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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  October 13, 2021 1:00pm-1:30pm BST

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officials from brussels head to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. the row about post—brexit checks has caused delay and consternation, now the eu says it has far—reaching proposals. to resolve the issue. it is incumbent upon us as a government — and i think it is incumbent upon the eu — to make sure that we have a sustainable future arrangement, and it is not working at the moment. we will explain what is going on and talk to our correspondent in brussels, belfast and westminster. fears of christmas shortages, as britain's biggest commercial port struggles to shift a backlog of shipping containers. care homes in england are struggling to recruit staff, and there are now more than 100,000 vacantjobs. the final frontierfor
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captain kirk, as he prepares to blast off into space. the korean tv series that has the world gripped in its tentacles — the incredible success of squid game. and coming up on the bbc news channel: fifa condemns the reaction by hungary fans to england's players taking the knee, and the clashes with police that followed during the world cup qualifier at wembley. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. it's caused problems since day one of the brexit process and, now, eu officials are on their way to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk.
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a fresh row had broken out between the eu and the uk over the arrangements agreed as part of the brexit deal which cover those checks. earlier, the conservative party co—chair 0liver dowden said the government would wait to see the eu plans in full, but would "engage fully and constructively" on the matter. 0ur brussels correspondent jess parkerjoins me now. yes, these proposals have been months in the making. a response to uk calls for change. important to stress we do not have the details yet, they welcome later. but brussels see this as a big offer and not one it was easy to get everyone here to agree to. morning. this man, if you don't know him yet, you may well soon. maros sefcovic, recently visiting queen's university in belfast. he is in charge of drawing up the eu's answer for trying to sort out this. checks on goods arriving in
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northern ireland from great britain. while some post—brexit controls have been delayed, businesses hit by changes are looking for long—term solutions. we can see a situation that is workable. yes, we'll leap in there with both feet and relish the opportunity. but at the moment, my suspicion is that the pan will be kicked down the road further and there will be lack of clarity and, you know, as a business, you need to have crystal clarity. it's understood the european commission will look to offer what they see as a significant cut to checks and customs procedures, to ensure the free flow of medicines and allow the continued import of certain chilled meats such as sausages, to smooth supermarket supply chains. this looks like a pretty major proposal from the eu, and we have to remember the eu is a very large single market of 27 states, it has a common external
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border to the rest of the world, so it can't simply abandon all its own rules or punch a hole in its own border. it's taken months to get here, and eu member states see it as a big offer, but some question the uk approach. what kind of partnership is it with someone who says, - yes, and then says no? we need to have trust. we need to build something. we need to provide citizens, businesses with visibility, i predictability, and so that they can rely on their political— decision—makers. he's the one in charge of the uk's effort to change the protocol. lord frost wants a more radical overhaul of the arrangements governing northern ireland. downing street believes that by going further now, you solve problems down the line. it is incumbent upon us as a government — and i think it's incumbent on the eu — to make sure that we have
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a sustainable future arrangement, and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get on that stable footing. this place will not propose changing how the treaty is policed, a key uk demand. the eu wants to work within the framework of an agreement that both sides signed up to. eu officials are travelling to deliver their proposals to london. important to say that while they are looking to reduce checks, they are certainly not looking to eliminate them, they do not think that that is possible. some people here think that brussels is really stretching the limits of what is possible within the rules to try and make this work, but i think they will be very keen here not to be seen to be doing that for borisjohnson, the uk government ought lord frost, but offer practical solutions to the people and businesses of northern ireland. 0n people and businesses of northern ireland. on this issue of governance and oversight of the treaty, that isn't being mentioned here today because they think again that that
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has to stay in place. northern ireland continuing to follow single market rules, the european court of justice the ultimate arbiter of that. so again, it is this idea of british sovereignty versus the eu trying to protect it single market. it may sound like a familiar argument, but it is entering a new phase. thank you very much, jessica parker, in brussels. in a moment, we'll talk to our ireland correspondent, chris page. he's in belfast. but first, let's go tojonathan blake in westminster. jonathan, there are claims that this was the british government's tactic all along. was the british government's tactic all alonu. , ~ all along. yesterday, the brexit minister lord _ all along. yesterday, the brexit minister lord frost _ all along. yesterday, the brexit minister lord frost said - all along. yesterday, the brexit minister lord frost said the - all along. yesterday, the brexit minister lord frost said the uk| all along. yesterday, the brexit - minister lord frost said the uk had signed up to this protocol with its hands tied and that the world had moved on. the two sides now have a trade deal in place and the protocol is causing problems which need to be fixed. that position has been characterised slightly differently by the prime minister's former senior adviser dominic cummings, who was tweeting last night saying boris johnson didn't have a scooby do what the deal he signed up to meant and always intended to ditch the bits he
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didn't like. that has prompted concern from one eu member state at least, ireland's deputy leader leo barack as saying that sends a message the british government doesn't necessarily keep its words and honour the agreements it makes. 7 mike leigh over occur. the eu intends to consider this seriously, but if no round is given on the red line of the oversight of the european court ofjustice, frankly, it isn't going to fly as far as the uk is concerned. there will be difficult negotiations to come and with those comments from ireland, it doesn't necessarily set the tone for a particularly constructive or friendly discussion. jonathan blake and westminster. _ chris page is in belfast. what are the people of northern ireland want from these talks? weill. ireland want from these talks? well, there are two — ireland want from these talks? well, there are two dimensions _ ireland want from these talks? well, there are two dimensions to - ireland want from these talks? -ii there are two dimensions to the protocol in northern ireland itself.
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one practical, the other political. 0ne practical, the other political. when it comes to the practical side of things, that is mainly about the businesses who have suffered a degree of disruption, particularly companies who have in the past at least got most of their supplies in england, scotland and wales. they say they found certainly that has become much more difficult, some companies have stopped delivering to northern ireland altogether because of the extra paperwork and checks which mean it is too much hassle. those businesses will say fundamentally, what they need is the checks happening here and the likes of belfast port to be minimised so that particularly with the crucial christmas season coming up, they know the business is going to run more smoothly. but let's also look at the politics for unionists. the protocol is about business, but it is about much more than that. it is about the fact that they see it there is an economic border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk and that is something which undermines northern ireland's place
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in the union. so unionists say they want the sea border to go. when it comes to the other parties, nationalists and cross community parties, for example, the alliance party, they say they oppose brexit altogether, but the protocol is the least worst option and they suggest the practical impacts are being exaggerated by unionists. the biggest unionist party, the democratic union is, they say if the changes are not to their satisfaction, at the end of the month, they will pull ministers out of the power—sharing devolved government, so the stakes certainly are very high. government, so the stakes certainly are very high-— are very high. thanks very much. chris page _ are very high. thanks very much. chris page in _ are very high. thanks very much. chris page in belfast. _ the uk's largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. the port of felixstowe, which handles over a third of the uk's freight container traffic, blamed the busy pre—christmas period and haulage driver shortages. but officials say the situation is improving. megan patterson reports. packed up and no backed —— and now backed up. christmas stock stuck in
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thousands of containers at felixstowe. normally, containers passed through here in two or three days, now it is taking more than a week. this is the uk's largest commercial port, a backlog here likely to have an impact in december.— likely to have an impact in december. ~ _, december. food i think will continue to move. december. food i think will continue to move- pigs _ december. food i think will continue to move- pigs in _ december. food i think will continue to move. pigs in blankets, _ december. food i think will continue to move. pigs in blankets, turkeys. l to move. pigs in blankets, turkeys. the import from europe and what we have in the united kingdom will sustain us more than happily. but toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in. more than one third of the uk's freight container traffic is handled at felixstowe. maersk is re—routing elsewhere to europe, using smaller vessels in an attempt to ease supply chain pressure. adam's haulage business moves 100 containers a day, but a lack of space at felixstowe means his drivers are taking containers back to liverpool now instead. , ., ., , ,
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containers back to liverpool now instead. , . ., ,, . ~ ., instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries _ instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created _ instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by _ instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the - instead. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver l of deliveries created by the driver shortage, — of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other_ shortage, brexit and a number of other things. that hasjust created a perfect _ other things. that hasjust created a perfect storm. but other things. that has 'ust created a perfect stemmh other things. that has 'ust created a perfect sterneh other things. that has 'ust created a perfect stench a perfect storm. but this is a tlobal a perfect storm. but this is a global issue _ a perfect storm. but this is a global issue come _ a perfect storm. but this is a global issue come up - a perfect storm. but this is a global issue come up with i a perfect storm. but this is a - global issue come up with similar situations in ports across the us, china and east asia. problems here first began to emerge injuly. but officials say the situation at felixstowe has improved in the last few days. i felixstowe has improved in the last few da s. ., , , felixstowe has improved in the last fewda s. . , , few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of _ few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our _ few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our colleagues - few days. i am pretty confident in the ability of our colleagues to i the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the by chains and retailers to work through some very, very sophisticated logistics planning to prioritise. the government says it is working to increase the uk's hgv driver capacity, but resolution before christmas seems unlikely to be fully delivered. megan patterson, bbc news. the uk economy grew by 0.4% in august, as the full lifting of coronavirus restrictions boosted events and hospitality, but the data showed further signs
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of a slowdown in the recovery from the pandemic, as global supply chain woes take their toll. 0ur economics correspondent andy verity is here. how does this level of growth compare with what is normal? well, if ou are compare with what is normal? well, if you are talking _ compare with what is normal? well, if you are talking about _ compare with what is normal? .11 if you are talking about before the pandemic, then it is really good growth. 0.4% in among translates to four or 5% over the year, that would be faster growth than we have had for decades. 0utside be faster growth than we have had for decades. outside of the bounce back from the pandemic. but we have to remember these are exceptional circumstances. if you look at what is happening to the economy over the last 18 months, we have a chart here you can look at and you can see it is like a precipitous roller—coaster. write down at the beginning with the lockdown suppressing economic activity and right back up. but now it has levelled off and we are not quite back up to the level we were pre—pandemic. but in fact, if you look at the figure forjuly —— july, the revised figure, the economy shrank slightly in july so
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the revised figure, the economy shrank slightly injuly so there are signs this recovery isn't as fast as the bank of england anticipated when it said we would get growth of 7% this year. a big part of the reason is what you have already been talking about, namely, shortages and supply bottlenecks. so the shortages mean that in industries like construction, they are getting plenty of orders in, but they can't meet those orders. in some cases, they are turning away orders because they are turning away orders because they don't have the materials and in some cases a skilled labour to meet those orders. some cases a skilled labour to meet those orders— those orders. briefly, to what extent is brexit _ those orders. briefly, to what extent is brexit having - those orders. briefly, to what extent is brexit having an - those orders. briefly, to what - extent is brexit having an effect? i think not perhaps globally on the supply chains into the ports as we were saying, but the lorry driver shortage is partly due to brexit, the extra paperwork makes it less worthwhile for lorry drivers to work here and you see an effect on exports. if you compare exports with 2018, long before the pandemic, they are down by 13%, which is a substantial drop. so although some of these problems are global, some of these problems are global, some of them are down to brexit. take you
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very much. — of them are down to brexit. take you very much. andy _ of them are down to brexit. take you very much, andy verity. _ of them are down to brexit. take you very much, andy verity. -- _ of them are down to brexit. take you very much, andy verity. -- thank - of them are down to brexit. take you | very much, andy verity. -- thank you very much, andy verity. —— thank you very much, andy verity. —— thank you very much. care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs unfilled than before the pandemic, according to a leading industry body. the charity skills for care says the number of unfilled jobs fell at the start of the pandemic, but rose this year, as the economy opened up. they also said employers are finding it harder to keep existing staff. 0ur social affairs correspondent alison holt reports. the nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they're all right now? yeah, they're fine. yeah7 good. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she's recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home. 0h, definitely. after four weeks away. mm—hm. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire, finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota.
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we are struggling for staff at the moment. so i'm finding, i think last week... well, every night, i think i was out doing maybe one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide, and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today7 dr kris 0wden, who runs this care company, also worked on hospital wards, helping discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs.
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we normally are having to turn down about eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity with staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so, looking after patients now is hard, and can you imagine when the winter comes, when the colder weather comes, people become more unwell7 the government says it's running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news. our top story this lunchtime. eu officials are to set out their proposals on checks moving from great britain to northern ireland and violent clashes between travelling fans and police overshadowed the england game against hungary at wembley. coming up on the bbc news channel. andy murray says he will skip the davis cup because he needs to rest and isn't sure he deserves to be
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picked for the team, anyway. the former world number one was knocked out of the indian wells tournament overnight. the hyper violent korean drama squid game has become netflix's biggest ever series launch. the dystopian nine part series, which debuted in september, tells the story of a group of misfits taking part in a series of children's playground games with an unpleasant twist. its been watched by 111 million users in its first 28 days, knocking period drama bridgerton off the top spot. squid game's popularity has sparked a huge online following and spawned thousand of copycat video clips. steve holden has more. squid game is a dystopian drama that puts a deadly spin on some classic childhood games. 0ver nine episodes contestants with huge personal debt
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put their lives at risk to win millions of pounds in prize money. the creator of the south korean show originally came up with the idea in 2008, with netflix taking it on for distribution in 2019. it blends violence, satire and heart with striking visuals. put simply, everyone is talking about it. there was very little hype around the launch of this when it came out. they have launched this creative, interesting, vibrant, violent new show onto the platform and it has just grown through word—of—mouth in a really interesting and pretty inspiring way. i will not have this go wrong. you mean our ruse? until now, netflix had said that period drama bridgerton was its most popular series launch. it says squid game has had 111 million users watching in its first 28 days. netflix can be secretive
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and selective about its viewing figures but it counts one view as anyone who has watched two minutes of an episode. squid game is also another example of the rise of korean culture globally. two years ago movie parasite won best film at the oscars. and bts, from the capital seoul, are now the world's biggest boy band. squid game continues to ride that south korean wave. steve holden, bbc news. short courses in science and technology are to be offered to up to 4 thousand adults in england who are already in work. the government says the courses will meet the needs of employers, and are part of the overall plan to increase skills and improve flexibility in the workplace. its part of a wider programme of educational reform, which includes removing some btecs in favour of new technical qualifications called �*t levels'.
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0ur education editor branwenjeffreys reports. level six in here... ministers want to build a new approach to skills in england. and michelle donelan is in charge of making it work. this building is being turned into swindon�*s institute of technology. short courses in science or technology will be on offer, top up for adults already in work. we know that people do four or five jobs in one lifetime nowadays. and there are jobs that will be around in a year's time that potentially are not there today. so we need an education system that is flexible and nimble and can cope with that. and enable people to progress in their careers. if i could ask you to put your bed at a 30 degrees angle... but this is a far bigger change. some of the first t level students studying health care hands—on at college. their one t level the equivalent of three a—levels.
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i struggle with writing things down and remembering it like that. i see things visibly and remember a lot easier. so that was what drew me to the course. i'm quite a shy person but i think as i work with more people and i talk to more people, i will come out of that shell and become more confident with everything. i think t level is probably the best option because like i said, the facilities are great and it is more hands—on so it teaches you better skills than btec would. t levels involve a lot of hands—on learning. but these students will also get a 45 day work placement, and they have to do that in order to complete a t level. but as more t levels are added in other subjects, the plan is to withdraw funding from some btecs. it is controversial. btecs are a proven route to success. but ministers argue it is needed to avoid duplication. branwenjeffreys, bbc news, swindon.
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hungary fans fought with police during last night's world cup qualifier against england at wembley. some of their supporters booed as england players took the knee in an anti racism gesture before kick off. the metropolitan police said "minor disorder" broke out as they arrested a fan for "a racially aggravated public order offence" in relation to comments directed towards a steward. it comes just months after criticism of the policing of the european championship final at wembley. our sports correspondent alex howell reports. before kick—off, the tone was set. and not long after that it turned violent with hungary fans clashing with police in the stands of the national stadium. i think the togetherness that people see is there and that doesn't change based on banners, it doesn't change based on people's views, it doesn't change based on people opposing what we stand for. so it makes no difference to me. the met police released a statement last night saying officers went
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into the away end to arrest a spectator because of racially aggravated comments towards a steward and as a result of that the violence we saw in the away end broke out. i think governing bodies could quite easily ban hungary for a period of time, ask them to show improvements, and then allow them in on the basis of satisfying whatever criteria they lay down. and it is an unexpected turn of events! - 0n the pitch, england had to come from behind to salvage a draw and despite a disappointing performance, it's the images in the stands that people are talking about. they came a few months after the euros final here between england and italy where ticketless supporters forced their way into the stadium. and last night, in another match in england's group, there was more trouble. objects were thrown onto the pitch as albania played poland and the game had to be temporarily stopped. this morning the world governing body fifa said its position remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as well as any form
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of discrimination or abuse. fifa has a very clear zero tolerance stance against such a point —— abhorrent behaviour in football. what steps the authorities eventually take will be decided in the coming weeks but with places at qatar 2022 still up for grabs, any sanctions could have a big impact on qualification. alex howell, bbc news. captain kirk is getting ready to blast off to the final frontier yet again. injust over an hour william shatner will boldly go where no actor has ever been before. the 90 year old, who has lived long and prospered, will make history as the oldest person to travel to space when he takes off from texas aboard a rocket developed by amazon founder jeff bezos. he says he's looking forward to seeing earth from a new perspective. sophie long reports. i'm going up into space. i don't know how many
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people can say that. it's life changing in its way. interest in space exploration has waned over the last few decades. the fact that william shatner is making this journey has renewed some of that sense of wonder. there is an adventure in my life that i would not have had, had i not done this. and it looks like there's a great deal of curiosity about this fictional character, captain kirk, going into space. for those who've never watched an episode of star trek, here's why. captain kirk is possibly one of the most known, iconic mythological characters in our sort of collective pop culture. and the idea that the man who portrayed this daring captain, pushing us to the limits of our knowledge and exploring the deepest frontiers of space gets to go into space himself, itjust makes me laugh. i wish william shatner the best of luck on his voyage. it's reignited interest in space
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travel and also in the series that broke so many boundaries all those decades ago. in the original series, you had a black woman, an asian—american man in space during the civil rights movement. in its way star trek has always pushed a more progressive vision of inclusion, whatever the conversation is at the time, it pushes that forward. and it says, look at what we could do if we work together! over the years, trekkers and trekkies have found much to bond over, including their own language. if all goes according to plan, he won't be exploring strange new worlds or making first contact with new life forms. but william shatner�*s historic flight to space will be extraordinary for science, for pop culture, for the future of space travel and for him. we're just at the beginning but how miraculous that beginning is! how extraordinary it is to be part of that beginning. there is this mystique
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of being in space and that much closer to the stars and being weightless. i shall be entranced by the view of space. sophie long, bbc news, west texas. a panel of senior doctors in the united states have cast doubt on the benefits of taking daily aspirin to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. they say the potential benefits are outweighed by an increased risk of internal bleeding. the nhs says most people aged 60 or over can simply take a low dose of aspirin if recommended by the doctor. and a marathon swimmer is back in the water to try to break the record for the most swims across the channel. chloe mccardel is
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attempting to swim across the strait of dover and despite being just 21 miles across the english channel as a challenging swim and each crossing takes ten eyes and more. changing tides can add extra distance and the waves can reach two metres high in the water is also host a stream of cargo ships and ferries. she completed her record equalling swim last week. scottish social media user has succeeded in getting a supermarket to remove its oat milk from sale after using a platform her campaign. luna's videos on tiktok had millions of views. lidl has now recalled all its oat milk with a use by date in the next year. it says fresh batches would be available soon. the 23 year old student started monitoring lileust free oat milk in august when she noticed a carton was "lumpy" and "smelly". if you entered last night's record euromillions draw,
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here's the bad news. you didn't win it. but here's the good news — nobody else did either. that means the record jackpot of £181; million will be up for grabs again on friday, but it won't get any larger as it's now reached its maximum level. time for a look at the weather, here's chris fawkes. it is one of those afternoons with a lot of cloud around but for some a bit of sunshine. so this was sent to us from the cambridgeshire area just a couple of hours ago with the sunshine fully out but it has not been like that everywhere and for many of us it is pretty cloudy and across western areas of the uk the cloud is thick enough to bring some spots of drizzle. it has been pretty
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cloudy elsewhere across the western side of the uk in spite of high pressure being in charge. this is dragging in all this cloud to western coasts and hills and that is why we are seeing that damp weather. it might brighten up for a time across scotland. but east anglia and the southern counties of england have the best of the breaks in the crowd today and the best of the sunshine. but it is mild with temperatures at 15, 17 degrees. 0vernight tonight expensive cloud across the uk with some damp weather and if you mist and fog patches and then rain moving into the far north of scotland by the end of the night. that cold front will bring some rain and just ahead of that the wind will get strong for a time into the first part of tomorrow morning.

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