urging countries to repatriate their citizens — but many are refusing, seeing them as a security risk. meanwhile those inside the camps are living in uncertain and sometimes dangerous conditions. poonam taneja reports.
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the islamic state may have been defeated but here in the camps, it is brutal ideology lives on. killings are common, weapons are smuggled in and people smuggled out. children are at risk of radicalisation. so, when boys reach adolescence, they are moved on to secure detention centres, alone. he is ten years old. his mother and younger siblings are all he has left. his father, an iso fighter, was killed in an air strike. the mother brought him here from the caribbean island of trinidad. i their people who quickly realised what it was about
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to come its brutality, and they very quickly decided to return themselves. but you stayed here right until the end. but little has been done to bring them back. some countries like sweden, germany and belgium have brought back some of their citizens while others like britain and france have only repatriated children. mainly orphans. the adults are seen as a security threat. that is because is killed thousands. among them, kurdish men and women buried in this cemetery. the lives of women and children in the camps is challenging but there is little sympathy for them from the families of those killed by islamic state group and its foreign fighters.
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their grief is raw as this woman mourns her son, one of countless cards killed during a decade of civil war. one of countless kurds killed during a decade of civil war. there is growing frustration that the responsibility for detaining islamic state families. the situation inside is very bad. kurdish officials have this dire warning. translation: there are daily killings, they are training - the children in their ideology. the international community is not taking their duties and response abilities toward it. if it keeps going like this, we will face a disaster that we will not be able to deal with. but while countries decide what to do, children are trapped here.
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there are fears that they are wasting away and for many, a brighterfuture at home are fading. let's turn to europe's energy crisis. gas is costing as much as five times more than it did a year ago. russia provides more than a third of europe's gas — some have accused it of restricting supplies. president putin has hit back at that. you're talking about accusations that russia uses energy sources as a weapon. that is complete nonsense,
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it's rubbish. it's politically motivated non— justified blather. where do we use this weapon? and which conflicts to be participate? and as for the economy, that is absolutely out of the question. even in the toughest periods of the cold war, russia fulfilled its contractual obligation in some supplying to europe. president putin was responding to this comment from joe biden's national security advisor, in an interview with the bbc last week. we've long been concerned about using energy as a political weapon and we could see it happening again. let's look at why energy prices are high. broadly —— there's a global squeeze on supplies of natural gas. (gfx)a broadly, there's a global squeeze on supplies of natural gas.
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a cold winter in europe last year means stored gas levels now are much lower than normal. there's also been increased demand from asia — especially china — for liquefied natural gas. that's eaten into supply too. and this is the result on gas prices. this is hitting fuel bills for both households and companies across europe. and some argue russia could do more to help. they can be more helpful and they can easily increase the gas it is sending to europe by 15%. the accusation that russia is restricting supply — connecy to the state—backed energy company gazprom and a pipeline to the eu, nord stream 2. that's a pipeline that's been completed — but not yet switched on. here's one energy analyst. they can supply more gas to europe but refuses to do that saying that we will do that if you accept gas terms of handling this. it is very simple. it is pure black
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blackmail. now — there's already a pipeline in place between russia and the eu — nord stream 1. nord stream 2 runs alongside it, through the baltic sea to germany, doubling the supply capacity to europe. it's waiting final approval from european regulators. but russia has consistently denied throttling supplies to get the go—ahead. you could have pointed to alexander novak same bed in his view, european certification of the north stream to pipeline so that he could actually be used as we know it has been built but is not being used yet, certification for use with definitely cool soaring european gas prices. to many in europe, that sounds a little bit like an implicit threat that if they don't do which
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you want with regards to north stream two, there could be problems this winter? it stream two, there could be problems this winter? . , ., this winter? it means that the preferred _ this winter? it means that the preferred option _ this winter? it means that the preferred option would - this winter? it means that the preferred option would not. this winter? it means that the preferred option would not bei this winter? it means that the i preferred option would not be to certifies that prices soar further and i will say that we are talking here in the market that escaped in the hands of those who are spilling the hands of those who are spilling the policies and approaches and determine what will happen in the next few weeks and months. we would prefer to half year at their market, russia is about theirs, it is not about bullies. it is about bears. we walked towards this. tom marzek—manser is an analyst at energy consultancy icis do you think this is a problem that russia can solve? it is
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do you think this is a problem that russia can solve?— russia can solve? it is a problem that russia _ russia can solve? it is a problem that russia could _ russia can solve? it is a problem that russia could solve _ russia can solve? it is a problem that russia could solve in - russia can solve? it is a problem that russia could solve in the - that russia could solve in the entire gas market is hoping that they do. there certainly less gas coming into northwest europe then three covid—i9 times and the market is really waiting any day now for some sort of development that we can see to come whether they will come through the ukraine or the commission but not completed pipeline. commission but not completed --ieline. a... commission but not completed --ieline. . pipeline. accord winter and the extra demand _ pipeline. accord winter and the extra demand from _ pipeline. accord winter and the extra demand from asia, - pipeline. accord winter and the extra demand from asia, but i pipeline. accord winter and the - extra demand from asia, but where does the pandemic fit into this. how does the pandemic fit into this. how does demand connect with that? i think it's about the fact that we bounced back globally so quickly and that means that the economy, particularly asia is particularly stronger and energy hungry than they were in than anyone expected. so, we've had that coupled with some
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cold weather and the previous winter with the stored sites within the european union and within the uk are lower, much lower than they need to be at this time of the year. can lower, much lower than they need to be at this time of the year.— be at this time of the year. can you hel us be at this time of the year. can you help us with _ be at this time of the year. can you help us with the _ be at this time of the year. can you help us with the supply _ be at this time of the year. can you help us with the supply of- be at this time of the year. can you help us with the supply of gas - help us with the supply of gas in europe to the overall supply of comedy think europe is too reliant on russia? we comedy think europe is too reliant on russia? ~ ., comedy think europe is too reliant on russia?— comedy think europe is too reliant on russia? ~ ., , . ., ., on russia? we do consume a lot of russian gas — on russia? we do consume a lot of russian gas but — on russia? we do consume a lot of russian gas but where _ on russia? we do consume a lot of russian gas but where else - on russia? we do consume a lot of. russian gas but where else would we get it from? at the moment, the two sources to europe a either additional russian gas or lng. we have seen over the summer liquefied natural gas is being bought by the asian market and they're consistently of competing european prices to attract any spare parts that may come out of qatar or america. so, we're not really left with many options in the short—term.
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everything you send that last answer, i know that the regulators have approved it yet, but is it really possible to see any other outcome than that eventually being switched on was shallow ultimately it will get switched on and the first half is rated to go, basically. ? first half is rated to go, basically-— first half is rated to go, basically. first half is rated to go, basicall . . , ., ., �* basically. ? ready to go. but there's also _ basically. ? ready to go. but there's also capacity - basically. ? ready to go. but there's also capacity to - basically. ? ready to go. but there's also capacity to go i basically. ? ready to go. but| there's also capacity to go to poland and the ukraine that is being underutilised and before north stream is switched on, would like to see those pipelines increase their flow hopefully from beginning of november and then we can see a drastic fall in the wholesale prices of europe with the benchmark. and on that of europe with the benchmark. and on than , , ., , of europe with the benchmark. and on than , , that there will be people across euro -e that there will be people across europe thinking _ that there will be people across europe thinking is _ that there will be people across europe thinking is there - that there will be people across europe thinking is there any - that there will be people across - europe thinking is there any respite coming? there might be in the medium—term? i
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coming? there might be in the medium-term?— coming? there might be in the medium-term? ~ , ., , medium-term? i think if you see some sianals in medium-term? i think if you see some signals in the — medium-term? i think if you see some signals in the next _ medium-term? i think if you see some signals in the next week, _ medium-term? i think if you see some signals in the next week, that - medium-term? i think if you see some signals in the next week, that these i signals in the next week, that these will be used more than they already are, then that will bring down the whole price and at the beginning of november, ideally, hopefully and there really would be some respect for consumers and households. thank ou. from for consumers and households. thank you- from the — for consumers and households. thank you. from the consultancy. _ for consumers and households. thank you. from the consultancy. you - for consumers and households. thank you. from the consultancy. you can i you. from the consultancy. you can find reports for me and the team across the bbc and if you're in the uk, you can get the news category and iplayer and wherever you are, you can explain it on the sounds app if you prefer to listen and the videos are also on the website too. today, there is a new video on america and its climate commitments and what it is currently doing with its missions. speaking of america and the biden administration, we are expecting joe biden to talk about
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the supply chain issues that the us is facing what the white house is going to be doing about that. that is coming up soon. good evening. if you seen some decent glimpses of the sun today you have done pretty well. for much of the uk, the skies were cloudy and there's going to be plenty of that cloud sticking around tomorrow too. one change in our story will be strengthening winds for scotland. the big area of high pressure stays to the south of the uk, but this low starts to squeeze into the north and that will mean our winds across scotland start to strengthen even as we head into the small hours of thursday. some showers feeding into western scotland as well on the strengthening breeze. elsewhere, light winds especially to the south of the uk, enough cloud around to keep our temperatures up to the higher end of single figures, double figures in a few spots.
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for scotland as this weather front start to push into the north through thursday morning, we could be talking about gales for the normal hours and through much of the day. at times the winds could gust up to 40mph. stronger winds will work their way south along with the band of rain. come the afternoon, i think we will see that rain fringing into glascow perhaps for the end of school for the evening rush hour. that band of rain marks a boundary between relatively mild air to the south of the uk and much colder air that will sweep across us for friday. perhaps not getting into the far southwest. elsewhere it will look brighter, more sunshine may give the impression that it should feel warmer but actually with a northerly breeze and moving into more arctic air, it will feel considerably cooler. temperatures across scotland perhaps eight to ten at best. similar to the figures that many will see overnight. further south ia, perhaps 15 with a mild air clings on. clear skies and that cold air around overnight friday will set us up for a patchy frost to start us off
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on saturday particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk. but coming in towards the western area of cloud and rain will mean a milder start here but a grayer day on saturday with some rain particularly for northern ireland and the northwest of england some showers down towards the southwest. sunday, it looks like the rain will be a way to the east, we should see a drier day, a brighter day as well once any early morning mist orfog clears and with the strengthening southwesterly wind at the moment it also looks like it will be a warmer day.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. president biden is meeting us port officials to help prevent key supply chains being disrupted in the run up to christmas. with the latest shortages of some products already happening the key pair is being christmas on through to christmas. the eu sets out its plans to solve the disagreement with the uk over how trade moves in and out of northern ireland. today the european commission has proposed that robust package of creative practical solutions designed to help northern ireland deal with the consequences of brexit. and we look at squid game —
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the violent korean drama — that's become netflix's biggest ever series launch. we will begin by talking about global supply chain issues. i'm sure you're aware of him that opera knew they've been around for some time. in the us there is particular pressure will talk about that in a minute because joe pressure will talk about that in a minute becausejoe biden is expected to speak in the coming minutes. let's look at the uk with a head of global gates said to plan ahead for christmas because of delays at ports. as a short of of lord drivers and build up of containers and felix towed that the uk's biggest commercial port it has it were told 50,000 containers waiting to be collected and ships are having to wait up to ten days to unload. coming in but going out to slowly.
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felixstowe is the busiest container port in the uk, bringing in goods from around the world. but for months, the situation here and internationally has been getting worse as demand for goods grows after the pandemic. the situation is caused by a messy mix of global problems, including covid disruption. here in the uk it is made worse by a shortage of hgv drivers to take the goods away, and so, they built up. there are around 100,000 containers here. the port normally has around 60,000 to 70,000 on average. they aren't the only port in this position. well, this is a global issue, so its happening imports around the world, and it's obviously happening in all the container ports around the uk. because of the volume of traffic, of containers, and of particularly imports at the moment, which are coming into the uk as we come out of lockdown. as well as taking time to get
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goods to the right place, the cost of shipping goods is also going up. the freight rates have gone up massively. two years ago you paid about $3000 for a 40 foot from shanghai to felixstowe. this month, it is between $19,000 and $20,000, so as you can see, they have gone up sixfold. this has a knock—on effect in our shops, including on toys coming in before christmas. if i use this as an example, this item 12 months ago would have cost us 70p to ship from the far east to the uk. it is now going to cost £7 to ship. now, that puts it in perspective. we are selling theirs at present at £15. that isn't going to happen when the new freight rates come in. the government has reassured shoppers that they should shop normally this equipment and has said that while global capacity
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regularly fluctuates, it is working with the industry to tackle the challenges at ports. the supply chain is stuck in a snarl up and it could take months to unpick. and the you srs similar units at port. this is in the run up to thanksgiving and christmas a month after. the white house is in outset the port of los angeles the biggest container port in the country will switch to loading and unloading containers around the clock. also six companies including walmart, target and samsung are now committing to 2a hours deliveries too. let's hear more from michelle fleury in new york. hear more from michelle fleury in new york. if you listen to what major us retailers have been saying for a while now, they keep talking about the fact that there a shortage of lorry drivers, they keep talking about the fact shipping containers a second at sea, shipping costs
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are going to the roof and they are warning consumers that they are are going to be price tags or a shortage of goods right in the run—up to the holiday shopping season. for many of them this really matters because that's the time when they do about 40% of their business. so they are crying, look let's get christmas back on track and it seems the white house is responding with this meeting of port executives, commitments from business leaders as you point out to try and resolve some of the supply chain bottlenecks we are seeing right now. well after that meeting with port bosses, he is due to speak at the white house about supply—chain challenges and of course when that happens you'll see it here on the bbc. meanwhile the international monetary fund yesterday cut its forecast for global growth, blaming the pandemic and interruptions to the supply chain. we've seen the revival of commodity prices and you're also seeing pent—up demand being released. this is a very odd recovery where we have a strong mismatch between demand and supply and not still being sorted out in these last few months.
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the pandemic has gone so the problem persists and we have additional supply pressures especially more recently coming from energy crisis. so all of this will feed into inflation we expect we will see it elevated for the next few months. prices in the usa are now rising much faster than they have for years inflation in september was 5.4% — the highest its been, since 2008. nomia iqbal is in washington. can we start with the practicalities here? what is causing the smart looks at the big ports like los angeles? looks at the big ports like los anueles? , . ., ., angeles? there is quite a lot of factors that _ angeles? there is quite a lot of factors that go _ angeles? there is quite a lot of factors that go into _ angeles? there is quite a lot of factors that go into it. - angeles? there is quite a lot of factors that go into it. you've . factors that go into it. you've got big supply chain problems you got the search of the delta variant across the world which is shutting down quite a lot of ports, you've got a lack of access of vaccines in many countries. you've also got a
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shortage of shipping containers and truck drivers and rail operators and that sort of thing. all of this is coming together to cause this problem. generally speaking this is a problem that is happening when the world is trying to reopen. it's not just americans, obviously people around the world up and stuck it on for so long and instead of going out and spending they are buying things, getting them delivered at home. and that triggered this import avalanche. in orderfor that triggered this import avalanche. in order for that to go smoothly you need the supply—chain to work nonstop. you've got this massive backlog of goods that are not making it to peoples homes and on the shelves. it could become a problem for president biden which is weiss trying to get on top of this, which is why he's holding this round table with company leaders at some point this afternoon.— point this afternoon. presumably he started to it — point this afternoon. presumably he started to it now _ point this afternoon. presumably he started to it now because _ point this afternoon. presumably he started to it now because he - point this afternoon. presumably he started to it now because he knows| started to it now because he knows this need sorting now in order for the goods to be in the shops for a time when americans start shopping at the end of november.—
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at the end of november. yeah, i don't think— at the end of november. yeah, i don't think any _ at the end of november. yeah, i don't think any president - at the end of november. yeah, i don't think any president wants. at the end of november. yeah, i l don't think any president wants to see these alarmist headlines such as christmas is going to be cancelled and as you mentioned thanksgiving as well and halloween is a big event here as well. he doesn't want those sort of headlines. his big pitch to the american public is that he will get the economy back on track. lots of small businesses are usually affected by what is happening with the supply chains. he will be looking to try and come up with a resolution and one of them is true as we are there, to keep the la port open 2a hours. that's where nearly half of america's imports, foreign imports coming to america. also the white house is stressed there is there is only so much they can do. the press secretary was asked today can you guarantee that people will get their stuff by christmas, by thanksgiving and she made the point of saying well, we are not fedex, we are not ups. they believe on the
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federal level there is only so much they can do and they are hoping once this announcement is made that this will potentially prompt additional retailers long—haul trucking firms and rail operators to act so that the global... until the global supply chain starts working nonstop. thank you very much. as and when we hearfrom president biden thank you very much. as and when we hear from president biden we will come back to washington. let's return to the eu's proposals to reduce tensions with britain over how part of the brexit agreement, concerning northern ireland, operates. the measures include slashing red tape and reducing checks on goods and medicines between the british mainland and northern ireland. here's our ireland correspondent emma vardy. could this be the light at the end
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of the channel for businesses? bringing goods into northern ireland from great britain has become much more difficult under the brexit arrangements. we more difficult under the brexit arrangements.— more difficult under the brexit arrangements. more difficult under the brexit arranuements. ~ . ~ ., . arrangements. we went back for a consignment _ arrangements. we went back for a consignment of _ arrangements. we went back for a consignment of goods, _ arrangements. we went back for a consignment of goods, that's - arrangements. we went back for a consignment of goods, that's the l consignment of goods, that's the paperwork that we had to produce. under the protocol and 2021 this is the paperwork. it under the protocol and 2021 this is the paperwork-— under the protocol and 2021 this is the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this _ the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this on _ the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this on one _ the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this on one of— the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this on one of lori? - the paperwork. it could be multiple loads of this on one of lori? the i the paperwork. it could be multiple| loads of this on one of lori? the uk government argues that difficulties are so serious that it will now wants an entirely new treaty. where's saying fewer if anybody want to begin _ where's saying fewer if anybody want to begin moving goods between great britain _ to begin moving goods between great britain and _ to begin moving goods between great britain and northern ireland put up companies — britain and northern ireland put up companies to northern ireland are simply— companies to northern ireland are simply saying why should i bother? what _ simply saying why should i bother? what eight year. let's try to make christmas — what eight year. let's try to make christmas a — what eight year. let's try to make christmas a little _ what eight year. let's try to make christmas a little brighter, - what eight year. let's try to make christmas a little brighter, shall. christmas a little brighter, shall we? . we? marks & spencer zverev said it won't be sending _ we? marks & spencer zverev said it won't be sending some _ we? marks & spencer zverev said it won't be sending some christmas i won't be sending some christmas products of the irish sea because of the red tape and there was do to be a ban on the british banger being and brought into northern ireland as
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chills meats cannot be imported under eu rules. but the eu has indicated it will now reduce the paperwork. the proposals are understood to include a unique agreement on food to reduce checks on food and drink products moving over the irish sea and an arrangement to allow the sale of chilled me to continue in the eu said it will change its laws to solve the problems which are posing a threat to the supply of medicines in northern ireland. it is a threat to the supply of medicines in northern ireland.— in northern ireland. it is this robust package _ in northern ireland. it is this robust package of— in northern ireland. it is this robust package of practical, | robust package of practical, imaginative solutions as we continue to implement the protocol on ireland, northern ireland for the benefit of all communities on the ground. benefit of all communities on the round. �* ., , ., . benefit of all communities on the round. ., , ., , benefit of all communities on the round. ., , ., ground. but logistics are only part ofthe ground. but logistics are only part of the problem. _ ground. but logistics are only part of the problem. this _ ground. but logistics are only part of the problem. this is _ ground. but logistics are only part of the problem. this is an - of the problem. this is an ideological battle to. loyal communities view any type of border in the accuracy as severing northern ireland to link with the uk, intricate growth to union as identity here. uk government is also called to an end of the role of the
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court ofjustice and the arrangement for political leaders in the republic of ireland say the demands are inactive bad faith. the uk going back on the deal that it signed up to. , , . . ., , back on the deal that it signed up to. , , . back on the deal that it signed up to. this is a country that makes treaties that _ to. this is a country that makes treaties that strikes _ to. this is a country that makes| treaties that strikes agreements to. this is a country that makes - treaties that strikes agreements and then intends to renege on them. and that message must now resonate around — that message must now resonate around the world. don't make any agreement— around the world. don't make any agreement with the british government, don't sign any treaty with the _ government, don't sign any treaty with the united kingdom until you can he _ with the united kingdom until you can be confident that this is a country— can be confident that this is a country that can honour its promises. country that can honour its promises-— country that can honour its romises. ., . ., promises. without a resolution in the uk could _ promises. without a resolution in the uk could trigger— promises. without a resolution in the uk could trigger a _ promises. without a resolution in the uk could trigger a clause - promises. without a resolution in the uk could trigger a clause to i the uk could trigger a clause to override part of the brexit deal. sparking a potential trade war with northern ireland caught in the middle. dtljohn campbell, bbc�*s northern ireland economics and business editor. before we talk about proposals from the european union i'm interested to know what impact this disagreement is having on northern irish businesses.— is having on northern irish businesses. �* , ,, , ., businesses. businesses in northern ireland businesses. businesses in northern ireiand have — businesses. businesses in northern ireland have been _ businesses. businesses in northern ireland have been speaking - businesses. businesses in northern ireland have been speaking to - businesses. businesses in northern ireland have been speaking to the i ireland have been speaking to the european commission for months now
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and saying there are real problems here. i think this evening they feel the commission have been listening because quite a lot of what they've been asking for in terms of easing the burden is in the eu papers. i think like any businesses across the uk people who are relying are worried about christmas. it was interesting we heard today from the owner of a major food interesting we heard today from the owner of a majorfood importer in northern ireland he was saying really, brexit and the protocol is interacting with all the other supply—chain issues. what he's finding is that when businesses in great britain i have and make a decision about how they use their resources, which customers they're going to send, how the going to deploy their staff it's easy for them to say well, well forget about northern ireland because it's already too difficult to send stuff there so therefore we willjust concentrate on our customers and the other parts of the uk. i concentrate on our customers and the other parts of the uk.— other parts of the uk. i wonder if we are seeing — other parts of the uk. i wonder if we are seeing any _ other parts of the uk. i wonder if we are seeing any other - other parts of the uk. i wonder if| we are seeing any other ships and trade patterns for example from
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within other eu member states aside from the public of ireland language thatis from the public of ireland language that is written now being bypassed and are alternative routes now being pursued to get goods into northern ireland? , ,., pursued to get goods into northern ireland? , ., . ., ireland? there is some of that going on. traditionally _ ireland? there is some of that going on. traditionally we've _ ireland? there is some of that going on. traditionally we've had - ireland? there is some of that going on. traditionally we've had what's i on. traditionally we've had what's known as the land bridge and that basically means that if companies on the island of ireland are buying from mainland europe they would just chuck those goods up to the uk and put them on a ferry over to the island of ireland. there's been a big reduction in trade against the land bridge and a huge increase in the number of stories which are going fairly directly from dublin into belgium and france. you will have some companies in northern ireland who may be struggling to get goods from great britain. instead they are buying them either locally within northern ireland, the getting them from the republican island or they are using those new sea routes to bring some products and from mainland europe. some striking statistics we've seen this year have been the increase in trade between
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northern ireland and the republic of ireland virtually doubling from where it was pretty brexit levels as businesses both north and south of the border try to cut great britain out of the supply chains and do business with each other. when you talk to businesses _ business with each other. when you talk to businesses and _ business with each other. when you talk to businesses and northern - talk to businesses and northern ireland are some frustrated that this is a two still going on they think that this is been settled by the protocol? ida. think that this is been settled by the protocol?— the protocol? no, i don't think an bod the protocol? no, i don't think anybody expected _ the protocol? no, i don't think anybody expected it _ the protocol? no, i don't think anybody expected it to - the protocol? no, i don't think anybody expected it to be - the protocol? no, i don't think. anybody expected it to be settled at the start of this year. one of the biggest complaint you will hear from northern ireland businesses is that there wasn't a proper transition. and there wasn't proper education of businesses in great britain about what they would need to do to continue to trade with northern ireland. they say that the uk government focused too much i'm talking about trade between the uk and the eu and not enough on educating people on the differences between the rest of the uk and northern ireland. for example there was a very small business i was talking to just this week and they usually get a couple of pallets a week from their suppliers in great britain. they did not receive a
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single pallet between december and may because their suppliers in great britain just hadn't been prepared for how the protocol actually works. john, thank you for coming on outside source, we appreciate it. those of you watching if you want to follow this issue of the protocol there was no one better to follow than john on there was no one better to follow thanjohn on twitter. it will update you on all the different details and consequences of those details with “p consequences of those details with up to look them up on twitter if you use it. stay with us on outside source — still to come... the international energy agency says the transition to clean energy is still far too slow to meet climate targets. care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs unfilled than before the pandemic, according to a leading industry body. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. the nurses have been up today,
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the bandages were too tight but they're all right now? yeah, they're fine. yeah? good. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she's recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home. oh, definitely. after four weeks away. mm—hm. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire, finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide, and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere.
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how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris owden, who runs this care company, also worked on hospital wards, helping discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down about eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity with staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so, looking after patients now is hard, and can you imagine when the winter comes, when the colder weather comes, people become more unwell? the government says it's running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is...
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the eu has set out plans to solve the disagreement with the uk over how trade moves in and out of northern ireland. let's turn to climate change and the international energy agency says the world needs to invest much more money, on clean energy. the iea is a global body on energy which counts many of the biggest countries amongst its members. it says the world needs to spend nearly four trillion dollars on clean energy and infrastructure by 2030 to hit the agreed targets on climate change. that's three times, what countries spend currently. ellen fraser is an energy consultant. it's very, very clear in terms of what areas of our energy economy need to excellerate materially versus where we need to start pulling back. i thinks it's a really very helpful summary to show the
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extent to which we need to drive renewable investment quite heavily over the coming period. this isn'tjust about hitting climate targets — its connected to the current problems with high prices for fossil fuels, too. the iea says that without investment in clean energy — there is a risk of more sharp price changes for energy in general. it says the pandemic has hindered efforts to cut coal and oil use — with 2021 on course to see the second biggest increase in co2 emissions ever. part of the problem is that demand for energy is increasing as the world economy recovers. thiery bros is a professor at the french university science po. this is what we are facing right now. we are facing a rebound in demand and we don't have enough energy. again i think this is really the problem. we need more renewable but we also need more energy storage. if we don't have any at hand we are going to have people still needing energy and still reverting to fossil fuels. still needing energy and still reverting to fossil fuels.
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the iea says the move to greener energy would also create millions ofjobs and pay for itself — but to date investment has been going the other way. richard brooks is an expert in climate finance. since the paris agreement was signed five years— since the paris agreement was signed five years ago nearly six years ago now, _ five years ago nearly six years ago now. nearly — five years ago nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion have gone into fossii— now, nearly $3.8 trillion have gone into fossil fuel companies. that's coal, _ into fossil fuel companies. that's coal. oil— into fossil fuel companies. that's coal, oiland into fossil fuel companies. that's coal, oil and gas companies from 'ust coal, oil and gas companies from just 60 _ coal, oil and gas companies from just 60 banks. clearly the money is flowing _ just 60 banks. clearly the money is flowing in _ just 60 banks. clearly the money is flowing in the wrong direction. we need _ flowing in the wrong direction. we need to— flowing in the wrong direction. we need to he — flowing in the wrong direction. we need to be stepping up our investments in renewables and quickly— investments in renewables and quickly phasing out investments in fossil— quickly phasing out investments in fossil fuels. quickly phasing out investments in fossil fuels. raising the sum the iea says is required for clean energy — four trillion dollars — is obviously, quite a challenge. let's hear from the director of the iea, on why he's optimistic. first of all there is no lack of capital there is no problem and the limits of money. i believe in europe and north america clean energy
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projects and the capital will need. the issue is the emerging countries, developing countries. because the bulk of the missions come from asia and other countries around the world other emerging countries around the world. therefore my hope, my hope is we find some catalyst investments put in place in glasgow. and there is a discussion of putting $100,000,000,000 on the table and it could come through this project the hundred billion dollars in order to supplement clean energy in the emerging world i think will play a very important role to trigger private investment. it's also very important that government leaders around the world come together, unite and give in on unmistakable signal to invest or say investor, we are in order to build a clean energy future clean secure future. eight
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you continue to invest in the old energy you may well lose money. now you may have seen it — apparantly a lot of people have. the netflix series squid game has racked up 111,000,000 views for its debut series — injust 28 days, since it launched. making it the platform's biggest ever series. and if you haven't seen it — it's a a violent korean dystopian drama which tells the story of a group of misfits — taking part in six, children's playground games — where the cost of losing is death. kathryn van arendonk from the new york magazine explains the shows allure. it isa it is a well told story in nine hours. it has these incredible visuals, i think some of the performances are really great. and i
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think it is continuing in interest in actually we had in the world for quite a while. hunger games style stories, the sense of dystopian survival dramas that really appeal at this moment. the idea of poverty and financial inequality being connected with this kind of social experimentation, it is also not new. it is part of what is happening in say hunger games as well which is been a worldwide sensation over the past decade. but squid game makes that a much more straightforward connexions. it is not a fantasy world, they haven't redrawn a map and created this whole new mythology. it isjust and created this whole new mythology. it is just modern—day south korea and the problem that lands everyone in this game is that they are wildly in debt. and the nakedness of that i think is part of the striking appeal of the show. it is a show with an intensely
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anti—capitalist message. and yet the lesson that netflix and i thinkjeff beto's at amazon and really all of us are learning from it is you can make a lot of money from intense anti— capitalism. and i don't think squid game has a great answerfor that but i do think it wants us all to sit with the discomfort. there ou co. to sit with the discomfort. there you go- that's — to sit with the discomfort. there you go- that's a _ to sit with the discomfort. there you go. that's a show— to sit with the discomfort. there | you go. that's a show everyone's talking about the moment. we are waiting on president biden to speak of the white house to address global transportation supply chain bottlenecks. you can see the shot that's coming into us here in the bbc news room. no sign of the president yet but of course when he appears we will definitely keep an eye on what he says. he's been meeting with the bosses of some of america's biggest ports who got plenty on their plate at the moment because a number of issues including a shortage of workers at the ports is meant that there is an issue with getting the goods off the boats, through the ports and out into us businesses and shops. the white house is trying to fix that with
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thanksgiving and christmas on the way. no sign of the president yet though. thanks for watching across the hour. i'll see you soon. all the best. good evening. if you've seen some decent glimpses of the sun today you have done pretty well. for much of the uk, the skies were cloudy and there's going to be plenty of that cloud sticking around tomorrow too. one change in our story will be strengthening winds for scotland. the big area of high pressure stays to the south of the uk, but this low starts to squeeze into the north and that will mean our winds across scotland start to strengthen even as we head into the small hours of thursday. some showers feeding into western scotland as well on the strengthening breeze. elsewhere, light winds especially to the south of the uk, enough cloud around to keep our temperatures up to the higher end of single figures, double figures in a few spots.
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for scotland as this weather front start to push into the north through thursday morning, we could be talking about gales for the northern isles and through much of the day. at times the winds could gust up to 40mph. stronger winds will work their way south along with the band of rain. come the afternoon, i think we will see that rain fringing into glascow perhaps for the end of school for the evening rush hour. that band of rain marks a boundary between relatively mild air to the south of the uk and much colder air that will sweep across us for friday. perhaps not getting into the far southwest. elsewhere it will look brighter, more sunshine may give the impression that it should feel warmer but actually with a northerly breeze and moving into more arctic air, it will feel considerably cooler. temperatures across scotland perhaps eight to ten at best. similar to the figures that many will see overnight. further south 1a, perhaps 15 with a mild air clings on. clear skies and that cold air around
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overnight friday will set us up for a patchy frost to start us off on saturday particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk. but coming in towards the western area of cloud and rain will mean a milder start here but a grayer day on saturday with some rain particularly for northern ireland and the northwest of england some showers down towards the southwest. sunday, it looks like the rain will be a way to the east, we should see a drier day, a brighter day as well once any early morning mist orfog clears and with the strengthening southwesterly wind at the moment it also looks like it will be a warmer day.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: plan ahead for christmas says a shipping boss — amid delays at the uk's ports. a shortage of hgv drivers means around 50,000 containers are still waiting to be collected at felixstowe — the uk's biggest commercial port. retailers are warning it will have a knock on effect on their shelves. we still have toys to sarah but if you are looking for choice, don't expect to come in on december and see what you would normally experience in a toy store. the eu sets out its plans to try to resolve disagreements over post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland. two more cassualties of the global
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spike in gas prices — pure planet and colorado energy have ended trading.

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