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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines: eu officials will set out proposals later to reduce checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, as the trade row with the government continues. it is incumbent upon us and the eu to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. fears about the impact on christmas, as the biggest commercial port in britain deals with a backlog of shipping containers. a potentially tricky laser treatment designed to help menopause is no better than fake therapy according to a new trial. captain kirk heads for the final frontier as william shatner prepares to blast off on a trip to the edge of space, becoming the oldest person
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to boldly go where no man has gone before. the korean tv series squid game has become the biggest ever series launch from netflix, knocking steamy period drama bridgerton off the top spot. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. it's caused problems since day one of the brexit process and now eu officials are on their way to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving from great britain to northern ireland. a fresh row has broken out between the eu and the uk over the arrangements agreed as part of the brexit deal which cover those checks. earlier, the conservative party co—chair, oliver dowden, said the government would wait to see the eu plans in full, but it would "engage fully
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and constructively" on the matter. our brussels correspondent jess parkerjoins me now. —— reports. this man, if you do not know him yet, you may well soon — maros sefcovic, recently visiting queen's university in belfast. he is in charge of drawing up the eu's answer for trying to sort out this — checks on goods arriving in northern ireland from great britain. while some post—brexit controls have been delayed, business hit by changes are looking for long—term solutions. if we can see a situation that is workable, yes, we will leap in there with both feet and relish the opportunity, but at the moment, my suspicion is the can will be kicked down the road further and there will be a lack of clarity and, you know, as a business you need to have crystal clarity. it is understood the european commission will look to offer what they see as a significant cut to checks and customs procedures to ensure the free flow of medicines
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and allow the continued import of certain chilled meats such as sausages to smooth supermarket supply chains. this looks like a pretty major proposal from the eu and we have to remember that the eu is a very large single market, 27 states, it has a common external border to the rest of the world, so it cannot simply abandon all its own rules or punch a hole in its own borders. it has taken months to get here and eu member states see it as a big offer, but some question the uk approach. what kind of partnership is it with someone who says yes and then says no? we need to have trust. we need to build something. we need to provide citizens, businesses with visibility, predictability, so that they can rely on the political decision—makers.
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he is the one in charge of the uk's efforts to change the protocol. lord frost once in a more radical overhaul of the arrangements lord frost wants a more radical overhaul of the arrangements governing northern ireland. downing street believes that by going further now, you solve problems down the line. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get a stable footing. this place will not propose changing how the treaty is policed, a key uk demand. the eu wants to work within the framework of an agreement that both sides signed up to. jessica parker, bbc news. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is here. remember in 2019, get brexit done, said the government. it was done, they said four months and months, it is all done, now it has not done it?
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the british government has two arguments, david frost, the backset administer, set effectively the eu held a gun to the uk's head and it was them selling to a deal they did not want to do is to which point the eu would say there was no gun and if anything it was pointing at your own head because he was so desperate to get it done to a certain timetable. the other argument he uses is in the real world it has ended up much harder to operate than expected. does the future of the eu uk relationship rely on the situation of the plate of sausages in belfast? lauder frost would say it does because he is held at the prospect of a much rosierfuture relationship if they can get over this large hurdle of the protocol, but what we are waiting for in the next few hours, probably three or four hours, is there the man who looks after brexit issues for the eu, to reveal that there is a pile of papers they are proposing which will see the
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details ofjust how far the eu is prepared to move and we think it will be on things like reducing the number of customs checks on goods, reducing the number of attacks on plants, animal and food product in a big way and also trying to find a workaround so that yes, sausages can continue to travel across the irish sea because in theory, in a few months�* time, they should be banned. you have covered quite a lot of eu deadlines over the last four or five years, are we at high noon yet or high at 11 o�*clock? years, are we at high noon yet or high at 11 o'clock?— years, are we at high noon yet or high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done _ high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done is _ high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done is get _ high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done is get rid _ high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done is get rid of - high at 11 o'clock? what they have cleverly done is get rid of the - cleverly done is get rid of the concept of a deadline altogether because up until a few months ago, there were these grace periods where there were these grace periods where the full set of rules did not kick in until a the full set of rules did not kick in untila certain the full set of rules did not kick in until a certain point later this year. over the summer they managed to negotiate a standstill arrangement where those deadlines disappeared, so our old friends the cliff edge is nowhere to be seen. what will we talk about if there is no deadline to say only two days to go? ida no deadline to say only two days to io? ., ., no deadline to say only two days to no? ., ., , , go? no deadline but there will be negotiations. _ go? no deadline but there will be negotiations. the _ go? no deadline but there will be negotiations. the british - go? no deadline but there will be negotiations. the british side - go? no deadline but there will be negotiations. the british side are | negotiations. the british side are working on it, still have a
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timetable, they will take a couple of weeks negotiating quite intensely with the eu and the next flash point will probably be middle of november. jessica parker told us all to look out for maros sefcovic, what we know about him? he out for maros sefcovic, what we know about him? , ., , ., about him? he is an eu insider, a bit more pragmatic— about him? he is an eu insider, a bit more pragmatic than - about him? he is an eu insider, a bit more pragmatic than michel. bit more pragmatic than michel barnier, who did the backset negotiations.— barnier, who did the backset negotiations. who spoke about eve da negotiations. who spoke about everyday pretty _ negotiations. who spoke about everyday pretty much. - negotiations. who spoke about everyday pretty much. he - negotiations. who spoke about everyday pretty much. he has. negotiations. who spoke about i everyday pretty much. he has had negotiations. who spoke about - everyday pretty much. he has had to stand u- everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to — everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the _ everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the french _ everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the french a _ everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the french a bit - everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the french a bit to - everyday pretty much. he has had to stand up to the french a bit to get i stand up to the french a bit to get these proposals on the table because these proposals on the table because the french are the ones who are the real sticklers with the rules. i think he has successfully convinced them that it is time to move. what is interesting about this is the european commission has listened to people in northern ireland, with the businesses, politicians, and they are realising there is a problem with this deal they signed with the uk back in 2019. up until now they said there is not really a problem, now they are admitting there is and
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moving as a result. the uk would say far too late, but better late than never may be?— far too late, but better late than never may be? joining me now is glyn roberts who is the chief executive of retail northern ireland. thank you so much forjoining us. what is your response to the fact the eu is going to make some proposals? the eu is going to make some mammals?— the eu is going to make some --roosals? ., ,, i. ., ., proposals? thank you for having me. i think it is good _ proposals? thank you for having me. i think it is good to _ proposals? thank you for having me. i think it is good to see _ proposals? thank you for having me. i think it is good to see both - proposals? thank you for having me. i think it is good to see both the - i think it is good to see both the uk government and the eu bringing forward solutions, new ideas and new thinking and i think that is always what we wanted them to do. instead of focusing on the problem, we are now focusing on what the solution is. we obviously are looking in detail to the proposals tabled by a lord frost and obviously we will study in detail what the european commission will put forward later on today. commission will put forward later on toda . ~ . , commission will put forward later on toda. ., ., commission will put forward later on toda .~ ., , ., ., ., today. what is solution made for ou? i today. what is solution made for you? i think _ today. what is solution made for you? i think first _
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today. what is solution made for you? i think first and _ today. what is solution made for you? i think first and foremost i today. what is solution made for you? i think first and foremost iti you? i think first and foremost it is reducing _ you? i think first and foremost it is reducing checks _ you? i think first and foremost it is reducing checks and _ you? i think first and foremost it i is reducing checks and inspections. it is not about kicking the can down the road again, about every few months in a crisis mode, it is about ensuring we get stability, security and certainty. that is what the business community in northern ireland once, that we are able to have unfettered access between east, west, north, south and ensuring that many businesses cannot continue to have the access to the eu single market for stock —— can continue. if the political will is that we can do a deal. , ., ., , ., ., a deal. there is an example i had of a deal. there is an example i had of a erson a deal. there is an example i had of a person in — a deal. there is an example i had of a person in northern _ a deal. there is an example i had of a person in northern ireland - a deal. there is an example i had of a person in northern ireland who i a person in northern ireland who wants to buy a sofa, they click on the website of a safer company based in britain by the end of the process the website now says we do not ship to northern ireland. that shopper now goes to buy a sofa in the republic of ireland because there is no border. the republic and the north are building closer economic ties shopper by shopper, do closer political ties then follow?
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ultimately, what does success look like? it is helping and ensuring that hard—working families can continue to access products and also making sure that they can get the full access to the full range of products and also making sure they are not paying more for theirfood. so it is crucially important that this has to work notjust for business, but the government, but for ordinary hard—working families and i do not think any consumer should be at any disadvantage at all. we need that unfettered access, we need to ensure products can come north, south, east, west, that is absolutely critical that we get that as part of the solution. as i said, i think it is good we are now seeing greater focus i think it is good we are now seeing greaterfocus on i think it is good we are now seeing greater focus on the solutions, closely engaging with the commission, european the uk government, the irish government, pooling ideas and suggestions and i am pleased to see and certainly i think many of those ideas have been taken up by the uk government and
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the european commission. is taken up by the uk government and the european commission.- the european commission. is this 'ust the european commission. is this just tinkering _ the european commission. is this just tinkering around _ the european commission. is this just tinkering around the - the european commission. is this just tinkering around the edges i just tinkering around the edges though? i just tinkering around the edges thou~h? ., , just tinkering around the edges thou~h? .,, ., just tinkering around the edges thou~h? ., , , ., though? i hope not, because we do need that long-term _ though? i hope not, because we do need that long-term stability. - though? i hope not, because we do need that long-term stability. no l need that long—term stability. no more canet kicking down the road. we still have a pandemic to recover from and there is huge shock to the economic system so we need to make sure we get issues around the protocol addressed, just come pensively, and also nowt so we can focus on the recovery, because that is what we need to be doing, not endlessly trying to fight backset battles. ——just endlessly trying to fight backset battles. —— just comprehensively. we hope that they lead to a deal and those talks that take place in november will lead to success. {iii november will lead to success. of course you say you hope for a deal, but some people watching may say thatis but some people watching may say that is ideal, it already exists, part of the backset process and that is something people have to adapt to. �* , , ,
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to. -- brexit process. the difficulties _ to. -- brexit process. the difficulties with _ to. -- brexit process. the difficulties with the - to. -- brexit process. the l difficulties with the protocol to. -- brexit process. the - difficulties with the protocol with the members who have difficulty receiving products from their gb —based home sales and that is simply unacceptable. we need to measure we have deal that benefits businesses, notjust have deal that benefits businesses, not just the large have deal that benefits businesses, notjust the large market have deal that benefits businesses, not just the large market for local independent retailers that we represent in northern ireland. many of them are experiencing difficulties around receiving a certain product. we have to make sure that is fixed. we need to ensure that we have that unfettered access between gb and ni, north and south, as well as keeping that all—important access to the eu single market and i hope longer term we can develop a vision for northern ireland which is the gateway to the european union, as well as being very internationally focused recently and i think it�*s something you give to the wider world. so i am optimistic that if there is
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political will we can move on from this difficult situation.— this difficult situation. thank you so much. the uk�*s largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. the port of felixstowe, which handles over a third of the uk�*s freight container traffic, blamed haulage driver shortages. but officials say the situation is improving. megan patterson reports. packed up and are backed up. normally containers would pass through here into a three days in felixstowe, but now it is taking more than a week. this is the uk�*s largest commercial port and a back locking are likely to have an impact in december. locking are likely to have an impact in decemi>er-_ in december. food i think will continue to — in december. food i think will continue to move, _ in december. food i think will continue to move, pigs - in december. food i think will continue to move, pigs in - in december. food i think will- continue to move, pigs in blankets, turkeys, the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom which will sustain us more than happily, but toys, electrical goods, white goods...
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happily, but toys, electrical goods, white goods- - -_ white goods... more than the uk's third is handled _ white goods... more than the uk's third is handled at _ white goods... more than the uk's third is handled at the _ white goods... more than the uk's third is handled at the felixstowe. | third is handled at the felixstowe. big ships are being directed away from the port tear elsewhere at europe. this is in an attempt to ease supply chain pressure. adam�*s haulage business moves 100 containers a day, but a lack of space at felixstowe means his drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead.- drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog _ to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog of _ to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries - massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things and hasjust all brexit and a number of other things and has just all created a perfect storm. and has 'ust all created a perfect storm. . , , and has 'ust all created a perfect storm. ., , , ., ., ,, storm. that this is a global issue with similar _ storm. that this is a global issue with similar situations _ storm. that this is a global issue with similar situations in - storm. that this is a global issue with similar situations in ports i with similar situations in ports across the us, china and east asia too. problems first began to merge here injuly when officials say too. problems first began to merge here in july when officials say the situation in felixstowe has improved in the last few days. i am situation in felixstowe has improved in the last few days.— in the last few days. i am pretty confident in _ in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the _ in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability - in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of- in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our. confident in the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the _ colleagues to deliver on time and for the supply chains and retailers
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to work_ for the supply chains and retailers to work through some very sophisticated logistics planning to prioritise — sophisticated logistics planning to prioritise the right goods to get to us on _ prioritise the right goods to get to us on time — prioritise the right goods to get to us on time for stop the government says it _ us on time for stop the government says it is _ us on time for stop the government says it is working to increase the uk's _ says it is working to increase the uk's hgv — says it is working to increase the uk's hgv driver capacity, but resolution before christmas seems unlikel to resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be _ resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be fully _ resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be fully delivered. - peter wilson, managing director of shipping agency cory brothers told us about the difficulties they have been facing. the hgv driver situation is extreme difficult in the united kingdom and the shortage is clear. we are seeing significant delays in getting the boxes into this at centres and then getting them out to stores. what we have seen is for the importers in particular with the build—up to christmas is that they have been early, getting boxes in now rather than early november, so that we have time to distribute what we need to stores. i will be very honest, we will not have the overall choice that we had in store, but we will
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not see empty shelves. this will be around the christmas toys, clothing, gifts and the christmas sort of present experience if you like. food i think will continue to move, pigs in blankets, turkeys, the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain as more than happily, but yes, toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in, but importers are working on this and have brought boxes early so we cannot wear this storm and it is a storm. —— can weather this storm. the headlines on bbc news... officials from the uk and eu are to meet in london this afternoon to discuss cutting checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. shoppers are being warned to plan ahead for christmas, as supply chain issues lead to a backlog of shipping
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containers at britain�*s biggest commercial port. the countdown is on, as the man who played star trek�*s captain kirk, william shatner, prepares to blast off on a trip to the edge of space in the next hour. the uk economy grew by 0.4% in august, as the lifting of coronavirus restrictions boosted leisure events and demand for hospitality. but the latest data showed further signs of a slowdown in the recovery, as global supply chain woes take their toll. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity explained how this level of growth compares with normal trends. if you�*re talking about before the pandemic, then it is really good growth. 0.4% in a month that translates to four or 5% over the year. that would be faster growth than we have had for decades, outside of the pounds back from the pandemic, but we had remember, these are exceptional circumstances. if you look at what is happening, what has happened to the economy over the last 18 months. we have a chance here you can look at. you can see it is like a precipitous roller—coaster, write only the
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beginning with the lockdown of suppressing economic activity and then right back up, but now you can see it has levelled off and we are not quite back up to the level we were pandemic stop and in fact, if you look at the figure forjuly, the revised figure, it shows the economy shrank slightly injuly, said about some slight signs that this recovery is not as fast as the bank of england anticipated when it said there would be great of a 7% this year and a big there would be great of a 7% this yearand a big part there would be great of a 7% this year and a big part of the reason is what you have already been talking about, namely shortages and supply bottlenecks. the shortages mean that in industries like construction, there are plenty of orders in, but they cannot actually meet those orders. in some cases they are turning away orders because they do not have the materials in some cases the skilled labour to meet those orders. care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs left unfilled than before the pandemic. the charity skills for care says the number of vacant posts fell at the start of the pandemic but rose this year as
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the economy opened up. they also said employers are finding it harder to keep existing staff. 0ur social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she has recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i�*m finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more
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people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today�*s report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris 0wden runs this care company and also worked on hospital wards, helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down eight new patients a day because we don�*t have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard. can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes, people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns
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and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news. let�*s speak to jane townson, chief executive officer at homecare association, the uk�*s membership body for homecare providers. she�*s in birmingham. how are staffing levels with your members? everybody is really struggling to recruit. home demand has increased substantially over the last year and state funded home care possibly 10% increase in the body of ours purchased by councils and for people paying for their own care, 20 to 30% growth in request, so against that backdrop, we are also experiencing more staff are leaving than anyone can remember.- experiencing more staff are leaving than anyone can remember. caring is clearl a than anyone can remember. caring is clearly a rewarding _ than anyone can remember. caring is clearly a rewarding job. _ than anyone can remember. caring is clearly a rewarding job. so _ than anyone can remember. caring is clearly a rewarding job. so many - than anyone can remember. caring is clearly a rewarding job. so many of i clearly a rewarding job. so many of us know a carer who has held hands with a member of our family in that
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family member�*s final days, but it is also tough. it is not particularly well paid. how would you recommend to people? i particularly well paid. how would you recommend to people? i think it is one of the — you recommend to people? i think it is one of the few _ you recommend to people? i think it is one of the few roles _ you recommend to people? i think it is one of the few roles that - you recommend to people? i think it is one of the few roles that enables. is one of the few roles that enables you to really make a difference to people�*s lives and quite often that people�*s lives and quite often that people do leave care, go into retail and come back, because nowhere else do they gain that sense of really making a difference. but that is not an excuse not to barely recognise and reward the skill and experience thatis and reward the skill and experience that is required for these roles. these are notjust about making cups of tea. people nowadays received state funded home care only if they have a quite advanced health care needs, and so our care workers are providing end—of—life care, they are supporting people that have feeding tubes, that need a catheter care, wound care, there are people with quite moderate and advanced
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dementias, frailty, so they are compact roles and substantial training is needed to perform them and we need to invest in our workforce and ensure that they feel valued. and there are huge opportunities for very interesting careers in the care sector. there are many people who started as care workers and have worked their way up, even to being ceos, so there are huge career opportunities and it is just making sure people can see that. , , ., ., ., just making sure people can see that. , ,., ., ., , that. does the shortage of staff put care home residents _ that. does the shortage of staff put care home residents in _ that. does the shortage of staff put care home residents in any - that. does the shortage of staff put care home residents in any kind - that. does the shortage of staff put care home residents in any kind ofl care home residents in any kind of risk? , ., , , ., , ., risk? obviously we are providing care in people's _ risk? obviously we are providing care in people's own _ risk? obviously we are providing care in people's own homes - risk? obviously we are providing care in people's own homes and| risk? obviously we are providing - care in people's own homes and yes, care in people�*s own homes and yes, at the moment, many of our providers have waiting lists. they have not got the staff to meet the demand and thatis got the staff to meet the demand and that is partly pent—up demand following the pandemic and is also just the growth in numbers of people
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in long—term conditions, general demographic, which means they are having to say no to taking on new people to support which they find really difficult because often people are phoning up in tears, family members have reached the end of their tether and in some cases, providers are having to hand back contracts the people they are already sporting because theyjust have not got enough staff and the question is, who else is going to look after them? the hospitals are nearly full and it is not desirable anyway to neglect people in the community until a crisis point is reached and then they end up in a more expensive settings of care, either care homes or hospitals, so we really need to invest in the community and enabling people to live well at home and at the moment, all of the money is being poured into the nhs and very little in at the front end. 0nly into the nhs and very little in at the front end. only 4% of what is spent on the nhs is a spent on care
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at home. ., . ~' spent on the nhs is a spent on care at home. ., ., ,, ., _, , spent on the nhs is a spent on care at home. ., ., ,, ., , ., at home. you talk of course about care at home. _ at home. you talk of course about care at home, how— at home. you talk of course about care at home, how important - at home. you talk of course about care at home, how important is i at home. you talk of course about care at home, how important is it| care at home, how important is it for someone in the final years are to stay at home as opposed to being cared for in a care home itself? many people choose if at all possible to remain in their own home, surrounded by people that they love and connected to the communities where they have lived for many years. sometimes people do need to move into care homes and thatis need to move into care homes and that is fine, but when people could be supported at home, then that is what we should be aiming for. it is the best place for them. they can eat what they like, do what they like, keep pets, they can basically live their lives in the way that they want and we needed to be supporting people to stay healthy at home as well and quite often people will end up in hospital with conditions like dehydration, which clearly are preventable and that can then lead to increased urinary tract infections, it increased falls, all of which then put pressure on the
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nhs so our aim should be to be like countries like sweden for example where 33% of people over 80 are supported at home. in this country, may be only ten or 15% are, so what we need to see is a shift in government policy, a shift in strategy to support probably at least 15 million people who are receiving some form of care at home and needed, rather thanjust receiving some form of care at home and needed, rather than just leaving them and then they end up in an acute hospital.— them and then they end up in an acute hospital. a potentially risky vaginal laser treatment offered to menopausal women is no better than a sham orfake therapy, researchers say. the treatment was trialled to see if it might ease vaginal dryness and painful sex linked to the menopause. 0ur health correspondent michelle robertsjoins me now. to cut through the treatment and what the study found. this treatment
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is desi . ned what the study found. this treatment is designed to — what the study found. this treatment is designed to damage _ what the study found. this treatment is designed to damage the _ what the study found. this treatment is designed to damage the tissue. i what the study found. this treatment is designed to damage the tissue. -- j is designed to damage the tissue. —— take us through the treatment. they think that could provide some relief for some symptoms linked to menopause. there has been a big? about whether that is a good idea, as you could understand. in the uk at the moment, the nhs has an advisor that has been looking at this treatment. at the moment, they said should only be used in research settings to gather more evidence. this is the type of evidence, this study that we are talking about, that they have been asking for, that they want to have a proper head—to—head trial, look at the treatment versus a placebo, which is a fake treatment, and see if it provides any extra added benefit and in this trial, it did not. so then there is the question, some private providers can give treatment to women and they can go and buy it, so there is still a question of whether it is safe and effective enough to
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warrant wider use.— it is safe and effective enough to warrant wider use. where does that leave women _ warrant wider use. where does that leave women looking _ warrant wider use. where does that leave women looking for _ warrant wider use. where does that leave women looking for potential. leave women looking for potential treatments? i leave women looking for potential treatments?— leave women looking for potential treatments? , , , ., treatments? i spoke with experts on this all day yesterday. _ treatments? i spoke with experts on this all day yesterday. there - treatments? i spoke with experts on this all day yesterday. there is i this all day yesterday. there is obviously a need for extra treatments. we have all heard of hrt, which some people can take, some cannot. it can be really beneficial, but there is a need for new treatments out there, so it makes sense to investigate these types of things, but it is another step towards actually they�*re not recommending something that has not been fully, fully proven in trials. —— actually then not recommending is. -- actually then not recommending is. , , , ., -- actually then not recommending is. , ,, ., ., -- actually then not recommending is. does this show that society talks more _ is. does this show that society talks more about _ is. does this show that society talks more about the - is. does this show that society i talks more about the menopause? is. does this show that society - talks more about the menopause? the fact that talks more about the menopause? iie: fact that you and i talks more about the menopause? i"i;a: fact that you and i are talks more about the menopause? iie fact that you and i are talking about it, we have had royals speak out recently, celebrities, and mps are trying to get a members bill through parliament to get free hrt on the nhs without a script in
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charge. there is lots of noise around it, so it�*s as i could is becoming less of a to b topic. around it, so it's as i could is becoming less of a to b topic. what has led to that _ becoming less of a to b topic. what has led to that change? _ becoming less of a to b topic. what has led to that change? -- - becoming less of a to b topic. what has led to that change? -- a - becoming less of a to b topic. what has led to that change? —— a taboo topic. it has led to that change? -- a taboo to - ic. , has led to that change? -- a taboo toic. , ., ., , ., topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects _ topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects a _ topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects a lot _ topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects a lot of _ topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects a lot of people i topic. it is a growing understanding that it affects a lot of people and i that it affects a lot of people and it is worth talking about. it may sound a bit uncomfortable for some chat about, but actually it is real and it is important to talk about. it has been fascinating, thank you so much. the hyper—violent korean drama squid game has become netflix�*s biggest ever series launch. the dystopian nine—part series, which debuted in september, tells the story of a group of misfits taking part in a series of children�*s playground games with an unpleasant twist. that is to say the least. it�*s been watched by 111 million users in its first 28 days, knocking period drama bridgerton off
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the top spot. squid game�*s popularity has sparked a huge online following and spawned thousands of copycat video clips. steve holden reports. squid game is a dystopian drama that puts a deadly spin on some classic childhood games. 0ver nine episodes contestants with huge personal debt put their lives at risk to win millions of pounds in prize money. the creator of the south korean show originally came up with the idea in 2008, with netflix taking it on for distribution in 2019. it blends violence, satire and heart with striking visuals. put simply, everyone is talking about it. there was very little hype around the launch of this when it came out. they have launched this creative, interesting, vibrant, violent new show onto the platform and it has just grown through word—of—mouth in
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a really interesting and pretty inspiring way. i will not have this go wrong. you mean our ruse? until now, netflix had said that period drama bridgerton was its most popular series launch. it says squid game has had 111 million users watching in its first 28 days. netflix can be secretive and selective about its viewing figures but it counts one view as anyone who has watched two minutes of an episode. squid game is also another example of the rise of korean culture globally. two years ago movie parasite won best film at the oscars. and bts, from the capital seoul, are now the world�*s biggest boy band. squid game continues to ride that south korean arrived. —— south korean wave.
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steve holden, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. the amount of cloud will vary across the afternoon. across western areas it will continue to be pretty grey and damp with occasional spots of drizzle around our coasts and hills. temperatures in the mild side everywhere but particularly in the sunshine across the south with temperatures into the high teens. 0vernight tonight, a grey one again with low crowd around, heavier rain starting to encroach into shetland, thatis starting to encroach into shetland, that is from a weather front that will continue to bring wet weather as we start the day here on thursday. along with that, strong winds reaching gale force at times, the rain trickling a little further south across scotland. the cloud thickener for a spot of drizzle for western parts but there will be
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breaks in the cloud, central and eastern areas with the best of any sunshine across the midlands and parts of eastern england. that�*s your weather. hello, this is bbc news. iamjames i am james reynolds. the headlines... the eu is to propose fewer border checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, to try and address the row over trade. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement, and it is not working at the moment. fears about the impact on christmas, as the biggest commercial port in britain deals with a backlog of shipping containers. beam me up, bezos — the countdown is on for william shatner as captain kirk prepare to blast off on a trip to the edge of space due in the next half hour.
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sticking back down to earth. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here�*s hugh ferris. fifa says it strongly condemns the ugly scenes before an antiracism campaign group has called for hungary to be banned from international football after their fans were once again involved in controversial scenes in a game against england. fifa has condemned the clashes between visiting fans and police during the world cup qualifier between the two at wembley. a banner could be seen amongst the away fans prior to kick off, in protest at england players taking the knee. shortly after, fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police, which authorities say began with racial abuse aimed at a steward. 0n the pitch, hungary scored first, beforejohn stones equalised. hungary have already been ordered to play two home matches behind closed doors, following the racism england players experienced there last month. well, fifa says in that statement that "its position remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as well as any form of discrimination or abuse. fifa has a very clear zero—tolerance stance against such abhorrent behaviour in football".
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the fair network has called on the authorities to ban hungary, while others have their own questions too. the fact that they arrived with a banner denouncing taking the knee spoke volumes, but the part of the intent from some of the people in the crowd last night and i guess one of our questions is, from a fifa perspective again, how are people allowed to get tickets for a game in allowed to get tickets for a game in a country where you know there is going to be a high representation of black players when they have got such a history of ruler —— racism and perpetrating racism in their own country, never mind abroad. so i think the serious question to ask is how they got on the ground of the first place. chelsea boss emma hayes says her side�*s packed season is "better than being bored", as they prepare to face women�*s champions league opponents, juventus. as well as european football, and their women�*s super league duties, the blues are in the fa cup semi—finals. five chelsea players willjoin up with the england squad for two world cup qualifiers upon return from turin.
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i think it is hard for english teams. _ i think it is hard for english teams, knowing that every weekend the intensity of our games are really. — the intensity of our games are really, really tough. there is no denying — really, really tough. there is no denying leagues across europe have wonderful— denying leagues across europe have wonderful teams of them but it is the speed — wonderful teams of them but it is the speed and the intensity that a wsl game is played at that takes a lot out— wsl game is played at that takes a lot out of— wsl game is played at that takes a lot out of players. but, you know, this is _ lot out of players. but, you know, this is what — lot out of players. but, you know, this is what happens in the men's game _ this is what happens in the men's game and — this is what happens in the men's game and we all have to adjust to that in_ game and we all have to adjust to that in our— game and we all have to adjust to that in our game. a game and we all have to ad'ust to that in our game.i game and we all have to ad'ust to that in our game. a kenyan athlete has been found _ that in our game. a kenyan athlete has been found dead _ that in our game. a kenyan athlete has been found dead in _ that in our game. a kenyan athlete has been found dead in her - that in our game. a kenyan athlete has been found dead in her home i that in our game. a kenyan athlete | has been found dead in her home in the country. she finished fourth in the country. she finished fourth in the 5000 metres at the tokyo 0lympics. kenyan police are still investigating the circumstances around her death. she set the world record for a women�*s only road race in germany last month. athletics kenya say they are distraught at her untimely death. andy murray says he�*s not planning to play in next month�*s davis cup finals, after being
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knocked out of the indian wells tournament in the third round. murray lost in straight sets 6—4, 7—6 to third seed alexander zverev. afterwards, he said he needs to rest his body, and also believes he doesn�*t deserve to make the team, given how well cameron norrie and dan evans are playing. this is physically the best i have felt for— this is physically the best i have felt for a — this is physically the best i have felt for a while, _ this is physically the best i have felt for a while, but _ this is physically the best i have felt for a while, but i _ this is physically the best i have felt for a while, but i was - this is physically the best i have felt for a while, but i was sort i this is physically the best i have| felt for a while, but i was sort of battling — felt fora while, but i was sort of battling my— felt for a while, but i was sort of battling my game _ felt for a while, but i was sort of battling my game a _ felt for a while, but i was sort of battling my game a little - felt for a while, but i was sort of battling my game a little bit. i felt for a while, but i was sort of| battling my game a little bit. it's 'ust battling my game a little bit. it's just not. — battling my game a little bit. it's just not. yeah. _ battling my game a little bit. it's just not, yeah, the _ battling my game a little bit. it's just not, yeah, the consistency. just not, yeah, the consistency isn't _ just not, yeah, the consistency isn't fair, — just not, yeah, the consistency isn't fair, and, _ just not, yeah, the consistency isn't fair, and, i— just not, yeah, the consistency isn't fair, and, i don't - just not, yeah, the consistency isn't fair, and, i don't know, i isn't fair, and, i don't know, decision— isn't fair, and, i don't know, decision making _ isn't fair, and, i don't know, decision making is - isn't fair, and, i don't know, decision making is not i isn't fair, and, i don't know, decision making is not great isn't fair, and, i don't know, i decision making is not great in isn't fair, and, i don't know, - decision making is not great in the important — decision making is not great in the important moments _ decision making is not great in the important moments still. - wales have called up 19—year—old uncapped exeter lock christ tshiunza for their autumn internationals. there is also a recall for wasps flanker thomas young, who has been given special dispensation after he announced he willjoin cardiff. young was named in wayne pivac�*s squad despite playing outside of wales for the rest of the regular season. he�*s given special dispensation to the welsh rugby union�*s 60—cap rule.
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wales play new zealand, south africa, fiji and argentina in the coming weeks. scotland have selected south africa born sharks back row dylan richardson for a two—day training camp before theirfirst autumn international. the 22—year—old has spent his entire career at the durban based franchise, but qualifies for scotland through his father. that is all your support for you now. much more the next hour or so. captain kirk is getting ready to blast off to the final frontier yet again. william shatner will boldly go where no actor has ever been before. at the age of 90, he will make history as the oldest person to travel to space when he takes off from texas aboard a rocket developed by amazon founderjeff bezos. he says he�*s looking forward to seeing earth from a new perspective. sophie long reports. i�*m going up into space. i don�*t know how many people can say that.
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it�*s life—changing, in its way. interest in space exploration has waned over the last few decades. the fact that william shatner is making this journey has renewed some of that sense of wonder. there is an adventure in my life that i would not have had, had i not done this. and it looks like there�*s a great deal of curiosity about this fictional character, captain kirk, going into space. for those who�*ve never watched an episode of star trek, here�*s why. captain kirk is possibly one of the most known, iconic mythological characters in our sort of collective pop culture. and the idea that the man who portrayed this daring captain, pushing us to the limits of our knowledge and exploring the deepest frontiers of space gets to go into space himself, itjust makes me laugh. i wish william shatner the best of luck on his voyage. it�*s reignited interest in space travel, and also in the
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series that broke so many boundaries all those decades ago. in the original series, i you had a black woman, an asian—american man in space during the civil rights _ movement. in these ways, star trek has always pushed a more progressive - vision of inclusion, whatever- the conversation is at the time, it pushes that forward. and it says, look at what we could do if we work together! _ over the years, trekkers and trekkies have found much to bond over, including their own language. if all goes according to plan, he won�*t be exploring strange new worlds or making first contact with new life forms. but william shatner�*s historic flight to space will be extraordinary for science, for pop culture, for the future of space travel, and for him. we�*re just at the beginning but how miraculous that beginning is! how extraordinary it is to be part of that beginning. there is this mystique
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of being in space and that much closer to the stars and being weightless. i shall be entranced by the view of space. sophie long, bbc news, west texas. if, if, or goes to plan then the rocket will take off in about 20 minutes�* time from texas. there it is. william shatner is one of four passengers on board, as we have to work out how to describe them, astronauts, space tourists, space passengers. we will bring you that as and when it happens. shall we go back to some normal news? as we have been reporting, the eu is set to set “p been reporting, the eu is set to set up proposals later about northern ireland. it is expected to involve reduced checks on goods and medicine. the post—brexit arrangement known as the northern
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ireland protocol was introduced to help prevent checks along the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris is here to help explain what this is all about. i feel like i ifeel like i am interviewing i feel like i am interviewing you for a job! what is the northern ireland protocol?— ireland protocol? good to see ca tain ireland protocol? good to see captain kirk — ireland protocol? good to see captain kirk taking _ ireland protocol? good to see captain kirk taking drastic i ireland protocol? good to see i captain kirk taking drastic measures to avoid discussing the northern ireland protocol! it is basically what took it out of the eu, what it does is mean that goods moving from great britain into northern ireland have to be checked in certain ways, and the reason for that is there was and the reason for that is there was an agreement for both sides, between the uk and eu that they shouldn�*t be any checks on the land border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland in the map zooms out like that, it reminds you that the republic of ireland as part of the republic of ireland as part of the eu single market, so as soon as goods go into the republic of ireland, they can move anywhere across that whole blue european zone, without further checks, so
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there have to be checked somewhere, once the uk is outside the single market, and what the protocol does is set up a system, which means there are some checks between great britain and northern ireland within the uk. the government signed up to two years ago, no it doesn�*t like it. two years ago, no it doesn't like it. , . ., two years ago, no it doesn't like it. , .., , two years ago, no it doesn't like it. , , , ., ., it. the second big question, what are the sausage _ it. the second big question, what are the sausage wards? - it. the second big question, what are the sausage wards? well, i are the sausage wards? well, number when they are — are the sausage wards? well, number when they are manner— are the sausage wards? well, number when they are manner from _ are the sausage wards? well, number when they are manner from heaven i are the sausage wards? well, number| when they are manner from heaven for a good tabloid headline but basically again this is about the rules of the european single market, which under the terms of the protocol apply for the trade in goods to northern ireland. the export of chilled meat into the eu single market is completely banned. so frozen sausages, yes, chilled sausages no. so there has been this period of grace, the series of grace periods at the moment, which meant some of the rules of the protocol aren�*t actually in place, but if it was implemented in full, it would mean that the british banger was not allowed to be exported from great britain into northern ireland. unacceptable, says the government,
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and what we understand, in a couple of hours�* time, the eu will say one of hours�* time, the eu will say one of the things it is going to suggest as a compromise is that there should be a special exemption for northern ireland and the ban on chilled meat, so the sausage will continue to be able to go across the irish sea, and thatis able to go across the irish sea, and that is in terms of a broad series of things, which the eu is going to do to make, they say, the practical implication of the protocol much more effective.— implication of the protocol much more effective. next bit of 'argon bustin: , more effective. next bit of 'argon busting. why is i more effective. next bit of 'argon busting, why is the i more effective. next bit of jargon busting, why is the european i more effective. next bit of jargon l busting, why is the european court so important?— busting, why is the european court so imortant? .,, ., so important? okay, so the european court ofjustice. _ so important? okay, so the european court ofjustice, is _ so important? okay, so the european court ofjustice, is the _ so important? okay, so the european court ofjustice, is the name - court ofjustice, is the name suggests, is essentially the ultimate arbiter of eu law. again, it comes back to the rules of the european single market, when it comes to over assessing —— overseeing those rules, it is the ecj which has the final say. and again, because northern ireland follows the european single market, it was agreed at the northern ireland protocol that it would be the european court ofjustice that had the ultimate say on how the protocol is interpreted, and
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implemented. now, the uk is saying that has to stop, it has to go, it is not acceptable for the court, if you like, on one side, to have oversight of an agreement between two sides. there is one possible compromise in the air because the eu has totally ruled out a relocation of the text at this point. but the agreement it has with switzerland for example still has the ecj there but very much in the background, with another layer of oversight, which is a bit more international. so that is one possible landing zone, but at the moment the eu is saying when it comes to the court ofjustice, there is no movement. in the uk is saying it simply has to go. so if you are looking for a landing zone, a switzerland style agreement is one possible place you could land. ileact possible place you could land. next ruestion, possible place you could land. next question. what _ possible place you could land. next question, what about _ possible place you could land. next question, what about article 16, that we always talk about? we do, article 16 as _ that we always talk about? we do, article 16 as part _ that we always talk about? we do, article 16 as part of— that we always talk about? we do, article 16 as part of the _ that we always talk about? we do, article 16 as part of the protocol, i article 16 as part of the protocol, and it is the part which allows either side to suspend bits of the protocol if they are seen to be
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causing economic or social difficulties. now, the uk is saying that threshold has been crossed. it is clear to them their economic difficulties caused by the protocol, in terms of the supply of goods to northern ireland. societal problems, yes, they have been political tensions as a result of the protocol being put into place. if the uk decides to trigger article 16, that would step things up a bit. i think what we�*re going to see now after the eu announcement today is a few weeks of discussion between the two sides. lord frost said in his speech yesterday he will take the eu proposal seriously, they will have a discussion. in about a month�*s time, probably conveniently after cop26 so it doesn�*t come as an embarrassment just before that, we are going to find out whether those talks have got anywhere. if they haven�*t, then the uk is certainly indicating that article 16 is in play. if the uk decided to do that, and expend part of the protocol unilaterally, i
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think we�*ll see some response from the eu, which could be tariffs on certain goods, again, some sort of trade response from the european union. we have got to that point yet. there are discussions which will be under way, starting today i believe, but at the moment, especially on that issue of the court, there is really a very sort of fundamental dividing line between the two sides. i of fundamental dividing line between the two sides-— the two sides. i will speak to you aaain the two sides. i will speak to you again then _ the two sides. i will speak to you again then in _ the two sides. i will speak to you again then in about _ the two sides. i will speak to you again then in about a _ the two sides. i will speak to you again then in about a month i the two sides. i will speak to you again then in about a month or. the two sides. i will speak to you i again then in about a month or so! chris morris, thank you so much. solicitors are beginning action against amazon, on behalf of delivery drivers. demands are being made by the law fim — leigh day — that self—employed drivers should be given the same rights as fully signed up workers. kate robinson is an employment solicitorfrom leigh day and joins me now. why have you launched this action? at the moment these delivery drivers are classed as self—employed, but the way they work in practice on the way they are integrated into amazon�*s business, we think actually
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because of this they are employees that they should be getting employee rights, which includes being paid at least the national minimum wage, being paid holiday pay.— least the national minimum wage, being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its art, being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its part. has — being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its part, has said _ being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its part, has said that _ being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its part, has said that it _ being paid holiday pay. amazon, for its part, has said that it is _ its part, has said that it is committed to ensuring that drivers are fairly paid by the delivery companies they work with. what do you make of what amazon has to say? i think that amazon has a huge amount of control over the way that these drivers work, and it is not sufficient to say that they will check that these delivery service partners are doing what they need to do. amazon has a responsibility too. these drivers are integrated into their business, they conform to amazon standards, they are identified as amazon delivery drivers and it is incredibly important that amazon make sure it inquires —— it applies to employment regulation. i have spoken to drivers who basically essentially pay to
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work. so they have a situation where they are having so many expenses connected with theirjob that they barely bring in any kind of take—home pay, well below the national minimum wage, and the knock—on effect of that is they can�*t afford basic living expenses. what is the timeline for all of this? ~ , , , this? we will be issuing the tribunal. — this? we will be issuing the tribunal, we _ this? we will be issuing the tribunal, we have _ this? we will be issuing the tribunal, we have another. this? we will be issuing the | tribunal, we have another to this? we will be issuing the i tribunal, we have another to be issued, and then we will wait to set a date and move forward as quickly as possible. a date and move forward as quickly as possible-— a date and move forward as quickly as ossible. ., ,, y., , . ., as possible. thank you very much for 'oinin: us. the headlines on bbc news... officials from the uk and eu are to meet in london this afternoon to discuss cutting checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. shoppers are being warned to plan ahead for christmas, as supply chain issues lead to a backlog of shipping containers at britain�*s biggest commercial port. the final frontierfor captain kirk, as he prepares to blast off
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in jeff bezos�* spaceship. the riba stirling prize will be awarded tomorrow. it includes an eco friendly mosque in cambridge, a stunning bridge linking to hubs of an ancient castle in cornwall and a mixed residential development that was at one point earmarked for demolition by london council. today it is the turn of the windermere jetty museum in the lake district. that is home to a unique collection of boats. the building itself boasts black oxidised copper clad walls and large cantilevered overhangs. that is the first contemporary building for more than 50 years.
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ifound it an enormous privilege being trusted to imagine a building in such a beautiful setting. this building is intentionally a very atmospheric visitor experience. i'm rowan seaford. i'm an associate director at carmody groarke. i�*m andy groarke, of carmody groarke architects, and we are the architects for the windermerejetty museum. the museum is seen and approached from all sides, so you can arrive by boat to one of the jetties, or you can arrive by foot or by car by land. the centrepiece of the wooden wet dock is surrounded by a cluster of copper—clad buildings. we spent a year up here to understand the seasons and how different materials weather in the lake district environment. overtime, the building will develop, it's inevitable, oxidisation, in order to give the building quite a timeless quality.
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the brief for this building i was to create a world—class building, in which to house the internationally- significant boat collection. it needs to be a building that - could accommodate large—scale boats, that was exciting for the public to want to visit. _ but also, importantly, i because it sat within one of our great national parks — i the lake district national park — it had to be part of- the landscape it was within. sustainability has been really central to the concept of the building. we have systems, such as the lake—source heat pump, that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we�*ve selected, wherever possible, local materials, so that the travel from source to site is as short as possible. the building has a zero—waste strategy so, actually, all of the domestic waste water is treated on—site and it's filtered through the landscape and reed beds, so it can then be discharged back into the lake as clean water. the site isjust amazing. it reflects boat—building, it reflects restoration, i it reflects conservation.
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some of the success of what the team has achieved here is a building that is simultaneously foreground and background. foreground�*s the visitor experience, it�*s the building that�*s here. and yet, it�*s the background, it�*s the backdrop to a beautiful landscape setting and immersing yourself in a fantastic collection. the windermerejetty museum in the lake district is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain�*s best new building. and we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tomorrow night at 7.30pm. france has announced the death of hubert germain — the last surviving recipient of the country�*s rarest bravery award from the second world war — the order of liberation. it was bestowed on just
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over a thousand heroes of the french resistance. the elysee palace described mr germain as a figurehead of free france. the bbc�*s tim allman looks back at his life. 1944, and after four long years, paris is free once again. general de gaulle leading the free french and allied troops and retaking the city, but for most of the war, it was the men and women of the resistance who defied nazi occupation. among their number, hubert germain, seen here with president macron last year. a resistance fighter, a war hero, and a man who in preparing to take exams to enter the french military, decided he would neverfollow to enter the french military, decided he would never follow german orders. translation: i decided he would never follow german orders. translation:— decided he would never follow german orders. translation: i thought about it for five minutes, _ orders. translation: i thought about it for five minutes, and _ orders. translation: i thought about it for five minutes, and said _ orders. translation: i thought about it for five minutes, and said to - it forfive minutes, and said to myself, what are you doing here? so i got up and handed back a blank piece of paper. i said i�*m not
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interested, i�*m off to wharf. b5 piece of paper. i said i�*m not interested, i�*m off to wharf. $5 a interested, i'm off to wharf. as a soldier of the _ interested, i'm off to wharf. as a soldier of the free _ interested, i'm off to wharf. as a soldier of the free french - interested, i'm off to wharf. as a soldier of the free french forces, he took part in the battle of el alamein, and went on to liberate the port of toulon and the city of lyon. after the war, he ended politics, becoming a government minister in the 1970s. hubert germain represented what president macron called the flame of the resistance, a flame that will never be extinguished. he will be buried in the last empty vault of the national memorial to french fighters of the second world war. the life of hubert germain. let�*s take you to texas now. where you might be able to see, we are waiting for the launch of the new shepherd rocket. that launch had been due in five minutes�* time. we are seeing some archive pictures from blue
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origin. it is a promotionalfilm but we had a quick look at the countdown clock, the launch has been rescheduled for about 3k minutes�* time. if that stays to schedule, we should be able to bring bits of it to you here. now, on earth, time for a look at the weather with chris. a lot of fine weather to come to the rest of the day, the amount of cloud will vary a lot, the best of the sunshine has been through southern and eastern england and will keep those sunny skies for many into the afternoon. however across western areas of the uk the cloud is much thicker, thick enough for an occasional spot of drizzle. high pressure firmly in charge, but the wind is going on a clockwise sense around this high pressure, shovelling up all this cloud and shoving it into the western coasts and hills, that is why we have that damp weather for western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and western areas of wales, where we continue to see occasional splits of drizzle feeding in. the best of the breaks in the cloud again across
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east anglia, south—east england, south—west england as well, and in the sunshine, temperatures into the high teens. there will be another very warm october day. overnight tonight, those gaps in the cloud will tend to fill back in. a lot of low cloud around, is a mist and fog patches in the cloud still thick enough for some drizzle, outbreaks of rain starting to edge its way into shetland, towards the end of the night, and that rain is associated with a weather front. this cold front is going to be bringing some wet weather, just ahead of it, some very strong winds just working into the northern isles for a time, so orkney and shetland picking up a spell of gail�*s first thing in the morning to stock rain pushes into the north—west of mainland scotland as well, but away from that, again there will be occasional spots of drizzle, northern ireland, wales and western areas of england. the best of any breaks in the cloud, most likely east wales, the midlands, east anglia and across parts of the south from time to time. still mild for most but starting to turn colder across orkney, shetland and northern parts of highland as well. through friday, this cold front pushes
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southwards, a real drop in temperatures following on behind this feature. the wren will —— the rain will tend to weaken, so no greats amount, and behind that pressure will rise. increasing amounts of sunshine building back in. but in those sunny skies, that is where the coldest air is through the afternoon, just eight degrees or so in aberdeen. it is certainly going to feel a lot chillier, even in england, wales and northern ireland, those temperatures will be coming down several degrees compared with what we have seen. into the weekend, the chance of a frost to start the day on saturday across the north—east but otherwise this weekend there will be some rain around at times. that�*s your weather.
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steve holden, bbc news.
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this is bbc news. i�*m james reynolds. the headlines at three: captain kirk heads for the final frontier — william shatner is preparing to blast off on a trip to the edge of space, becoming the oldest person to boldly go where no man has gone before. the eu are to propose fewer border checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, to try and address the row over trade. it is incumbent upon us as a government and i think it is incumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. fears about the impact on christmas, as the biggest commercial port in britain deals with a backlog of shipping containers.
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and the truly terrifying korean tv series squid game becomes the biggest ever series launch from netflix, knocking steamy period drama bridgerton off the top spot. hello and welcome to bbc news at three o�*clock. captain kirk is getting ready to blast off to the final frontier yet again. this time in real life. in the next hour, william shatner will boldly go where no actor has ever been before. at the age of 90, he will make history as the oldest person to travel to space when he takes off from texas aboard a rocket developed by amazon founderjeff bezos. he says he�*s looking forward to seeing earth from a new perspective. and sophie long joins us now from texas.
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half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go- _ half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go- we _ half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go. we got _ half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go. we got to _ half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go. we got to d-45, i half an hour to go? yes, half an hour to go. we got to d-45, sol half an hour to go? yes, half an i hour to go. we got to d-45, so 45 hour to go. we got to d—45, so 45 minutes before the scheduled take—off and it was put on hold for just under half an hour. we do not have the official confirmation of where that was. the weather here is good, it was postponed already by 24 hours, was supposed to have taken place yesterday, but the clock is now taking again and i believe it is william shatner along with the other three passengers on this flight, only the second flight to carry human passengers to the edge of space by blue origin are now about to board the capsule. after that happens, just under half an hour before take—off, the hatch will close. in the last half an hour, they have been driven out from the astronaut training centre to the launch pad one, which you canjust see behind me that. they were chauffeured byjeff bezos, he was on
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at the inaugural flight with his brother a couple of months ago in july. it does seem the clock is now taking again after that brief pause. this is a highly anticipated launch. largely because, of course, william shatner, at the age of 90, will be on board. if it doesn�*t go ahead, he will become the oldest person ever to travel to the edge of space. —— if it does go ahead. beamed into many people�*s homes, this has captured the imagination of millions of people of a future space explorers and a star trek fans as well, one of whom, a superfan, jeff bezos himself. well, one of whom, a super fan, jeff bezos himself.— bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base _ bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base is, _ bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base is, is _ bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base is, is what _ bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base is, is what is - bezos himself. fascinating to hear that jeff base is, is what is the i thatjeff base is, is what is the founder of a blue origin, is also a driver there is also a driver for zen astronauts. —— jeff bathos. everyone is interested in this, interested in what william shatner has to say, but is this just not really and from blue origin to disguise the fact that space x is
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actually doing the more substantial work in terms of space exploration? you are right, this is a masterful pr move, has moved to the other pr into another stratosphere if you like. getting captain kirk to take part in this second flight, were to the world media be here if that was not the case? we have seen richard branson, he was the first billionaire spaceship owner to write his own spaceship to the edge of space, then of course we had jeff bezos. just after week after him. behind the scenes, as you rightly point out, it could be argued elon musk and the space x are really in a first position in this new private industry space race. they have successfully ferried astronauts to the international space station and are building a spaceship that will hopefully land on the moon and mars. if you�*re looking at that kind of serious space travel, yes, elon musk is probably leading the field, but
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none the less, this is an enormous date for blue origin, the future of space travel. at the moment we are still only see the super—rich and invited guests like the super famous william shatner gets to travel on these rides into space, but they will tell you this is much more than a rocket field ego trip. this is about the future of space travel and even though it is only the uber rich who are getting to take part at the moment, with every successful flight it becomes a little bit closer for the rest of us are earthlings. i should just explain what we are all watching. we have seen pictures of those four astronauts ringing the bell in their blue spaces as they walk along to the capsule. we have seen them shaking hands withjeff bezos and now watching pictures of them entering the capital itself. when i spoke about the first launch of blue origin eight a few months ago with the former nasa astronaut, said should they be called astronauts? he had been a space at some seven days, these astronauts were in space four minutes or so it. is there a discussion, astronauts,
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space tourists, holiday—maker? how should they be described? that space tourists, holiday-maker? how should they be described?— should they be described? that is a massive debate _ should they be described? that is a massive debate as _ should they be described? that is a massive debate as you _ should they be described? that is a massive debate as you rightly i should they be described? that is a massive debate as you rightly pointj massive debate as you rightly point out. you look to the blue origin webcast as we have been doing in the morning and they are very much calling them astronauts. they were given coins that put on their spacesuits as they went out to do the launch pad their and they are calling them astronauts. they will pass the line which is the internationally recognised boundary with space, but richard branson�*s crew would argue they are not doing anything. they have gone through training of course, but likely to make sure they could get out in a case of emergency and they know how to handle what is going to happen to them when they go up to space. they will become weightless forjust under three minutes, but mostly they will be enjoying the view before they glide back down. there is no pilot on that flight, which would make me personally feel rather nervous, they are not actually doing anything. when a virgin galactic made its flight, not aspiring to space, they did not pass the line,
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but every person on that flight was given a job, even though i think sir richard branson, was to monitor the situation so it was as good as it possibly could be further everyone who goes after, they were given tasks to perform on board. this is not the case with the blue origin flights. they are passengers, they are calling them croup. when they land back on earth, the people here will be calling them astronauts, but thatis will be calling them astronauts, but that is a subject of a big debate. what will be true is when william shatner loves her, he will have gone where no nonagenarian has gone before. whether you call him an astronaut or not, it is a major day for blue origin, major day for space travel and major david captain kirk. —— when william shatner lands here. now completely overshadowed by their fellow 90 round passenger, they have three minutes in space, what is planned for william shatner? well he
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read out a quote from star trek do you think? i read out a quote from star trek do ou think? ., ., ~ ., ., you think? i do not know. i imagine when ou you think? i do not know. i imagine when you listen _ you think? i do not know. i imagine when you listen to _ you think? i do not know. i imagine when you listen to what _ you think? i do not know. i imagine when you listen to what he - you think? i do not know. i imagine when you listen to what he has i you think? i do not know. i imagine| when you listen to what he has been saying about going up there, he is... jeff bezos a couple months ago said he was doing it for the cakes. william shatner says i�*m not doing a tense anyone, i�*m going there for the experience. —— for the kicks. whatever happens today, he will become its basic story in real life. i believe he is taking up with him some mementos ofjeff bezos had as a child and his mother kept for him, but we wait to see what he does when he gets up there. we are hoping to speak to him when he arrives back on earth about his experience, but i think given what we have heard from him to date, this is really about
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the experience. he says it is a miracle that at the age of 90 he is going to get to be a rocket man. he has sung about it, it played that role, and now he is doing it for real, which has captured the imaginations of millions around the world. pr stunt or no pr stunt. truths; world. pr stunt or no pr stunt. why was patrick — world. pr stunt or no pr stunt. why was patrick stewart not invited? i don�*t know if you heard that, why was the other captain on star track not invited? does he get a ticket to next time? ., ., ., , not invited? does he get a ticket to next time?— next time? you would hope so, because penny _ next time? you would hope so, because penny he _ next time? you would hope so, because penny he was - next time? you would hope so, because penny he was jeff i next time? you would hope so, i because penny he was jeff bezos' because penny he wasjeff bezos�* hero and that is who he has modelled himself on. —— apparently. it was reported he even thought about calling amazon make it so after one of patrick stewart�*s saying is, i may be a bit off track there, but certainly given he is a super fan of
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star trek, certainly given he is a super fan of startrek, he certainly given he is a super fan of star trek, he of course had a cameo appearance in the 2016 film, so i would not be surprised. i certainly do not think william shatner is the last big—name celebrity in the science fiction world we will see launching from the pad behind me, that much is true.— that much is true. thank you so much. that much is true. thank you so much- we _ that much is true. thank you so much. we will— that much is true. thank you so much. we will go _ that much is true. thank you so much. we will go back - that much is true. thank you so much. we will go back to i that much is true. thank you so much. we will go back to that l much. we will go back to that when it happens, of course. it�*s caused problems since day one of the brexit process and now eu officials are in london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving from great britain to northern ireland. a fresh row has broken out between the eu and the uk over the arrangements agreed as part of the brexit deal. earlier, the conservative party co—chair, oliver dowden, said the government would wait to see the eu plans in full, but it would "engage fully and constructively" on the matter. jessica parker reports. this man, if you do not know him yet, you may well soon.
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maros sefcovic, recently visiting queen�*s university in belfast. he is in charge of drawing up the eu�*s answer for trying to sort out this — checks on goods arriving in northern ireland from great britain. while some post—brexit controls have been delayed, business hit by changes are looking for long—term solutions. if we can see a situation that is workable, yes, we will leap in there with both feet and relish the opportunity, but at the moment, my suspicion is the can will be kicked down the road further and there will be a lack of clarity and, you know, as a business you need to have crystal clarity. it is understood the european commission will look to offer what they see as a significant cut to checks and customs procedures to ensure the free flow of medicines and allow the continued import of certain chilled meats such as sausages to smooth supermarket supply chains. this looks like a pretty major proposal from the eu and we have
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to remember that the eu is a very large single market of 27 states, it has a common external border to the rest of the world, so it cannot simply abandon all its own rules or punch a hole in its own borders. it has taken months to get here and eu member states see it as a big offer, but some question the uk approach. what kind of partnership is it with someone who says yes and then says no? we need to have trust. we need to build something. we need to provide citizens, businesses with visibility, predictability, so that they can rely on their political decision—makers. he is the one in charge of the uk�*s efforts to change the protocol. lord frost wants a more radical overhaul of the arrangements governing northern ireland. downing street believes that by going further now, you solve problems down the line.
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it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get on that stable footing. this place will not propose changing how the treaty is policed, a key uk demand. the eu wants to work within the framework of an agreement that both sides signed up to. jessica parker, bbc news. our political correspondent jonathan blake has more on this. what does the uk realistically want from the eu?— what does the uk realistically want from the eu? , ., ., ., , from the eu? they want no oversight ofthe from the eu? they want no oversight of the european _ from the eu? they want no oversight of the european court _ from the eu? they want no oversight of the european court of _ from the eu? they want no oversight of the european court ofjustice, i from the eu? they want no oversight of the european court ofjustice, in i of the european court ofjustice, in short. the eu's highest court, of the european court ofjustice, in short. the eu's highest court, which at the moment is the ultimate arbiter of any disputes which work to arise or might be to arise in the
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implementation of the northern ireland protocol. the uk as you heard in the report there is not happy about that, they say it is not sustainable in the long term, not sensible, and so they are proposing an entirely new legal text to replace the northern ireland protocol which is currently there. but it does not sound like the proposals that are coming from the eu this afternoon will go there and they will offer some concessions around you at customs checks, around making it easier for medicines to come in, around allowing certain products to come between great britain and northern ireland and onwards to the eu, but there will not be at all any change to the role of the ecj, and that is why i think while downing street has said it will seriously consider the proposals coming from the eu and then there will be negotiation in then there will be negotiation in the days and weeks to come, this is not going to be a breakthrough moment and solve the problem of the
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northern ireland protocol on temporal. northern ireland protocol on temporal-— northern ireland protocol on temoral. , ., ., temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated _ temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated and _ temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated and a _ temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated and a deal - temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated and a deal that - temporal. this was a deal that the eu negotiated and a deal that the| temporal. this was a deal that the i eu negotiated and a deal that the uk signed up to. is that any thought this is the uk's deal as well, why did they sign up to a deal they did not like? iii did they sign up to a deal they did not like? , ., did they sign up to a deal they did not like? ,, , did they sign up to a deal they did not like? , ., , ., did they sign up to a deal they did not like? ,, , ., , .,, not like? if you put that people in downin: not like? if you put that people in downing street, _ not like? if you put that people in downing street, the _ not like? if you put that people in downing street, the answer - downing street, the answer comes back something along the lines of things have changed. the brexit minister himself when he was speaking in lisbon yesterday said that the uk signed up to this agreement with its hands tied. in 2019, when it neither side knew whether there would be a trade deal that would be the result of negotiations that happened after the withdrawal agreement was signed, and also now the uk government, boris johnson, after his landslide victory at the last election, has a bit more political manoeuvre perhaps to extract concessions and extract different moves from the eu that he just did not have before. and also they argue that the problems that
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have arisen with the protocol, because both sides remember are not happy with the way it is working as it is, problems that have arisen have arisen because they have implemented it and are following the rules, not because it has not been implemented and they are ignoring it. so in response to that criticism, which a lot of people make, the answer comes back that it justis make, the answer comes back that it just is not working and a new solution is needed. that is why we have seen the uk government to sing again this afternoon that itjust is not sustainable as it is, accusing the eu of undermining the belfast, good friday agreement, in the way it has impairment of the protocol, and saying that is not sustainable on an ongoing basis and changes are needed. , ., .,, ongoing basis and changes are needed. , ., ., , needed. remember all those months and ears needed. remember all those months and years with _ needed. remember all those months and years with michel _ needed. remember all those months and years with michel barnier - and years with michel barnier walking, not walking, travelling between brussels and london, to expect to see something of that with maros sefcovic playing the role of michel barnier? i maros sefcovic playing the role of michel barnier?— michel barnier? i think it will be different because _ michel barnier? i think it will be different because there - michel barnier? i think it will be different because there is -
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michel barnier? i think it will be different because there is no - michel barnier? i think it will be l different because there is no fixed time limit on negotiations. sides are trying to come if you believe what they in public at least, work out a solution and were expected to go on to the next few weeks, with perhaps mid—november being something of a crunch point. but there is not that imperative of a ticking clock we had so much that would the various deadlines and although it did end up shifting in many cases this time around, so we will not perhaps see the intense days of diplomacy and negotiating through the night, but there will be some very difficult and i am sure very fraught negotiations to come in the next few days and weeks.— fraught negotiations to come in the next few days and weeks. thank you so much. that was the view from westminster. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page. what is expected where you are? i suppose here at belfast port where checks have been in operation since
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january the ist of this year, this is where all political rhetoric, negotiations, it really hits reality. the protocol in northern ireland, the supposed, operates on two different levels for stop what is practical, one is political. when it comes to practical it is, it is businesses who have experienced the biggest degree of disruption he will be watching what happens across as this afternoon most closely. the businesses that have been hardest hit, many small businesses, the ark of the companies that have been relying on firms in the rest of the uk for supplies for stop it has got to the stage where firms in scotland, england and wales have either stopped delivering to northern ireland because it simply never say it is not worth the hassle anymore because of the extra paperwork and checks, was certainly the that are still coming happening more slowly, so many businesses are saying look, we are coming to like crucial christmas season now and we need to know business is running smoothly again. it is all about
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minimising the checks, controls that are happening across northern ireland in ports, but also northern ireland in ports, but also northern ireland being the sort of place that is, the politics are extremely important and for unionists, it is about more than business. we talk about more than business. we talk about business applications a lot, but it is also about sovereignty, identity, northern ireland's place in the uk. to the unionist parties, they will take the northern ireland protocol is in effect an economic border in their own country, something that cuts off northern ireland from the rest of the uk, reorientate the economy away from london and towards brussels and therefore dublin and therefore it is threatening to the very nature of the united kingdom itself. so the parties that do not take that view, the nationalist parties, they will say they oppose brexit altogether, the protocol was some sort of consequence of that, but could have been avoided, but it is the least worst option and they will also suggest unionists could be exaggerating the practical impact of
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the protocol, for example they will say there is no widespread day—to—day impact on consumers here. but the biggest unionist party, the democratic unionists, have said that if there are not a substantial changes to the protocol, if the sea border is not scrapped basically, come the end of the month of november, they are prepared to pull their ministers out of the power—sharing devolved government at stormont and that would in effect to bring down those power—sharing institutions. the stakes are certainly high. on this afternoon, when about 70 people around the world are following william shatner�*s genuine space which the hymn was the final frontier, here the focus is very much in the trade frontier which remains at the centre of the political universe. —— so many people around the world. of the political universe. -- so many people around the world. when every single — many people around the world. when every single correspondent mentions where william shatner is going, you can tell what people are interested in.
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the uk's largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. the port of felixstowe, which handles over a third of the uk's freight container traffic, blamed haulage driver shortages. but officials say the situation is improving. megan patterson reports. packed up and now backed up. christmas stock stuck in thousands of containers at felixstowe. normally, containers would pass through here in two or three days, now it is taking more than a week. this is the uk's largest commercial port, a backlog here likely to have an impact in december. food i think will continue to move. pigs in blankets, turkeys. the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain us more than happily. but toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in. more than a third of the uk's freight container traffic is handled at felixstowe. shipping giant maersk is now re—routing some of its biggest ships away from the port to elsewhere to europe, using smaller vessels to unload goods in an attempt
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to ease supply chain pressure. adam's haulage business moves 100 containers a day, but a lack of space at felixstowe means his drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. that has just all created a perfect storm. but this is a global issue, with similar situations in ports across the us, china and east asia too. problems here first began to emerge injuly. port officials say the situation at felixstowe has improved in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the supply chains and retailers to work through some very, very sophisticated logistics planning to prioritise the right goods to get to us on time. the government says it is working to increase the uk's hgv driver capacity, but resolution before
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christmas seems unlikely to be fully delivered. megan patterson, bbc news. china has announced plans to build more coal—fired power plants, despite pledging to reduce carbon emissions and become carbon neutral by 2060. the country made the statement after a meeting of beijing's national energy commission. president putin has said the variability of supply... isa is a story we will come through in a little bit. with me now is our climate editorjustin rowlatt. captain kirk first! the third corresponded _ captain kirk first! the third corresponded in _ captain kirk first! the third corresponded in a - captain kirk first! the third corresponded in a row! - captain kirk first! the third i corresponded in a row! more captain kirk first! the third - corresponded in a row! more plants, why! corresponded in a row! more plants, wh ! , . corresponded in a row! more plants, wh! ., ., corresponded in a row! more plants, wh ! , ., ., ., ., corresponded in a row! more plants, wh! ., ., ., why! there is an amount of brain, that ou why! there is an amount of brain, that you might — why! there is an amount of brain, that you might associate - why! there is an amount of brain, that you might associate with - that you might associate with climate change, torrential rain has
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flooded several regions in china, disposing 1.8 million people and flooding coalmines and the chinese already have an energy crunch as they come out of the covid crisis and i think we are worried about energy supply. there have been cuts in some part of china and they will have to invest more coal to do with that and it may mean it will not hit the targets that they have set for reducing carbon emissions. what they have said is they will peak by 2030 with an ambition of reducing its net zero x 2060. there is some uncertainty now about what the kind of offer for the world that china will be bringing to the table in glasgow in three weeks' time. this is the kind of— glasgow in three weeks' time. this is the kind of thing people will be thinking, when they see the chinese delegation coming in, we do not know who it will be led by, you're building more coal—fired power stations and sitting in glasgow saying that's not do things like that? it saying that's not do things like that? . ., , ., ., ,
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that? it could well be that china is sa inc that? it could well be that china is saying they _ that? it could well be that china is saying they will — that? it could well be that china is saying they will cut _ that? it could well be that china is saying they will cut it _ that? it could well be that china is saying they will cut it rough - that? it could well be that china is saying they will cut it rough and i that? it could well be that china is | saying they will cut it rough and be less willing to compromise on emissions, but it could also... china for decades has got the risk that global warming presents to china. it is very threatened, it has water shortages, we have seen this torrential rain... i water shortages, we have seen this torrential rain. . ._ water shortages, we have seen this torrential rain... i remember one at desert i visited _ torrential rain... i remember one at desert i visited a _ torrential rain. .. i remember one at desert i visited a few— torrential rain... i remember one at desert i visited a few years - torrential rain... i remember one at desert i visited a few years ago... i desert i visited a few years ago... yes, is growing, so they know it climate change is a huge risk for them, they have huge problems caused ljy them, they have huge problems caused by air pollution because of coal fired power plants and they know this is an issue they want to deal with but did the same time the chinese government has a balance that with delivering the wealth of a modern society to its people. it is a difficult compromise which they are trying to work through, but hopefully, one hopes that this is in the short term to say we are tackling this problem of energy shortages and hopefully in the longer term they will continue. they have made a huge investment in renewables and they will continue that investment and replace some of
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their coal—fired power stations with wind turbine and solar and the things we know work and is becoming more economical. i things we know work and is becoming more economical.— more economical. i read they want to become more economical. i read they want to laecome carbon _ more economical. i read they want to become carbon neutral _ more economical. i read they want to become carbon neutral by _ more economical. i read they want to become carbon neutral by 2060, - more economical. i read they want to become carbon neutral by 2060, so l more economical. i read they want to | become carbon neutral by 2060, so if you and i are having this conversation in this room in 2060, i am in my mid—80s, you are probably in your mid—705, is that a realistic target? it in your mid-70s, is that a realistic taraet? , ., ., in your mid-70s, is that a realistic taret? , ., ., , .,, target? it is hard to say, people think the technology _ target? it is hard to say, people think the technology is - target? it is hard to say, people think the technology is there. i target? it is hard to say, people | think the technology is there. we have accommodation of energy efficiency and renewables, probably plus some nuclear, china has a really big ambitions for nuclear power, building dozens of new nuclear power stations. should ever meet the energy demands we have got. it is possible, it is a stretch. we are ways underestimate the scale of the challenge that we face. this is about all the prosperity of the modern world, all the prosperity since the beginning of the industrial revolution, has been built on the ready, easy power of fossil fuels, built on the ready, easy power of fossilfuels, incredibly energy dense fuels, that we have been
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digging upforthe dense fuels, that we have been digging up for the last 150, 200 years. what we're asking is to transition away from that to new renewable forms of power. it is a massive ask, huge challenge for reality to their humanity. we have technology that is capable of it. there is another report saying not investing enough in renewables but we certainly need to start pouring money into it. we could do it better to distract and what we need to see in glasgow is the world getting started on this exciting adventure into a new world of energy. exciting adventures into _ into a new world of energy. exciting adventures into a _ into a new world of energy. exciting adventures into a new— into a new world of energy. exciting adventures into a new world - into a new world of energy. exciting adventures into a new world takes l into a new world of energy. exciting l adventures into a new world takes us into our next story. you knew that was happening. into our next story. you knew that was happening-— into our next story. you knew that| was happening._ there was happening. captain kirk! there we no. was happening. captain kirk! there we go- shall— was happening. captain kirk! there we go- shall we — was happening. captain kirk! there we go. shall we go _ was happening. captain kirk! there we go. shall we go back _ was happening. captain kirk! there we go. shall we go back to - was happening. captain kirk! there we go. shall we go back to texas? |
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the passengers, glenda rees, chris, audrey powers, and captain kirk, william shatner. listening in is our science correspondent. what william shatner. listening in is our science correspondent.— william shatner. listening in is our science correspondent. what you make of it? am i allowed _ science correspondent. what you make of it? am i allowed to _ science correspondent. what you make of it? am i allowed to mention - science correspondent. what you make of it? am i allowed to mention it - of it? am i allowed to mention it captain kirk? every other correspondent at the bbc before i came on has been talking about it and i do not know if i am allowed to? it and i do not know if i am allowed to?_ it looks _ and i do not know if i am allowed to?_ it looks as - and i do not know if i am allowed to?_ it looks as if - and i do not know if i am allowed to?_ it looks as if we i to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for— to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for a _ to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for a little _ to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for a little bit _ to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for a little bit more - to? go with it. it looks as if we are in for a little bit more of. are in for a little bit more of a wait, actually. if you look at the clock in the top right—hand corner of the screen, you can see a t minus 15 minutes and then we have at h which is counting down which is a whole, so it could be they are doing one or two final checks to see that the rocket and capsule system is ready to go before they resume the
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countdown proper to get the engines let. a little bit of a british connection here today. nicholas patrick, of yorkshire, a nasa astronaut for a number of years, went on the space shuttle twice, he is the flight director at blue origin. he is in charge of events today and he is the one who will decide whether or not this vehicle can leave the pad. but they are all sitting in the commerce captain, they are waiting for the ride of a life and we are watching. —— they are sitting, they are strapped in. what is blue origin's main goal in space? we heard it todayjeff bezos was the driver of the car of the four space astronaut, but what does he want to achieve in space? what he want to achieve in space? what ou have he want to achieve in space? what you have to _ he want to achieve in space? what you have to remember— he want to achieve in space? twat you have to remember about he want to achieve in space? wusgt you have to remember about bezos is he is a space geek. he loves the space, obviously a star track as a kid was a favourite tv programme of
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his and he started this company, blue origin, getting on for 20 years ago, of something as a hobby with the idea of building rockets, this ambition, this vision of being able to live off earths and while he has been building up his tattoo amazon empire, he has slowly been funding projects within it blue origin. mostly in stealth mode for a long time. he does not let people go around his factories to have a look at what is happening, but we know he is working hard. has been selling something like $1 billion of stock every year to fund what happens at blue origin and this vehicle, new shepherd, the rocket and capsule, the whole system is called new shepherd, is really the first product to come out of blue origin. he has other rockets are coming soon. there is one called new glenn, the clue there is in the name, it is
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afterjohn glenn, the famous american astronaut. he afterjohn glenn, the famous american astronaut. he went back into sace american astronaut. he went back into space at _ american astronaut. he went back into space at the _ american astronaut. he went back into space at the age _ american astronaut. he went back into space at the age of _ american astronaut. he went back into space at the age of 77. - american astronaut. he went back into space at the age of 77. yes, i american astronaut. he went back. into space at the age of 77. yes, mr glenn, senator _ into space at the age of 77. yes, mr glenn, senator glenn, _ into space at the age of 77. yes, mr glenn, senator glenn, as _ into space at the age of 77. yes, mr glenn, senator glenn, as he - into space at the age of 77. yes, mr glenn, senator glenn, as he was i glenn, senator glenn, as he was then, held the record for a long time as the oldest person in space and then the most recent flight of blue origin's new shepherd, that had the famed female aviator wally funk on board and she was 82, so she raised the record and now we have a william shatner, captain kirk, who is 90 and it may be a while before that record is beaten, i do not know. we are all getting older. the two of us might be able to afford at some point a seat on this vehicle because it is quite expensive, beyond my salary, but give me a few years and i might be there. there was a space journalist programme that was meant to be in
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the 19805 but never got off the ground. there are a lot of us very confused at the moment. on the top right of our screen, there is t —15 minutes and there is also a screen below it, h, and 1557, that clock is going up. where are we?- below it, h, and 1557, that clock is going up. where are we? well, the to one is going up. where are we? well, the top one is the _ going up. where are we? well, the top one is the kind _ going up. where are we? well, the top one is the kind of _ going up. where are we? well, the top one is the kind of like - going up. where are we? well, the top one is the kind of like the - top one is the kind of like the official countdown, the t. so if they were to get rid of the clock underneath, that is how far away we would be away from the launch, 15 minutes. but you often see this with rocket launchers. there is something they are not quite happy about, so they are not quite happy about, so they have a hold, they call a hold. sometimes these are built into the countdown. if you remember watching shuttle launches all those years, they would have special points when they would have special points when they would have special points when they would do that, and then the clock would resume after they had sorted one or two things out. just looking at the pictures here, i see people are starting to go down the steps from the launch tower,
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hopefully to get in a car and move away, because you wouldn't want to be that close when this rocket lifts off full stop the noise and the vibration would certainly be pretty unpleasant. vibration would certainly be pretty unleasant. , ., ., ., vibration would certainly be pretty unpleasant-— vibration would certainly be pretty unleasant. ., ., ~ ., unpleasant. jonathan amos, for the moment, thank _ unpleasant. jonathan amos, for the moment, thank you. _ unpleasant. jonathan amos, for the moment, thank you. they - unpleasant. jonathan amos, for the moment, thank you. they are - unpleasant. jonathan amos, for the moment, thank you. they are still. moment, thank you. they are still walking down that container. we will keep an eye on that but here on earth we will bring you the weather with chris. hello again. the amount of cloud will vary across the afternoon. across east anglia and southern england will have the best of the sunshine. across western areas it will continue to be pretty grey and damp with occasional spots of drizzle around our coasts and hills. temperatures in the mild side everywhere but particularly so in the sunshine across the south with temperatures into the high teens. another warm october day. overnight tonight, a grey one again
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with low cloud around, heavier rain starting to encroach into shetland, that is from a weather front that will continue to bring wet weather as we start the day here on thursday. along with that, strong winds reaching gale force at times, the rain trickling a little further south across scotland. the cloud thick enough for a spot of drizzle for western parts but there will be breaks in the cloud, central and eastern areas with the best of any sunshine across the midlands and parts of eastern england. that's your weather. this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines... beam me up, bezos — the final countdown is on for william shatner, as captain kirk prepares to blast off on a trip to the edge of space, in the next few minutes. the eu are to propose fewer border checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk, to try and address the row over trade. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think
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it is encumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement, and it is not working at the moment. fears about the impact on christmas, as the biggest commercial port in britain deals with a backlog of shipping containers. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. good afternoon. an anti—racism campaign group has called for hungary to be banned from international football, after their fans were once again involved in controversial scenes at a game against england. fifa have condemned the clashes between visiting fans and police during the world cup qualifier at wembley. a banner could be seen amongst the away fans prior to kick—off, in protest at england players taking the knee. shortly after, fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police, which authorities say began with racial abuse aimed at a steward. on the pitch, hungary scored first, beforejohn stones equalised. hungary have already been ordered to play two home matches behind closed doors, following the racism england players experienced there last month.
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well, fifa says in that statement that "its position remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as well as any form of discrimination or abuse. fifa has a very clear zero—tolerance stance against such abhorrent behaviour in football". there is a wider approach that is needed — there is a wider approach that is needed to— there is a wider approach that is needed to receive this club is one that in— needed to receive this club is one that in educational terms here we would _ that in educational terms here we would see — that in educational terms here we would see is one that needs to be put into— would see is one that needs to be put into special measures, need supervision, clearly needs to demonstrate how they are educating their people, how they are creating their people, how they are creating the change and changing behaviour in a way— the change and changing behaviour in a way that_ the change and changing behaviour in a way that is real, and we are not seeing _ a way that is real, and we are not seeing that— a way that is real, and we are not seeing that at the moment. so the approach _ seeing that at the moment. so the approach has been taken —— that have been taken _ approach has been taken —— that have been taken by the governing bodies are not— been taken by the governing bodies are not working. the swedish fa say manchester united forward anthony elanga was subjected to a racist comment by an opponent while playing for his country's under 21 side against italy yesterday. sweden have submitted a report
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to the match referee, following allegations made by the 19—year—old. the italian football federation said it denies the claims. the european under—21 championship qualifierfinished1—1. chelsea boss emma hayes says her side's packed season is "better than being bored" as they prepare to face juventus in the champions league tonight. as well as european football and their women's super league duties, they're in the fa cup semi—finals. five chelsea players will also join up with the england squad for two world cup qualifiers upon return from turin. i think it's hard for english teams, knowing that every weekend the intensity of our games are really, really tough. there's no denying leagues across europe have wonderful teams in them, but it's the speed and the intensity that a wsl game is played at that takes a lot out of players. but, you know, this is what happens in the men's game and we all have to adjust to that in our game. kenyan athlete agnes tirop has
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been found dead in her home in the country. she was a two—time world championship medallist, and finished fourth in the 5,000 metres at the tokyo olympics. kenyan police are still investigating the circumstances surrounding her death in the western town of iten. tirop set the world record for a women's only 10km road race in germany last month. athletics kenya say they are distraught at her untimely death. wales have called up 19—year—old uncapped exeter lock christ tshiunza for their autumn internationals. there is also a recall for wasps flanker thomas young, who beame eligible after he announced he willjoin cardiff. young was named in wayne pivac�*s squad, despite playing outside of wales for the rest of this season. he's given special dispensation to the welsh rugby union's 60—cap rule. wales play new zealand, south africa, fiji and argentina in the coming weeks. scotland have selected south africa—born sharks back—row dylan richardson for a two—day training camp before theirfirst autumn international. the 22—year—old has spent his entire
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career at the durban—based franchise, but qualifies for scotland through his father. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. u nless unless william shatner gets in the way. that is the story of the day! it is t -10 way. that is the story of the day! it is t —10 or so minutes. ten and a half minutes. we will not miss it, we will come back, that is the situation in texas. back to the uk. the uk's largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. the port of felixstowe, which handles over a third of the uk's freight container traffic, blamed haulage driver shortages. but officials say the situation is improving. the latest company to report issues is the entertainer, one of the uk 5 biggest toy retailers. its boss, gary grant, says they've had problems getting transportation to bring
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the containers from the ports to its uk warehouses. our news correspondent simon browning has more. simon, tell us about the problems the firm is facing.— the firm is facing. that's right. gary grant. — the firm is facing. that's right. gary grant, the _ the firm is facing. that's right. gary grant, the boss _ the firm is facing. that's right. gary grant, the boss of - the firm is facing. that's right. gary grant, the boss of the i gary grant, the boss of the entertainer has been speaking this afternoon about the problems his business is facing at felixstowe. he is struggling to get containers that are filled with toys destined for some of his 170 shops across the united kingdom, struggling to get those toys to shops. that's because of the shortage of hgv drivers that has been well documented across the uk. he said at the moment if you went into one of his shops around the uk, they are looking well stocked, and that's because for the last couple of months they have been working hard to make sure that stocks are high in the shops at the moment, because they really perceive there is going to be an enormous crunch in november and december, when large volumes of toys are coming into the country, and they don't think they are going to be able to get them towards the shops. so there is concern, and gary grant
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the boss believes there will be toys out of position. so there is not going to be a such a lack of toys in the uk, just think they will be stuck at port, which will cause a big problem, especially for parents who are after some of the top toys for christmas this winter. what who are after some of the top toys for christmas this winter. what are those top toys? — for christmas this winter. what are those top toys? he _ for christmas this winter. what are those top toys? he was _ for christmas this winter. what are those top toys? he was telling - for christmas this winter. what are those top toys? he was telling me | those top toys? he was telling me paw patrol is _ those top toys? he was telling me paw patrol is doing _ those top toys? he was telling me paw patrol is doing massive - those top toys? he was telling me i paw patrol is doing massive business this year. they had a movie out this summer and he this year. they had a movie out this summerand he said this year. they had a movie out this summer and he said that when some of the big toys have movies out, demand just absolutely explodes. so paw patrol has done good business for five to six years but he expects the demand on that will be huge, and also barbie. and he says the problem that toys will face as the ones that are under huge demand will be the ones that will see the biggest gaps. he did reiterate he didn't want to create a panic about toys, he said there will never be a shortage of toys in toy shops, they will always be there, but there will be certain items that will be missing this year. he feels, because of the issues of transportation of getting
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those toys from ports and warehouses and into his shops.— and into his shops. simon browning, thank ou and into his shops. simon browning, thank you so — and into his shops. simon browning, thank you so much. _ t minus about eight, eight minutes in texas, have got that right? seven minutes seconds. looking on from texasis minutes seconds. looking on from texas is sophie long. sophie, it is getting close. it texas is sophie long. sophie, it is getting close-— getting close. it is, it is getting close, getting close. it is, it is getting close. and _ getting close. it is, it is getting close, and rather— getting close. it is, it is getting close, and rather exciting - getting close. it is, it is getting close, and rather exciting as i getting close. it is, it is getting i close, and rather exciting as well, james. t —7 i think at the moment, so they arejust james. t —7 i think at the moment, so they are just going through the check list. we saw the our crew come out of the capsule and down the stairs, they have moved away from the tower, so the coast is clear. they are just now going through the final preparations, ready for take—off. and it is very exciting. i have been to a couple of these things now and actually it is really emotional for people who have worked on these projects for years, and so in a few moments time, we will see the new shepard launched from launch pad one, just about three miles
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behind me there, we are expecting it to be very loud, and the whole journey carrying a course william shatner, who played captain kirk for so many decades, carrying him up to the edge of space, more than 50 years after he first donned a spacesuit, he will now become a real—life space explorer. the whole journey should last less than 11 minutes, if it all goes according to plan. they will experience just over three minutes of weightlessness up there, where we he will experience views of planet earth that people say who have done it themselves say is life changing and that is what he has really been looking forward to, looking forward to being entranced by that view of planet earth. after those three minutes, they will then freefall, without a pilot on board, remember, free fall back to earth. a5 remember, free fall back to earth. as they approach the earth's surface, parachutes will be released to slow its guide down to earth and then hopefully we will see all four passengers, including of course william shatner, emerge from the capsule where no doubt they will be
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met byjeff bezos. he was the one who gave a few parting words of wisdom just over two months ago of course that he was in their exact position, so he will know exactly how they feel. position, so he will know exactly how they feel-— how they feel. you know and all those hollywood _ how they feel. you know and all those hollywood films, - how they feel. you know and all those hollywood films, sophie, | how they feel. you know and all i those hollywood films, sophie, in the minutes before take—off, the astronauts are pressing switches and so on, that is because they were the pilots. these people are not actually going to be doing the flying. what are they doing in these final minutes, just sitting there with their seat belts trapped on? i think they are listening to the control captain, because as you rightly point out, there is no pilot, no crew on board, just four passengers, so they have buckled and safely and basically been told to sit back and relax, as much as anyone can do that, when you are about to be catapulted on a rocket without any pilot on board. they have had training over the past two days, mostly basic training about what to do, how to act in zero gravity, how to be safe in that environment, and how to get out of the capsule in the rare case of an
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emergency. most of theirjourney will be sitting back and relaxing, they have been taught how to deal with the g force and what to do when they are up there, but yes, the main point of this mission for the 41 borders to enjoy the experience, and what an experience it will be, james. , ., ~ , ., what an experience it will be, james. , ., ~ i. �*, james. sophie, thank you. let's brina in james. sophie, thank you. let's bring in our— james. sophie, thank you. let's bring in our science _ james. sophie, thank you. let's i bring in our science correspondent jonathan amos. jonathan, we are all told before ourflights, sit jonathan amos. jonathan, we are all told before our flights, sit back, relax and enjoy the flight. do you think those are the final instructions from jeff bezos to those four astronauts?- instructions from jeff bezos to those four astronauts? well, he shook the _ those four astronauts? well, he shook the hand _ those four astronauts? well, he shook the hand of _ those four astronauts? well, he shook the hand of everybody i those four astronauts? well, he shook the hand of everybody as | those four astronauts? well, he - shook the hand of everybody as they got in the capsule. i'm sure they are excited. i know when i go on an aeroplane, i have slightly sweaty hands when we head down the runway. i wouldn't be surprised if the four individuals on top of this rocket have slightly sweaty hands at the moment. but injust have slightly sweaty hands at the moment. but in just a few minutes, they will get a big kick in the
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backside, as this rocket lifts off the pad here in west texas, and they will climb, climb straight up, aiming for100 will climb, climb straight up, aiming for 100 kilometres article just over the carmen line, as you heard sophie talk about all afternoon, this boundary with space, the internationally recognised line between the atmosphere ending and space beginning. it is a bit more, go to them that but we won't get into it today. —— karman line. once you get above that line, and not many people have come than 600 people have gone above 100 kilometres, so whether you recall them astronauts or flight participants, there is a huge debate going on at the moment, as to what we actually call these people, they will have been technically in space. when they come back they will have a big smile on their face, when they come back they will have a big smile on theirface, no doubt about it. if big smile on their face, no doubt about it. g; big smile on their face, no doubt about it. x: .., , ., about it. t -3, we will carry on talkin: about it. t -3, we will carry on talking up _ about it. t -3, we will carry on talking up till _ about it. t -3, we will carry on talking up till about _ about it. t -3, we will carry on talking up till about 30 - about it. t -3, we will carry on| talking up till about 30 seconds beforehand also. what does the space
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expert world make of the actual rocket, jonathan?— rocket, jonathan? yes, it is impressive- _ rocket, jonathan? yes, it is impressive. we _ rocket, jonathan? yes, it is impressive. we talk - rocket, jonathan? yes, it is impressive. we talk a - rocket, jonathan? yes, it is impressive. we talk a lot i rocket, jonathan? yes, it is- impressive. we talk a lot about elon musk and the fact he can bring his rockets back and land them, a lot of hullabaloo about that. of course jeff bizos beat him to that particular goal by one of those rockets we have seen her doing that shortly before massacre succeeded in doing it. of course the big difference between bizos and mask is this is what we call sub nautical —— suborbital. just a short hop and we come back down, whereas elon musk sends people into orbit, and we saw just a few weeks ago, in the realms of space tourism, four individuals, again, paid for by a billionaire, going up into orbit, several hundred kilometres above the earth and circling the globe. this particular rocket here doesn't have the capability to do that. nonetheless it is very impressive to see the way
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that it goes up under control and the way that it comes back down under control, the rocket part, the bisht apart lands on a pad and then we see the capsule come down under parachute, landing out in the desert. so to parachute, landing out in the desert. soto do this, yes, it is very impressive, no doubt about it. one minute and a0 seconds away, something like that now. we have seen the gantry move away from the rocket. you don't want that to be too close when the rocket lifts off. my too close when the rocket lifts off. my hands are getting sweaty, james, i don't know about yours! then;r my hands are getting sweaty, james, i don't know about yours!— i don't know about yours! they are, one minute — i don't know about yours! they are, one minute on _ i don't know about yours! they are, one minute on our— i don't know about yours! they are, one minute on our count _ i don't know about yours! they are, one minute on our count and - i don't know about yours! they are, one minute on our count and about| i don't know about yours! they are, i one minute on our count and about 15 seconds to go. jonathan, just take us through the last minute things, what happens before the rockets fired? 50 what happens before the rockets fired? _, , , ., fired? so the computers are in charre fired? so the computers are in charge here — fired? so the computers are in charge here now. _ fired? so the computers are in charge here now. this - fired? so the computers are in charge here now. this is - fired? so the computers are in charge here now. this is a - charge here now. this is a computer—controlled flight. the bottom of the rocket, we have these nozzles, and in the combustion chambers they will mix hydrogen and
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oxygen very powerful combination. the umbilicals easy at the moment is connecting to the rocket, that would attach, at that moment we will then be prepared for this rocket to lift. a5 be prepared for this rocket to lift. as i say, it will be a kick in the backside of everybody in that vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos, vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos. we — vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos. we are _ vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos, we are now— vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos, we are now 25 _ vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos, we are now 25 seconds - vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan amos, we are now 25 seconds or. vehicle. they will feel it. jonathan i amos, we are now 25 seconds or so from the launch.
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lift off. the rocket, organised, built by blue origin from jeff bezos, now takes off towards the edge of space. on board, four passengers, including 90—year—old
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william shatner. watching these pictures is jonathan william shatner. watching these pictures isjonathan amos, our science correspondent. jonathan, what are we seeing here? so science correspondent. jonathan, what are we seeing here?- what are we seeing here? so the rocket is heading _ what are we seeing here? so the rocket is heading straight - what are we seeing here? so the rocket is heading straight up. - what are we seeing here? so the | rocket is heading straight up. the first milestone will be the separation of the booster and the capsule. so that comes at about two minutes 30, two minutes a5 into the flight. normally the long range cameras, we've got a good shot here now, are able to capture this. so you will see the booster shut down, the capsule and detach itself from the capsule and detach itself from the booster and the two will continue to rise up because at that moment they are still about 75 kilometres above west texas. the momentum will carry them on up, but the capsule will be going ahead of the capsule will be going ahead of the booster. at the moment, because they are following that engine, the four people on board, including our captain kirk, he will be pressed back into his seat, he will be
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looking out the window, you will see everything disappearing below but it is a very steady flight, a very well controlled vehicle, this. if they run into difficulties that is what they call an escape system on that capsule. it would push itself away from the booster and then come back by a parachute. but everything looks absolutely sweet at the moment, and we are coming up on that moment actually now where the engine on the booster has shut down, and we should see the separation between the capsule and the booster. that really is the powered portion of the flight over. it is then all about ballistics. obviously we are heading up, we will get to a certain altitude, it is normally around 105, 106 kilometres above the earth, and then you fall back down, that is a pretty good shot. now we can see that the booster and the capsule
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have accelerated. still going up at this stage remember. still heading up this stage remember. still heading up towards the karman line, that boundary between the end of the atmosphere and the start of space. and it is really at this kind of moment now that they will begin to start to feel a little bit weightless. you know, when they get to the top of the climb, they will get out of their seats, they will unbuckle, and they will start to float around in the capsule. they will be laughing and they will be joking, they will be looking out the windows, very big windows in this capsule. and then the capsule will start to fall back to earth, and at a certain point they will get a message to get themselves back into their seats, to buckle in for the ride, the fall back down to earth. but so far, so good, james. it looks absolutely wonderful. what a view. it is amazing. what kind of communication will they have with mission control? 50
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communication will they have with mission control?— mission control? so they are in contact with — mission control? so they are in contact with mission _ mission control? so they are in contact with mission control i mission control? so they are in contact with mission control all mission control? so they are in - contact with mission control all the time, through the radio. because they are probably shouting and chatting to each other. they have had minimal training actually, only a couple of days. because this is a fully computer—controlled flight, there isn't really an awful lot for them to do inside the capsule. obviously they have to be aware, like when we go on an aeroplane, if there is some kind of emergency, they would be protocols on how to brace and that kind of thing. but most of the training they have received is about how to have fun up there. so when they unbuckle, they will float around. of course, it is an enclosed space. you don't want to, you know, kick william shatner in the face, because you are not looking where you are putting your feet, that kind of thing. you don't want to kick a 19—year—old man in the face. so they've been told how to organise themselves, how to behave in that weightless
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environment, how to use the handrails, how to control themselves so that they can move around and get themselves back into the seats when they come back down. but yes, i mean, the view up there will be extraordinary. i mean, we're looking down from the booster here, straight back down to west texas. but of course they will be looking out. they will be looking across the terrain of texas. they will see the mountains, they will see great rivers and lakes, and if they look up, they will see the blackness of space, they will see the curvature of the earth, a remarkable thing. you know, even when we get into an aeroplane, you can kind of make out that the earth is curved, but they will really see it up there, and thatis will really see it up there, and that is a wonderful view, it really, really is. everybody who has experience that has said it is an absolutely fantastic view. 50 experience that has said it is an absolutely fantastic view. so what are we now. _ absolutely fantastic view. so what are we now, james? _ absolutely fantastic view. so what are we now, james? did - absolutely fantastic view. so what are we now, james? did you - absolutely fantastic view. so what| are we now, james? did you count absolutely fantastic view. so what - are we now, james? did you count as to when they actually lifted up? i think it was about five minutes ago,
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something like that, i think it was, i'm getting carried away here, sorry. i i'm getting carried away here, sor . ~' i'm getting carried away here, sor . ~ ., ., i'm getting carried away here, sor . ~ ., , sorry. i think we are about six minutes in- — sorry. i think we are about six minutes in. does _ sorry. i think we are about six minutes in. does that - sorry. i think we are about six minutes in. does that mean i sorry. i think we are about six - minutes in. does that mean there is about four minutes to go before they are back down on earth? yes, so the next milestone will be the landing of this booster. this is the bit that i absolutely love. so this really is heading down to planet earth at quite a lick, at a real speed. they have grid fins that help control where it is moving, how it is moving, and they also have air brakes on it as well, but still it will be coming in too fast. so when we come up on about seven and a half, eight minutes, a about there into the flight, they will be coming up into the flight, they will be coming up really, really quickly on the landing pad, and they will ignite that engine once more to take out that engine once more to take out that last bit of energy that they need to land softly on the pad, and we will also see the legs come out as well. and it is a wonderful site. it kind of looks like thunderbirds,
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we have to talk about science fiction, here it is now. yes, we have lit the flame, and they will bring it in under control. it will be walking pace when it finally touches down on the pad. what a wonderful view that is. that is modern engineering, quite extraordinary.— modern engineering, quite extraordina . ., , extraordinary. that is the booster landinu , extraordinary. that is the booster landing. am _ extraordinary. that is the booster landing. am i— extraordinary. that is the booster landing, am i right? _ extraordinary. that is the booster landing, am i right? that's- extraordinary. that is the booster landing, am i right? that's the i landing, am i right? that's the booster. landing, am i right? that's the booster- it _ landing, am i right? that's the booster. it comes _ landing, am i right? that's the booster. it comes back - landing, am i right? that's the | booster. it comes back quicker. landing, am i right? that's the i booster. it comes back quicker. it is a lot heavier than the capsule. the capsule is coming down now as well. it will take a little while. it doesn't come down to a specific position, it is going to come down just out in the desert. we will be looking for the parachutes when they come out, because obviously, as it's coming down now, it is coming down too fast, so they will release parachutes will stop there should be three of them, i think, that come out, that will give them that soft little landing. again, a little bit too fast, a little bit uncomfortable if you were to just land like that
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just under those three parachutes, so they give a little puff at the bottom of the capsule, like they do with the russian soyuz capsules when they come back, they fire a pyrotechnic system of pyrotechnics underneath the capsule that take out that last bit so it is just a gentle bump. that last bit so it is 'ust a gentle bum -. , that last bit so it isjust a gentle bump._ because i that last bit so it isjust a gentle i bump._ because again, we bump. there it is. because again, we want our 90-year-old _ bump. there it is. because again, we want our 90-year-old to _ bump. there it is. because again, we want our 90-year-old to have - bump. there it is. because again, we want our 90-year-old to have a i want our 90—year—old to have a reasonably soft landing. so i mean this is great now, they will be back in their seats, they will be strapped in. we have had the drogue is and now come the main shoots. these will open up, they will flare and that will really bring us in nice and slow so that we can touch down in the desert. i nice and slow so that we can touch down in the desert.— down in the desert. i heard a little bit of scattered _ down in the desert. i heard a little bit of scattered applause - down in the desert. i heard a little bit of scattered applause on i down in the desert. i heard a little bit of scattered applause on our. bit of scattered applause on our sound feed, sometimes ten minutes goes quickly, sometimes it goes slowly, how do you think there's ten minutes have gone for those, if we call them astronauts, restaurants?
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yeah, i reckon it has raised by, what do you think? i yeah, i reckon it has raised by, what do you think?— yeah, i reckon it has raised by, what do you think? i think they are auoin to what do you think? i think they are going to ask. _ what do you think? i think they are going to ask. can _ what do you think? i think they are going to ask, can we _ what do you think? i think they are going to ask, can we do _ what do you think? i think they are going to ask, can we do it - what do you think? i think they are going to ask, can we do it again?! | going to ask, can we do it again?! yes, quite right, although it is expensive, if you want to purchase a ticket off mr bay is us. richard branson, as you know, has a rocket plane. —— mr bizos. there is an advertised price, $a50,000 for a similar kind of light. jeff bezos does not advertise the price. you have a conversation on the phone and you agree a place —— you agree a price. william shatner is going for free i'm sure but one or two other individuals and their will have parted with a sizeable sum of money for this roller—coaster space roller—coaster ride, if you like. coming in very slow now so you can see it is going to be a nice, soft landing, but look for that puffjust as we touch the desert sands, and
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that will take up that last bit of dissent energy that gives them and even smoother touchdown. you haven't got a50 grand spare have you, james? jonathan, the eagle has landed. they are back on earth. probably all shaking hands, slapping each other on the backs. they are back on earth, what a trip, what a voyage. to wheel out our star trek clich 5 now, he boldly went. to wheel out our star trek clich s now, he boldly went.— to wheel out our star trek clich s now, he boldly went. space, been there, now, he boldly went. space, been there. done _ now, he boldly went. space, been there, done that. _ now, he boldly went. space, been there, done that. jonathan, i now, he boldly went. space, been there, done that. jonathan, the i there, done that. jonathan, the moment, thank you so much. and sophie long joins
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us now from texas. did you watch it to take and land? we did. quite an emotional experience of standing here on the ground and watching a rocket shoot out, knowing you have four human beings on there and one of them is 90—year—old william shatner and you can see from where i am standing here, the rocket dislodged from the capsule and then you know they are going up to space. you watch the rocket chasse come down and then it is a few moments later that you can see people start crying out, i can see people start crying out, i can see them, i can see them! you can see them, i can see them! you can see them, i can see them! you can see the capsule and the parachutes have been deployed and then it glides for what seems, from where i'm standing, quite slowly, i'm sure it is not from the capsule, back to the earth's surface, so it appears everything has happened as it should do. after several delays, first by 2a hours, then it several minutes, then another, but it seems there is a journey, voyage, launch, then another, but it seems there is ajourney, voyage, launch, has happened successfully. we wait to see the passengers come out of the
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capsule and i'm sure many people here will be desperate to speak to all of them. but of course, william shatner, the nonagenarian science fiction star that made history today. fiction star that made history toda . ~ ., , ., fiction star that made history toda. ., fiction star that made history toda. today. who needs at special effects when ou today. who needs at special effects when you can _ today. who needs at special effects when you can have _ today. who needs at special effects when you can have the _ today. who needs at special effects when you can have the real - today. who needs at special effects when you can have the realthing? l when you can have the real thing? how loud was it? it when you can have the real thing? how loud was it?— when you can have the real thing? how loud was it? it was not as loud as i was expecting _ how loud was it? it was not as loud as i was expecting it _ how loud was it? it was not as loud as i was expecting it to _ how loud was it? it was not as loud as i was expecting it to be. - how loud was it? it was not as loud as i was expecting it to be. pretty i as i was expecting it to be. pretty loud. it was a pretty loud, james, but not deafening as i was expecting it to be. what is really loud art the sonic booms as the rocket comes back and makes contact with the earth, but it is kind of an exciting experience, as you can imagine, standing here and watching it all take place. in the middle of nowhere, one of the most desolate parts of the texas desert. we nowhere, one of the most desolate parts of the texas desert.— parts of the texas desert. we have not parts of the texas desert. we have got pictures _ parts of the texas desert. we have got pictures of— parts of the texas desert. we have got pictures of that _ parts of the texas desert. we have got pictures of that capsule - parts of the texas desert. we have got pictures of that capsule which i got pictures of that capsule which has arrived, i do not know if you are able to see some of those pictures in the middle of tundra or does it also won. we are obviously waiting for the teams to arrive.
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let's bring jonathan back in. they knock on the door? how do they get out? ,, ., ., . knock on the door? how do they get out? ., . . ., out? so, the ground crew will come in and they — out? so, the ground crew will come in and they will— out? so, the ground crew will come in and they will release _ out? so, the ground crew will come in and they will release the - out? so, the ground crew will come in and they will release the hatch. i in and they will release the hatch. i have a feeling actually one of the reasons we were late lifting off was because they were doing some leak checks, because obviously when you are 100 kilometres above the earth, there is not much air there, pretty much in a vacuum, so they needed to be short probably that there was a perfect seal. so it is not like there will be a handle that they will operate. they will wait for the ground crew to come along and to get them out as well. hopefully the ride was so smooth, a bit like being on a roller—coaster, that they will have no ill effects. it is a way is possible that someone might feel a little bit queasy, i suppose. the loadings are not great. they are a bit like being on a roller—coaster. we can see the axa now which is
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coming in towards the capsule and they will come along, check everybody is all right and they normally bring in some steps because they hatch itself is a little bit above ground. i do not think they will ask william shatner tojump will ask william shatner to jump out, will ask william shatner tojump out, they will give him some steps with a hand rail, as the other three as well, let's be clear about that, to enable them to walk out. there will be quite a crowd, i'm sure, that will turn up very shortly and we hopefully will get to see at some point william shatner emerge waving to everybody and us here on television. fantastic. did to everybody and us here on television. fantastic. did they take cameras with _ television. fantastic. did they take cameras with them? _ television. fantastic. did they take cameras with them? i'm _ television. fantastic. did they take cameras with them? i'm sure i television. fantastic. did they take| cameras with them? i'm sure some television. fantastic. did they take i cameras with them? i'm sure some of them will have — cameras with them? i'm sure some of them will have done. _ cameras with them? i'm sure some of them will have done. it _ cameras with them? i'm sure some of them will have done. it was _ cameras with them? i'm sure some of them will have done. it was quite i them will have done. it was quite interesting actually to watch the space tourism flight that elon musk performed just the other week. as i was saying a little bit earlier to you, these four individuals that he
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sent up went orbital, several hundred kilometres above the earth and went round and round and round, they all took their mobile phones and were taking pictures of planet earth. that is a bit more interesting than the dog and whatever, the house you might show someone in a pub to come back and say here, i took this picture on my phone of planet earth, what do you think? ., , , , think? there was me with my very 21st century _ think? there was me with my very 21st century question, _ think? there was me with my very 21st century question, are - think? there was me with my very 21st century question, are meant i think? there was me with my very| 21st century question, are meant to say that they take their phones? spending more time on the ground than they did in space! that spending more time on the ground than they did in space!— than they did in space! that is kind ofthe than they did in space! that is kind of the nature _ than they did in space! that is kind of the nature of _ than they did in space! that is kind of the nature of this. _ than they did in space! that is kind of the nature of this. it _ than they did in space! that is kind of the nature of this. it is - than they did in space! that is kind of the nature of this. it is very i of the nature of this. it is very short. is it worth it? if you are a billionaire i guess it is loose change. for most of us are looking on, the vast majority that is looking on, it is an extraordinary amount of money that people have to part with in order to ride on these
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new space vehicles that are being offered further fee paying passengers. just seeing the first of the ground crew arrive here now, tapping on the windows, checking everybody is ok. we will see some steps coming very shortly. will the prices come down? who knows. you speak to the experts and they say at this market is going to be worth $3 billion by the end of this decade. that sounds like a lot of money, but when the flights themselves cost so much, maybe it is not quite as big as you might think. nasser now will sell you lodgings on the international space station. if you broke into a b&b, £100 a night is not bad, it will cost you $100,000 a night on the international space station. —— if you book into a b&b for stock and you have to pay to get
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there and back on a rocket provided by elon musk which will probably cost tens of millions of dollars. i do not know how many will go to space in the next few years, and ordinary people which is inverted commas because if you are a billionaire you're not really an ordinary person, are youbut certainly it will be done at more than in the past. i mentioned the figure that fewer than 600 have been above 100 calamities in the past 60 years since we first started human space flight. —— 100 kilometres. in the next few years i'm sure it will be thousands that go into space and they will not be professionals either. the vast majority of them. they will be ordinary people, albeit maybe wealthy, but they will be ordinary people, not professional astronauts who have dominated that card of space fair up until this point. card of space fair up until this oint. ~ . ., card of space fair up until this oint, . . ., ., card of space fair up until this oint, . .., ., ., ., “ card of space fair up until this oint. ~ _, ., ., ., ~ ., , point. we continue to look at these ictures of point. we continue to look at these pictures of the _ point. we continue to look at these pictures of the ground _ point. we continue to look at these pictures of the ground crew - point. we continue to look at these pictures of the ground crew goes i point. we continue to look at these pictures of the ground crew goes to work on it, as you said, moving those steps in place and then opening the hatch. is thatjeff
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bezos himself? he opening the hatch. is that jeff bezos himself?— opening the hatch. is that jeff bezos himself? he will be the official. bezos himself? he will be the official- as — bezos himself? he will be the official. as you _ bezos himself? he will be the official. as you know, - bezos himself? he will be the official. as you know, he i bezos himself? he will be the official. as you know, he kind| bezos himself? he will be the i official. as you know, he kind of stood down from day—to—day activities at amazon for stock —— he will be there for sure. the company does not have a reputation for doing things fast and so maybe he has gone in there and thought amazon is looking after itself and now i needed to get one of my other companies are moving a bit quicker. i think that is william shatner lying there, i think. still waiting in his seat. kind of looks like william shatner to me. don't know if he was doing the hand gesture, the famous hand gesture you are supposed to do with your fingers. i dare say he will probably emerge and do that. jonathan, what to do nasser, as we wait for the hatch to be opened, and we will cover that straightaway, what dirt nasa astronauts make of the new kind of astronauts? —— what
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do nasa astronauts make? if the new kind of astronauts? -- what do nasa astronauts make?— the new kind of astronauts? -- what do nasa astronauts make? if you meet them publicly — do nasa astronauts make? if you meet them publicly they _ do nasa astronauts make? if you meet them publicly they very _ do nasa astronauts make? if you meet them publicly they very much - do nasa astronauts make? if you meet them publicly they very much welcome j them publicly they very much welcome it. they see the way space is going now and to be honest, kind of doesn't really need to open up. —— it does need to open up. the days when you could only get space when you have the right stuff, remember that? i you have the right stuff, remember that? ., the you have the right stuff, remember that? i do. the famous book, the film, that? i do. the famous book, the film. tom — that? i do. the famous book, the film, tom wolfe, _ that? i do. the famous book, the film, tom wolfe, indeed. - that? i do. the famous book, the film, tom wolfe, indeed. those days are over and if we are ready to make the most of what space can offer us, and remember, this is kind of the glamour and a bit. we have lots of satellites out there doing amazing things looking down at earth, communications, earth observation, that kind of thing, if we are ready to make the most of what space can offer us, then it needs to get cheaper and it needs to democratise and this is a step along that way.
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yes, it is the billionaires and millionaires that are taking those first steps, but we hope at some stage it will open itself up for many more people, more ordinary people. more ordinary people. talking about billionaires, do you think elon musk, the arrival billionaire, who has space x company and watching right now, ? billionaire, who has space x company and watching right now,? he billionaire, who has space x company and watching right now,?— billionaire, who has space x company and watching right now,? he may well be, he is and watching right now,? he may well be. he is very — and watching right now,? he may well be. he is very busy — and watching right now,? he may well be, he is very busy in _ and watching right now,? he may well be, he is very busy in eastern - and watching right now,? he may well be, he is very busy in eastern texas i be, he is very busy in eastern texas where he has a facility called star base where he is building... the hatch is open! _ base where he is building... the hatch is open! the _ base where he is building... the hatch is open! the hatch - base where he is building... the hatch is open! the hatch is i base where he is building... the| hatch is open! the hatch is going base where he is building... the i hatch is open! the hatch is going to 0 en, jeff hatch is open! the hatch is going to open. jeff bezos — hatch is open! the hatch is going to open, jeff bezos is _ hatch is open! the hatch is going to open, jeff bezos is going _ hatch is open! the hatch is going to open, jeff bezos is going to - hatch is open! the hatch is going to open, jeff bezos is going to do i hatch is open! the hatch is going to open, jeff bezos is going to do it i open, jeff bezos is going to do it and he sticks his head and. hello? did you enjoy that? he is saying.
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saying about elon musk, if you go to the coast of texas, right on the border with mexico, elon musk is building an enormous rocket, the biggest rocket we have ever seen, far bigger than the rockets that sent men to the moon with the apollo and there will be reusable, go up and there will be reusable, go up and come down like we have seen here now, fully reusable. there are tawdry powers. she is the first out, big hugs all round. that looks like captain kirk himself, he is out, it givesjeff captain kirk himself, he is out, it gives jeff bezos a captain kirk himself, he is out, it givesjeff bezos a nice big hug. thank you, sir, that was a great ride. �* ., ., ride. blue origin, who we have called captain _ ride. blue origin, who we have called captain kirk _ ride. blue origin, who we have called captain kirk for - ride. blue origin, who we have called captain kirk for many i ride. blue origin, who we have - called captain kirk for many years,
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william shatner has crossed the line space and becomes the oldest man to go into space at. space and becomes the oldest man to go into space at— go into space at. jonathan, your final thoughts? _ go into space at. jonathan, your final thoughts? keep _ go into space at. jonathan, your final thoughts? keep watching l go into space at. jonathan, your - final thoughts? keep watching this, we want to see this kind of system if far more often. we have any seen two flights from bezos, this one and the one he went on injuly. if this kind of thing is really going to open up, you need to see many, many more flights. that goes for richard branson as well. we have only seen one flight from him so far with that crew on the back of his rocket plane. this needs to become a routine affair if it is really going to open up this new domain of the space tourism. on that note, let's drink some champagne. he space tourism. on that note, let's drink some champagne.— space tourism. on that note, let's drink some champagne. he threw it on the round! drink some champagne. he threw it on the ground! i — drink some champagne. he threw it on the ground! i wonder— drink some champagne. he threw it on the ground! i wonder if— drink some champagne. he threw it on the ground! i wonder if he _ drink some champagne. he threw it on the ground! i wonder if he can - the ground! i wonder if he can afford another bottle. jeff bezos
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there, william shatner and our own correspondentjonathan watching. correspondent jonathan watching. back down correspondentjonathan watching. back down to earth now. it's caused problems since day one of the brexit process and now eu officials are on their way to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving from great britain to northern ireland. a fresh row has broken out between the eu and the uk over the arrangements agreed as part of the brexit deal. earlier, the conservative party co—chair, oliver dowden, said the government would wait to see the eu plans in full, but it would "engage fully and constructively" on the matter. i'm joined now by rte's europe editor and author of brexit and ireland, tony connelly. what can we expect from the eu? we are what can we expect from the eu? - are expecting four papers altogether from maros sefcovic he was the chief eu interlocutor in the next hour or so or 15 minutes, he is going to
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have a news conference here in brussels and these will cover the key areas where the most contentious friction created between great britain and northern ireland has been felt by traders and also any more political sense areas which have impinged upon the whole identity of sense of britishness amongst some unionist politicians, so these will cover medicines to ensure that medicines are produced in great britain and licensed in great britain can't circulate in northern ireland, which of course will be operating under the rules of the eu single market. —— can circulate. that will cover food movements between great britain and northern ireland, huge mixed consignments of agri— food products to supermarkets in northern ireland and there will be a paper on customs formalities and a paper on a northern ireland institutions in
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stormont, northern ireland assembly and executive and indeed are businesses and stakeholders, how they can have more of a say or more oversight and how the northern ireland protocol is operated. we are going to see the detail when this news conference happens, but already we know that these papers, all these proposals, should reduce to massive extent, to a very significant extent, to a very significant extent, the range of checks and controls that are happening on goods moving from great britain to northern ireland and this is designed to show the eu is listening to northern ireland businesses and politicians and is prepared to make life easier as far as the protocol is concerned. we life easier as far as the protocol is concerned.— is concerned. we spent the day dartin: is concerned. we spent the day darting around _ is concerned. we spent the day darting around westminster- is concerned. we spent the day| darting around westminster and belfast in brussels but what about dublin, what does the republic of ireland's government make of this? island was obviously front and centre of the brexit negotiations,
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the withdrawal agreement for three orfour the withdrawal agreement for three or four years and the withdrawal agreement for three orfour years and it the withdrawal agreement for three or four years and it obviously wanted to get its strategic interests protected in it would have emerged from these negotiations and the principal objective was to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland, to avoid infrastructure and checks. that is achieved by the protocol, but obviously if the unionist population in northern ireland, and just unionist population in northern ireland, andjust up unionist population in northern ireland, and just up the road from dublin, if they are not happy and there is political instability that is a problem of the irish government. they have been a somewhat caught in the middle of this particular attention, hoping for the commission to be as flexible as possible, but not necessarily wanting to go on a solo run away from the european mainstream. but i think they will be largely supportive of the measures this
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afternoon. ., ~ supportive of the measures this afternoon-— speaking in the lords, brexit minister lord frost was asked how the uk government can say they are being asked to apply eu law without consent when adhering to the european court ofjustice was agreed in the northern ireland protocol. my my lords, there is of course a difference between what is in an international instrument and what happens at the day—to—day and... as i am sure it is understood very well. the critical difficulty that is being created in northern ireland is being created in northern ireland is about individual legal instruments which come out in pursuit in from the european union every day and are applied to northern ireland automatically and without any sort of process. and thatis without any sort of process. and that is not a system that is going to be sustainable and that is why we
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have said are arrangements need to change to bring the law in line with democratic norms elsewhere and it is why we need to find a solution that everybody in northern ireland can get behind and thinks it represents their interests. lard get behind and thinks it represents their interests.— get behind and thinks it represents their interests. lord frost speaking in the house _ their interests. lord frost speaking in the house of _ their interests. lord frost speaking in the house of lords. _ our correspondent chris page sent us this update on the political reaction in northern ireland to these developments. i suppose here at belfast port where checks have been in operation since january the ist of this year, this is where all political rhetoric, all the negotiations if you like, really hits reality. the protocol in northern ireland, i suppose, operates on two different levels. one is the practical, one is political. when it comes to the practicalities, it is businesses who have experienced the biggest degree of disruption who will be watching what happens across in brussels this afternoon most closely.
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the businesses that have been hardest hit, many of them small businesses, they are the companies that have been relying on firms in the rest of the uk for supplies. it has got to the stage where firms in scotland, england and wales have either stopped delivering to northern ireland because it simply they would say is not worth worth the hassle any more because of the extra paperwork and checks, or certainly the deliveries that are still coming are happening more slowly, so many businesses are saying look, we are coming into that crucial christmas season now and we need to know business is going to start running smoothly again. for them it is all about minimising the checks, controls that are happening in ports across northern ireland, but also northern ireland being the sort of place that is, the politics are extremely important and for unionists, it is about more than business. although they will talk about the business implications a lot, it is also about sovereignty, identity, northern ireland's place in the uk. to the unionist parties, they will say the northern ireland protocol is in effect an economic border in their own country, something that cuts off
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northern ireland from the rest of the uk, reorientates the economy away from london and towards brussels and therefore dublin and therefore it is threatening to the very nature of the united kingdom itself. so the parties that do not take that view, the nationalist parties, the likes of the cross community alliance party, they will say they oppose brexit altogether, the protocol was some sort of consequence of that that could have been avoided, but it is the least worst option and they will also suggest unionists could be exaggerating the practical impact of the protocol, for example they will say there is no widespread day—to—day impact on consumers here. but the biggest unionist party, the democratic unionists, have said that if there are not substantial changes to the protocol, if the sea border is not scrapped basically, come the end of the month and into november, they are prepared to pull their ministers out of the power—sharing devolved government at stormont and that would in effect bring down those power—sharing institutions, so the stakes are certainly high.
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the uk's largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. the port of felixstowe, which handles over a third of the uk's freight container traffic, blamed the busy pre—christmas period and haulage driver shortages. but officials say the situation is improving. megan patterson reports. packed up and now backed up. christmas stock stuck in thousands of containers at felixstowe. normally, containers would pass through here in two or three days, now it is taking more than a week. this is the uk's largest commercial port, a backlog here likely to have an impact in december. food i think will continue to move. pigs in blankets, turkeys. the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain us more than happily. but toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in. more than a third of the uk's freight container traffic
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is handled at felixstowe. shipping giant maersk is now re—routing some of its biggest ships away from the port to elsewhere in europe, using smaller vessels to unload goods in an attempt to ease supply chain pressure. adam's haulage business moves ioo containers a day, but a lack of space at felixstowe means his drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. that has just all created a perfect storm. but this is a global issue, with similar situations in ports across the us, china and east asia too. problems here first began to emerge injuly. port officials say the situation at felixstowe has improved in the last few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the supply chains and retailers to work through some very, very sophisticated logistics
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planning to prioritise the right goods to get to us on time. the government says it is working to increase the uk's hgv driver capacity, but resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be fully delivered. megan patterson, bbc news. kind of awards ceremony, william shatner is getting decorated byjeff bezos. he hasjust taken shatner is getting decorated byjeff bezos. he has just taken a shatner is getting decorated byjeff bezos. he hasjust taken a brief ride into the edge of space. it looks like... looks like he's getting his astronaut wings. let's listen in the. getting his astronaut wings. let's listen in the-— listen in the. that is all right, cu s. listen in the. that is all right, guys- well. — listen in the. that is all right, guys. well, good _ listen in the. that is all right, guys. well, good job! - listen in the. that is all right, |
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guys. well, good job! perfect. listen in the. that is all right, - guys. well, good job! perfect. the guys. well, good 'ob! perfect. the ennina of guys. well, good 'ob! perfect. the penning ofthe— guys. well, good job! perfect. the penning of the wings _ guys. well, good job! perfect. the penning of the wings is _ guys. well, good job! perfect. the penning of the wings is more - penning of the wings is more complete than the flight into space it self. let's speak now to dr suzie imber, associate professor in space physics at leicester university. was the science, public relation, entertainment or inspiration? l entertainment or inspiration? i think it was all of those things. the element of this technology required is incredible. having watched other humans go into space is inspection, outreach, all of the things you just mentioned. what is inspection, outreach, all of the things you just mentioned. things you 'ust mentioned. what did ou make things you just mentioned. what did you make of — things you just mentioned. what did you make of the _ things you just mentioned. what did you make of the flight? _ things you just mentioned. what did you make of the flight? i _ things you just mentioned. what did you make of the flight? i was - you make of the flight? i was astonished by how quickly it all went. , ~ , , . went. yes, i think the public, when ou think went. yes, i think the public, when you think about _ went. yes, i think the public, when you think about going _ went. yes, i think the public, when you think about going into - went. yes, i think the public, when you think about going into space, l you think about going into space, our minds go to the international space station perhaps when we have astronauts living and working for months at a time. this is a very different proposition to that. just
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ate few minutes of the floating round in microgravity environment. just over in tens of minutes really. what is itjeff bezos trying to do with blue origin? is hejust about this publicity created by william shatner or specific ambitions to go further into space? it is shatner or specific ambitions to go further into space?— further into space? it is hard to know at the _ further into space? it is hard to know at the moment, - further into space? it is hard to know at the moment, very - further into space? it is hard to| know at the moment, very early further into space? it is hard to - know at the moment, very early days with blue origin. they have not done many launches and each launch in the early stages does tend to create quite a lot of publicity and public excitement. i certainly think there will be more launches are similar to this, but of course, as with many space companies, i'm sure his ambitions go beyond the kind of launch wejust saw, ambitions go beyond the kind of launch we just saw, which is to go to 100 club above the earth's service, just to the edge of space, just above the common line which is how we define the edge of space and back. these space entrepreneurs aim going further. are you from that show astronauts have what it takes?
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this is it your ambition! if he show astronauts have what it takes? this is it your ambition!— this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me _ this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me a _ this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me a ticket _ this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me a ticket i _ this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me a ticket i would - this is it your ambition! if he was to offer me a ticket i would take l to offer me a ticket i would take it, cannot deny that, that is for sure. in it, cannot deny that, that is for sure. ., , ., ., ., sure. in that show that there were a lot of ou sure. in that show that there were a lot of you who _ sure. in that show that there were a lot of you who wanted _ sure. in that show that there were a lot of you who wanted to _ sure. in that show that there were a lot of you who wanted to prepare i sure. in that show that there were a | lot of you who wanted to prepare the way to get into space. how does this, what we have seen with william shatner, get you and other scientists close towards space? welcome again, this is very different proposition. at the moment, wejust have different proposition. at the moment, we just have a a few minutes of the perceived weightlessness and then come back to the earth again. the dream of many who want to be astronauts is a little more ambitious in a sense that as a scientist, my dream i guess it would be to do experiments in space, the microgravity environment allows as a laboratory to do different kinds of physics. so it doing science in spaceis physics. so it doing science in space is a sort of what the international space station and national space probes allow us to
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do. having said that, some of these programmes such as virgin galactic, which is offering something not too dissimilar to what we saw with blue origin, they offer you a few minutes on the micro gravity environment and there are experiments we can do in that environment that will be helpful. it is a different kind of environment, but stillspace helpful. it is a different kind of environment, but still space for sites to be done, even on these short launches.— sites to be done, even on these short launches. should also say you did win astronauts _ short launches. should also say you did win astronauts do _ short launches. should also say you did win astronauts do you - short launches. should also say you did win astronauts do you have i short launches. should also say you i did win astronauts do you have what it takes? it has been fantastic to speak to you, thank you very much. in the past 15 minutes, captain kirk — aka william shatner — has been talking about what he saw, and how he felt, saying it was the most profound experience of his life. it was so moving to me. this experience has been unbelievable. uc weightlessness, my stomach went up,
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and this was so weird, but not as weird as the power. this is what i have never experienced, it is one thing to say at the sky is fragile, it is all true. but what is not true, what is unknown, is that this pillow, there is this soft group, look at the colour. is a ten mile? depends how you measure it, maybe 50 miles _ depends how you measure it, maybe 50 miles. but— depends how you measure it, maybe 50 miles. �* , ., ., depends how you measure it, maybe 50 miles. �* i. ., ., depends how you measure it, maybe 50 miles. �* ., ., ., :: :: miles. but you are going at 2050 mass er miles. but you are going at 2050 mass per hour. _ miles. but you are going at 2050 mass per hour, so _ miles. but you are going at 2050 mass per hour, so whatever i miles. but you are going at 2050 mass per hour, so whatever the l mass per hour, so whatever the mathematics is. —— 250 mph. you are through blue and into black and it is mysterious and galaxies but what you see is black and what you see
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down there is light and that is the difference. and not to have this... william shatner explaining his experience of space with the man who sent him, jeff bezos. back down to earth now. a scottish social media user has succeeded in getting lidl supermarket to remove its "lumpy" oat milk from sale after using her platform for her campaign. luna's videos on tiktok had millions of views. lidl has now recalled all its oat milk with a use—by date in the next year. it says fresh batches would be available soon. the 23—year—old student started monitoring lileust free oat milk in august when she noticed a carton was "lumpy" and "smelly". tiktoker luna, known as "lunahtic", on the platform joins us now from scotland. when did you realise that something was not right? i at when did you realise that something was not right?_ was not right? i at first noticed robabl was not right? i at first noticed probably early _ was not right? i at first noticed probably early august - was not right? i at first noticed probably early august of i was not right? i at first noticed probably early august of that l probably early august of that something was not right and then i
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let lidl know on about the 15th. you filmed the experience, how important was that in drawing attention to what was happening, and we are seeing some of that filming now? aha, seeing some of that filming now? lot of people seem to think that maybe it was just something wrong with the batch and i did that to kinda prove it was any cartoon i was picking up off the shelf that was and smelly. —— any carton. hour picking up off the shelf that was and smelly. -- any carton. how long did it take for— and smelly. -- any carton. how long did it take for people _ and smelly. -- any carton. how long did it take for people to _ and smelly. -- any carton. how long did it take for people to take - and smelly. -- any carton. how long did it take for people to take your. did it take for people to take your filming seriously, for the company to notice? , to notice? the minute i put the video out _ to notice? the minute i put the video out i _ to notice? the minute i put the video out i had _ to notice? the minute i put the video out i had hundreds i to notice? the minute i put the video out i had hundreds of i to notice? the minute i put the - video out i had hundreds of comments of people saying it has been exactly the same with our milk floating in our tea. the same with our milk floating in ourtea. it the same with our milk floating in our tea. it took a long time lidl to acknowledge anything, but people were relating straightaway. refill? were relating straightaway. really stuid were relating straightaway. really stupid question, _ were relating straightaway. really stupid question, what _ were relating straightaway. really stupid question, what is _ were relating straightaway. really stupid question, what is wrong i were relating straightaway. really stupid question, what is wrong with lumpy oat milk? can you notjust get through the lumps? irate lumpy oat milk? can you not 'ust get through the lumps?i through the lumps? we did a couple of exoeriments _ through the lumps? we did a couple of experiments and _ through the lumps? we did a couple of experiments and put _ through the lumps? we did a couple of experiments and put the - through the lumps? we did a couple of experiments and put the oat i through the lumps? we did a couple of experiments and put the oat milk| of experiments and put the oat milk in a strainer, blender and there was just this awful smell and the lumps would not go away no matter what we did. it wasn't sour and just not
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very nice. i5 did. it wasn't sour and 'ust not very n_ did. it wasn't sour and 'ust not ve nice. , , .,, very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it — very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it was — very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it was sour. _ very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it was sour. we - very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it was sour. we just i very nice. is the problem resolved now? -- it was sour. we just had | very nice. is the problem resolved i now? -- it was sour. we just had the now? —— it was sour. we just had the other day lidl now recalled all the oat milk and they will be making a new product, so we are super excited about that. are you a bit sick of oat milk now or not? ida. about that. are you a bit sick of oat milk now or not?— about that. are you a bit sick of oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line _ oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line for _ oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line for sure! _ oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line for sure! thank - oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line for sure! thank you i oat milk now or not? no, i will be first in line for sure! thank you so j first in line for sure! thank you so much for telling _ first in line for sure! thank you so much for telling us _ first in line for sure! thank you so much for telling us all _ first in line for sure! thank you so much for telling us all about i first in line for sure! thank you so j much for telling us all about that, we really do appreciate it. ila we really do appreciate it. no problem- _ now for a look at the weather with chris. this afternoon has been really, really mild once again, temperatures reached 18 degrees in plymouth earlier, and although many of us have had cloud for quite a bit of us have had cloud for quite a bit of the day, we have seen some sunshine across southern england and parts of east anglia, it is even brightened up for a time in scotland as well. you can see the extent of the cloud on the satellite picture. across western areas, it has been thick enough to give us the occasional spot of drizzle and as we go on through the night it will
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continue to be damp, just a few spots here and there, if you missed in fog patches as well. across the far north of scotland, the conference will be working on here. the wins will strengthen overnight and we will start to see some rain arriving in parts of shetland towards the end of the night, but a mild night, temperatures about eight to 11 degrees. tomorrow, a windy speu to 11 degrees. tomorrow, a windy spell of weather for scotland, gales for a time across shetland, orkney, as this band of heavy rain pushes southwards across scotland. for northern ireland, england and wales, it will be similar to today, a lot of cloud around, occasional spot of drizzle in the west, some breaks in the cloud and for most of us it is mild again, temperatures up to 17 or 18 degrees. the irish foreign minister says new eu proposals will see most checks on food products moving between northern ireland and great britain scrapped, as the uk government pushes for changes.
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that is not a system that is going to be sustainable. that is why we have said these government's arrangements need to change. check, two, one. captain kirk boldly goes where no man has gone before, for real — william shatner has become the oldest person to go to space, on a private flight with amazon founderjeff bezos spot now, and four and full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh. we start with the news that david brooks, the bournemouth and wales international player, has announced he is suffering from cancer were recently diagnosed. he has released a statement via his social media channels just in the last minute or two, saying it is a very difficult message for me to write. i have been
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diagnosed with stage two hodgkins lymphoma and will begin a course of treatment next week, he says, although this has come as a shock to myself and my family, the prognosis is a positive one and i am confident i will make a full recovery and be back playing as soon as possible. he thanked in particular the football association of wales, who spotted the illness, and without that he might not have been able to detect it as he has done. that is david brooks, the 24—year—old bournemouth player who is a welsh international as well announcing in the just in the last few minutes he has been diagnosed with stage ii hodgkins lymphoma. the intent is to begin a course of treatment next week. he hasn't played since the end of september but that is david brooks, the bournemouth and wales player. of course we will have more on that as we get it. anti—racism group the fare network have called for hungary to be banned from international football, after violent clashes between their fans and police during the world cup qualifier against england at wembley. fifa have condemned the incident,
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as well as the banner that was revealed by away fans, prior to kick—off, in protest at england players taking the knee. then fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police, who said it began with racial abuse aimed at a steward. the game finished 1—1, and followed england players receiving racist abuse during the reverse fixture in budapest last month. that led to hungary being told to play two matches behind closed doors. well, fifa says in that statement that "its position remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as well as any form of discrimination or abuse. fifa has a very clear zero—tolerance stance against such abhorrent behaviour in football". we can't really allow the hungarian fan base to go and watch, regardless of where they are playing, whether it is in london, and one doesn't think the sorts of things happen at wembley anymore, certainly not from
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away fans, so i think it is surprising that they sort of effectively challenge the police and push them away, it is not something we see very often. new watford manager claudio ranieri says he's very confident the club can avoid relegation from the premier league. they're on seven points after seven games, enough to get the previous manager xisco munoz the sack. but the former leicester boss says he's happy to be back in england, a week before he turns 70. ifi if i feel good, if i feel emotion, i want _ if i feel good, if i feel emotion, i want to— if i feel good, if i feel emotion, i want to continue. that's it. football, _ want to continue. that's it. football, for me, is my life, from when _ football, for me, is my life, from when i _ football, for me, is my life, from when i was — football, for me, is my life, from when i was young, i think about playing — when i was young, i think about playing football, and after becoming manager, _ playing football, and after becoming manager, and nowi playing football, and after becoming manager, and now i have a lot of energy— manager, and now i have a lot of energy to — manager, and now i have a lot of energy to give to my players and i want _ energy to give to my players and i want to _ energy to give to my players and i want to continue. kenyan athlete agnes tirop has been found stabbed to death in her home in the country, with her husband being treated as a suspect by police. tirop was a two—time world championship medallist, finished fourth in the 5,000 metres
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at the tokyo olympics, and just last month set the world record for a women's only 10km road race in germany. athletics kenya say they are distraught at her untimely death. wales have called up 19—year—old uncapped exeter lock christ tshiunza for their autumn internationals. there is also a recall for wasps flanker thomas young who became eligible after he announced he willjoin cardiff. young was named in wayne pivac�*s squad, despite playing outside of wales for the rest of this season. he's given special dispensation to avoid the welsh rugby union's 60—cap rule. wales play new zealand, south africa, fiji and argentina in the coming weeks. scotland have selected south africa—born sharks back—row dylan richardson for a two—day training camp before theirfirst autumn international. the 22—year—old has spent his entire career at the durban—based franchise, but qualifies for scotland through his father. that's all the sport for now.
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as we've been reporting, the eu is to set out proposals later to address the row about trade in northern ireland. the eu's proposals, which it calls far—reaching, are expected to involve reduced checks on goods and medicines. the post—brexit arrangement, known as the northern ireland protocol, was introduced to help prevent checks along the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here to help explain what this is all about. chris, let's strip away all the jargon and go through it bit by bit. first of all, what is the northern ireland protocol? 50 first of all, what is the northern ireland protocol?— ireland protocol? so it is the northern _ ireland protocol? so it is the northern ireland _ ireland protocol? so it is the northern ireland bit - ireland protocol? so it is the northern ireland bit of i ireland protocol? so it is the northern ireland bit of the l ireland protocol? so it is the i northern ireland bit of the brexit withdrawal agreement, the deal that took us out of the european union, and we've got a map that can show us and we've got a map that can show us a little bit of what it actually does. the map basically tells you that the protocol sets up a series of checks and controls. i think we will see a map, with a bit of luck. it sets up a series of checks and controls, here we go, between great
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britain and northern ireland, so within the uk, and that has made it harder to send some goods from britain into northern ireland, which makes the unionist community very unhappy. the reason that has been set up is to avoid any hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, which of course is in the eu, and avoiding a hard border, a very important part of the northern ireland peace process. when the map zooms out like that, you realise why that is important, also to avoid that hard border for the european union. once stuff is in ireland, in the republic of ireland, it is in the eu single market and it can go anywhere within that whole blue zone of the european single market. so the eu jealously guards the borders of the single market. on the borders of the single market. on the other hand the uk is saying, yeah, but the rules we have at the moment essentially set up a dividing line within our own country and for the unionist community in northern ireland in particular, constitutionally it appears to set northern ireland apart from the rest of the country.
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northern ireland apart from the rest of the country-— of the country. next question, sausaue of the country. next question, sausage was. _ of the country. next question, sausage was, what _ of the country. next question, sausage was, what are - of the country. next question, sausage was, what are they? l of the country. next question, - sausage was, what are they? sausage was, the sausage was, what are they? sausage was. they are — sausage was, what are they? sausage was. they are a _ sausage was, what are they? sausage was. they are a gift — sausage was, what are they? sausage was, they are a gift for— sausage was, what are they? sausage was, they are a gift for the _ sausage was, what are they? sausage was, they are a gift for the tabloid i was, they are a gift for the tabloid headline writer, because who doesn't like a story about the british banger? again, it is about the eu single market, there is a ban, an absolute ban on exporting anything into the eu single market, which is a chilled meat product. so frozen sausages are ok, chilled sausages are not. and because the northern ireland protocol means that northern ireland protocol means that northern ireland basically follows the rules of the eu single market for all goods, then once it were to be implement it in full, it would mean that sausages would not be allowed to be sent from great britain into northern ireland. 0 cess which was —— we understand that the eu will announce a series of measures, and one we understand will be that the sausage was over, there will be no longer a ban specifically for
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northern ireland from britain to northern ireland from britain to northern ireland. they are recognising a little bit more that northern ireland is a special case and there will be a whole series of other measures they will announce which they say will get rid of a lot of checks between great britain and northern ireland but not all of them. ., ., . , northern ireland but not all of them. ., ., . them. onto realtechnicalities now, them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european _ them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european court, _ them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european court, why— them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european court, why is- them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european court, why is that i them. onto realtechnicalities now, the european court, why is that so | the european court, why is that so important? the the european court, why is that so important?— important? the european court of justice is the _ important? the european court of justice is the ultimate _ important? the european court of justice is the ultimate arbiter i important? the european court of justice is the ultimate arbiter of l justice is the ultimate arbiter of eu law, essentially the supreme court of the european union, so anything to do with the laws regarding the european single market essentially goes to the european court ofjustice if they are not settled before then. and again because northern ireland is following those rules, european court has been designed, this was agreed by the government two years ago, as the ultimate overseer of the northern ireland protocol. it is now saying that is not acceptable, that there has to be another layer in there, and european court ofjustice and the other eu court ofjustice,
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the eu is willing to take some big steps in its view to make the practical difficulties on the ground more willing to overcome. it is not willing to renegotiate the text of what is now an international treaty signed less than two years ago. looking at that text, what is article 16?— looking at that text, what is article16? . '~ ,�* . looking at that text, what is article16? . '~,~ . '~ article 16? article 16 is article 16 ofthe article 16? article 16 is article 16 of the new _ article 16? article 16 is article 16 of the new northern _ article 16? article 16 is article 16 of the new northern ireland i of the new northern ireland protocol, that is the bit if you like that people have called the nuclear button. it means that either side, if they are not happy with the way things are going, if the protocol is causing economic or social difficulties, then you can trigger article 16 and suspend parts of the protocol. you can't get rid of the protocol. you can't get rid of the protocol altogether but you can suspend specific parts of it. now the eu doesn't think that is justified yet because it says that uk hasn't tried hard enough to actually implement the protocol in full, but the british government has made it pretty clear that it thinks that the conditions for triggering article 16 have been met. if it is
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to do that, after a few weeks a pretty intense negotiations between the two sides, then i think we have to look for an eu response. in the brexit process, as you know, people often say, james, it is life but not as we know it. i had to get a william shatner reference in there somewhere! that is what article 16 might do, it will take a few weeks yet before we know whether we get to that point. you yet before we know whether we get to that oint. ., ., , that point. you have set the bar re that point. you have set the bar pretty high- _ that point. you have set the bar pretty high. chris _ that point. you have set the bar pretty high. chris morris, i that point. you have set the bar pretty high. chris morris, thank| that point. you have set the bar i pretty high. chris morris, thank you so much. we can speak now to the labour peer and shadow minister for task force europe, baronessjenny chapman. baroness chapman, thank you so much forjoining us. what you expect from the eu? i forjoining us. what you expect from the eu? , . . ., , the eu? i expect the eu will come up with some constructive _ the eu? i expect the eu will come up with some constructive proposals, i with some constructive proposals, thlet's— with some constructive proposals, that's what — with some constructive proposals, that's what we've been led to believe — that's what we've been led to believe is _ that's what we've been led to believe is can happen, and we are hoping _ believe is can happen, and we are hoping that— believe is can happen, and we are hoping that the government will consider— hoping that the government will consider them in good faith. this could _ consider them in good faith. this could he — consider them in good faith. this could he a — consider them in good faith. this could be a day where we take a step
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forward _ could be a day where we take a step forward in _ could be a day where we take a step forward in this process, and i am hopeful— forward in this process, and i am hopeful that we can get a little bit closer— hopeful that we can get a little bit closer to — hopeful that we can get a little bit closer to achieving some stability, mainly— closer to achieving some stability, mainly for— closer to achieving some stability, mainly for the people in northern ireland _ mainly for the people in northern ireland but actually for all of us in the _ ireland but actually for all of us in the uk — ireland but actually for all of us in the uk who really want to get on and move _ in the uk who really want to get on and move on from this now. we have left the _ and move on from this now. we have left the european union and we need to resolve _ left the european union and we need to resolve these outstanding issues so that _ to resolve these outstanding issues so that we — to resolve these outstanding issues so that we can move on and stop having _ so that we can move on and stop having to — so that we can move on and stop having to hear about sausage was and what have _ having to hear about sausage was and what have you. is having to hear about sausage was and what have you-— what have you. is labour happy for the european _ what have you. is labour happy for the european court _ what have you. is labour happy for the european court of _ what have you. is labour happy for the european court ofjustice i what have you. is labour happy for the european court ofjustice to i the european court ofjustice to retain a roll? irate the european court ofjustice to retain a roll?— the european court ofjustice to retain a roll? we are less hung up about those _ retain a roll? we are less hung up about those issues _ retain a roll? we are less hung up about those issues than _ retain a roll? we are less hung up about those issues than the i about those issues than the government appears to be today, given— government appears to be today, given that — government appears to be today, given that it wasn't at all hung up about— given that it wasn't at all hung up about this — given that it wasn't at all hung up about this two years ago when it negotiated the treaty. we think the main thing is to get goods flowing and to— main thing is to get goods flowing and to achieve some sort of, as i say, _ and to achieve some sort of, as i say, stability for businesses and communities in northern ireland. given_ communities in northern ireland. given that — communities in northern ireland. given that the government did agree that northern ireland was going to stay within the single market, there
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is going _ stay within the single market, there is going to _ stay within the single market, there is going to be some role for the sq. _ is going to be some role for the ecj. exactly how that happens i think— ecj. exactly how that happens i think is— ecj. exactly how that happens i think is something that could be subject— think is something that could be subject to that conversation between the uk _ subject to that conversation between the uk and the european union. at the uk and the european union. at the moment, it seems that there are no red _ the moment, it seems that there are no red lines — the moment, it seems that there are no red lines as such, and i think what _ no red lines as such, and i think what we — no red lines as such, and i think what we need is positive engagement to see _ what we need is positive engagement to see really whether getting hung up to see really whether getting hung up on _ to see really whether getting hung up on one — to see really whether getting hung up on one issue like that is something that is worth bringing the whole _ something that is worth bringing the whole thing down over, or whether there _ whole thing down over, or whether there is— whole thing down over, or whether there is another solution that can be found — there is another solution that can be found. ., , be found. the government says it wants to get _ be found. the government says it wants to get rid _ be found. the government says it wants to get rid of _ be found. the government says it wants to get rid of the _ be found. the government says it wants to get rid of the protocol, i wants to get rid of the protocol, the eu is offering some proposals which keep it intact. what would labour do, would you get rid of it entirely? taste labour do, would you get rid of it entirel ? ~ ., �* u, labour do, would you get rid of it entirel ? ~ ., �* _, ., entirely? we wouldn't come out therefore a _ entirely? we wouldn't come out therefore a reason, _ entirely? we wouldn't come out therefore a reason, it _ entirely? we wouldn't come out therefore a reason, it is - entirely? we wouldn't come out therefore a reason, it is there i entirely? we wouldn't come out| therefore a reason, it is there to preserve — therefore a reason, it is there to preserve the good friday agreement. but what _ preserve the good friday agreement. but what you do have to do is make sure, _ but what you do have to do is make sure. as _ but what you do have to do is make sure. as ever— but what you do have to do is make sure, as ever in northern ireland, that all— sure, as ever in northern ireland, that all communities, that you have the confidence of all communities. now clearly at the moment there is a
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problem _ now clearly at the moment there is a problem. we don't deny that, and that is— problem. we don't deny that, and that is why— problem. we don't deny that, and that is why we are very keen to hear what _ that is why we are very keen to hear what the _ that is why we are very keen to hear what the proposals are this afternoon. we are optimistic and we will look_ afternoon. we are optimistic and we will look at — afternoon. we are optimistic and we will look at them, as we hope the government will, in good faith, and we will— government will, in good faith, and we will talk— government will, in good faith, and we will talk to communities and businesses and elected leaders in northerh— businesses and elected leaders in northern ireland to work out whether these _ northern ireland to work out whether these proposals are sufficient. if they are — these proposals are sufficient. if they are not, then it is right that they are not, then it is right that the uk _ they are not, then it is right that the uk government replies, and you enter— the uk government replies, and you enter this _ the uk government replies, and you enter this negotiation, and it is a dialogue — enter this negotiation, and it is a dialogue. that is the right way to continue — dialogue. that is the right way to continue. what isn't the right way is to be _ continue. what isn't the right way is to be antagonistic and to provoke a fight _ is to be antagonistic and to provoke a fight this — is to be antagonistic and to provoke a fight. this government seems a bit addicted _ a fight. this government seems a bit addicted to _ a fight. this government seems a bit addicted to the brexit argument. the labour— addicted to the brexit argument. the labour party is not. we want to make brexit— labour party is not. we want to make brexit work. — labour party is not. we want to make brexit work, and we think today could _ brexit work, and we think today could be — brexit work, and we think today could be a — brexit work, and we think today could be a moment where we move a little bit _ could be a moment where we move a little bit closer to that.— little bit closer to that. baroness jenn little bit closer to that. baroness jenny chapman _ little bit closer to that. baroness jenny chapman from _ little bit closer to that. baroness jenny chapman from labour, - little bit closer to that. baroness i jenny chapman from labour, thank little bit closer to that. baroness - jenny chapman from labour, thank you so much.
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one of the uk's biggest film industry events, the london film festival continues — at a time when many cinemas have been struggling to attract audiences, since the lifting of covid restrictions — last year's event was largely held online because of the pandemic. one of the filmmakers showcasing his work, who is also shortlisted for the the festival's filmmaker bursary award is rob savage, director of the new horror film dashcam shot on smart phones — hejoins us now. hi, rob. hire, how is it going? would you _ hi, rob. hire, how is it going? would you describe _ hi, rob. hire, how is it going? would you describe this - hi, rob. hire, how is it going? would you describe this as - hi, rob. hire, how is it going? would you describe this as a i hi, rob. hire, how is it going? . would you describe this as a covid horror film? would you describe this as a covid horrorfilm? it would you describe this as a covid horror film?— horror film? it is a horror movie set during _ horror film? it is a horror movie set during the — horror film? it is a horror movie set during the kind _ horror film? it is a horror movie set during the kind of _ horror film? it is a horror movie set during the kind of of - horror film? it is a horror movie set during the kind of of covid. l horror film? it is a horror movie i set during the kind of of covid. we made this other horror movie last year, called host, which was all about lockdown, and this new movie is kind of about the world opening back up again and people tentatively going back outside. the back up again and people tentatively going back outside.— back up again and people tentatively going back outside. the people want to watch films _ going back outside. the people want to watch films about _ going back outside. the people want to watch films about the _ going back outside. the people want to watch films about the lockdown i going back outside. the people want| to watch films about the lockdown on the pandemic or do we just want to forget all about it? i the pandemic or do we 'ust want to forget all about it?_ forget all about it? i think people robabl forget all about it? i think people probably just _ forget all about it? i think people probablyjust want _ forget all about it? i think people probably just want to _ forget all about it? i think people probably just want to forget - forget all about it? i think people probably just want to forget all i probably just want to forget all about it and the main thing we wanted to do was make this kind of roller—coaster horror movie that people could enjoy that would get
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people could enjoy that would get people out to the cinema again and have that communal experience together, which is so central to horror movies. and all of the kind of, you know, ithink we horror movies. and all of the kind of, you know, i think we would be doing a disservice to not mention the lockdown or covid at all, but it is very much kind of in the background.— is very much kind of in the back round. ., h. , is very much kind of in the backuround. ., , , i. background. right. how scary is your film, background. right. how scary is your film. then? — background. right. how scary is your film. then? it's— background. right. how scary is your film, then? it's pretty _ background. right. how scary is your film, then? it's pretty scary! - background. right. how scary is your film, then? it's pretty scary! but - film, then? it's pretty scary! but it's very fun. _ film, then? it's pretty scary! but it's very fun. as _ film, then? it's pretty scary! but it's very fun, as well. _ film, then? it's pretty scary! but it's very fun, as well. i _ film, then? it's pretty scary! but it's very fun, as well. i don't - it's very fun, as well. i don't think it's going to give everyone numbers —— nightmares was not dashcam, can you tell us what it is all about, then, and the premise of the dash cam? it’s all about, then, and the premise of the dash cam?— the dash cam? it's a tough one to exlain, the dash cam? it's a tough one to earplain. it — the dash cam? it's a tough one to earplain. it is— the dash cam? it's a tough one to explain, it is about _ the dash cam? it's a tough one to explain, it is about a _ the dash cam? it's a tough one to explain, it is about a conspiracy i explain, it is about a conspiracy theorist live stream who flouts covert restrictions to come over to the uk and visit an old friend of hers, and in doing so kind of whips up hers, and in doing so kind of whips up this whirlwind of chaos, which ends with the two characters getting chased by a demon across the british countryside. so it's a bit of a weird one. countryside. so it's a bit of a weird one-— countryside. so it's a bit of a weird one. .,, . ,, ., . weird one. rob, what kind of a response _ weird one. rob, what kind of a response of— weird one. rob, what kind of a response of be _ weird one. rob, what kind of a response of be had _ weird one. rob, what kind of a response of be had from - weird one. rob, what kind of a l response of be had from people weird one. rob, what kind of a - response of be had from people who have seen it? it’s response of be had from people who have seen it?— have seen it? it's been really
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interesting — have seen it? it's been really interesting and _ have seen it? it's been really interesting and i'm _ have seen it? it's been really interesting and i'm really - interesting and i'm really interested to see what the british audience makes of it. we played at the toronto film festival for a lot of north american critics, and come you know, people's response very much depended on whether they want to see a movie about covid, whether they are, kind of, you know, there are a lot of mixed feelings about that, including lockdown, including covid, including a conspiracy theorist character, and the movie was a tasteful thing to do at this point, but i think it isjust part of the conversation, which is what we wanted. is of the conversation, which is what we wanted-— of the conversation, which is what we wanted. , . , . . we wanted. is a terrifying watching our own we wanted. is a terrifying watching your own film _ we wanted. is a terrifying watching your own film with _ we wanted. is a terrifying watching your own film with other _ we wanted. is a terrifying watching your own film with other people? | we wanted. is a terrifying watching i your own film with other people? no, it's the best. — your own film with other people? tic, it's the best, the best feeling in the world, to sit in the back of the cinema and watch people's shoulders jump up cinema and watch people's shoulders jump up when you play a good jump scare, it's the best. rab jump up when you play a good 'ump scare, it's the bestfi scare, it's the best. rob savage, thank you _ scare, it's the best. rob savage, thank you for— scare, it's the best. rob savage, thank you forjoining _ scare, it's the best. rob savage, thank you forjoining us. - officials in the us are investigating possible cases of so—called 'havana syndrome', this time in their embassy in colombia. the mysterious illness was first reported in cuba, in 2016, and us diplomats have since reported
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cases around the world. the latest incident comes days before us secretary of state antony blinken is due to visit the country. with me to discuss what we know about the situation is bbc�*s security correspondent, gordon corera. gordon, first of all, what is havana syndrome?— gordon, first of all, what is havana s ndrome? ~ . , , ., syndrome? well, the answer is that it's a mystery. _ syndrome? well, the answer is that it's a mystery. is — syndrome? well, the answer is that it's a mystery, is the _ syndrome? well, the answer is that it's a mystery, is the truth. - syndrome? well, the answer is that it's a mystery, is the truth. it's - it's a mystery, is the truth. it's an affliction which has hit us diplomats and spies, starting in cuba in 2016, hence the name havana syndrome, in which those people often felt a pressure or pain in their head, headaches, disturbances, sometimes very long lasting symptoms, which were debilitating. often a noise, as well. first of all in cuba, but then cases in china a year or two later, and since then, they have been at least 200 reports, accelerating in the last few months, including berlin, vienna, vietnam, and now colombia, as well. truth?
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and now colombia, as well. why colombia? _ and now colombia, as well. why colombia? what _ and now colombia, as well. why colombia? what are _ and now colombia, as well. why colombia? what are they looking for in colombia, and how can us officials protect against possible symptoms? the officials protect against possible symptoms?— officials protect against possible s mtoms? , , ., ., symptoms? the problem is no one tuite symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows _ symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for _ symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for sure _ symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for sure what - symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for sure what it - symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for sure what it is. - symptoms? the problem is no one quite knows for sure what it is. it i quite knows for sure what it is. it has been a mystery. there is some suspicion and certainly is some evidence pointing to it being some kind of directed energy, perhaps some kind of microwaves perhaps linked to surveillance, although other people have claimed that perhaps it is psychogenic, in other words socially, psychologically induced. that has certainly been dismissed by many of the people who have suffered it, and by some of the experts who have looked at it, but i think what is complicated is different cases may be due to different cases may be due to different things and there may be a core of real place —— cases, with other people also reporting symptoms, which have been brought into this title of havana syndrome, or unexplained or anomalous health incidents, as they are formally known. and the problem is without knowing what has really caused it exactly, it is really hard for the us to protect its diplomats from it.
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the cia has started a task force to try and look into what the cause might be and whether someone is doing it to us diplomats and spies, but at the moment what is happening as it is simply being reported, and sometimes people are being made in fact, medically evacuated out of countries, sometimes their families are being affected, and the concern is that it might be having a real impact on us diplomacy, with some diplomats being nervous about hosting is —— postings and what might be happening in some missions. over the past week on the bbc news channel we have been taking a look at the 6 contenders for the title of britain's best new building, the riba stirling prize 2021 which will be awared tomorrow. the shortlist includes an eco—friendly mosque in cambridge, a stunning bridge linking two halves of an ancient castle in cornwall and a mixed office and residential development the at one point was earmarked for demolition by a london council. today it is the turn of the windermere jetty museum in the lake district. the museum is home to a unique collection of boats. the building itself boasts black—oxidised copper clad walls and large cantilevered overhangs
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and is the first contemporary building on the shore of windermere for more than 50 years. ifound it an enormous privilege being trusted to imagine a building in such a beautiful setting. this building is intentionally a very atmospheric visitor experience. i'm rowan seaford. i'm an associate director at carmody groarke. i'm andy groarke, of carmody groarke architects, and we are the architects for the windermerejetty museum. the museum is seen and approached from all sides, so you can arrive by boat to one of the jetties, or you can arrive by foot or by car by land. the centrepiece of the wooden wet dock is surrounded by a cluster of copper—clad buildings. we spent a year up here to understand the seasons and how different materials weather in the lake district environment. over time, the building will develop, it's inevitable, oxidisation, in order to give the building quite
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a timeless quality. the brief for this building i was to create a world—class building, in which to house the internationally- significant boat collection. it needs to be a building that - could accommodate large—scale boats, that was exciting for the public to want to visit. _ but also, importantly, i because it sat within one of our great national parks — i the lake district national park — it had to be part of- the landscape it was within. sustainability has been really central to the concept of the building. we have systems such as the lake—source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we've selected, wherever possible, local materials, so that the travel from source to site is as short as possible. the building has a zero—waste strategy so, actually, all of the domestic waste water is treated on—site and it's filtered through the landscape and reed beds, so it can then be discharged back into the lake as clean water.
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the site isjust amazing. it reflects boat—building, it reflects restoration, i it reflects conservation. some of the success of what the team has achieved here is a building that is simultaneously foreground and background. foreground's the visitor experience, it's the building that's here. and yet, it's the background, it's the backdrop to a beautiful landscape setting and immersing yourself in a fantastic collection. and we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tomorrow night at 7.30pm. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with chris. today, there has been a lot of cloud across the uk, but they have been some breaks in the cloud, it brightened up for a time in scotland but the best part of the sunshine has been across parts of east anglia and the south—east of england. this was st ives in cornwall, and along the coastline eastwards and southwards, we saw temperatures of 18 degrees in plymouth, this afternoon, very mild indeed. meanwhile across western areas, the cloud has been taken up for some drizzle. with that cloud slashing its way into western coasts and hills, that is where we have seen the patches of drizzle that will continue to be the case really as we go through this evening and overnight, with the cloud thick enough to bring an odd spit of drizzle in the air across wales, north—west england, northern ireland and western areas of scotland. otherwise, quite a bit of dry weather overnight, it will be mild on account of other cloud, temperatures between nine and 11 celsius, then towards the end of the night, we will start to see some
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rain arriving in shetland. that rain is from this cold front that will be pushing on, as we go into the first part of thursday. notice the isobars are squeezing just ahead of that front, it indicates it will be quite windy, with gales for a time in shetland, orkney and probably highland this band of increasingly heavy rain continues to slowly push its way southwards across scotland through the rest of the day. for northern ireland, england and wales, quite a bit of dry weather but like today a bit of cloud, thick enough today a bit of cloud, thick enough to give the odd spit of drizzle across western areas, just like today, there will be some breaks in the cloud, particularly across east wales, central and eastern parts of england, temperatures reaching highs of 70 degrees, whereas iii degrees is average for this time of year. friday, the cold front continues to push southwards, this one followed by a good wodge of cold air. by friday, the front is very weak as it pushes into the south of both england and wales, just a few spots of rain on it, not a lot though, and is that clear is true, actually most of the uk will have sparkling blue
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skies and sunshine. not a great deal of cloud, but as the sun comes out, temperatures go down, eight degrees in aberdeen, ten for newcastle thru friday afternoon. further south, you will notice those temperatures are also beginning to drop away. it will be a cold night friday night with a frost across parts of the north—eastern uk, and saturday might not end up being too bad a day, though there will be some rain arriving across western areas as we go through the afternoon. sunday, strengthening south—westerly winds pick up, that will bring us a milder air as well, temperatures for some could reach 17 or 18 degrees across parts of the south as we go through the second half of the weekend. that is your latest weather. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines. one of the uk's biggest toy retailers is warning delays at ports and issues with supply chains will mean shortages this christmas. most checks on food products moving between northern ireland and great britain will be scrapped under new eu proposals — according to the irish foreign minister — as the uk government pushes for changes. it is incumbent upon us as a government and i think it is incumbent upon the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. and at half past 5 — the eu's lead negotiator is due to host a press conference in brussels — about measures to ease flow of goods from britain to northern ireland. also this hour: care homes in england are struggling to recruit staff and there are now more than a hundred thousand
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job vacancies.

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