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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines. one of the uk's biggest toy retailers is warning delays at ports and issues with supply chains will mean shortages this christmas. most checks on food products moving between northern ireland and great britain will be scrapped under new eu proposals — according to the irish foreign minister — as the uk government pushes for changes. it is incumbent upon us as a government and i think it is incumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. and at half past 5 — the eu's lead negotiator is due to host a press conference in brussels — about measures to ease flow of goods from britain to northern ireland. also this hour: care homes in england are struggling to recruit staff and there are now more than a hundred thousand
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job vacancies. and star trek�*s william shatner — goes where no 90 year old has gone before — and blasts off into space. one of the uk's biggest toy retailers says shops will have stock leading up to christmas but that supply chain issues could cause problems. the entertainerfounder, gary granty commenting on a build—up of shipping containers at felixstowe — the uk's biggest commercial port — says it's due to a shortage of lorry drivers. he says the biggest difficulty wouldn't be a lack of toys, but getting products to the right places. megan patterson reports
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on the situation at felixstowe. packed up and now backed up. christmas stock stuck in thousands of containers at felixstowe. normally, containers would pass through here in two or three days, now it is taking more than a week. this is the uk's largest commercial port, a backlog here likely to have an impact in december. food i think will continue to move. pigs in blankets, turkeys. the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain us more than happily. but toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in. more than a third of the uk's freight container traffic is handled at felixstowe. shipping giant maersk is now re—routing some of its biggest ships away from the port to elsewhere to europe, using smaller vessels to unload goods in an attempt to ease supply chain pressure. adam's haulage business moves 100 containers a day,
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but a lack of space at felixstowe means his drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. that has just all created a perfect storm. but this is a global issue, with similar situations in ports across the us, china and east asia too. problems here first began to emerge injuly. port officials say the situation at felixstowe has improved in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the supply chains and retailers to work through some very, very sophisticated logistics planning to prioritise the right goods to get to us on time. the government says it is working to increase the uk's hgv driver capacity, but resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be fully delivered. megan patterson, bbc news. however, officials in
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felixstowe say the log—jam of shipping containers is easing. the port has blamed the shortage of haulage drivers, along with brexit border changes, and the pandemic. one majorfirm, maersk, has diverted its largest ships to ports in belgium and the netherlands. peter wilson, managing director of shipping agency cory brothers told us about the difficulties they have been facing. the hgv driver situation is extreme difficult in the united kingdom and the shortage is clear. we are seeing significant delays in getting the boxes into this at centres and then getting them out to stores. what we have seen is for the importers in particular with the build—up to christmas is that they have been early, getting boxes in now rather than early november, so that we have time to distribute what we need to stores. i will be very honest, we will not have the overall choice that we had in store, but we will not see empty shelves. this will be around the christmas
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toys, clothing, gifts and the christmas sort of present experience if you like. food, i think will continue to move, pigs in blankets, turkeys, the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain as more than happily, but, yes, toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in, but importers are working on this and have brought boxes early so we can weather this storm. where the train to do to improve the situation crisp 7 ? their dream to increase the flow of container— ? their dream to increase the flow of container ships _ ? their dream to increase the flow of container ships that _ ? their dream to increase the flow of container ships that are - ? their dream to increase the flow of container ships that are on the l of container ships that are on the port side in the industry. i've
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spoken to the boss, the person you've been speaking about is whether the biggest stores across the united kingdom and he has told me that they've been having big trouble getting their goods at a felix still because that shortage of drivers. it is been effecting so to the uk economy and the supply of goods coming out of felix though is hugely delayed getting into these warehouses and the shops. if you went to one of the shops across the united kingdom, one of his stores, they're really well—stocked at the moment and that is because they have been planning very, very hard to make sure that stores are stocked in october and november and december to make sure that there is not a supply chain crunch because that is what they are anticipating in december because they believe that while there are toys and goods in the country, they're going to be stuck in the wrong places they could end up being stuck at the other side of the port because the transport system and hgv
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drivers are really struggling to get them from the port side to the warehouse and then to shops and that is where the concern is at the moment about having the right toys and stores for christmas. the moment about having the right toys and stores for christmas.— and stores for christmas. the toys are there of _ and stores for christmas. the toys are there of its _ and stores for christmas. the toys are there of its say _ and stores for christmas. the toys are there of its say transport - and stores for christmas. the toys | are there of its say transport them. depending on who you speak to, the causes of these logjams are different. some people say it is a drivers shortage, some since the pandemic and some say it is brexit, which is it?— which is it? there is one term that's being — which is it? there is one term that's being used _ which is it? there is one term that's being used constantly l which is it? there is one term - that's being used constantly about this and it is a perfect storm and i'm sorry to say that there's so many factors of play at the moment in the supply chain strategies. when the goods are coming to the united kingdom especially the port, hgv drivers is the main thing. of the effects of the pandemic, it creates difficult shocks in the supply chain and lots of places were shut for a long time and with port movements not happening in the movement of ships stopping, they weren't moving
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at the time ended up being stopped in position. so, the international supply chain is disconnected and the economy is starting to wake up at the moment. there is a global explosion in demand for consumer goods for ordering lots of goods, we want to buy things and trying to get goods to put them back into the high streets and there really struggling to get the goods and that they need it's been exacerbated and the fact that goods are coming in and they do not want to get them from portside. in once that brexit has caused a lot of problems for them because it's been a huge backlog of training to train staff now in the new changes to customs papers and customs declarations. this allowed different factors that play. retail bosses are becoming concerned about that period through would sever a lot of toys and the port patrol, the barbie toys and the port patrol, the barbie toys and some of the other dolls and things that we've talked about under those christmas trees and the government have said they're hard
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with industry but all of the people are telling not to doubt. it will be some crunches and some of the most popular toys. aha, some crunches and some of the most pepuiar toys-— popular toys. a ma'or rail freight o erator popular toys. a ma'or rail freight operator is h popular toys. a major rail freight operator is switching _ popular toys. a major rail freight operator is switching to - popular toys. a major rail freight operator is switching to order, i operator is switching to order, slower, dirtier diesel engines because of the crisis here. freight liner is withdrawing its entire 23 strong fleet of this because of rising energy costs and will instead be using diesel locomotives. . it's one of the big large freight operators in the uk. a spokesperson said it is a difficult decision they made in order to maintain a cost—effective solution for transporting essential goods and
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supplies across the uk can me just a few days before the meeting in glasgow which will encourage all countries to phase out fossil fuels like diesel. it's caused problems since day one of the brexit process — and now eu officials are on their way to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving from great britain to northern ireland. a fresh row has broken out between the eu and the uk over the arrangements — agreed as part of the brexit deal. earlier, the conservative party co—chair, oliver dowden, said the government would wait to see the eu plans in full,
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the political difficulty being created in northern ireland which come out from producing today are applied in northern ireland automatically and without any sort of process. and that is not a system which is going to be sustainable, thatis which is going to be sustainable, that is why we have set these governance arrangements need to change to bring them more in line with democratic norms elsewhere and it is why we need to find a solution that everybody in northern ireland can get behind and thinks represents their interests. let's speak to chris page our ireland correspondent. what are the hopes in northern ireland? ., ., , ., ., ireland? that would depend on what side of the coin _ ireland? that would depend on what side of the coin you _ ireland? that would depend on what side of the coin you are _ ireland? that would depend on what side of the coin you are on _ side of the coin you are on politically, but for businesses,
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what they really are saying more than anything else is they need a reduction in the number of checks coming on goods moving between the rest of the uk and northern ireland, particularly with christmas coming up, crucial season for so many firms and they are saying they need basic certainty and shown us that things will be running more smoothly. very strongly opposed to the northern ireland protocols saying as an economic barrier between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, some of it undermines northern ireland's place in the union and the economy away from london towards brussels and therefore, towards dublin. they will talk about businesses but also it is a bout for them, the symbolism of sovereignty and that means that an issue really has come to the fore, particularly in the last few days, though it has been in the mix
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beforehand and that is the rule of the european court ofjustice. rather technical it may sound, but the unionists, they don't want the european court ofjustice to be the final decider, have the final say on any of the disputes on how the protocol is run because to them, it will be the rule, lost fort northern ireland are set by the eu by an eu institution and of northern ireland is a full—fledged part of the uk, lost should be set by london and nowhere else. two other parties, nationalists across the parties like the alliance party which oppose brexit altogether, they say the protocol is the least worst option and unionists for example are exaggerating the day—to—day impact of the protocol and also that yes, there's a degree of disruption to businesses but no widespread impact on the day—to—day lives of consumers. so, the politics and remain complicated and businesses are hoping for more than anything
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else is simply the existing problems will be solved in the cheques will be reduced from britain northern ireland will be smooth as possible and the indications are that when we see the vice president take the news conference in brussels within the next half hour, the day is going to put the emphasis on practical solutions for businesses and there say they've been listening to businesses in northern ireland above all else and they will solve these problems for them rather than anybody else. problems for them rather than anybody else-— problems for them rather than an bod else. ., ~ , . i'm joined now by dr kathryn simpson, senior lecturer in european politics at manchester metropolitan university. welcome. as chris was saying and about 1015 minutes' time, where do to hear from the about 1015 minutes' time, where do to hearfrom the eu about 1015 minutes' time, where do to hear from the eu exactly what they're proposing but already the irish foreign minister has talking
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about this idea that most food coming from the northern ireland from britain is going to remain in northern ireland want to subject any cheques. how much of the concession is that by the eu? the cheques. how much of the concession is that by the eu?— is that by the eu? the interesting thins is that by the eu? the interesting thin . s are is that by the eu? the interesting things are going _ is that by the eu? the interesting things are going to _ is that by the eu? the interesting things are going to see _ is that by the eu? the interesting things are going to see in - is that by the eu? the interesting things are going to see in the last half an hourfrom things are going to see in the last half an hour from them things are going to see in the last half an hourfrom them is the eu commission is going to see for papers. customs and the role of northern ireland institution in business and how the protocol is going to be implemented and that is really a reflection of the time that he spent in september working with the devolved administration and the institutions but also businesses about how it's going to be impacted brussels is very conscious about the cycles with the solutions are and which will lead to the technical discussions which will take place in london as of tomorrow between lender
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and process for supper then going back to whether or not this is a big concession on brussels part, i think crossing the european union are not seeing it that way, think they're seeing it that way, think they're seeing it that way, think they're seeing it as a response to the practical day—to—day aspects of the implementation of the northern ireland and notes impacting the lives of people in northern ireland. how much of a redline for the eu will it be though to eliminate the role of the european court of justice in northern ireland, which is something that lloyd frost was very clear about? i is something that lloyd frost was very clear about?— very clear about? i think that is the real sticking _ very clear about? i think that is the real sticking point - very clear about? i think that is the real sticking point and - very clear about? i think that is the real sticking point and it. very clear about? i think that is i the real sticking point and it won't go away any time soon. a very solid red line for the european union and it was not mentioned in the papers that were going be presented from the eu commission and the eu have been strategic and not mentioning it at all and obviously as you said, they talked about this yesterday in they talked about this yesterday in the house of lords and it will be a
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big sticking point moving forward and i think vets are the technical discussions will have to come into play. to be interesting to see in the four papers and relation, i think in particular to customs because the role of the northern ireland institution in business. former advisers, ireland institution in business. formeradvisers, dominic ireland institution in business. former advisers, dominic cummings last couple of days saying that look, this is also where they were going to play it, they're just going to get the deal done and pick out the bits they did not like. how damaging to the trust between britain and the eu is that sort of comment?— britain and the eu is that sort of comment? , , ., , ., , comment? trust is really low between the uk and the — comment? trust is really low between the uk and the european _ comment? trust is really low between the uk and the european union - comment? trust is really low between the uk and the european union and i the uk and the european union and several member states as well the republic of ireland and dominic cummings comments have not been helpful in that instance. this is someone who obviously was key and central to the government and the key government advisers but no longer is. and i think that is the
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way downing street will want to play this. so, the trust is really lacking and i think if that is in negotiation strategy, several countries will be raised and trained to move forward in the practical decision making in the implementation of something that is sensitive as the northern ireland protocol going forward. if sensitive as the northern ireland protocol going forward.— protocol going forward. if they can't agree. — protocol going forward. if they can't agree, what _ protocol going forward. if they can't agree, what will- protocol going forward. if they can't agree, what will the - can't agree, what will the consequences be for one or both sides to trigger what is known as article 16 was much more them practical terms?— article 16 was much more them practical terms? basically that the uk would walk _ practical terms? basically that the uk would walk away _ practical terms? basically that the uk would walk away from - practical terms? basically that the uk would walk away from the - uk would walk away from the negotiators which is really alarming for those in brussels and eu members and also to negotiate the northern ireland protocol. this is something with the current government and at the helm of it, this is a reproduction of the backstop and the
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theresa may government of seven years ago. and to go down those lines and say that it's a possibility is alarming for the uk and also the european union and of course the neighbours as well. the consequences and the reaction as well for northern ireland would be substantial and this is the whole reason that we've had a backstop and an insurance policy and we have what is now known as the protocol of northern ireland and the republic of ireland. it's very difficult one and this is not an issue that is going away any time soon but i think patience is starting to waiver and really, the everyday lives of citizens want clarity on how things are starting to operate on a day—to—day basis are starting to operate on a day-to-day basis— are starting to operate on a day-to-day basis thank you very
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much. some breaking news in the past few minutes — the leicester east mp claudia webbe has been found guilty of harassment. westminster magistrate's court heard how she made made threatening phone calls to a woman because she was jealous of the woman's relationship with her partner. the trial heard ms webbe, who is an independent mp for leicester east after being suspended by the labour party, threatened to send naked pictures of michelle merritt to her family. care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs unfilled than before the pandemic, according to a leading industry body. the charity skills for care says the number of unfilled jobs fell at the start of the pandemic but rose this year as the economy opened up. they also said employers are finding it harder to keep existing staff. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she has recently returned home
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after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i'm finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies
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are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris owden runs this care company and also worked on hospital wards, helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard. can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes, people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news.
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hollywood actor william shatner has gone where no 90 year old man has gone before and travelled into space. shatner, who played captainjames t kirk in the star trek films and tv series, travelled at warp speed — with three other individuals aboard the blue origin sub—orbital capsule, a rocket developed by amazon founderjeff bezos. the blue origin craft launch was delayed by about fifty minutes due to high winds. those aboard got to experience a short period of weightlessness as they climbed to a maximum altitude, travelling above the internationally recognized boundary of space known as the karman linejust about 62 miles above earth. from there they were able to see the curvature of the earth through the capsule's big windows. mr shatner�*s trip on the rocket system lasted about 10 minutes — where i'm sure he would've had to kling—on. the crew capsule returned to the ground under parachutes.
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you can see its descent towards the texas desert and its landing which raised a cloud of dust. let's hear what william shatner had to say to jeff bozos after heading into space. what you have done, everybody in the world needs to do. everybody in the world needs to do. everybody in the world needs to see. it was unbelievable. i mean, the little things, just but to see the blue colour and was staring into the blackness, that is the thing. the covering of blue, the plaintiff,
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this comforter of blue that we have on earth, we think it's a blue sky and all of a sudden, you ripped the sheet off your looking at the blackness, and to black ugliness you look down and there is the blue down there in the black up there. it is just there is mother earth and comfort and is there death? i don't know? is that the way death is? look up know? is that the way death is? look up and it's gone. it was so moving. this experience is something unbelievable. our science correspondent, jonathan amos joins us now. how envious were you when you saw this's i was pretty, supportive, jealous. this's i was pretty, supportive, 'ealous. , .,
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jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because — jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he _ jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he is _ jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he is a _ jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he is a fan - jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he is a fan of- jealous. yet, will he gets a free trip because he is a fan of starl trip because he is a fan of star trek and this is where the heroes of his childhood. if you want to go, you'll have to pay a big price. it is very interesting to see shatner there. he was tears afterwards. you speak to astronauts who have been up there in the talk about the overview effect, this idea did when he looked on planet earth and they see the curvature of the planet, and this is the black of space in the blue of the black of space in the blue of the atmosphere, they talk about being changed. and he clearly got it. that is an example of it in fewer than 600 people have been where he has been. if you go back to 60 odd years ago, only 500 odd people have been above 100 km and now william shatner is one of them.
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and he really enjoyed it. i don't know whether or not will get a chance but we thought it was fabulous. if chance but we thought it was fabulous. ., ., , , ., fabulous. if more of us went up and saw how beautiful _ fabulous. if more of us went up and saw how beautiful our _ fabulous. if more of us went up and saw how beautiful our planet - fabulous. if more of us went up and saw how beautiful our planet is, - saw how beautiful our planet is, we would look after a little bit of the better but what is the future of these rocket trips that he has spent a good bit of money and advertisement on? it’s a good bit of money and advertisement on? �* , ., ., , advertisement on? it's going to be interestin: advertisement on? it's going to be interesting to _ advertisement on? it's going to be interesting to see _ advertisement on? it's going to be interesting to see and _ advertisement on? it's going to be interesting to see and of _ advertisement on? it's going to be interesting to see and of course, l advertisement on? it's going to be l interesting to see and of course, we had space tourism in the 2,000, some very wealthy people spent a week or so on the international space station and in that era space tourism ceased when the russians stopped selling seeds and the capsules. but it's getting going again and the reason why we may well see this one stick is because there are many more companies offering these kinds of trips and richard branson, elon musk and this goes
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above and beyond the atmosphere and comes down. you learn musk will send you there many times if you give them several tens of millions of dollars and it's probably more robust of space tourism now butjust have to wait and see. bier? have to wait and see. very enterprising, _ have to wait and see. very enterprising, you - have to wait and see. very enterprising, you might. have to wait and see. very l enterprising, you might say. have to wait and see. very enterprising, you might say. thank you very much. delayed reaction to that. this is the scene in brussels and will be hearing from the eu brexit chief negotiator. and easy for you to say. and we will be hearing the full proposals from how to make sure the northern ireland protocol doesn't fall apart. let's take a look at the weather forecast now and susan is here. all that's not what i was hoping to see. this is what many of us have been seeing. a lot of cloud piled up over the uk.
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the sun has a little bit of a glow in the glimmer but tomorrow again, it's going to be a battle for the sun to get through. tomorrow, for scotland there's a multiple change in our whether it will be much windier because the theory of low pressure is going to be trying to squeeze into the north of the uk. to the south, i'm afraid it's more of the south, i'm afraid it's more of the same, high—pressure will have a lot of fine weather and a lot of the looming over large overnight. by the end of the night, some showers in the wind will already start to strengthen up and this weather from proportion to the north on thursday, gales and some very wet weather for northern ireland and the west of scotland through the morning. elsewhere we should see some bright spots of sunshine and temperatures certainly cooler behind the rain for more than scotland just 13 and we could still see 16 or 17 and fingers crossed for a bit of sunshine further south.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. one of the uk's biggest toy retailers is warning delays at ports and issues with supply chains will mean shortages this christmas. most checks on food products moving between northern ireland and great britain will be scrapped under new eu proposals — according to the irish foreign minister — as the uk government pushes for changes. it is incumbent upon us as a government, i think it's incumbent upon the eu to make sure that we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. the leicester east mp claudia webbe has been found guilty of harassment. the trial heard she threatened to send naked pictures of a woman to her family. care homes in england are struggling to recruit staff and there are now more than a hundred thousand job vacancies.
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and star trek�*s william shatner — goes where no 90 year old has gone before — and blasts off into space. we are quite shameless this afternoon. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre... good evening... bournemouth and wales midfielder david brooks has announced he has cancer. he's released a statement on social media to say he has been diagnosed with stage two hodgkin lymphoma and will begin a course of treatment next week. brooks has played for bournemouth since 2018 and was part of the wales squad for euro 2020. his most recent game was in the championship at the end of september and he had withdrawn from the most recent wales squad through illness. this is the statement he's released this afternoon and part of it reads...
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he goes on to... bournemouth have tweeted themselves to say we're all behind you brooksy. an anti—racism campaign group has called for hungary to be banned from international football after their fans were once again involved in controversial scenes at a game against england. fifa have condemned the clashes between visiting fans and police during the world cup qualifier at wembley. a banner could be seen amongst the away fans prior to kick off in protest at england players taking the knee. shortly after fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police which authorities say began with racial abuse aimed at a steward. on the pitch. hungary scored first before john stones equalised. 1—1 draw hungary have already been ordered to play 2 home matches behind closed doors following the racism england players experienced there last month.
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we can't really allow the hungarian fan base to go unwatched regardless of whether playing whether it's in london on one doesn't think these are things happen at wembley any more. certainly not from away fans. yes, i think it's surprising that they effectively challenge the police and push them away. it's not something you see very often. it's not something you see very often. new watford manager claudio ranieri sez he's very confident the club can avoid relegation from the premier league. they're on seven points after seven games — enough to get the previous manager xisco munoz the sack but the former leicester boss says he's happy to be back in england — a week before he turns 70. ifi if i feel good, if i feel emotion i want to continue, that's it. football for me is my life and when i was young i think about play football and after make a manager. and now i have a lot of energy to
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get to my players and i want to continue. kenyan athlete agnes tirop has been found stabbed to death in her home in the country with her husband being treated as a suspect by police. tirop was a two—time world championship medallist finished fourth in the 5000 metres at the tokyo olympics and just last month set the world record for a women's only 10km road race in germany. athletics kenya say they are distraught at her untimely death. wales have called up 19—year—old uncapped exeter lock christ tshiunza for their autumn internationals. there is also a recall for wasps flanker thomas young who became eligible after he announced he willjoin cardiff. young was named in wayne pivac�*s squad despite playing outside of wales for the rest of this season. he's given special dispensation to avoid the welsh rugby union's 60—cap rule. wales play new zealand, south africa, fiji and argentina in the coming weeks. scotland have selected south africa—born sharks back—row
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dylan richardson for a two—day training camp before theirfirst autumn international. the 22—year—old has spent his entire career at the durban—based franchise, but qualifies for scotland through his father. ronnie o' sullivan admitted being bored in his last match at the northern ireland open. hopefully the rocket�*s victory over alfie burden today will have offered some stimulation. o'sullivan won by 4 frames to 1 to reach the last 16 in belfast. he's only dropped 2 frames this week. i absolutely guarantee a pledge of excitement whenjohn i absolutely guarantee a pledge of excitement when john watson will bring you sports. that's it for me. we are never bored in our work. short courses in science and technology are to be offered to up to 4—thousand adults in england who are already in work. the government says the courses will meet the needs of employers, and are part of the overall plan to increase skills and improve flexibility in the workplace.
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its part of a wider programme of educational reform, which includes removing some b—techs in favour of new technical qualifications called 't—levels'. our education editor branwen jeffreys reports level six in here... ministers want to build a new approach to skills in england. and michelle donelan is in charge of making it work. this building is being turned into swindon's institute of technology. short courses in science or technology will be on offer, top up for adults already in work. we know that people do four or five jobs in one lifetime nowadays. and there are jobs that will be around in a year's time that potentially are not there today. so we need an education system that is flexible and nimble and can cope with that. and enable people to progress in their careers. if i could ask you to put your bed at a 30 degrees angle... but this is a far bigger change. some of the first t level students studying health care
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hands—on at college. their one t level the equivalent of three a—levels. let's cross to brussels where maros sefcovic is speaking. regarding the northern ireland protocols. regarding the northern ireland -rotocols. �* , regarding the northern ireland rotocols. �* , ., ., , protocols. i'm truly glad to be here for what _ protocols. i'm truly glad to be here for what i _ protocols. i'm truly glad to be here for what i believe is - protocols. i'm truly glad to be here for what i believe is an - here for what i believe is an important moment in our eu — uk relations. today the european commission has proposed a robust package of creative, practical solutions to designed to have the northern ireland deal with the consequences of brexit while further benefiting from the protocol on ireland and northern ireland. if i were to label this proper solution i would dove them the package of opportunity. this is in fact our
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core purpose. the eu has an unwavering commitment to the people of northern ireland. and for this reason the implementation of the protocol which brings about unique advantages of dual access to both the uk and eu markets. ultimately our number one priority remains to ensure that the hard—earned gains of the good friday and belfast agreement, i'm talking about peace and stability are protected while avoiding a hard border on the island of ireland and maintaining the integrity of the eu single market. before i walk you through the details let me underline that today's package has the potential to make real, tangible difference on the ground. the reason why i am so confident is simple, we have
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listened to and engage with and heard northern irish stakeholders. from political leaders to businesses at a cross—section of civic society. and our probable solution are direct, genuine concerns they have raised. we have put a lot of hard work into this package, explored every possible angle of the protocol and at times went beyond current eu law. in effect, we are proposing in alternative model for implementation of the protocol. on the one hand, the flow of goods between eu uk and know that i will stay in northern ireland. on the other robust safeguards and monitoring mechanism should be put in place to make sure that they stay in northern ireland.
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now turning to our first proposal on medicines. you may recall that during my visit to belfast in september i said that for my part i would do whatever it takes to guarantee the uninterrupted, long—term supply of medicines from great britain to northern ireland. and indeed we have completely turned our rules upside down and inside out to find a solid solution to an outstanding challenge. that involves ceu changing its own rules on medicines. in practice british wholesalers of medicines will be able to continue supplying northern ireland from the current location in great britain. they will not need to relocate infrastructure including
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testing facilities or regulatory factions to northern ireland or the european union. this means for instance that great britain can continue acting as a hub for supply of medicines for northern ireland even though it is now a third country. we are ready to put forward a legislative proposal to this end. turning to the second part of our package, the area of public, plant and animal health and the movement of sanitary and sanitary goods from great britain to northern ireland. we are talking a bout a significant range of retail goods that would be for sale to end consumers in the northern ireland only. these would benefit from both simplified certification and an approximately 80% reduction of checks and controls
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required today. let me illustrate what this means. imagine you are a northern irish business importing products of animal origin like yoghurt, cheese or chicken from great britain. more than 80% of the identity and physical checks required will now be removed. this will significantly ease the process for bringing food supplies from great britain to northern ireland. similarly, a lorry transporting different food products like dairy, meat, fish, fruits and vegetables from great britain to supermarkets in northern ireland, dalejust now need one certificate stating all goods of different types class or description meet the requirement of eu legislation. so if you are transporting 100 different food
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products only one certificate is neededin products only one certificate is needed in stead of 100. for all this to work in practice however, the uk government needs to do its part. for example by ensuring that border control posts are up and running as agreed a long time ago. we also need specific safeguards in place like clear labels and ability to monitor every leg of the supply chain. we are showing great flexibility of the remaining controls must be done properly. i believe and it's understandable that in this way we want to protect the integrity of our eu single market. we are similarly ambitious in a third part of our package concerning the customs area. here we propose to expand to the scope of the existing scheme on
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goods not at risk of entering the eu single market to provide the businesses and products. for example, more small and medium—size enterprises could benefit from this scheme while goods covered by this scheme while goods covered by this scheme are free of customs duties because they stay in northern ireland. we also propose to cut in half customs formalities and processes that are required today for these goods. for instance, in two a northern irish car dealer ordering car parts from great britain will only need to provide basic information to the customs authorities such as the invoice value of the part putting the parties of the transaction. once again up to 50% of the current formalities will be removed. this is possible if the right safeguards are put in place ranging from better
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market surveillance to a termination clause. combined with our proposed solution in the area of sanitary and vito started terry rules this will create a type of express lane lastly facilitating the movement of the goods from great britain to northern ireland. and lastly, in response to a clear and strong demand on the ground we are proposing ways to enhance participation of northern ireland authorities and stakeholders in the implementation of protocol while fully respecting the uk constitutional order. our proposed solution aim to improve the exchange of information by establishing structured dialogue between various stakeholders and the european commission. northern irish stakeholders will be invited to attend meetings of specialised
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committees and we also aim to create a strong link between northern ireland assembly and the eu uk parliamentary partnership assembly. before i conclude let me reiterate that this robust package of practical imaginative solutions we can continue to implement the protocol on ireland, northern ireland for the benefit of all communities on the ground. it not only cements stability and predictability in this principal ingredient for the local economy to flourish, also paves the way for enhance opportunities. when i visited northern ireland in september i met it's resilient business community and civic society. i heard about potential investors from united states, canada, came to take advantage of northern ireland's unique position
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and provided there is clarity on how things will work first. earlier today i presented the package of in—house opportunities to our member states and the european parliament. we continue to stand united behind northern ireland while at the same time remaining determined to protect our internal market. now i invite the uk government to engage with us earnestly and intensively on all our proposals. with them and i am convinced we can be in the home stretch when it comes to the protocol. it is my hope that in the coming weeks we willjointly arrive at an agreed solution that northern ireland truly deserves. thank you. thank you very much vice president. we will_ thank you very much vice president. we will take — thank you very much vice president. we will take a few questions. adam,
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please _ we will take a few questions. adam, lease. . ~ we will take a few questions. adam, lease. ., ~' ,, , we will take a few questions. adam, lease. ., ~ i. , . please. thank you very much in deed for the presentation. _ please. thank you very much in deed for the presentation. you've - for the presentation. you've obviousiy— for the presentation. you've obviously heard _ for the presentation. you've obviously heard the - for the presentation. you've obviously heard the speechl for the presentation. you've - obviously heard the speech from lord frost yesterday _ obviously heard the speech from lord frost yesterday. and _ obviously heard the speech from lord frost yesterday. and you _ obviously heard the speech from lord frost yesterday. and you heard - obviously heard the speech from lord frost yesterday. and you heard his i frost yesterday. and you heard his absolute _ frost yesterday. and you heard his absolute determination _ frost yesterday. and you heard his absolute determination not- frost yesterday. and you heard his absolute determination not to - frost yesterday. and you heard his absolute determination not to sign up absolute determination not to sign up to— absolute determination not to sign up to a _ absolute determination not to sign up to a protocol— absolute determination not to sign up to a protocol that _ absolute determination not to sign up to a protocol that includes - absolute determination not to sign up to a protocol that includes the i up to a protocol that includes the european — up to a protocol that includes the euronean court _ up to a protocol that includes the european court of _ up to a protocol that includes the european court ofjustice. - up to a protocol that includes the european court ofjustice. is - up to a protocol that includes the european court ofjustice. is that| up to a protocol that includes the i european court ofjustice. is that a red line _ european court ofjustice. is that a red line for— european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you _ european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you as— european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you as much— european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you as much as - european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you as much as it- european court ofjustice. is that a red line for you as much as it is- red line for you as much as it is for him? — red line for you as much as it is for him? also— red line for you as much as it is for him? also carry— red line for you as much as it is for him? also carry outs, - red line for you as much as it is for him? also carry outs, whatl for him? also carry outs, what preparations— for him? also carry outs, what preparations have _ for him? also carry outs, what preparations have you - for him? also carry outs, what . preparations have you suggested for him? also carry outs, what - preparations have you suggested if you do— preparations have you suggested if you do have — preparations have you suggested if you do have to— preparations have you suggested if you do have to trade _ preparations have you suggested if you do have to trade up— preparations have you suggested if you do have to trade up to - preparations have you suggested if you do have to trade up to that - you do have to trade up to that trigger— you do have to trade up to that trigger article _ you do have to trade up to that trigger article 16? _ you do have to trade up to that trigger article 16?— you do have to trade up to that trigger article 16? thank you very much for that _ trigger article 16? thank you very much for that question. _ trigger article 16? thank you very much for that question. i - trigger article 16? thank you very much for that question. i think i trigger article 16? thank you very i much for that question. i think what is our aim today, to stay on positive note. tuesday on all benefits which this package ? to
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stay. the dual market access is offering two northern island. i believe we represented today in appealing picture that we would really focus all our constructive and creative energy how to make this as good as possible. for the people and businesses in northern ireland. so i want to focus on the positive agenda, i want to focus on the solutions and i hope that lord frost willjoin me in that effort.— willjoin me in that effort. thank ou. the willjoin me in that effort. thank you. the measures _ willjoin me in that effort. thank you. the measures on _ willjoin me in that effort. thank you. the measures on sps - willjoin me in that effort. thank. you. the measures on sps customs willjoin me in that effort. thank- you. the measures on sps customs and even actuaiiy _ you. the measures on sps customs and even actuaiiy on — you. the measures on sps customs and even actually on medicines _ you. the measures on sps customs and even actually on medicines seem - you. the measures on sps customs and even actually on medicines seem to - even actually on medicines seem to id even actually on medicines seem to go some _ even actually on medicines seem to go some way— even actually on medicines seem to go some way to _ even actually on medicines seem to go some way to creating _ even actually on medicines seem to go some way to creating almost - go some way to creating almost a dual regulatory— go some way to creating almost a dual regulatory system _ go some way to creating almost a dual regulatory system in - go some way to creating almost a l dual regulatory system in northern ireiand _ dual regulatory system in northern ireiand for—
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dual regulatory system in northern ireland for goods _ dual regulatory system in northern ireland for goods coming - dual regulatory system in northern ireland for goods coming from - dual regulatory system in northern ireland for goods coming from the | ireland for goods coming from the uk, that— ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems_ ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems to _ ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems to be _ ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems to be in _ ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems to be in terms - ireland for goods coming from the uk, that seems to be in terms ofl uk, that seems to be in terms of express— uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane _ uk, that seems to be in terms of exuress lane at _ uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane at all— uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane at all the _ uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane at all the rest - uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane at all the rest of. uk, that seems to be in terms of express lane at all the rest of it. | express lane at all the rest of it. could _ express lane at all the rest of it. could you — express lane at all the rest of it. could you address _ express lane at all the rest of it. could you address that - express lane at all the rest of it. could you address that you - express lane at all the rest of it. i could you address that you yourself talked _ could you address that you yourself talked about — could you address that you yourself talked about in _ could you address that you yourself talked about in alternative - could you address that you yourself talked about in alternative model. talked about in alternative model for the _ talked about in alternative model for the protocol— talked about in alternative model for the protocol that _ talked about in alternative model for the protocol that seems - talked about in alternative model for the protocol that seems to i talked about in alternative model for the protocol that seems to be talked about in alternative model. for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you _ for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you seem — for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you seem to _ for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you seem to be _ for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you seem to be prepared - for the protocol that seems to be a? yet you seem to be prepared to - for the protocol that seems to be a? j yet you seem to be prepared to take a risk— yet you seem to be prepared to take a risk with— yet you seem to be prepared to take a risk with cumberland _ yet you seem to be prepared to take a risk with cumberland sausages - yet you seem to be prepared to take a risk with cumberland sausages butj a risk with cumberland sausages but you're _ a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not— a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not prepared _ a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not prepared to— a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not prepared to take - a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not prepared to take a - a risk with cumberland sausages but you're not prepared to take a risk. you're not prepared to take a risk with peopie's_ you're not prepared to take a risk with people's dogs _ you're not prepared to take a risk with people's dogs and _ you're not prepared to take a risk with people's dogs and cats. - you're not prepared to take a risk. with people's dogs and cats. why is it that _ with people's dogs and cats. why is it that you _ with people's dogs and cats. why is it that you still— with people's dogs and cats. why is it that you still see _ with people's dogs and cats. why is it that you still see passports - with people's dogs and cats. why is it that you still see passports as - it that you still see passports as being _ it that you still see passports as being too— it that you still see passports as being too risky _ it that you still see passports as being too risky even _ it that you still see passports as being too risky even though - it that you still see passports as i being too risky even though there hasn't _ being too risky even though there hasn't been — being too risky even though there hasn't been a _ being too risky even though there hasn't been a case _ being too risky even though there hasn't been a case of— being too risky even though there hasn't been a case of rabies - being too risky even though there hasn't been a case of rabies in - hasn't been a case of rabies in mainland _ hasn't been a case of rabies in mainland britain _ hasn't been a case of rabies in mainland britain since - hasn't been a case of rabies in mainland britain since 1922? l hasn't been a case of rabies in mainland britain since 1922? thank ou ve mainland britain since 1922? thank you very much _ mainland britain since 1922? thank you very much for _ mainland britain since 1922? thank you very much for the _ mainland britain since 1922? thank you very much for the question. . mainland britain since 1922? thank you very much for the question. i l you very much for the question. i think that here again very clearly i have to say that the proposals that they put on the package to a great extent in six to eight inspired by northern island and brexit working rule so the package as you have heard from me was very much inspired
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by the very concrete challenges and issues i heard most frequently in northern ireland. and the issue of cumberland sausages was one of them. so we clearly address it even though as you know, this is not allowed in the eu to have this type of imports from the third countries was up here we are again making enormous effort for the northern ireland only solution. that of course what you would like to see here is public health as properly protected and therefore we would require as we agreed some time ago for this time of protections you have specific export health certificate. the gums to the transport of the live animals
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here i would refer you to the sets of measures presented by the end of june where we come up with quite significant suggestions how to address this issue including tagging, re— tagging or the proposals for the assistance guiding dogs. proposals for the assistance guiding do . s. �* proposals for the assistance guiding dos. �* ., ., ., dogs. chief brexit negotiator settin: dogs. chief brexit negotiator setting out — dogs. chief brexit negotiator setting out the _ dogs. chief brexit negotiator setting out the proposals - dogs. chief brexit negotiator setting out the proposals on| dogs. chief brexit negotiator - setting out the proposals on how to ensure there are fewer aborted checks on goods moving between britain and northern ireland covering foods in retail products as well. in return to protect the integrity of the single market he said the eu would want to see the uk put in permanent birder that border controls which are long overdue. get those posts up and running he says, everything needs to be labelled and they want to be able to monitor
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where goods are going to. more nap throughout the evening here on the evening news. outside for look at the weather susan. good evening if you seen some decent glimpses of the sun today you are done pretty well. much of the uk, the skies were cloudy and is going to be plenty of that cloud sticking around tomorrow to do. one change in our story it will be strengthening wins for scotland. the big area of high pressure stays to the south of the uk but this flow starts to squeeze into the north and that will mean our wins across scotland start to strengthen put up even as we head into the small hours of thursday. some showers feeding into western scotland as well on the strengthening breeze. elsewhere light winds especially to the south of the uk, enough cloud a round keep our temperatures up to the higher end of single figures, double figures and a few small two spots. for scotland as this weather front start to put into the north through thursday morning we could be talking about gales for the normal hours and through much of the day at times the
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winds could gust up to 40mph. stronger winds will work their way south along with the band of rain. come the afternoon i think we will see that ranges fringe and into glascow perhaps for the end of school for the evening rush hour. that band of rain marks a boundary between relatively milder to the south of the uk and much colder air that will sweep across as for friday. perhaps not getting into the far southwest. elsewhere it will look brighter, more sanch i may give the impression that it should feel warmer but actually with a northerly breeze and moving into it will feel considerably cooler. chapters across scotland perhaps eight to ten at best. similarto scotland perhaps eight to ten at best. similar to the figures that many will see overnight. further south 1a, perhaps 15 with a mild air clings on. clear skies and that cold air around overnight friday will set us up for a patchy frost to start us off on saturday particularly across central and eastern areas of the uk. but coming
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in towards the western area of cloud and rain will mean a milder start here but a grayer day on saturday with some rain particularly for northern ireland and the northwest of england some showers down towards the southwest. today it looks like the southwest. today it looks like the rain will be a way to the east, we should see a drier day, i brighter day on early morning mist orfog clears and brighter day on early morning mist or fog clears and with the strengthening wind at the moment it also looks like it will be a warmer day.
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at six — plan ahead for christmas, says a shipping boss, amid delays at the uk's ports. a shortage of hgv drivers means around 50,000 containers are still waiting to be collected at felixstowe, the uk's biggest commercial port. retailers are warning it will have a knock—on effect on their shelves. we will still have toys to sell, but if you're looking for choice, don't expect to come in in december and see what you would normally experience in a toy store. but the government says they are confident people will be able to get their toys for christmas. also tonight... the eu sets out its plans to try to resolve disagreements over post—brexit trading arrangements in northern ireland. will it be enough?
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