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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent on the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides�* interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. £4 trillion a year — that's the sum countries will have to spend on clean energy if the world is to reach its target of becoming net zero by 2050.
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a crisis in care — a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers in the uk means people are waiting longerfor care, and the number of vacancies is still rising. are the vacanies in the care sector affecting care of you or you relatives? —— vacancies. if you work in the care sector, how are the shortages affecting you? on twitter and instagram, i'm @vicderbyshire, or email me at victoria@bbc.co.uk. why does a man living in a town in northern england died before a man living in london? parts of england saw a fall in life expectancy before the pandemic. also coming up this hour, william shatner is to boldy go where no 90—year—old man has gone before, as he becomes the oldest person to travel to the edge of space.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the eu will this afternoon put forward what it's called far reaching proposals to address the row about post—brexit trading between great britain and northern ireland. the uk has complained that the current system, called the northern ireland protocol, puts too many barriers in the way of selling chilled meats and other products, and wants it replaced. the eu is expected to suggest cutting the number of checks on products moving between great britain and northern ireland. the proposals are understood to include a deal around agrifood which includes agriculture, horticulture, and food and drink processing. there will also be an arrangement to allow the continued sale of chilled meats from great britain in northern ireland. these products had
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been facing a ban. and the eu is expected to propose changes to its laws to ensure the free flow of medicines in to northern ireland. yesterday, uk brexit minister lord frost proposed plans for an entirely new protocol to replace the existing northern ireland protocol, which was put in place to make sure an invisible border between northern ireland and the republic was maintained, to protect the peace process. he said keeping the existing protocol would be an "historic error because it did not have support in northern ireland itself. this morning, the conservative party co—chair, 0liver dowden, said the uk government would wait to see the eu proposals in full but, he said, it would "engage fully constructively" with the eu on the matter. it is the case that we do need to look fundamentally at this protocol, simply because it is not working, particularly for one of the communities, in northern ireland, and that must include also looking at the role of the european court ofjustice.
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it is highly anomalous that a treaty between two effectively parties is being adjudicated by the courts of one party. we can talk to our political correspondentjonathan blake. if correspondent jonathan blake. if these correspondentjonathan blake. if these proposals turn out to be accurate, will the uk accept them? not as a final solution. they might welcome some of the ground the eu has given, some of the things they are suggesting which you outlined, changes to the proposal around fewer customs checks, the continuation of allowing chilled meats from great britain into northern ireland and beyond, and also some changes to regulation around medicines, to address potential difficulties there. but the red line that the uk has which the brexit minister, david frost, set out earlier this week, was that the adjudication of the
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european court ofjustice over disagreements which arise through the northern ireland protocol, as you heard, the conservative party chair 0liver dowden talking about, thatis chair 0liver dowden talking about, that is a problem and it needs to 90, that is a problem and it needs to go, in the uk's eyes. they see it as an overhang of britain's membership of the eu and something which allows the eu far too much power and jurisdiction which it should not be allowed to have in northern ireland. but as we have seen from the leaked proposals which we know of what brussels will put forward later, the ec] is not mentioned and i would be very surprised if it is, and if the eu gives any sense at this stage it is willing to budge on that so while these proposals might be welcome for these proposals might be welcome for the opportunities they allow progress the uk may see them to make, they will not be the end of this negotiation by a long way. thank you. our ireland correspondent chris page explained what the impact
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of the current trading arrangements are on people who live in northern ireland at the moment. here in northern ireland, where again this part of the uk is finding itself at the sharp end of relations between the uk and eu, the impact of the protocol works on two levels, practical and political. the practical is about the degree of disruption which has been suffered by businesses, particularly those who have been getting most of their supplies from england, scotland and wales. they have been saying they have had delays in deliveries, and now some companies in the rest of the uk have stopped delivering to northern ireland altogether because they say it is simply too much hassle with the extra work and paperwork and checks. they are having to look at how they get their goods, for example, trying to get more supplies from northern ireland or the republic of ireland, so they don't have to cross that border in the irish sea, that trade barrier. 0n the political side,
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unionists simply do not like anything which they see as separating northern ireland from the uk so they see this as an economic border within their own country which is not acceptable to them, as they say it threatens northern ireland as a part of the union. so they say the protocol has to go. nationalists and the cross community alliance party who opposed brexit, they say the protocol is the least worst option, they would say that unionists are exaggerating the practical effects of the protocol on the ground in northern ireland and that there hasn't been, for example, really widespread disruption for consumers here. but that means that this protocol has become a huge political battle ground and the future of the devolved government itself is at stake because the biggest unionist party, the dup, has said that if the protocol is not significantly changed, if the sea border is not in effect scrapped, they will pull
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their ministers out of the devolved government and stormont�*s devolved power sharing executive cannot function without the dup. we can talk to peter hardwick is trade policy adviser at the british meat processors association. however your members been affected by this trading arrangement since brexit? {iii by this trading arrangement since brexit? . ., , ., , by this trading arrangement since brexit? _, , ., , , ., brexit? of course it has been more complicated _ brexit? of course it has been more complicated for _ brexit? of course it has been more complicated for them, _ brexit? of course it has been more complicated for them, i _ brexit? of course it has been more complicated for them, i spoke - brexit? of course it has been more | complicated for them, i spoke about the cheques at the border the previous week but also the extra paperwork, health worker certification, veterinary checks that need to take place, all of the paperwork that ensures compliance with eu rules before goods can be sent to northern ireland. that is also the case all the goods that go to the eu so it is exactly the same process. and we know that certification between northern ireland and the eu has added about £50 million to the bottom line of operators so it has had a
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significant impact on operators in terms of the costs of selling goods and moving goods around. you cannot answer for all — and moving goods around. you cannot answer for all of _ and moving goods around. you cannot answer for all of them _ and moving goods around. you cannot answer for all of them but _ and moving goods around. you cannot answer for all of them but broadly - answer for all of them but broadly speaking, do you know if your members believed borisjohnson when he said before brexit was done that over his dead body would there be checks down the irish sea, throw in the bin the customs declarations formed if you're asked to fill one in? . ~ , formed if you're asked to fill one in? . ~' , . formed if you're asked to fill one in? . ~ , ., , formed if you're asked to fill one in? . ~' , . , . .,, in? frankly, that is laughable. the facts are that _ in? frankly, that is laughable. the facts are that the _ in? frankly, that is laughable. the facts are that the protocol - in? frankly, that is laughable. the facts are that the protocol is - in? frankly, that is laughable. the facts are that the protocol is very i facts are that the protocol is very clear in that certain parts of union law, and i mean eu law, apply. and let's be clear, the european court ofjust let's be clear, the european court of just this, let's be clear, the european court ofjust this, as it's referred to, hasjurisdiction ofjust this, as it's referred to, has jurisdiction over those bits of union law that applied —— court of justice. we knew that from the outset, scratched our heads and said how could they have agreed to this? they put a border down the irish sea and they also agreed to the eu officials having the right to
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conduct checks in northern ireland which is another thing we object to put it whilst these things are extremely difficult for us, i find it difficult to understand how anyone did not see this with open eyes from the start. the anyone did not see this with open eyes from the start.— eyes from the start. the brexit minister on _ eyes from the start. the brexit minister on that _ eyes from the start. the brexit minister on that point, - eyes from the start. the brexit minister on that point, lord . eyes from the start. the brexit - minister on that point, lord foster says we were rushed, we were under pressure we needed to get it done. it's inexcusable, frankly. these are professionals, they spent their lives doing those things they poured over this for days and weeks the documentation was there. we had the opportunity to hold back and have another look at it. if you look at the document, it is full of annexes listing the bits of eu law that apply, notjust a general reference to, oh, the union law applies in northern ireland, it doesn't. what happens is they list the specific bits of law that applies the impact of that on us, and that is the important thing here, the impact on our operators is huge amounts of
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additional paperwork. the physical checks at the board are an issue but they are not the main issue actually because i have no doubt that what the commission will suggest, as well as what you have referred to round chilled meat preparation, sausages and the like, that they can reduce the physical checks to a minimum maybe one or 2%. but what they also want, and this is something i know that has been pushed back on very hard by politicians in northern ireland, is physical infrastructure on the ground in northern ireland. and to date, that has not taken place. people are still working out of marquees and portakabins and they want to see that physical infra structure to conduct the cheques and so far, the investment has not been made to put that in place in any significant way.— significant way. thank you for talkin: significant way. thank you for talking to _ significant way. thank you for talking to us, _ significant way. thank you for talking to us, peter _ significant way. thank you for| talking to us, peter hardwick, significant way. thank you for - talking to us, peter hardwick, the trade policy adviser at the british meat processors association which is the trade body for the british meat industry. officials at the uk's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, say the log jam of shipping
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containers is easing. 0ne majorfirm, maersk, has diverted its largest ships to ports in belgium and the netherlands. the port blamed the shortage of haulage drivers, brexit border changes, and the pandemic. graham satchell reports. a logjam at felixstowe, the uk's biggest commercial port. the situation is so serious some larger ships are being re—routed to other ports in europe. morning, mate. how are you doing? morning. i'm 0k. you? adam searle runs a haulage firm with 85 lorries. instead of taking empty containers back to felixstowe as normal, he's had to take them to liverpool as there is no space. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. it has just all created a perfect storm. in normal circumstances it takes two or three days for a container to be collected and driven away once it has been unloaded to the dock. the so—called dwell time is now closer to ten days. the worry now is what impact
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all this will have on christmas. will there be a shortage of toys and other gifts this year? i think that there will be some disruption this christmas as a result of the hgv shortage. but retailers are really adept at making sure that they prioritise the things people want, making sure that people's christmas favourites are available to buy. there are difficulties in the supply chain in other countries, america and china. this is a global problem. the government says it is working closely with the freight industry to work through the challenges. graham satchell, bbc news. pressure is growing on world leaders to make the forthcoming global climate talks count. but the commitments from many countries are still falling short of where they need to be. a major un climate conference called cop26 is happening injust over two weeks' time. the international energy agency is warning the world needs to spend trillions of dollars more on new sources of clean energy to hit agreed targets on climate change.
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and it says, without this investment, there is a risk of more sharp price changes for energy globally. courtney bembridge reports. less of this, and more of this. the international energy agency says we need to drastically change the way we generate energy. glasgow is preparing to welcome world leaders later this month for a crucial climate summit as they try to limit the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels. the international energy agency says for that target to be met, spending on clean energy projects must reach $4 trillion a year by 2030. it is very, very clear, in terms of what areas of our energy economy we need to accelerate materially versus where we need to start pulling back, and i think it is a really helpful summary to show the extent to which we really need to drive renewable investment quite heavily over the coming period. the pandemic has hindered efforts
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to cut down on coal and oil and this year the world is on track to record the second largest increase in emissions in history. it comes as energy prices hit record highs and there are warnings of further price hikes to come. since the paris agreement was signed nearly— since the paris agreement was signed nearly six— since the paris agreement was signed nearly six years — since the paris agreement was signed nearly six years ago _ since the paris agreement was signed nearly six years ago now, _ since the paris agreement was signed nearly six years ago now, nearly - nearly six years ago now, nearly $58— nearly six years ago now, nearly $58 trillion _ nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion has _ nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion has gone _ nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion has gone into - nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion has gone into fossilj $3.8 trillion has gone into fossil fuel companies, _ $3.8 trillion has gone into fossil fuel companies, that _ $3.8 trillion has gone into fossil fuel companies, that is - $3.8 trillion has gone into fossil fuel companies, that is coal, . $3.8 trillion has gone into fossil fuel companies, that is coal, oilj fuel companies, that is coal, oil and gas — fuel companies, that is coal, oil and gas companies, _ fuel companies, that is coal, oil and gas companies, from - fuel companies, that is coal, oil and gas companies, from just. fuel companies, that is coal, oil. and gas companies, from just 60 banks_ and gas companies, from just 60 banks so— and gas companies, from just 60 banks so clearly— and gas companies, from just 60 banks so clearly the _ and gas companies, from just 60 banks so clearly the money- and gas companies, from just 60 banks so clearly the money is - banks so clearly the money is flowing — banks so clearly the money is flowing in _ banks so clearly the money is flowing in the _ banks so clearly the money is flowing in the wrong - banks so clearly the money isj flowing in the wrong direction banks so clearly the money is - flowing in the wrong direction put it we _ flowing in the wrong direction put it we need — flowing in the wrong direction put it we need to _ flowing in the wrong direction put it we need to step _ flowing in the wrong direction put it we need to step up— flowing in the wrong direction put it we need to step up our- flowing in the wrong direction put. it we need to step up our investment in renewables— it we need to step up our investment in renewables and _ it we need to step up our investment in renewables and climate _ it we need to step up our investment in renewables and climate solutionsl in renewables and climate solutions and quickly — in renewables and climate solutions and quickly phase _ in renewables and climate solutions and quickly phase out _ in renewables and climate solutions and quickly phase out investment. in renewables and climate solutions and quickly phase out investment in fossil— and quickly phase out investment in fossil fuels, — and quickly phase out investment in fossil fuels, the _ and quickly phase out investment in fossil fuels, the energy— and quickly phase out investment in fossil fuels, the energy systems - and quickly phase out investment in fossil fuels, the energy systems ofl fossil fuels, the energy systems of the old _ the iea says renewable energy spending would pay for itself and create 26 millionjobs by 2030. courtney bembridge, bbc news. the headline on bbc news...
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and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. £4 trillion a year — that's the sum countries will have to spend on clean energy if the world is to reach its target of becoming net zero by 2050. a charity has warned that care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs unfilled than before the pandemic. skills for care says there are more than 100,000 vacancies and that the number is rising. the government says it has provided extra funding and is running regular recruitment campaigns. with more on this, here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care.
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she has recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire, finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i'm finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst
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recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris 0wden runs this care company and also worked on hospital wards, helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down about eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard. can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes, people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news.
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i have been asking for your experiences, if you rely on care or someone in yourfamily experiences, if you rely on care or someone in your family does, or experiences, if you rely on care or someone in yourfamily does, or if you work in the sector, how are the shortages and vacancies impacting you trying to do yourjob and have to there are some distressing e—mails. this is from alan. "i'm 77, i'm quite fit, but if i'm faced with having to go into a care home, i will euthanise myself after seeing and hearing all of the problems i will not be a burden. well done for covering these problems." alan, you must not do that, you would not be a burden if you need help from a carer i had to go into a home, absolutely no way. this is from somebody who says," my wife has advanced alzheimer's and i were visiting care staff worker, who is an angel, has told us her hours have to be reduced ljy told us her hours have to be reduced by two thirds. i have my own health issues as without her both might mental health and looking after my
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wife 24/7 is going to suffer badly. 0ne wife 24/7 is going to suffer badly. one reason is that as a society we do not pay care staff enough for the specialist skills they possess. like lifting patients, personal care etc, which most people would run from." thank you for those. they are really important experiences and contributions to feed into the conversations surrounding these shortages in the care sector, and also the future pay and conditions of care workers. now some of the other news of the day. apple is reported to be cutting production of its latest iphone because of a shortage of chips. the tech giant expected to make 60 million units in the final quarter of this year but has told its partner is that the total will be lower, by as many as 10 million phones. members of congress say the usa will reopen its land borders to mexico and canada to fully vaccinated travellers next month and that nonessential staff
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will resume. border has been closed with canada since march 2020 put it last month the white house and at an easing of critics on fully vaccinated air travellers from early november. the mayor of mexico city has confirmed that a statue of an indigenous woman will replace the christopher columbus monument point it is on one of the main thoroughfares of the capital. the statue of the european navigator, who paved the way for the colonisation and exploitation of the americas, which removed last year and a petition had been signed by thousands of indigenous women. a young british football coach has been jailed for 25 years in dubai after police found bottles of cb the oil in his car. it is derived from the cannabis plant that is used for medical reasons. he has been held at
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a police station for nine months. joining me now is radha stirling, founder and ceo of the british based civil and criminaljustice organisation detained in dubai, who is helping billy with his case. first of all, tell us what happened. this is another extreme situation of something that has been blown out of proportion. a 25 year sentence is absolutely ridiculous for a. his friend was visiting and really drove him to the airport, he had left his equipment in the car, unbeknownst to billy, and later sent a message to billy, and later sent a message to billy saying i think i have left my radha stirling in your car but don't worry about it put it billy thought nothing of it and said, i don't care because i'm not interested in
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smoking and vaping or anything. he forgot about it but it looks like the police had intercepted that whatsapp message and perhaps a buzzword like cbd came up because there were microsoft amounts of that in with other vaping equipment —— microscopic amounts. and the police targeted billy, went to his house and arrested him and cuffed him, searched all of his premises, his car, and they finally found these cbd bottles in his car and arrested him and took him into custody. but they put him in isolation, they deprived him of a lawyer, access to a phone, to the embassy, and intimidated and forced him to sign a confession in arabic and he has now been sentenced on the basis of that confession to 25 years in prison for trafficking selling and possessing
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the cbd oil. it is trafficking selling and possessing the cbd oil. , ., ., the cbd oil. it is not illegal in the cbd oil. it is not illegal in the uk, it— the cbd oil. it is not illegal in the uk, it is— the cbd oil. it is not illegal in the uk, it is illegal— the cbd oil. it is not illegal in the uk, it is illegal across- the cbd oil. it is not illegal in j the uk, it is illegal across the united arab emirates. even so, if the facts are as you have described them, four small bottles does not warrant, it would seem, a 25 year sentence, so what is going on? it is uuite sentence, so what is going on? it is quite extreme _ sentence, so what is going on? it 3 quite extreme we have seen this in other drugs cases in the past, like andy neil, darren crawford, what we're seeing is a pattern of abuse by dubai police in they are seeking maximum convictions and sentences and they are engaging in sting operations and setting people up. they are arresting people and convicting them on the basis witness testimony which are police informants who are paid to give witness statements against other people put at what we are seeing is that the police really trying to secure those drugs convictions because they are financially beneficial to them. they get promotions, they are approved in the
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media, and the government really appreciate these convictions so they are basically going out of their way to find people, to force them to confess, to sentence and convict them for ulterior motives. flan confess, to sentence and convict them for ulterior motives. can you tell us a bit _ them for ulterior motives. can you tell us a bit more _ them for ulterior motives. can you tell us a bit more about _ them for ulterior motives. can you tell us a bit more about your- them for ulterior motives. can you tell us a bit more about your claim that they forced billy to confess? firstly they isolated him, intimidated him and told him he would never leave the central intelligence department if you did not sign these documents. at that point, most people do crack. they are intimidated, physically man held bills, he is only 24 and in a foreign country, but most people signed the documents when they are under duress and some are beaten, some are actually physically abused, deprived of water, of food, dehydrated and also locked in rooms
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with the air conditioning turned as cold as it possibly go to give them the desperation to sign the documents. this has been going on for a long time, the british high courts have acknowledged that they will not extradite anyone to dubai because of these forced confessions. it is a common theme which has been going for 13 and a half years and people hope when they sign that passion that they can later get a lawyer to assist them, they can prove to the judge that it was a forced confession and they think they will be able to explain that and get out of it.— and get out of it. what help, if an , are and get out of it. what help, if any. are you — and get out of it. what help, if any, are you getting _ and get out of it. what help, if any, are you getting from - and get out of it. what help, if any, are you getting from thel any, are you getting from the british foreign and commonwealth office? 50 british foreign and commonwealth office? ., , ., , office? so far, they have preferred a list of lawyers — office? so far, they have preferred a list of lawyers and _ office? so far, they have preferred a list of lawyers and this _ office? so far, they have preferred a list of lawyers and this is - office? so far, they have preferred a list of lawyers and this is simply. a list of lawyers and this is simply standard at the moment. we have had albert douglas, his family attended the foreign office yesterday and released videos, they are astonished at how little the british foreign
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office wants to do for their 0ffice wants to do for their citizens. albert has launched an appeal for changes within the fco because it is not doing itsjob and it is prioritising those trade agreements over the rights of the citizens. and they basically admit that. from my experience, they are doing a terriblejob in comparison to countries like canada and united states who have been very active in supporting their citizens. the british fco has gone out of their way to even discourage people seeking alternative help while not giving them to help themselves. what giving them to help themselves. what the said is giving them to help themselves. what they said is that _ giving them to help themselves. what they said is that they are giving consulate support to a british man who has been imprisoned in the uae. what would you expect them to be doing and what would you want them to do? in doing and what would you want them to do? ., doing and what would you want them to do? . , . ., 4' doing and what would you want them to do? . , ., ., ~ , to do? in a situation like this, when we _ to do? in a situation like this, when we are _ to do? in a situation like this, when we are talking - to do? in a situation like this, when we are talking about, i to do? in a situation like this, i when we are talking about, and to do? in a situation like this, - when we are talking about, and we have a number of cases where the british foreign office could get involved diplomatically, where you can see there has been a case of injustice, the legal system in the
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uae is still immature, it is not caught up to be able to cope with the kind of foreign tourists and investors and expats that go there. there are a lot of cases of legal abuse, ofjudges not even looking at the expert evidence in front of them and still issuing convictions based on what the prosecution asks for. the british foreign office has the ability to go to their counterparts in the uae, the ministry of foreign affairs, and ask them to specifically investigate and oversee these cases of injustice because clearly the courts are not doing so in the uae. there is unfair trials, the prosecution asks for a conviction and they will almost automatically get it. in a trial that lasts 15 minutes. it is clear that lasts 15 minutes. it is clear that the british foreign office, if they demanded higher standards from their allies at the uae, i'm sure they would effect that improvement thatis they would effect that improvement that is really needed in order to make it a safe place but at the
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moment, we have baroness whitaker and andy slaughter mp having lobbied the uk fco and andy slaughter mp having lobbied the uk fcc to and andy slaughter mp having lobbied the uk fco to put in sanctions against the uae because of the treatment of british citizens there. we are people there right now in hospital because they have been beaten by prison guards and the fco is still doing nothing about that. it is incredible. bills; is still doing nothing about that. it is incredible.— it is incredible. billy hood is 24, if this sentence _ it is incredible. billy hood is 24, if this sentence plays _ it is incredible. billy hood is 24, if this sentence plays out, - it is incredible. billy hood is 24, if this sentence plays out, he i it is incredible. billy hood is 24, | if this sentence plays out, he will be almost 50 before he is released. you are obviously appealing against the sentence but how optimistic are you about that appeal working? it the support of the media and british government is able to manoeuvre at the uae authorities to look into the case, i am sure they will see that this has been another overambitious endeavour of the dubai police to secure another conviction for themselves, and i think ruining someone's entire life over a couple of bottles of cbd oil is not going
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to set that platform for foreign nationals and tourist to want to visit the uae. we have seen other drugs cases recently where we had peter clarke who was arrested for having residual hashish in his bloodstream that he had smoked in las vegas. if we keep seeing these types of ridiculous cases that are not in line with what the west would expect from a tourist destination, we will see a decline in tourism and it will harm the uae so i would hope that they care enough, that they are investing a lot in public relations, lobbying foreign countries for that tourism, but if they keep allowing cases like this to go forward, they are going to lose that effort they have made so hopefully they would see that and intervene in this case and let billy come home. {lister see that and intervene in this case and let billy come home.- and let billy come home. over the ears, i and let billy come home. over the years. i have _ and let billy come home. over the years, i have interviewed - and let billy come home. over the years, i have interviewed a - and let billy come home. over the| years, i have interviewed a number of family members or representatives like yourself are people who have found themselves detained in foreign countries, and on every occasion they have said to me that they are
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innocent, they did nothing but is that genuinely the case here? in this case, yes. it is a couple of bottles of cbd oil, there is zero evidence of tracking, or of selling. with that in mind, yes, this is a case you can intervene in. in other cases, where people had clearly broken the law and they admit it and they go to prison, that is fine, but with these cases of injustice, these minuscule reasons people are arrested for, like holding hands in public or offending someone or a cybercrime violation on facebook, those kind of cases have to be brought to the international attention and they need diplomatic intervention. attention and they need diplomatic intervention-— intervention. thank you for talking to us, intervention. thank you for talking to us. radha _ intervention. thank you for talking to us, radha stirling _ intervention. thank you for talking to us, radha stirling who - intervention. thank you for talking to us, radha stirling who is - intervention. thank you for talking to us, radha stirling who is from | to us, radha stirling who is from the organisation detained in dubai who are supporting billy hood, a 24—year—old football coach who is in custody after three or four small bottles of cbd oil were found in his car up and you heard her saying he
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was forced to sign a confession by the police in dubai. the headlines on bbc news: the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas, as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. $4 trillion a year — that's the sum countries will have to spend on clean energy, if the world is to reach its target of becoming net—zero by 2050. in the us state of wyoming, a coroner has said the young woman who vanished on a road trip with her fiance, and was later found dead, had been strangled. travel blogger gabby petito's death had already been ruled to be a homicide.
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herfiance, brian laundrie, has been missing for nearly a month, after returning home without gabby. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the sequence of events that led to gabby petito's death are still far from clear. she disappeared while on a road trip in the western united states with her boyfriend, brian laundrie. so, tell me what's going on. this video emerged after the police responded to reports that the pair had been seen arguing, as they travelled through the state of utah. there's two people that came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. the couple had been sharing details of their trip through social media, but their blog post abruptly ended in august. mr laundrie later returned home, alone. he has since disappeared. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. gabby petito's body was found last month, in a remote area of a wyoming
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park that the couple had visited. few details have been revealed, except now the cause of death. the teton county coroner's office is filing the following verdict. in the matter of the death of gabrielle venora petito, we find the cause and manner to be, cause, death by strangulation, and manner is homicide. by wyoming state statute, only the cause and manner of death are released. the autopsy findings and photographs and that sort of material is not released by state statute. the coroner added that miss petito's body, which was found in mid—september, had been outside in the wilderness for three to four weeks. he also confirmed that the 22—year—old was not pregnant at the time of her death. the case has attracted a huge amount of media coverage in the united states, and some criticism that it's received a disproportionate level of attention.
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unfortunately, this is only one of many deaths around the country of people who are involved in domestic violence, and it's unfortunate that these other deaths do not get as much coverage as this one. the fbi has named brian laundrie as a person of interest, and a warrant has been issued for his arrest. police and federal agents have been searching a wildlife reserve close to his parents' home in florida but, so far, there has been no sign of him. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. today is a big day for william shatner. the 90—year—old actor, famous for playing star trek�*s captain kirk, will boldly become the oldest person ever to fly into orbit, when he boards thejeff bezos—owned new shepard rocket. everybody�*s doing it! 0ur los angeles correspondent sophie long has been following his final preparations.
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i'm going up into space. i don't know how many people can say that. it's life—changing, in its way. interest in space exploration has waned over the last few decades. the fact that william shatner is making this journey has renewed some of that sense of wonder. there is an adventure in my life that i would not have had, had i not done this. and it looks like there's a great deal of curiosity about this fictional character, captain kirk, going into space. for those who've never watched an episode of star trek, here's why. captain kirk is possibly one of the most known, iconic, mythological characters in our sort of collective pop culture. and the idea that the man who portrayed this daring captain, pushing us to the limits of our knowledge and exploring the deepest frontiers of space gets to go into space himself, itjust makes me laugh.
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i wish william shatner the best of luck on his voyage. it's reignited interest in space travel, and also in the series that broke so many boundaries all those decades ago. in the original series, you had a black woman and asian—american man in space during the civil rights movement. in its way, star trek has always pushed a more progressive vision of inclusion, whatever the conversation is at the time, it pushes that forward. and it says, look at what he could do if we work together! over the years, trekkers and trekkies have found much to bond over, including their own language. if all goes according to plan, he won't be exploring strange new worlds or making contact with new life forms. but william shatner�*s historic flight to space will be extraordinary for science, for culture, for the future of space travel, and for him. we're just at the beginning, but how miraculous that beginning is! and how extraordinary it is to be
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part of that beginning. there's this mystique of being in space and that much closer to the stars and being weightless. i shall be entranced by the view of space. sophie long, bbc news, west texas. joining us now is astrophysicist, maggie lie. hello, maggie. so, where is he actually going? 50. hello, maggie. so, where is he actually going?— hello, maggie. so, where is he actuall uroin? , ., ., actually going? so, he is going into the edae actually going? so, he is going into the edge of — actually going? so, he is going into the edge of space. _ actually going? so, he is going into the edge of space. so _ actually going? so, he is going into the edge of space. so just - actually going? so, he is going into the edge of space. so just beyond i the edge of space. so just beyond the edge of space. so just beyond the common line, the internationally recognised boundary of space, above 100 kilometres in altitude. band recognised boundary of space, above 100 kilometres in altitude.— 100 kilometres in altitude. and how sirnificant 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is — 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is at _ 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is at the _ 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is at the fact _ 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is at the fact that - 100 kilometres in altitude. and how significant is at the fact that he - significant is at the fact that he is 90? i significant is at the fact that he is 90? 4' significant is at the fact that he is 90? ~ , significant is at the fact that he is 90? 4' , ., ., significant is at the fact that he is 90? ~ , ., ., , is 90? i think it is amazing he is 90 because _ is 90? i think it is amazing he is 90 because it — is 90? i think it is amazing he is 90 because it shows _ is 90? i think it is amazing he is 90 because it shows that - is 90? i think it is amazing he is i 90 because it shows that everyday people, even if you are 90, you can still be an astronaut. if he applied to be an astronaut at the age of 90, he wouldn't have been selected because of his age and health
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problems, but it shows space tourism is allowing people, regardless of health or other things, they can go to space. if health or other things, they can go to sace. , ., ., , ., to space. if they have the money or a very rich — to space. if they have the money or a very rich friend _ to space. if they have the money or a very rich friend at _ to space. if they have the money or a very rich friend at the _ to space. if they have the money or a very rich friend at the moment! . a very rich friend at the moment! currently, it is quite expensive, it is for very rich and wealthy people. but i think it's important that they can attract these investors and this money because that would drive down prices. air planes, most people previously couldn't afford to go on an aeroplane and now we get to paris for, like, £7. 50 an aeroplane and now we get to paris for, like. £7.— an aeroplane and now we get to paris for. like. £7.— for, like, £7. so do you honestly think, in for, like, £7. so do you honestly think. in your— for, like, £7. so do you honestly think, in your lifetime, - for, like, £7. so do you honestly think, in your lifetime, space . think, in your lifetime, space tourism is genuinely going to be affordable for normal people watching you speak right now? yes. watching you speak right now? yes, absolutel . watching you speak right now? yes, absolutely. like _ watching you speak right now? yes, absolutely. like i _ watching you speak right now? yes, absolutely. like i said, _ watching you speak right now? lei: absolutely. like i said, even air travel was unaffordable to general
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people before, but within my lifetime, the price has been driven down due to big investments. mira; lifetime, the price has been driven down due to big investments. why do ou think down due to big investments. why do you think billionaires _ down due to big investments. why do you think billionaires are _ down due to big investments. why do you think billionaires are doing - down due to big investments. why do you think billionaires are doing so - you think billionaires are doing so much in space?! you think billionaires are doing so much in space?— much in space? i think it's really important _ much in space? i think it's really important that _ much in space? i think it's really important that we _ much in space? i think it's really important that we invest - much in space? i think it's really important that we invest in - much in space? i think it's really| important that we invest in space because a lot of that technology is also reused down here on earth as well. people don't know, but a lot of the medical technology and other things, they were developed for space and now they are reused here on earth. and it can help make our lives better. on earth. and it can help make our lives better-— lives better. what about the environmental _ lives better. what about the environmental concerns, - lives better. what about the l environmental concerns, does lives better. what about the - environmental concerns, does that bother you? 50. environmental concerns, does that bother you?— bother you? so, traditionally, traditional _ bother you? so, traditionally, traditional rockets _ bother you? so, traditionally, traditional rockets have - bother you? so, traditionally, traditional rockets have high i traditional rockets have high environmental impacts, high carbon impacts. but actually, the new shepard rocket that william shatner will be riding on is a hydrogen —based engine so it's only by—products are hydrogen and oxygen so it is very low impact. by-products are hydrogen and oxygen so it is very low impact.— so it is very low impact. thank you very much. — so it is very low impact. thank you
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very much. maggie. _ so it is very low impact. thank you very much, maggie, thanks - so it is very low impact. thank you very much, maggie, thanks for- very much, maggie, thanks for talking to us. maggie lieu, who is an astrophysicist. the mother of a 15—year—old girl who died after taking mdma has become friends with the mother of the boy who supplied the fatal drugs. the two women say getting to know each other is helping them come to terms with what happened to their children. they're now beginning a campaign together to warn teenagers about the dangers of mdma. here's their story. i'm kerry, leah's mum. leah was my daughter. she was 15 when she died, after taking mdma. unlikely friendship. yeah, very unlikely. we're both grieving. they're both our children. we both lost something. yeah. you know, i know i have a son that i can tangibly touch... yeah. ..but i don't have that happy—go—lucky boy any more. yeah. and you have lost leah. yeah. you know, to the same drug,
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mdma, to the same evil. soi so i gota so i got a phone call that evening, as soon as i got there, she was sort of fitting on the car park floor. she was so conscious ? like she was still conscious, but not 100%. she was so conscious ? like she was still conscious, but not100%. she said, mum, she knew! still conscious, but not100%. she said, mum, she knew i was there. within a second, she was... she didn't speak again. i don't really remember much from there. 50. didn't speak again. i don't really remember much from there. so, i'm the mum--- — remember much from there. so, i'm the mum--- can _ remember much from there. so, i'm the mum... can i— remember much from there. so, i'm the mum... can i stop _ remember much from there. so, i'm the mum... can i stop for _ remember much from there. so, i'm the mum... can i stop for a - remember much from there. so, i'm the mum... can i stop for a minute? the mum... can i stop fora minute? ifind— the mum... can i stop fora minute? ifind this— the mum... can i stop fora minute? ifind this hard _ the mum... can i stop fora minute? i find this hard. i'm tammy, i'm the mother— i find this hard. i'm tammy, i'm the motherof— i find this hard. i'm tammy, i'm the mother of the, i find this hard. i'm tammy, i'm the motherof the, iwill i find this hard. i'm tammy, i'm the mother of the, i will say young boy
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at the _ mother of the, i will say young boy at the time — mother of the, i will say young boy at the time or young teenager, he was a _ at the time or young teenager, he was a teenager at the time, that supplied — was a teenager at the time, that supplied the mdma to another young teenager— supplied the mdma to another young teenager on that night. i was struggling with him, emotions were changing. _ struggling with him, emotions were changing, his whole manner was changing — changing, his whole manner was changing and i was fighting services every— changing and i was fighting services every day. — changing and i was fighting services every day, asking them to come help me. they should be injail. yes. connor said the _ they should be injail. yes. connor said the other night that he felt that he — said the other night that he felt that he should still be, he got out early. _ that he should still be, he got out early. he — that he should still be, he got out early, he got out because of good behaviour~ — early, he got out because of good behaviour. ., ., early, he got out because of good behaviour-— behaviour. how long did he get exactl ? behaviour. how long did he get exactly? 21 _ behaviour. how long did he get exactly? 21 months. _ behaviour. how long did he get exactly? 21 months. and - behaviour. how long did he get exactly? 21 months. and he - behaviour. how long did he get l exactly? 21 months. and he went behaviour. how long did he get - exactly? 21 months. and he went in november and _ exactly? 21 months. and he went in november and came _ exactly? 21 months. and he went in november and came out... - exactly? 21 months. and he went in november and came out... six - exactly? 21 months. and he went in i november and came out... six months later. i
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november and came out... six months later- i mean. — november and came out... six months later. i mean, six _ november and came out... six months later. i mean, six months _ november and came out... six months later. i mean, six months in _ november and came out... six months later. i mean, six months in prison - later. i mean, six months in prison for me, it's not long enough. it isn't long enough, no. i get - for me, it's not long enough. it| isn't long enough, no. i get how for me, it's not long enough. it - isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends. my — isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, my family... _ isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, my family... but _ isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, my family... but i - isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, my family... but i think - isn't long enough, no. i get how my friends, my family... but i think it i friends, my family... but i think it has both donors some good. you went on a lot about guilt. yes. has both donors some good. you went on a lot about guilt.— on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i thought. — on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i thought, where _ on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i thought, where have _ on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i thought, where have i _ on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i thought, where have i gone - on a lot about guilt. yes, guilt. so i i thought, where have i gone wrong? my child _ i thought, where have i gone wrong? my child involved with somebody eisos— my child involved with somebody else's child losing their life? | else's child losing their life? wasn't else's child losing their life? i wasn't convinced until i met you that it would do me any good, but after we met, it was a relief. i don't have the same hatred for connor as i did. i don't have the same hatred for connor as i did.— connor as i did. i think that is very- -- if— connor as i did. i think that is very- -- if it — connor as i did. i think that is very... if it was _ connor as i did. i think that is very... if it was the _ connor as i did. i think that is very... if it was the other - connor as i did. i think that isj very... if it was the other way round. — very... if it was the other way round. i— very... if it was the other way round, i don't know if i could not have _ round, i don't know if i could not have that — round, i don't know if i could not have that hatred. round, i don't know if! could not have that hatred.— round, i don't know if! could not have that hatred. yes. the campaign of doini it have that hatred. yes. the campaign of doing it together, _ have that hatred. yes. the campaign of doing it together, i _ have that hatred. yes. the campaign of doing it together, i think - have that hatred. yes. the campaign of doing it together, i think people i of doing it together, i think people will stop and look and they will probably be shocked at first because
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we are working together. the campaign _ we are working together. the campaign is _ we are working together. the campaign is do _ we are working together. the campaign is do you know mdma? to get the message out that mdma isn't a fun party— the message out that mdma isn't a fun party drug, we want people to know— fun party drug, we want people to know mdma kills. and we don't want another— know mdma kills. and we don't want another leah, we don't want another connor~ _ another leah, we don't want another connor. if_ another leah, we don't want another connor. .. . another leah, we don't want another connor. ,, ., ., connor. if we feel like we have told our story and _ connor. if we feel like we have told our story and tried _ connor. if we feel like we have told our story and tried to _ connor. if we feel like we have told our story and tried to educate - our story and tried to educate people, there we can't really do much else. but there has to be, leah died, and i can't let that be for no reason. a substantial number of english communities experienced a decline in life expectancy. imperial college london researchers have found. in the five years before the pandemic, life expectancy went down in almost one in five communities for women, and one in nine communities for men. a man can live for 27 years less if
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he lives in blackpool, which is a town in the north of england, compared to a man living in west london. in compared to a man living in west london. . . however, a kent village has been named as having the highest life expectancy in the uk. 95 for women. according to public health england. it is called detling. with me now is irene nobbs, turned 102 in april, and her carer laura tierney, head of activities at barty house nursing home in detling. the technology isn't amazing and i am told irene is struggling to heroes, but that has never stopped as before so we will persist. irene, can you hear me, it is victoria? yes, yes. excellent. you are 102, i am told, what is your secret? in six months. am told, what is your secret? in six months- and _ am told, what is your secret? in six
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months. and six _ am told, what is your secret? in six months. and six months _ am told, what is your secret? in six months. and six months on. - am told, what is your secret? in six months. and six months on. ok. i am told, what is your secret? in six| months. and six months on. ok. so what is your— months. and six months on. ok. so what is your secret _ months. and six months on. ok. so what is your secret to _ months. and six months on. ok. so what is your secret to living - months. and six months on. ok. so what is your secret to living to - what is your secret to living to that incredible age? accepting life as it is. to hear _ that incredible age? accepting life as it is. to hear good _ that incredible age? accepting life as it is. to hear good music. - that incredible age? accepting life as it is. to hear good music. and i as it is. to hear good music. and have good friends. 0k. as it is. to hear good music. and have good friends.— as it is. to hear good music. and have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what _ have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what do _ have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what do you _ have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what do you think- have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what do you think is - have good friends. ok. tell me about the music, what do you think is good| the music, what do you think is good music that has kept you going? weill. music that has kept you going? well, i don't like music that has kept you going? well, i don't like all— music that has kept you going? well, i don't like all this _ music that has kept you going? well, i don't like all this modern _ music that has kept you going? -ii i don't like all this modern music. i don't like all this modern music. i like all the old music. very fond of operas. i have a collection of records of operas. but anything that is good music. music today is too modern for me. i like songs, i like music with a meaning.— modem for me. i like songs, i like music with a meaning. words with a meanini. music with a meaning. words with a meaning- you _ music with a meaning. words with a meaning. you know _ music with a meaning. words with a meaning. you know what, _ music with a meaning. words with a meaning. you know what, irene? i music with a meaning. words with a - meaning. you know what, irene? there are loads of modern songs that have meaning. i'mjust telling are loads of modern songs that have meaning. i'm just telling you that, i'm not trying to switch you want
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the kind of music i like. but i totally get how music is life affirming. tell me about your friends, because you said they were important to you as well. name some names, irene. tell! important to you as well. name some names. irene-— names, irene. tell you about your friends and _ names, irene. tell you about your friends and name _ names, irene. tell you about your friends and name some _ names, irene. tell you about your friends and name some names. i names, irene. tell you about your friends and name some names. ll names, irene. tell you about your. friends and name some names. i still have friends — friends and name some names. i still have friends where _ friends and name some names. i still have friends where i _ friends and name some names. i still have friends where i lived _ friends and name some names. i sit ii. have friends where i lived recently until i gave it up to come here, they still come here to visit me. my niece came from cornwall yesterday to visit me. all the way from cornwall. i brought her up because my sister had a big family, so i had her the same age as my own daughter. and i brought her up with me, so she
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has treated me as a mother. so i'm very fortunate to have so many friends. and where i live, the place where i lived, i can't get back there any more. so lucky to be in here. but they say, we wish you back? we wish you back. they still visit me here. so i can't be too bad a person! visit me here. so i can't be too bad a erson! ., , ., a person! irene, what is it about detlini , a person! irene, what is it about detling, where _ a person! irene, what is it about detling, where you _ a person! irene, what is it about detling, where you live, - a person! irene, what is it about detling, where you live, that. a person! irene, what is it about- detling, where you live, that means people often live to 95, 100? yes. people often live to 95, 100? yes, well, it's amazing _ people often live to 95, 100? yes, well, it's amazing how— people often live to 95, 100? yes, well, it's amazing how the - people often live to 95, 100? .e: well, it's amazing how the years have gone by. but step—by—step, i've met so many people and done so many things that i still felt very active. but unfortunately, i had
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several operations on my hips and shortened leg which stopped me. this is also where i had double pneumonia which unfortunately, i had to. but i survived. and thank god, i will still be able to converse with people which i am very lucky to have. . . .. people which i am very lucky to have. , ., ,, , have. yes, thank god you did survive because it has _ have. yes, thank god you did survive because it has been _ have. yes, thank god you did survive because it has been an _ have. yes, thank god you did survive because it has been an absolute - because it has been an absolute pleasure talking to you, i have to say, irene. let me talk to laura, sitting next to you. laura, what is it about detling, what is going on? well, it is obvious they a good area to live. _ well, it is obvious they a good area to live, being in kent, it is greenfields everywhere. so it's an easy way— greenfields everywhere. so it's an easy way of— greenfields everywhere. so it's an easy way of life, isn't it? 0h. greenfields everywhere. so it's an easy way of life, isn't it?— easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it is. it's easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it is- it's a _ easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it is- it's a lot _ easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it is. it's a lot easier _ easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it is. it's a lot easier than - easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it| is. it's a lot easier than london. easy way of life, isn't it? oh, it l is. it's a lot easier than london. i think it is — is. it's a lot easier than london. i think it is probably _ is. it's a lot easier than london. i think it is probably down - is. it's a lot easier than london. i think it is probably down to -
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is. it's a lot easier than london. i think it is probably down to the i think it is probably down to the greenness of the area. say think it is probably down to the greenness of the area.- think it is probably down to the greenness of the area. say it again, irene. greenness of the area. say it again, irene- can — greenness of the area. say it again, irene- can i — greenness of the area. say it again, irene. can i tell— greenness of the area. say it again, irene. can i tell you _ greenness of the area. say it again, irene. can i tell you about - greenness of the area. say it again, irene. can i tell you about this - irene. can i tell you about this lace? irene. can i tell you about this place? yes. — irene. can i tell you about this place? yes. of— irene. can i tell you about this place? yes, of course. - irene. can i tell you about this place? yes, of course. it's- irene. can i tell you about this place? yes, of course. it's a i place? yes, of course. it's a lovely, lovely place, a caring place. they work so hard and i think they deserve a good wage. what place. they work so hard and i think they deserve a good wage.- they deserve a good wage. what is they deserve a good wage. what is the name of _ they deserve a good wage. what is the name of the _ they deserve a good wage. what is the name of the care _ they deserve a good wage. what is the name of the care home - they deserve a good wage. what is the name of the care home again? | the name of the care home again? because there is a story of today where it is talking about the great number of vacancies within the care sector, which means people like you, laura, presumably having to work even harder than normal. yes. laura, presumably having to work even harder than normal.- even harder than normal. yes, i think we've _ even harder than normal. yes, i think we've got _ even harder than normal. yes, i think we've got a _ even harder than normal. yes, i think we've got a really - even harder than normal. yes, i think we've got a really good i even harder than normal. yes, i i think we've got a really good team here. _ think we've got a really good team here. just — think we've got a really good team here, just the whole team, the carers. — here, just the whole team, the carers. the _ here, just the whole team, the carers, the management to are very lucky. _ carers, the management to are very lucky. we — carers, the management to are very lucky. we have got a really good team _ lucky. we have got a really good team here — lucky. we have got a really good team here. quite a tight team. i have _ team here. quite a tight team. i have been— team here. quite a tight team. i have been here 18 months and just root covid. — have been here 18 months and just root covid, the team have just, yes, they are _ root covid, the team have just, yes, they are amazing. like
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root covid, the team have 'ust, yes, they are amazingh they are amazing. like irene, i can't fault _ they are amazing. like irene, i can't fault them. _ they are amazing. like irene, i can't fault them. well, - they are amazing. like irene, i can't fault them. well, thank l they are amazing. like irene, i i can't fault them. well, thank you, laura, and thank you very much, irene. it has been a pleasure to talk to you both and it is good to hear your positive vibes on the airwaves. and if irene and laura were not enough, we can talk to a 79—year—old actor and director of the local drama group in detling, jill. ., ., �* ., ~ jill. how are you? i'm fine, thank ou, jill. how are you? i'm fine, thank you. absolutely _ jill. how are you? i'm fine, thank you, absolutely fine. _ jill. how are you? i'm fine, thank you, absolutely fine. tell- jill. how are you? i'm fine, thank you, absolutely fine. tell us - jill. how are you? i'm fine, thankl you, absolutely fine. tell us about this drama — you, absolutely fine. tell us about this drama group _ you, absolutely fine. tell us about this drama group and _ you, absolutely fine. tell us about this drama group and why - you, absolutely fine. tell us about this drama group and why you - you, absolutely fine. tell us about | this drama group and why you think this drama group and why you think this is life affirming.— this is life affirming. well, it has been going _ this is life affirming. well, it has been going for— this is life affirming. well, it has been going for many _ this is life affirming. well, it has been going for many years - this is life affirming. well, it has been going for many years in - this is life affirming. well, it has| been going for many years in the village over the period of, i don't remember, 30 odd years, probably. and we produce, covid allowing come of course, two productions a year. currently, we are rehearsing for play called pressure by david haig which will be performed in november, from the 11th to the 13th. it is interesting because it is an all
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embracing group, we have young people, the more elderly and ritual. —— ritual. currently, the set is being prepared by three people over 70 and the cast have two members over 80. 70 and the cast have two members over80. == 70 and the cast have two members over 80. ., , ., over 80. -- the more elderly and mature. people _ over 80. -- the more elderly and mature. people are _ over 80. -- the more elderly and mature. people are watching - over 80. -- the more elderly and mature. people are watching you | mature. people are watching you around the world right now, so teles what it is about detling, described the place. what might contribute to such magnificent ages? it is the place. what might contribute to such magnificent ages?— such magnificent ages? it is set on the north downs _ such magnificent ages? it is set on the north downs in _ such magnificent ages? it is set on the north downs in kent, - such magnificent ages? it is set on the north downs in kent, in - such magnificent ages? it is set on the north downs in kent, in an - such magnificent ages? it is set on | the north downs in kent, in an area of outstanding natural beauty. so it is a lovely place to live environmentally, lots of walks, so that's great. but there is also a huge community involvement with people being very busy. there are lots of opportunities, you will never be lonely in detling. the support of friends and neighbours, if there is a need for anybody to have that support, is there and ready and willingly given. we've got
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a thriving church, a pub, a village pub, which welcomes all people and is open at all hours. well, not all hours, but it's open and serves very good meals. there are lots of activities in the village hall. there is yoga, pilates, badminton. we've got a strollers group who organise monthly walks from the village and elsewhere. a thriving wru. a cricket team that's doing very well this season. and generally speaking, people have every opportunity to be actively involved —— thriving women's institute. people can participate if they have beenin people can participate if they have been in the village a couple of years or a long time.- been in the village a couple of years or a long time. thank you very much, years or a long time. thank you very much. gill. — years or a long time. thank you very much, gill. take _ years or a long time. thank you very much, gill. take care, _ years or a long time. thank you very much, gill. take care, goodbye. - france has announced the death of hubert germain, the last surviving recipient of the country's rarest bravery award from the second world war, the order of liberation. it was bestowed on just over a thousand heroes
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of the french resistance. the elysee palace described mr germain as "a figurehead of free france". tim allman looks back at his life. as allied troops sweep| onwards towards paris, a three—word announcement - from the capital brings great news — paris is liberated. 1944, and after four long years, paris is free once again. general de gaulle leading the free french and allied troops in retaking the city. but for most of the war, it was the men and women of the resistance who defied nazi occupation. among their number, hubert germain, seen here with president macron last year. a resistance fighter, a war hero and a man who, when preparing to take exams to enter the french military, decided he would never follow german orders. translation: i thought about it i for five minutes and said to myself, "what are you doing here?" so i got up and handed back
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a blank piece of paper. i said, "i'm not interested. i'm off to war." as a soldier of the free french forces, he took part in the battle of el alamein and went on to help liberate the port of toulon and the city of lyon. after the war, he entered politics, becoming a government minister in the 1970s. hubert germain represented what president macron called "the flame of the resistance" — a flame that will never be extinguished. he will be buried in the last empty vault of the national memorial to french fighters of the second world war. let's bring you a look at the weather now, with carol. a fairly cloudy day. some holes developing across the midlands, wales, northern ireland, northern
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england as well. but for most, cloudy with cloud building across east anglia and south—west england. and you could see the odd spot of rain coming out of that cloud. showers continuing on and off through the day across the north and west of scotland. it won't feel as cool as it did yesterday along the north sea coastline. this evening and overnight, we hang on to a fair bit of cloud. still though cher was peppering northern ireland, northern and western scotland. then the wind starts to strengthen through the night across the far north of scotland, you can see this rain waiting in the winds, affecting the northern isles overnight. that is a weather front sinking southwards through the course of tomorrow. it is a cold front, quite salient because behind it, we see cool air coming our way. a look at those isobars tells you that in the north, it is going to be pretty windy. for england, wales and northern ireland to start with, a lot of cloud, some breaks. dampness here and there, especially through the midlands, parts of wales and eventually we see that rain getting into northern ireland. by the end of the day, it
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gets as far south as northern england. but these are the average wind speeds. gusts across the far north of scotland and the northern isles could cost to gale force. temperatures tomorrow 12 to about 17 degrees. starting to pull in the cool air behind that front. 0vernight into friday, the weather front continues its journey, 0vernight into friday, the weather front continues itsjourney, sinking slowly southwards in doing so. cool air following on slowly southwards in doing so. cool airfollowing on behind is represented by the blue. so around the front and ahead of it, once again, still clinging on by the skin of our teeth to the milder conditions, but they won't last. it will be a temporary blast of cool air. 0n will be a temporary blast of cool air. on friday morning, we have the weather front across the south is a weak feature producing some cloud. a lot of dry weather on friday, a fair bit of sunshine around, and temperatures lowerfor bit of sunshine around, and temperatures lower for all of us than in the next day or so. from friday into saturday and sunday, for the weekend, well, the temperatures start to recover slightly again.
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there will be some dry weather around, but we do have some outbreaks of rain coming in from the atlantic.
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this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11... the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent on the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run up to christmas — as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care — a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care,
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and the number of vacancies is still rising. why does a man living in blackpool die 27 years before a man living in chelsea? parts of northern england saw a fall in life expectancy before the pandemic. william shatner is to boldly go where no 90—year—old man has gone before as he becomes the oldest person to travel to the edge of space. also coming up this hour — it's the violent drama taking the streaming world by storm. squid game has become netflix's biggest hit with over 110 million hits. good morning. the eu will this afternoon put forward what it's calling
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far—reaching proposals to address the row about post—brexit trade between great britain and northern ireland. the uk has complained that the current system — called the northern ireland protocol — puts too many barriers in the way of selling chilled meats and other products, and wants it replaced. the eu is expected to suggest cutting the number of checks on products moving. the proposals are understood to include a deal around agri—food — which includes agriculture, horticulture, and food and drink processing. there will also be an arrangement to allow the continued sale of chilled meats from great britain in northern ireland. these products had been facing a ban. and the eu is expected to propose changes to its laws to ensure the free flow of medicines into northern ireland. yesterday, uk brexit minister lord frost proposed plans for an entirely new protocol to replace the existing one — which was put in place to make sure an invisible border between northern ireland
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and the republic was maintained, to protect the peace process. he said keeping the existing protocol would be an "historic error" because it did not have support in northern ireland itself. this morning, the conservative party co—chair, 0liver dowden, said the uk government would wait to see the eu proposals in full but, he said, it would "engage fully constructively" with the eu on the matter. it is the case that we do need to look fundamentally at this protocol, simply because it is not working, particularly for one of the communities, in northern ireland, and that must include also looking at the role of the european court ofjustice. it is highly anomalous that a treaty between two effectively parties is being adjudicated by the courts of one party. we will get the view from northern ireland injust a moment.
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0ur political correspondentjonathan blake has more on this. we have heard about an entirely new protocol enough for the eu plan. what are we expecting? brute protocol enough for the eu plan. what are we expecting?- what are we expecting? we are ex-iectin what are we expecting? we are expecting not — what are we expecting? we are expecting not what _ what are we expecting? we are expecting not what the - what are we expecting? we are expecting not what the uk - what are we expecting? we are i expecting not what the uk wants. what are we expecting? we are - expecting not what the uk wants. the eu is going to put forward a series of proposals which within the existing framework of the northern ireland protocol would address some of the issues that have arisen. there will be fewer customs checks on goods coming from great britain into northern ireland. there will be changes to allow medicines to be imported more easily and i would also be a continuation of chilled mates and other products to allow them to be imported. technically under the existing arrangements. it seems, although we are still waiting for the full proposals, is as far as the eu is willing to go. it is not take it or leave it package, they are willing to do some tinkering but it seems it has been difficult them
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to do this far with the agreement of eu member states signed up. as you have set out, the uk wants to see an entirely new agreement, particularly with removal of anyjurisdiction of the european court ofjustice, that you highest authority which the british government has ongoing basis —— has in place on ongoing basis. while there one idea polite perception here in westminster it certainly won't give them everything that the uk wants and it won't be the end of the negotiation around the end of the negotiation around the northern ireland protocol, how it works and indeed whether it has a future. , ., . ., ., ,, it works and indeed whether it has a future. , ., ., ., ., ,, , ., , future. jonathan, thank you very much. let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page. we heard that lord frost said it
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would be a historic error to keep that protocol in place because it doesn't have support in northern ireland itself. what is the day—to—day reality of the protocol for people there? does a substantial section of the population in northern ireland think it needs to be changed? i northern ireland think it needs to be changed?— northern ireland think it needs to be changed? northern ireland think it needs to bechanied? , ., be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol — be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol here _ be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol here is _ be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol here is on _ be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol here is on two _ be changed? i suppose the impact of the protocol here is on two levels, i the protocol here is on two levels, the protocol here is on two levels, the practical and political. 0n the practical— the practical and political. 0n the practical side there is a degree of disruption — practical side there is a degree of disruption for some businesses, mainly— disruption for some businesses, mainly those businesses who in the past have _ mainly those businesses who in the past have got most of their supplies from companies in england, scotland and wales _ from companies in england, scotland and wales. a number of them have said that _ and wales. a number of them have said that deliveries have been slowed — said that deliveries have been slowed up. sometimes they have stopped — slowed up. sometimes they have stopped completely because companies and the _ stopped completely because companies and the rest of the uk aren't prepared _ and the rest of the uk aren't prepared to trade into northern ireland — prepared to trade into northern ireland any more because the extra paperwork— ireland any more because the extra paperwork means it is too much hassle — paperwork means it is too much hassle so— paperwork means it is too much hassle. so they have had to look at their supply chains, perhaps get more _ their supply chains, perhaps get more supplies locally here in northern— more supplies locally here in northern ireland or across the land border— northern ireland or across the land border in _ northern ireland or across the land border in the irish republic. i think—
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border in the irish republic. i think that _ border in the irish republic. i think that is particularly affecting small— think that is particularly affecting small businesses here who are less able to— small businesses here who are less able to absorb any disruption to their— able to absorb any disruption to their business model. politically, well. _ their business model. politically, well. i_ their business model. politically, well, i suppose it is about the symbolism around northern ireland's place in _ symbolism around northern ireland's place in the uk which really matters in northern— place in the uk which really matters in northern ireland. the unionists, the northern ireland protocol is a board _ the northern ireland protocol is a board in— the northern ireland protocol is a board in their own country, separating them from england's, scotland — separating them from england's, scotland and wales. they see it as undermining northern ireland's place in the _ undermining northern ireland's place in the union. as regards to support with their— in the union. as regards to support with their protocol, all the unionist— with their protocol, all the unionist parties which account for around _ unionist parties which account for around 40% of the vote from the last few elections, slightly more than that perhaps, they are opposed to the protocol. the other parties that characterise themselves as neither
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unionistm — characterise themselves as neither unionist... say it is the least worst— unionist... say it is the least worst option. 0n unionist... say it is the least worst option. on that side they say that unionists are exaggerating the practical— that unionists are exaggerating the practical side of the protocol because _ practical side of the protocol because they say there isn't much disruption — because they say there isn't much disruption for consumers in northern ireland _ i can now speak to richard tice, a businessman and the leader of the reform party — which used to be the brexit party. we are due to hear the eu's proposals today to sort out this row over the northern ireland protocol and trade after lord frost put forward his plans for a completely new version of the protocol, including the removal of the oversight role for the european court ofjustice. what do you make of the negotiation so far. this court ofjustice. what do you make of the negotiation so far.— of the negotiation so far. this is 'ust the of the negotiation so far. this is just the beginning _ of the negotiation so far. this is just the beginning of _ of the negotiation so far. this is just the beginning of what - of the negotiation so far. this is just the beginning of what will i just the beginning of what will probably be many weeks of negotiations. i think the eu have realised that david frost are chief
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negotiator is deadly serious about this. it is not working for the united kingdom and the interpretation of the rules has been completely overzealous and the eu realised that lsa respond constructively then quite rightly the uk government should invoke article 16 of the protocol and withdraw from it. i think what lord frost needs to do is set a deadline for these negotiations. the eu is a master of extending them for months and months and we don't want it to be dragged into the french elections, the fishing grounds and so on. i think it is important to set a deadline and then the eu no they've got to come up with something that works for us otherwise we invoke article 16. i would make that deadline pretty short. i would make that deadline pretty short. . . would make that deadline pretty short. ,, .. , would make that deadline pretty short. ,, , short. i guess politicians of every description _ short. i guess politicians of every description are _ short. i guess politicians of every description are good _ short. i guess politicians of every description are good at _ short. i guess politicians of every| description are good at extending talks and that is something very
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well—known in northern ireland. to scan back to something you said there, lord frost said that the ecj, there, lord frost said that the ecj, the role of the european court of justice, and its oversight, he has described that as a deal—breaker. is that rhetoric designed to extract some rhetoric from the —— concessions from the eu or is he deadly serious? brute concessions from the eu or is he deadly serious?— concessions from the eu or is he deadly serious? we feel strongly that one of _ deadly serious? we feel strongly that one of the _ deadly serious? we feel strongly that one of the reasons - deadly serious? we feel strongly that one of the reasons for - deadly serious? we feel strongly i that one of the reasons for leaving was to not suffer that oversight from the european court ofjustice. it is a court that essentially carries out the wishes of brussels and the european commission. it is really important. he is in charge of negotiations. he has been pretty strong so far but let's wait and see. unlike your previous correspondence, i think this has
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caused huge problems for northern ireland, particularly in selling goods from the rest of the united kingdom there. we are a sovereign nation of four countries and it is absurd that big businesses are essentially withdrawing from selling goodsin essentially withdrawing from selling goods in northern ireland because of the paperwork and bureaucracy of interpretation. fiend the paperwork and bureaucracy of interpretation.— the paperwork and bureaucracy of interretation. �* , , ,, , interpretation. and some businesses interpretation. and some businesses in northern ireland _ interpretation. and some businesses in northern ireland are _ interpretation. and some businesses in northern ireland are establishing i in northern ireland are establishing new relationships with businesses in the republic of ireland. so clearly there is issues therefore businesses in gb as well if they are losing trade because of that. manufacturing in northern ireland said in the last day or so that since the protocol operation plan was published, the role of the ecj hasn't been brought up role of the ecj hasn't been brought up once i northern ireland businesses is an issue. so is the government talking this up as a stick to beat the eu with because it wants to signed a deal to get brexit
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done. let's not forget the lord frost was party to this original protocol, he signed up to it! yes. protocol, he signed up to it! yes, but there was _ protocol, he signed up to it! yes, but there was a _ protocol, he signed up to it! yes, but there was a reasonable - but there was a reasonable expectation that common sense and good will would be applied by both sides. we haven't seen that. we have seeing an absurd situation that the soil on tractor tyres being rejected in northern ireland because it is british soil. the eu is forgetting that northern ireland is part of the united kingdom are not part of the european union. they have over interpreted it, they have overplayed their hand and quite rightly we are saying," that is not acceptable, something has to change." that is causing problems for businesses for both sides of the irish sea. we need to be absolutely firm and the eu needs to know that even change it
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away invoke article 16 very quickly indeed. . , ., , away invoke article 16 very quickly indeed. . , , indeed. dominic cummings has been su~ iiestin indeed. dominic cummings has been suggesting that _ indeed. dominic cummings has been suggesting that the _ indeed. dominic cummings has been suggesting that the original- suggesting that the original protocol signed up to to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland, that the uk government never really intended to follow the fine detail of it to put in place and was agreed to to quote this phrase again "to get brexit done" so you talk about goodwill but there has to be goodwill on both sides, doesn't there?— doesn't there? there is plenty of iood will doesn't there? there is plenty of good will on _ doesn't there? there is plenty of good will on our _ doesn't there? there is plenty of good will on our side. _ doesn't there? there is plenty of good will on our side. how- doesn't there? there is plenty of good will on our side. how can i doesn't there? there is plenty of. good will on our side. how can there be goodwill on the eu side if you reject british soil coming from another part of britain. that is deliberately being your classic, inconvenient, in order to send some kind of inverted commerce punishment. is kind of inverted commerce punishment.— kind of inverted commerce unishment. . . �* kind of inverted commerce unishment. . , �* punishment. is this the brexit day due envisaged? _ punishment. is this the brexit day due envisaged? -- _ punishment. is this the brexit day due envisaged? -- is _ punishment. is this the brexit day due envisaged? -- is this - punishment. is this the brexit day due envisaged? -- is this the - punishment. is this the brexit day i due envisaged? -- is this the brexit due envisaged? —— is this the brexit that you envisaged? let
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due envisaged? -- is this the brexit that you envisaged?— that you envisaged? let us be very clear. that you envisaged? let us be very clear- there _ that you envisaged? let us be very clear. there are _ that you envisaged? let us be very clear. there are global— that you envisaged? let us be very clear. there are global shortages l that you envisaged? let us be very| clear. there are global shortages in the supply chain all over the world. 0bviously the supply chain all over the world. obviously there are other factors, like covid and global shortages in various parts of the supply chain but we have had multiple guests from multiple sectors of businesses saying that brexit is a major factor in terms of encouraging people into jobs, such as lorry drivers who don't want to come back because of the short emergency visas. the reali is the short emergency visas. the reality is less _ the short emergency visas. the reality is less than _ the short emergency visas. tie: reality is less than 5% of hgv drivers have gone back to the european union. this business don't like it and the lobby groups don't like it and the lobby groups don't like it and the lobby groups don't like it because the negotiating leveraged is in favour of lorry drivers who have been badly paid with wages suppressed and have been badly looked after with bad facilities, the training costs, the
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cpc costs have been expensive so big businesses have to pay out more and they don't like it. i think it is great that some of them are seeing pay rises. it is a fair at levelling up pay rises. it is a fair at levelling up between the manual workers who are getting pay rises and big businesses. i are getting pay rises and big businesses.— are getting pay rises and big businesses. , , ., . ,, ., businesses. i bring you back to the iuestion businesses. i bring you back to the question is — businesses. i bring you back to the question is this _ businesses. i bring you back to the question is this the _ businesses. i bring you back to the question is this the brexit - businesses. i bring you back to the question is this the brexit you - question is this the brexit you envisaged when you campaigned for it originally? the people who voted for brexit, are you saying they have to put up with these shortages in the short term?— put up with these shortages in the short term? ., ., ., , , , short term? you are comparing apples with ears. short term? you are comparing apples with pears- the _ short term? you are comparing apples with pears. the shortages _ short term? you are comparing apples with pears. the shortages are - with pears. the shortages are a supply chain issue. i always wanted the lower paid to get higher wages. the recent deal with the united states and australia, we couldn't have done that under theresa may's deal. the vaccine roll—out, we
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acquired vaccines because we weren't acquired vaccines because we weren't a member of the european union. being a sovereign nation, it is better is back at the top table. of course there are bumps in the road. it will always be the case that trade negotiations are subject to give—and—take. brute trade negotiations are sub'ect to give-and-take.�* trade negotiations are sub'ect to give-and-take. trade negotiations are sub'ect to iive-and-take. ~ . ., ., ., give-and-take. we are almost out of time, if give-and-take. we are almost out of time. if these _ give-and-take. we are almost out of time, if these discussions _ give-and-take. we are almost out of time, if these discussions don't - time, if these discussions don't make progress, do you think article 16 should be triggered to do away with the protocol? what are the implications of that? a trade war between eu the uk? ida. implications of that? a trade war between eu the uk?— implications of that? a trade war between eu the uk? no, not at all. the eu needs _ between eu the uk? no, not at all. the eu needs to _ between eu the uk? no, not at all. the eu needs to see _ between eu the uk? no, not at all. | the eu needs to see that technology can easily deal with the issue in the small quantity of goods that pass between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. the eu because 's own expert said that should be the solution. there are
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plenty of other solutions out there, otherwise before the end of november i would invoke article 16. i'm joined by dr kirsty hughes, a specialist on brexit and eu politics and associate fellow of friends of europe — a brussels—based, not—for—profit think—tank for european union policy, analysis and debate. you may have heard some of what's richard tice had to say. he thinks the eu needs to apply some common sense to the situation. what is your take on discussions that have been going on so far on the northern ireland protocol? i going on so far on the northern ireland protocol?— ireland protocol? i think it is a very difficult — ireland protocol? i think it is a very difficult situation - ireland protocol? i think it is a very difficult situation and - ireland protocol? i think it is a very difficult situation and i i ireland protocol? i think it is a i very difficult situation and i think the view— very difficult situation and i think the view from brussels is that boris johnson _ the view from brussels is that boris johnson and david frost are backing down _ johnson and david frost are backing down on _ johnson and david frost are backing down on a _ johnson and david frost are backing down on a deal they signed. they
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didn't— down on a deal they signed. they didn'tiust — down on a deal they signed. they didn'tjust sign it, it was boris johnson's _ didn'tjust sign it, it was boris johnson's oven ready deal before the 2019 get— johnson's oven ready deal before the 2019 get brexit done election. it was an— 2019 get brexit done election. it was an extraordinary deal in the sense _ was an extraordinary deal in the sense that — was an extraordinary deal in the sense thatjohnson was an extraordinary deal in the sense that johnson agreed to put this forward between the mainland of britain _ this forward between the mainland of britain and _ this forward between the mainland of britain and northern ireland. that was the _ britain and northern ireland. that was the main difference with the agreement negotiated by theresa may. now they— agreement negotiated by theresa may. now they are blaming the eu for the steel and _ now they are blaming the eu for the steel and in some ways dominic cummings— steel and in some ways dominic cummings is right that it was never a serious _ cummings is right that it was never a serious deal, it is now immensely damaging _ a serious deal, it is now immensely damaging just in britain which is already— damaging just in britain which is already very low from the eu side. the threat — already very low from the eu side. the threat to renege on the treaty, notjust— the threat to renege on the treaty, notjust one — the threat to renege on the treaty, notjust one leg sign but one that you asked — notjust one leg sign but one that you asked is extremely problematic. obviously— you asked is extremely problematic. obviously this is in the context of the good — obviously this is in the context of the good friday agreement peace process — the good friday agreement peace process. this is notjust about if sausages — process. this is notjust about if sausages can go from great britain to northern ireland, and it seems
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that the _ to northern ireland, and it seems that the eu commission will say today— that the eu commission will say today that they can, this is serious politics— today that they can, this is serious politics that i think it is being treated — politics that i think it is being treated rather lightly by the british— treated rather lightly by the british government. use treated rather lightly by the british government. treated rather lightly by the british iovernment. . , , british government. use say trust is low between — british government. use say trust is low between the _ british government. use say trust is low between the two _ british government. use say trust is low between the two sides - british government. use say trust is low between the two sides but - british government. use say trust is low between the two sides but do i british government. use say trust is i low between the two sides but do you think the proposals by the eu put forward today are enough to make it work for the uk's side or is there more yet that the eu might be prepared to give taking into account what you have mentioned the position of northern ireland, its border and the landlord up —— its land border with the republic and the peace process? ii with the republic and the peace rocess? . with the republic and the peace rocess? , ,., process? if the briefing said there have been on _ process? if the briefing said there have been on what _ process? if the briefing said there have been on what has _ process? if the briefing said there have been on what has come - process? if the briefing said there have been on what has come in i process? if the briefing said there. have been on what has come in are right— have been on what has come in are right then — have been on what has come in are right then they are going to lead to perhaps— right then they are going to lead to perhaps a — right then they are going to lead to perhaps a 50% drop in checks and customs — perhaps a 50% drop in checks and customs processes going on at the moment — customs processes going on at the moment. what we do know is that
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people _ moment. what we do know is that people from brussels had gone to northern— people from brussels had gone to northern ireland, talk to local businesses, try to see what are the most _ businesses, try to see what are the most difficult bureaucratic things and rules— most difficult bureaucratic things and rules that are getting in the way so — and rules that are getting in the way so whether we're talking about chilled _ way so whether we're talking about chilled meat or whether we're talking — chilled meat or whether we're talking about medicine or other products. — talking about medicine or other products, this looks like a pretty major— products, this looks like a pretty major proposal from the eu. we have to rememberthe eu is a major proposal from the eu. we have to remember the eu is a very large single— to remember the eu is a very large single market of 27 states, it has a common— single market of 27 states, it has a common external border to the rest of the _ common external border to the rest of the world. so it can't simply abandon— of the world. so it can't simply abandon all of its own rules or punch — abandon all of its own rules or punch a — abandon all of its own rules or punch a hole in its own borders. is punch a hole in its own borders. [s the punch a hole in its own borders. the role of punch a hole in its own borders. is the role of the european court of justice, and lord foster said he wants the ecj removed from this oversight role from the northern ireland protocol from this new proposal, he says it is a deal breaker. is it also a deal—breaker
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for the european union that the ecj stays in that oversight role? this all comes down to sovereignty, doesn't it? i all comes down to sovereignty, doesn't it?— doesn't it? i don't think it does come down _ doesn't it? i don't think it does come down to _ doesn't it? i don't think it does come down to sovereignty. - doesn't it? i don't think it does come down to sovereignty. i i doesn't it? i don't think it does i come down to sovereignty. i think doesn't it? i don't think it does - come down to sovereignty. i think it comes— come down to sovereignty. ! think it comes down— come down to sovereignty. i think it comes down to the fact that the deal david _ comes down to the fact that the deal david frost _ comes down to the fact that the deal david frost negotiated, the other ready— david frost negotiated, the other ready deal basically said because of the complexities of northern ireland. _ the complexities of northern ireland, ireland and the good friday agreement, that northern ireland could _ agreement, that northern ireland could basically stay in the eu single — could basically stay in the eu single market for goods and because it is in— single market for goods and because it is in the _ single market for goods and because it is in the eu single market for goods— it is in the eu single market for goods they need to follow the rules of that— goods they need to follow the rules of that market and the rules of that market _ of that market and the rules of that market are — of that market and the rules of that market are overseen by the european court _ market are overseen by the european court of— market are overseen by the european court ofjustice. if you look at the politics— court ofjustice. if you look at the politics in— court ofjustice. if you look at the politics in northern ireland and perhaps— politics in northern ireland and perhaps worth remembering that northern— perhaps worth remembering that northern ireland voted by a majority against _ northern ireland voted by a majority against brexit but it got brexit anyway. — against brexit but it got brexit anyway, the big issue are the extent and the _ anyway, the big issue are the extent and the intrusiveness of the customs checks— and the intrusiveness of the customs checks that _ and the intrusiveness of the customs checks that we have seen so far this year and _ checks that we have seen so far this year and not — checks that we have seen so far this year and not the oversight of the
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european — year and not the oversight of the european court ofjustice. what we are also— european court ofjustice. what we are also expecting today is some proposals — are also expecting today is some proposals to the house that could be more _ proposals to the house that could be more democratic involvement or more regular— more democratic involvement or more regular formal discussions and stakeholders in northern ireland about— stakeholders in northern ireland about how the protocol operates. if johnson _ about how the protocol operates. if johnson and frost are offering up a clash _ johnson and frost are offering up a clash over— johnson and frost are offering up a clash over the european court of justice _ clash over the european court of justice we — clash over the european court of justice we may be at the start of a very dangerous and risky path towards — very dangerous and risky path towards a _ very dangerous and risky path towards a trade war and i really can't _ towards a trade war and i really can't see — towards a trade war and i really can't see what is in it for them. not trying _ can't see what is in it for them. not trying to win an election or re-win— not trying to win an election or re-win the _ not trying to win an election or re—win the brexit referendum so they are creating _ re—win the brexit referendum so they are creating a political fight on the question is why?— are creating a political fight on the question is why? thank you very much for your— the question is why? thank you very much for your time. _ ships are being diverted from the uk's largest commercial port because of a backlog of containers. felixstowe, which handles more than a third of the uk's container traffic, said the continuing shortage of hgv drivers was partly to blame. graham satchell reports.
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a logjam at felixstowe, the uk's biggest commercial port. the situation is so serious some larger ships are being re—routed to other ports in europe. morning, mate. how are you doing? morning. i'm 0k. you? adam searle runs a haulage firm with 85 lorries. instead of taking empty containers back to felixstowe as normal, he's had to take them to liverpool as there is no space. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. it has just all created a perfect storm. in normal circumstances it takes two or three days for a container to be collected and driven away once it has been unloaded to the dock. the so—called dwell time is now closer to ten days. the worry now is what impact all this will have on christmas. will there be a shortage of toys and other gifts this year? i think that there will be some disruption this christmas as a result of the hgv shortage. but retailers are really adept at making sure that they prioritise
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the things people want, making sure that people's christmas favourites are available to buy. there are difficulties in the supply chain in other countries, america and china. this is a global problem. the government says it is working closely with the freight industry to work through the challenges. graham satchell, bbc news. new figures released by the office for national statistics show that the uk economy grew by 0.4% percent in august. the gross domestic product or gdp was boosted by the first month without covid restrictions for bars, restaurants and entertainment. but the uk economy remains 0.8% smaller than it was in february 2020, the month before the uk went into its first lockdown. there's a warning that care companies are struggling to recruit enough staff — and that a shortfall of more than 100,000 employees in england means some people are having to wait longer for care.
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there are now more vacantjobs than before the pandemic, and a new report says the incoming mandatory vaccination policy could prompt more resignations. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she has recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i'm finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls.
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we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris 0wden runs this care company and also worked on hospital wards, helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard.
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can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes, people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news. hungry fans fought with police in the opening instances of the game against england yesterday. their fans also booed england players taking the knee. i'm joined by tony now. i know you at the game. describe what you heard and saw what it felt like to see this violence? it is not pleasant at all as an england supporter orjust a member of general society. the first thing i would like to say is to the
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steward who was injured, that is horrific, i absently hope he is doing well. from a positive perspective, the england's supporters behaviour was exemplary. from the moment the players took dna the cheering was really loud the support for our players was very vocal. —— from the moment the players took the knee. i think we have some serious problems in other parts of europe. i'm not saying we don't have problems in the uk as well but last night was really proud to be an england supporter and see how the fans stood up for our players. how the fans stood up for our ila ers. ., how the fans stood up for our .la ers. ., ,., ~' players. you said it felt like the --eole players. you said it felt like the people behind _ players. you said it felt like the people behind the _ players. you said it felt like the people behind the violence - players. you said it felt like the | people behind the violence were quite organised? it people behind the violence were quite organised?— people behind the violence were quite organised? it escalated very iuickl . i quite organised? it escalated very quickly- i can _ quite organised? it escalated very quickly. i can only _ quite organised? it escalated very quickly. i can only go _ quite organised? it escalated very quickly. i can only go off - quite organised? it escalated very quickly. i can only go off what - quite organised? it escalated very quickly. i can only go off what we | quickly. i can only go off what we saw. it escalated very quickly and apparently it was sparked by that incident with the steward. very quickly a large group of away supporters descended on police and were clearly ready to perpetrate violence. that is how it appeared
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from where we were sat. the fact they arrived with a banner denouncing taking the knee spoke volumes for parts of the intent for people in the crowd last night. one of our questions is, to fifa, how can countries get tickets for games when they have a history of perpetrating racism in their own country, never mind abroad. the serious question to ask is how i got in the ground in the first place. that in the ground in the first place. at least my next question to you, tony. do you think more could have been done to think about the implications of these fans, if you want to call them fans, those who were involved in the violence, the implications of them travelling here, could something have been done to stop that? �* , ,., , something have been done to stop that? ~ y ,, something have been done to stop that? absolutely. this is about fifa. this is — that? absolutely. this is about fifa. this is not _ that? absolutely. this is about fifa. this is not about - that? absolutely. this is about fifa. this is not about the - that? absolutely. this is about fifa. this is not about the fa. l that? absolutely. this is about i fifa. this is not about the fa. the fa have done everything they possibly could last night. this goes
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back to a conversation we have had before particularly in the away game against hungary. fifa needs to spend more time looking at risk assessments, player welfare, more time looking at risk assessments, playerwelfare, not just about physical issues. nobody should have to be subject to abuse, verbal or otherwise, when they are going about theirjob and performing a service they are paid for. it is ridiculous in this day and age. i would like to see a more rigorous risk assessment. last night's risk assessment should absolutely have included the stability of a violent eruption. whatever risk assessment was done it was not good enough again and we are left talking about the consequences of something that could and should have been avoided. thank you for your time today, tony, the ceo of kick it out. if you like cloudy days, you are in for a treat. a lot of cloud around.
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some breaks across parts of the midlands, wales and northern ireland but the cloud will be thick enough to produce the odd spot of rain and showers on and off across the day. temperatures, 12 to 17 degrees, not as cool as yesterday. through this evening and overnight, there will be some clear skies about still a lot of cloud. still showers persisting and by the end of the night, the wind in the north will be picking up. these are the overnight low temperatures. tomorrow then, we pick up temperatures. tomorrow then, we pick up the weather front. it is a cold front bringing in some rain and some of that will be heavy. gusty winds around it and behind it and we will see hefty showers. still a fair bit of cloud around with just the odd spot of rain. this is bbc news. the headlines for
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you. the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about post brexit checks. it is incumbent upon us to make sure that we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. time now for all the sports news. fifa says it strongly condemns the ugly scenes before and during england's match with hungary at wembley last night. the game which ended 1—1 was marred by clashes
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between visiting fans and police. fifa says it remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as well as any form of discrimination or abuse. a banner could be seen ahead of england players taking the knee. shortly after, fighting broke out which authorities say began at racial abuse aimed at a steward. hungary have been ordered to play two home matches following the racism england experienced there last month. every time we speak about racial abuse, the punishments but then followed never seem to quite be in line with what has happened but i guess i cannot speak too freely unless i know the facts and i sincerely hope that if that was the case, then the punishments this time fit what has happened.
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scotland needs one more win to secure a play—off place after they left it rather late to get a draw of 1-1. 1—1. it. 1-1. it is not easy place to come, i did try to warn everybody before we came here. the game was as we expected, a tough game. abs, here. the game was as we expected, a tough game-— tough game. a massive six points. we ut tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves — tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves in _ tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves in a _ tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves in a good _ tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves in a good position. - tough game. a massive six points. we put ourselves in a good position. we i put ourselves in a good position. we have now— put ourselves in a good position. we have now won four in a row. we need to make _ have now won four in a row. we need to make sure — have now won four in a row. we need to make sure that next month, one more _ to make sure that next month, one more cup _ to make sure that next month, one more cup final and hopefully we can io more cup final and hopefully we can go to— more cup final and hopefully we can go to moldova and finish the job and finish _ go to moldova and finish the job and finish in _ go to moldova and finish the job and finish in second and then we have denmark— finish in second and then we have denmark who are a really good team. northern— denmark who are a really good team. northern ireland is slim hopes for qualifying are over. they had led bulgaria at half—time but two goals after the break when it for the hosts. they are now fourth in group c and they are unable to make the
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play—offs. andy murray says he is not planning to play in next month's davis cup finals after being knocked out of indian wells in the third round. murray lost in straight sets 6—4, 7—6 to third seed alexander zverev. afterwards he said he needs to rest his body and also believes he doesn't deserve to make the team given how well cameron norrie and dan evans are playing. no one can tell me, guarantee me that my hippo be fine with the next 56 years. but that is the risk i am willing to take and i am out here playing again top four, five players in the world at not playing my best tennis and competing with them well. thomas young will join them well. thomas young will 'oin cardiff and will fl them well. thomas young will 'oin cardiff and will be i them well. thomas young will 'oin cardiff and will be available h them well. thomas young will join cardiff and will be available for - cardiff and will be available for selection. despite playing outside of wales for the rest of the regular
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season, he will be given dispensation to the 60 cat rule which would otherwise be in place. wales played new zealand, fiji, argentina and south africa in the coming weeks. some sad news to end on this morning. the golf commentator and journalist renton laidlaw has died. he reported on 165 majors including 58 open championships. he also presented sports report for bbc and did commentary for the bbc for many years. he was 82. that's all the sport for now. the korean drama squid game has officially reached 111 million users — making it netflix's biggest series launch ever in it's first 28 days. bridgerton had previously held the top spot, being watched by 82 million users. netflix's vice president for content in korea and south east asia says the show�*s success
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is "beyond our wildest dreams". steve holdenjoins as now steve holden joins as now to talk about this. it is on my radar, i have not watched it yet so for people like me, tell us what it is about without giving out too many spoilers. i about without giving out too many soilers. . about without giving out too many soilers. , ., , spoilers. i finished it last night and think of _ spoilers. i finished it last night and think of it _ spoilers. i finished it last night and think of it like _ spoilers. i finished it last night and think of it like your- spoilers. i finished it last night i and think of it like your favourite game show mixed with the hunger games. it is a dystopian thriller, hundreds of people compete in deadly versions of childhood games so the participants in south korea are sent to this mysterious island and they are made to compete with each other for this huge grand prize. over the course of nine episodes, we get to know some of the contestants really well. we root for them, the production values are amazing, it is very colourful and it blends violence and thrills with some real
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heart and some satire, too.- heart and some satire, too. there has been a _ heart and some satire, too. there has been a lot _ heart and some satire, too. there has been a lot of— heart and some satire, too. there has been a lot of discussion - heart and some satire, too. there has been a lot of discussion on i has been a lot of discussion on social media about the violence. is it too violent? what do you make of the way the violence is portrayed in it? if the way the violence is portrayed in it? y ., ., ., the way the violence is portrayed in it? , ., ., ., ., , the way the violence is portrayed in it? ., ., ., , , ., it? if you are going into this show, i think it? if you are going into this show, i think you — it? if you are going into this show, i think you know _ it? if you are going into this show, i think you know what _ it? if you are going into this show, i think you know what you - it? if you are going into this show, i think you know what you are - it? if you are going into this show, i i think you know what you are going to expect. it is brutal at times but it is part of what has got people talking about it. netflix are very secretive and selective about the viewing figures for their shows so it says that 111 million users have watched this. they counted one view as somebody who watches two minutes of an episode but its previous record holder was that period drama, bridgeton, with 82 million views. 111 million, way of the scale. i can see why it has been a success because it has had good word—of—mouth, it is easy to binge—watch, there are cliffhangers
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in it and what is even more extraordinary is that a non—english—language tv show, quite rare for shows like this to make an impact on british tv but netflix, they have been putting more investment into foreign programming and look at the impact of korean culture at the moment in general. parasite, that film won best film at the oscars a few years ago. bts, they are the biggest boy band right now. south korea are really having a moment. . now. south korea are really having a moment. , , ., now. south korea are really having a moment. . , ., now. south korea are really having a moment. , , ., ., moment. interesting when you look at the two biggest _ moment. interesting when you look at the two biggest hits _ moment. interesting when you look at the two biggest hits for— moment. interesting when you look at the two biggest hits for netflix - moment. interesting when you look at the two biggest hits for netflix so - the two biggest hits for netflix so far, bridgeton and now this. they could not be more different, could they? i guess you got executives at netflix trying to find out what the common factors are in these two shows, if there are any, and replicate that with other productions.— replicate that with other productions. replicate that with other roductions. . .. . productions. yes, i think with squid iames, it productions. yes, i think with squid games. it has _ productions. yes, i think with squid games, it has been _ productions. yes, i think with squid games, it has been a _ productions. yes, i think with squid i games, it has been a word-of-mouth games, it has been a word—of—mouth
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experience. with bridgeton, there was of hype around it and people were expecting the launch around christmas time, a lot of build—up. squid khat game launched quite softly, i would say for netflix and it has been word—of—mouth, people looking at memes, sharing pictures and videos on social media, so as with anything, it is hard to predict what is going to be a hit. all i know from watching it, it is entertaining tv. it is fast moving, keeps you guessing, has characters that you care for, and looks good. that is part of its success so i think it is hard for netflix to come up think it is hard for netflix to come up with a specific formula for what we are going to watch but with this, they seem to have got all the components right.— they seem to have got all the components right. thank you for that.
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thousands of wives and children of islamic state groups foreign fighters are currently held in camps in northern syria. the kurdish authorities which run them are urging countries to repatriate their citizens but many are refusing, seeing them as a security risk. the islamic state may have been defeated but here in the camps, it is brutal ideology lives on. killings are common, weapons are smuggled in and people smuggled out. children are at risk of radicalisation. so, when boys reach adolescence, they are moved on to secure detention centres, alone.
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he is ten years old. his mother and younger siblings are all he has left. his father, an iso fighter, was killed in an air strike. the mother brought him here from the caribbean island of trinidad. i their people who quickly realised what it was about to come its brutality, and they very quickly decided to return themselves. but ou decided to return themselves. but you stayed here right until the end. it is difficult to leave. but little has been done to bring them back. some countries like sweden, germany and belgium have brought back some of their citizens while others like britain and france
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have only repatriated children. mainly orphans. the adults are seen as a security threat. that is because isa killed thousands. among them, kurdish men and women buried in this cemetery. the lives of women and children in the camps is challenging but there is little sympathy for them from the families of those killed by islamic state group and its foreign fighters. their grief is raw as this woman mourns her son, one of countless cards killed during a decade of civil war. there is growing frustration that the responsibility for detaining islamic state families. , ., ., , families. them. the situation inside is very bad- — families. them. the situation inside is very bad. kurdish _ families. them. the situation inside is very bad. kurdish officials - families. them. the situation inside is very bad. kurdish officials have i is very bad. kurdish officials have this dire warning. _ this dire warning. translation: ., ., , translation: there are daily killinis, translation: there are daily killings. they _ translation: there are daily killings, they are _ translation: there are daily killings, they are training - translation: there are daily killings, they are training the i killings, they are training the children in their ideology. the
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international community is not taking their duties and response abilities toward it. if it keeps going like this, we will face a disaster that we will not be able to deal with. but disaster that we will not be able to deal with. �* . ., , deal with. but while countries decide what _ deal with. but while countries decide what to _ deal with. but while countries decide what to do, _ deal with. but while countries decide what to do, children i deal with. but while countries i decide what to do, children are trapped here. there are fears that they are wasting away and for many, a brighter future at home are fading. the headlines: the european union is setting out its plan to reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. later
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the two sides will hold face—to—face talks in an attempt to resolve the dispute over a post brexit trade. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care, a shortfall of more than 100,000 makers means people are waiting longer for care and then above vacancies is still rising. sarah everard's killing has led to a closer look at the culture within the police and now two inquiries have been announced to see what needs to change and how people like her murderer can be stopped from entering the police again. but all this takes time and change won't happen straightaway. in the meantime, women continue to work in the police and in some cases don't enjoy what they do or who they work with because of the culture. newsnight�*s reporter sima kotecha has been speaking to former and current female police officers up and down the country.
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some of the stuff i have heard has been incredibly disturbing, some has betrayed a culture of misogyny, sexual assault and harassment. just to give you an example and some of the women currently serving who didn't want to go on camera for obvious reasons, they were worried they would lose theirjobs, told me they would lose theirjobs, told me they feel it has got worse over the last five years. one woman said it is constantly poking fun, saying i am not up to the job before i is constantly poking fun, saying i am not up to thejob before i have breasts. some bosses even laughing when these comments are flying around. it makes you feel belittled and constantly harassed. another one saying that the button was pointed in her private areas by a male officer, made herfeel very uncomfortable. she said it was wrong and she stormed out of the room. one woman that i had a lengthy chat with recently left the metropolitan police in 2019 after serving for decades. her name is patricia and
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here is what she had to say about here is what she had to say about her experience during that time. my her experience during that time. my bra strap was injured when i was an operator when another officer was driving the car and he was trying to rip my tights while we were stationary. i punched him and said, stop it. i have had, in the changing rooms at a police station, on an early turn, just changing out of my clothes and literally, someone was trying to open the door and there was no lock on it. i literallyjust went to the door and it was the officer that was pinging my bra strap that was actually trying to open the door while i was getting changed. you just get fed with it, it really grounds you down after a while. i was on night duty and i was studying and i thought, i will have a break from studying, studying and i thought, i will have a breakfrom studying, went studying and i thought, i will have a break from studying, went into the
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refreshment room and i was the only female in the room with about 15 officers. i was reading a magazine and all i could hear was also laughing. i looked up and there was pornography being played on the tv. i was absolutely shocked and disgusted. it i was absolutely shocked and disgusted-— disgusted. it feels like it is something _ disgusted. it feels like it is something from _ disgusted. it feels like it is something from the - disgusted. it feels like it isj something from the 1970s. disgusted. it feels like it is i something from the 1970s. it disgusted. it feels like it is - something from the 1970s. it is shocking, isn't it?— shocking, isn't it? yes, it is. i have been _ shocking, isn't it? yes, it is. i have been listening _ shocking, isn't it? yes, it is. i have been listening to - shocking, isn't it? yes, it is. i| have been listening to stories, anecdotes like this over the last week. some of it is historic, it is not all contemporary. however these women were talking about decades long careers, where they were subjected to the sort of behaviour and three of the women actually were adamant that it still is very contemporary, this sort of misogyny,
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it is still happening today, but women are still very fearful to talk about it. they are saying about what they really hope for that going forward, through what happened with sarah everard and how there is now a focus on culture and these two enquiries that are going to be carried out in the coming months, more women will go forward. patricia served in the metropolitan police and they did come back with a statement saying the met police takes these allegations extremely seriously. there is no place for this kind of behaviour and be actively encouraging reporting of incidents and we expect all our officers and staff to challenge inappropriate behaviour and not to be a bystander. france has announced the death of hubert germain, the last surviving recipient of the country's rarest bravery award from the second world war, the order of liberation. it was bestowed on just over 1,000 heroes of the french resistance. the elysee palace
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described mr germain as a figurehead of free france. as allied troops sweep - onwards towards the palace, a three—word announcement - from the capital brings great news — paris is liberated. 1944, and after four long years, paris is free once again. general de gaulle leading the free french and allied troops in retaking the city. but for most of the war, it was the men and women of the resistance who defied nazi occupation. among their number, hubert germain, seen here with president macron last year. a resistance fighter, a war hero and a man who, when preparing to take exams to enter the french military, decided he would never follow german orders. translation: i thought about it i for five minutes and said to myself, "what are you doing here?" so i got up and handed back a blank piece of paper. i said, "i'm not interested.
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i'm off to war." as a soldier of the free french forces, he took part in the battle of el alamein and went on to help liberate the port of toulon and the city of lyon. after the war, he entered politics, becoming a government minister in the 1970s. hubert germain represented what president macron called "a flame of the resistance" — a flame that will never be extinguished. he will be buried in the last empty vault of the national memorial to french fighters of the second world war. the french resistance fighter, hubert germain, who has died at the age of 101. the shortlist for this years riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco—friendly mosque in cambridge, a footbridge on the cornish coast and the centrepiece of a university in south—west london. today it is the turn of the windermerejetty museum in the lake district.
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it is the first contemporary building on the shores of windermere for more than 50 years. ifound it an enormous privilege being trusted to imagine a building in such a beautiful setting. this building is intentionally a very atmospheric visitor experience. i'm rowan seaford. i'm an associate director at carmody groarke. i'm andy groarke, of carmody groarke architects, and we are the architects for the windermerejetty museum. the museum is seen and approached from all sides, so you can arrive by boat to one of the jetties, or you can arrive by foot or by car by land. the centrepiece of the wooden wet dock is surrounded by a cluster of copper—clad buildings.
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we spent a year up here to understand the seasons and how different materials weather in the lake district environment. over time, the building will develop, it's inevitable, oxidisation, in order to give the building quite a timeless quality. the brief for this building i was to create a world—class building in which to house the internationally- significant boat collection. it needs to be a building that - could accommodate large—scale boats, that was exciting for the public to want to visit, but also, - importantly, because it sat - within one of our great national parks, the lake district national park, it had to be part— of the landscape it was within. sustainability has been really central to the concept of the building. we have systems such as the lake—source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we've selected, wherever possible, local materials, so that the travel from source to site is as short as possible. the building has a zero—waste strategy so, actually,
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all of the domestic waste water is treated on—site and it's filtered through the landscape and reed beds, so it can then be discharged back into the lake as clean water. the site isjust amazing. it reflects boat—building, it reflects restoration, i it reflects conservation. some of the success of what the team has achieved here is a building that is simultaneously foreground and background. foreground's the visitor experience, it's the building that's here. and yet, it's the background, it's the backdrop to a beautiful landscape setting and immersing yourself in a fantastic collection. the windermerejetty museum in the lake district, one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain's best new building. we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tomorrow night at 7:30pm.
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a man in bosnia has built a rotating house for his wife. apparently she was tired of seeing the same view from her window and he was so fed up of hearing her complain that he got to work. she can now choose the view she likes and pause the rotation until she fancies a change. some news coming in from essex police in relation to the activities of the group, insulate britain. essex police said they were called to reports of people on the slip road atjunction 31 of the m25 shortly after eight to 25 this morning and they say officers were on the scene within five minutes. they have made 35 arrests and got
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traffic moving again following reports of people blocking the road in two locations in thurrock. essex police arresting 35 people from the insulate britain group after the slip road of the m25 was blocked early this morning. the police say they were able to keep one line open to allow traffic to keep moving and then were able to reopen all lanes shortly afterwards. just to clarify, 16 people were arrested at that incident and then police were called to reports of people blocking stone lane which is where they made a further 19 arrests. time now for the weather. there will be some holes in the
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cloud developing but for most, it is going to be cloudy, the cloud building across east anglia. you can still see the odd spot of rain coming out of that cloud. showers continuing on and off throughout the day. it won't feel as cool as yesterday along the north sea coastline. through this evening and overnight we hang on to a fair bit of cloud. still though showers to bring northern ireland and scotland and then the wind starts to strengthen through the course of the night because the far north of scotland you can see this rain waiting in the winds. that is a weather front which will be sinking southwards through the course of tomorrow. it is a cold front and behind it we will start to see some colour coming our way. one look at the isobars tells you that in the north it will be pretty windy. for england, wales and northern ireland to start with, a lot of cloud. some dampness here and there to lead through the midlands and parts of wales and eventually we will see
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some of that rain hitting into northern ireland and by the end of the day, it will get as far south as northern england. these are the average wind speeds but gusts across the far north could cost to gale force. temperatures tomorrow, 12 to 17 degrees. we started pull in the colour behind the front. overnight thursday and into friday, the weather front continues its journey, sinking slowly southwards. the cooler air following on sinking slowly southwards. the cooler airfollowing on behind as represented by the blue colour here. just ahead of it, once again we are still clinging on by the skin of our teeth to the milder conditions, but they won't last. on friday morning, here we have the weather front across the south, producing some cloud. a lot of dry weather on friday, a fair bit of sunshine around and temperatures lower for all of us than what they will be in the next day or so. from friday into
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saturday, but the weekend, the temperatures start to recover slightly again. there will be some dry weather around but we do have some outbreaks of rain coming in from the atlantic to stop.
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this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at midday... the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. later the two sides will hold face—to—face talks in an attempt to resolve the dispute over post—brexit trade. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent on the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run up to christmas — as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care — a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting
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longerfor care, and the number and the number of vacancies is still rising. william shatner is to boldly go where no 90—year—old man has gone before as he becomes the oldest person to travel to the edge of space. also coming up this hour — it's the violent drama taking the streaming world by storm. squid game has become netflix's biggest hit with over 110 million views. welcome to bbc news. the eu will this afternoon put forward what it's calling far—reaching proposals to address the row about post—brexit trade
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between great britain and northern ireland. the uk has complained that the current system — called the northern ireland protocol — puts too many barriers in the way of selling chilled meats and other products, and wants it replaced. the eu is expected to suggest cutting the number of checks on products moving. the proposals are understood to include a deal around agri—food — which includes agriculture, horticulture, and food and drink processing. there will also be an arrangement to allow the continued sale of chilled meats from great britain in northern ireland. these products had been facing a ban. and the eu is expected to propose changes to its laws to ensure the free flow of medicines into northern ireland. yesterday, uk brexit minister lord frost proposed plans for an entirely new protocol to replace the existing one — which was put in place to make sure an invisible border between northern ireland and the republic was maintained, to protect the peace process. he said keeping the existing protocol would be an "historic "error" because it did not have support in northern ireland itself. this morning, the conservative party co—chair,
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oliver dowden, said the uk government would wait to see the eu proposals in full but, he said, it would "engage fully "constructively" with the eu on the matter. it is the case that we do need to look fundamentally at this protocol, simply because it is not working, particularly for one of the communities, in northern ireland, and that must include also looking at the role of the european court ofjustice. it is highly anomalous that a treaty between two effectively parties is being adjudicated by the courts of one party. our correspondent in brussels isjessica parker. what more are you hearing at this stage about the proposals from the eu side? it stage about the proposals from the eu side? . . stage about the proposals from the eu side? , ., , , , ., eu side? it is a broad brush at the moment about _ eu side? it is a broad brush at the moment about what _ eu side? it is a broad brush at the moment about what we _ eu side? it is a broad brush at the moment about what we know. - eu side? it is a broad brush at the moment about what we know. we j eu side? it is a broad brush at the - moment about what we know. we know
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they are going to look to what they regard as a significant reduction on checks and customs, procedures, allowing the continued import of certain chilled meats, including sausages into great britain from northern ireland. a white satin issue? well, the european union essentially has a ban on chilled meats coming in from third countries. we will get further details this afternoon and i think the devil will be in the detail in terms of how much this will make the uk's government concerns. of course, how much it will meet the concerns of communities in northern ireland as well. the eu does see it as a significant offer, even stretching the boundaries of how far they can go in their legal framework. the boundaries of how far they can go in their legalframework. things might be seen very differently in downing street. in terms of
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governance, lord frost arisen charge of the uk side of things, he wants to see the removal of the european court ofjustice in its role in the northern ireland protocol but that is a no go here in brussels and no sense that is going to change. we have been hearing from reza mae's former chief of staff he has said that the uk's proposals have no chance to success and will do even further damage to the relationship with our nearest neighbours. he says that if you agree on something during an election saying it is a great deal and then immediately try and unpick the thing afterwards the people who you signed a deal with will say that you didn't sign it in good faith in the first place. what is the mood for compromise in brussels given the way the uk side has been talking about the eu and presenting this? lord
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has been talking about the eu and presenting this?— has been talking about the eu and presenting this? lord frost's speech esterda presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that _ presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that he _ presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that he made _ presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that he made in _ presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that he made in lisbon i presenting this? lord frost's speech yesterday that he made in lisbon in| yesterday that he made in lisbon in portugal, i think it is fair to say i haven't spoken to anyone in brussels who particularly liked that speech. he talked about wanting to put relations on a better footing but also suggesting that the northern ireland protocol had been an example of the european overreach and that they didn't want britain to succeed. so it was david frost style diplomacy there and it didn't necessarily go down that well in brussels. in terms of the issue of trust, a lot of people point out that this is an agreement that the uk did sign up to. the counterargument to that we have heard from downing street from lord frost as well as that it was signed in haste basically, in extraordinary circumstances, that is being applied over rigorously by the european union and that they need a pragmatic
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approach to northern ireland. these are the arguments we will hear over the coming weeks. what we expect to happen now is that the two sides will start some sort of intense talks and negotiations over the next few weeks to see if there is some room for meeting and agreement. as i say, the issue for the european court ofjustice and its oversight role does seem like a difficult one to resolve at the moment. what about the impact is of the current trading arrangement — the northern ireland protocol as it is at the moment — on the people of northern ireland? i'm joined now by aodhan connolly, director of the northern ireland retail consortium. what is the day—to—day impact of the project and argue about it but what are the facts on the ground? there is a lot of he _ are the facts on the ground? there is a lot of he said _ are the facts on the ground? there is a lot of he said and _ are the facts on the ground? there is a lot of he said and she - are the facts on the ground? ti77 is a lot of he said and she said and in the middle the truth. at the
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start of the year we said that northern ireland —— they said that northern ireland —— they said that northern ireland —— they said that northern ireland was starving and they couldn't get food across and that wasn't true at all. there were only ever a couple of hundred product lines missing in the supermarket and the result of that is that people simply didn't know what they had to do, it was a new customs regime. the uk government spent billions of pounds about telling people how to trade with the eu but didn't spend any time telling people how to deal with northern ireland. it was that kind of chilled factor about how to deal with northern ireland. it has got better for a lot of people but there is still customs and paperwork for things only prohibited and restricted list but in general people are getting on. there are
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some sectors that have been feeling it very acutely, such as manufacturing, who are finding it hard to get suppliers to send things to northern ireland or are seeing an increase in cost. that would have got a lot worse if we had seen the end of the grace period, things like export health certificates, and other certification that would have been needed for every lorry coming over. that is really where there would have been huge costs if people weren't ready for that. share would have been huge costs if people weren't ready for that.— weren't ready for that. are you seeini weren't ready for that. are you seeing new _ weren't ready for that. are you seeing new business _ weren't ready for that. are you i seeing new business relationships being struck up across the border on the island of ireland, businesses in northern ireland starting to do more business with firms in the republic of ireland, replacing existing relationships they had with businesses in gb?- relationships they had with businesses in gb? ., ,., businesses in gb? there are some ienuinel businesses in gb? there are some genuinely new— businesses in gb? there are some
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genuinely new business _ businesses in gb? there are some genuinely new business between i businesses in gb? there are some i genuinely new business between the north and the south and the north with eu countries because the protocol does give us that the dual access to both the uk general market and the european union. there has been some changes where people get their products from and supply chains but a lot of the gb to n! supply chains have endured. chains but a lot of the gb to ni supply chains have endured. some haven't though. _ supply chains have endured. some haven't though. quite _ supply chains have endured. some haven't though. quite publicly - supply chains have endured. some haven't though. quite publicly there haven't though. quite publicly there have been some notable examples where they haven't. at least if the whole relationship hasn't been harmed some products are no longer available northern ireland. same available northern ireland. some have really _ available northern ireland. some have really gotten _ available northern ireland. some have really gotten a _ available northern ireland. some have really gotten a lot _ available northern ireland. some have really gotten a lot more - available northern ireland. ”he have really gotten a lot more media attention than they should have, for example sausages. we are 1.9 million people here northern ireland but we feed over 10 million people. we export sausages and we export beef in that kind of thing. lesson 5% of
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the sausages consumed in northern ireland come from great britain. a lot of things were overhyped but you absolutely right, something that had to change. the protocol was agreed the uk government and the eu, when the uk government and the eu, when the protocol came out northern ireland businesses, including myself, said they did not want the protocol they just didn't want any borders north south—east or west because it's so circular and integrated are the supply change that any friction at all would have a detrimental effect in northern ireland. if i a detrimental effect in northern ireland. ._ a detrimental effect in northern ireland. , , ., ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol _ ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol is _ ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol is in _ ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol is in place, - ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol is in place, do - ireland. if! may interrupts, now the protocol is in place, do you| the protocol is in place, do you want to see some changes to it or can you on a practical level make what you have got work? iaide can you on a practical level make what you have got work? we want to see changes — what you have got work? we want to see changes but _ what you have got work? we want to see changes but we _ what you have got work? we want to see changes but we have _ what you have got work? we want to see changes but we have said - see changes but we have said that from the start. we wrote to both sides in december saying, "thanks very much, lads, but it is not going
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to be enough." the eu proposals are very reflective of the northern ireland business groups proposals. ships are being diverted from the uk's largest commercial port because of a backlog of containers. felixstowe, which handles more than a third of the uk's container traffic, said the continuing shortage of hgv drivers was partly to blame. graham satchell reports. this morning we have heard that there is potential for this morning we have heard that there is potentialfor disruption there is potential for disruption over christmas there is potentialfor disruption over christmas and the people should plan ahead with their purchases. graham satchell reports. a logjam at felixstowe, the uk's biggest commercial port. the situation is so serious some larger ships are being re—routed to other ports in europe. morning, mate. how are you doing? morning.
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i'm ok. you? adam searle runs a haulage firm with 85 lorries. instead of taking empty containers back to felixstowe as normal, he's had to take them to liverpool as there is no space. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. it has just all created a perfect storm. in normal circumstances it takes two or three days for a container to be collected and driven away once it has been unloaded to the dock. the so—called dwell time is now closer to ten days. the worry now is what impact all this will have on christmas. will there be a shortage of toys and other gifts this year? i think that there will be some disruption this christmas as a result of the hgv shortage. but retailers are really adept at making sure that they prioritise the things people want, making sure that people's christmas favourites are available to buy. there are difficulties in the supply chain in other countries, america and china. this is a global problem. the government says it is working closely with the freight industry
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to work through the challenges. graham satchell, bbc news. let's pick up on this discussion about ships being diverted from the uk's largest commercial port felix though because of the backlog of containers there. —— felixstowe. the group which runs the port of felixstowe.. joining me now is tim morris, chief executive of the uk major ports group, which represents a number of port operators including the group which runs the port of felixstowe.. give us your take on what the situation is at felixstowe on the scale of the backlog of containers? what we are seeing in felixstowe now
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is one particular symptom of what has been a very busy period for ports across the uk. the last 12 months have seen real surges in demand for ship freight, consumer goods, building materials and others. you have to remember we are an island nation. ports have worked really hard to stay open throughout that period and brexit. what we are seeing different now is supply chain disruptions in the land side, such as hgv drivers, and what we are seeing is that ports are the jam in the sand wedge between a very busy and quite volatile global shipping market but also some congested supply chains in the uk. ports are working hard to make sure they can power the nation through. than power the nation through. an increase in demand for goods brought
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by sea as economies opened up after the worst of the lockdown from the pandemic plus the combination of hgv driver shortages. pandemic plus the combination of hgv drivershortages. how pandemic plus the combination of hgv driver shortages. how big is this backlog? how many days or weeks behind are we talking? your package iuite riihtl behind are we talking? your package quite rightly talked _ behind are we talking? your package quite rightly talked about _ behind are we talking? your package quite rightly talked about dwell - quite rightly talked about dwell times, how long a container stays on ports, that has 44 may maybe four days to eight days or at least six to seven days. that has been happening sincejuly. that will work its way through and we are working very closely not just with its way through and we are working very closely notjust with our customers and supply chain partners but also with the government in order to help unblock notjust ports, the ports are actually capable of loading and unloading tonnes of boxes and grain when they come in, we have the capacity to do
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that, what we need to do now is work with others in the supply chain to make sure that the whole supply chain is moving. so make sure that the whole supply chain is moving.— make sure that the whole supply chain is moving. so this comes back to the issue — chain is moving. so this comes back to the issue of _ chain is moving. so this comes back to the issue of drivers, _ chain is moving. so this comes back to the issue of drivers, hgv - to the issue of drivers, hgv drivers, to turn up to the port and take these containers to their destinations.— take these containers to their destinations. ., , ., ., , destinations. that is one of the big discussions — destinations. that is one of the big discussions we're _ destinations. that is one of the big discussions we're having _ destinations. that is one of the big discussions we're having right - destinations. that is one of the big| discussions we're having right now. the level of demand have seen have been consistent but the arrival of ships has been unpredictable for the last 12 months. that ships has been unpredictable for the last 12 months.— last 12 months. that to a greater extent is beyond _ last 12 months. that to a greater extent is beyond your _ last 12 months. that to a greater extent is beyond your control- last 12 months. that to a greater i extent is beyond your control which must be frustrating. obviously you can have those discussions with government and other parties to explain that the situation is but it is beyond your control, isn't it? iaide is beyond your control, isn't it? we do our is beyond your control, isn't it? - do our best to put in place what we can do. we need more people, more opening hours, more crates and storage space, but ultimately we are one part of a broader supply chain. we are confident we can do what we
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can do but when other parts of that supply chain struggle, what do you see is the situation that unfortunately we have seen in a temporary basis in felixstowe in the last day to which is now starting to unwind. ~ ., ,, last day to which is now starting to unwind. ~ ., i. ., unwind. would you agree with the head of the _ unwind. would you agree with the head of the cory _ unwind. would you agree with the head of the cory brothers - head of the cory brothers international shipping agency who said there may be potential for disruption over the holiday period and that it would be prudent for people to plan ahead? i and that it would be prudent for people to plan ahead?— and that it would be prudent for people to plan ahead? i think what seeini at people to plan ahead? i think what seeing at the _ people to plan ahead? i think what seeing at the moment, _ people to plan ahead? i think what seeing at the moment, you - people to plan ahead? i think what seeing at the moment, you quite i seeing at the moment, you quite rightly reference this is a global issue with tight supply chains across the world, what we saw during last christmas in the pandemic when demand was still very high was that ports and the rest of the supply showed manage their way through some
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very difficult circumstances and we are confident we can do the same this year. from a personal reflection i haven't been on the internet ordering the kids' christmas presents this year but i'm pretty confident of the ability of our colleagues to deliver on time and for the supply chains and retailers to work through some very sophisticated logistic planning to ensure things arrive on time. thank ou ve ensure things arrive on time. thank you very much- _ fifa says it strongly condemns the ugly scenes before and during england's match with hungary at wembley last night. the game, which ended 1—1, was marred by clashes between visiting fans and police. a banner could be seen amongst the away fans prior to kick off... ..in protest at england players taking the knee. shortly after
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fighting broke out between hungarian fans and police which authorities say began with. ..racial abuse aimed at a steward. on the pitch... hungary scored first before john stones equalised. hungary have already been ordered to play two home matches behind closed doors following the racism england players experienced there last month. well, fifa have says in that statement that "its position "remains firm and resolute in rejecting any form of violence as "well as any form of discrimination or abuse. "fifa has a very clear zero—tolerance stance against "such abhorrent behaviour in football." the arrived with a banner opposing players _ the arrived with a banner opposing players taking the knee speaks volumes — players taking the knee speaks volumes about what they went to do last night _ volumes about what they went to do last night. the question is why are fifa giving — last night. the question is why are fifa giving countries tickets when they have — fifa giving countries tickets when they have such a history of racism and perpetrating racism in their own
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country— and perpetrating racism in their own country never mind abroad. the question— country never mind abroad. the question to _ country never mind abroad. the question to ask is how they got into the game _ question to ask is how they got into the game in — question to ask is how they got into the game in the first place. andy murray sez he's not planning to play in next month's davis cup finals... after being knocked out of indian wells in the third round. afterwards he said he needs to rest his body... and also believes he doesn't deserve to make the team given how well cameron norrie and dan evans are playing. it is physically the best i have been for a while but the consistency isn't there and the decision—making isn't there and the decision—making is not great. isn't there and the decision-making is not great-— is not great. that is it for now but much more _ is not great. that is it for now but much more on — is not great. that is it for now but much more on the _ is not great. that is it for now but much more on the bbc _ is not great. that is it for now but much more on the bbc sport - is not great. that is it for now but - much more on the bbc sport website. there is also the app as well to entertain you for the rest of the
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afternoon. how is the uk economy doing? well, the latest figures show it grew by 0.4% in august as more of us went out and went on holiday. the office for national statistics says that the services sector made the biggest contribution to economic growth in the first full month after all covid restrictions were lifted in england. let's speak now with our economics correspondent andy verity. in normal times that would be pretty good growth, it would be four or five year is far more than the growth we have had before the pandemic. but these are not ordinary times. we are supposed to be in bounce back lands, we should be going up but it looks like we are slowing down a little bit. most economists expected 0.5%. it is
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constantly undershooting what most people were hoping for. the bank of england wants to grow 7% this year. if you look at what is holding up the economy, we are not used to seeing a picture like this, normally out of a recession you look at problems with the lack of demand, people not buying enough staff but now what you have here is not a lack of demand, you have an inability to supply that demand. in construction, activity shrank in august and in the economy overall it shrank injuly. part of the reason for that is that firms in constructions could not get hold of the building materials they need to meet their orders. so they have a healthy order book but they cannot reach it. another reason is a lack of skilled workers. that is partly down to brexit. the same applies of course to haulage drivers, just talking a few minutes
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ago about logistics, some of it is down to global supply, but some of it is down to simple practicalities. if you do not have enough lorry drivers you cannot get goods from a to b. that has been affecting quite a few firms who haven't been able to grow as they would like to simply because they can't get the supply that they need. this will continue to hold back the recovery if we are not careful. if that shortage of lorry drivers is not overcome, for example. lorry drivers is not overcome, for examle. �* , . .. lorry drivers is not overcome, for examle. �* , . lorry drivers is not overcome, for example-— lorry drivers is not overcome, for examle. . , ., ,, , . example. andy, thank you very much for that. today is the big day for william shatner. later the actor, famous for playing captain kirk will boldly go where a few men — and a few women — have been before. but not at his age. the 90—year old will become the oldest person ever to fly into orbit when forms part of a four man crew aboard thejeff bezos owned new shepard rocket. our los angeles correspondent sophie long has been
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following his final preparations. i'm going into space. i don't know how many people can say that. it's life changing in its way. interest in space exploration has waned over the last few decades. the fact that william shatner is making this journey has renewed some of that sense of wonder. there is an adventure in my life that i would not have had, had i not done this. and it looks like there's a great deal of curiosity about this fictional character, captain kirk, going into space. for those who have never watched an episode of star trek, here's why. captain kirk is possibly one of the most known, iconic, mythological characters in our sort of collective pop culture. the idea that the man who portrayed this daring captain, pushing us to the limits of our knowledge and exploring the deepest frontiers of space gets to go into space himself,
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itjust makes me laugh. i wish william shatner the best of luck on his voyage. it's reignited interest in space travel and also in the series that broke so many boundaries all those decades ago. in the original series, you had a black woman and asian—american man in space during the civil rights movement. in its way star trek has always pushed a more progressive vision of inclusion, whatever the conversation is at the time, it pushes that forward. it says, look at what we could do if we work together. over the years, trekkers and trekkies have found much to bond over, including their own language. if all goes according to plan, he won't be exploring strange new worlds or making contact with new life forms. william shatner�*s historic flight to space will be extraordinary for science, for pop culture, for the future of space travel and for him. we're just at the beginning but how miraculous that beginning is! how extraordinary it is to be
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part of that beginning. there is this mystique of being in space and that much closer to the stars and being weightless. i shall be entranced by the view of space. sophie long, bbc news, west texas. so hejoins us so he joins us from texas. lovely to see you. just two and half hours to go before the launch. something very special about this story. obviously people are fascinated about it is william shatner but now he is actually going into space aged 90, it is quite a magical story. it is actually going into space aged 90, it is quite a magical story.- it is quite a magical story. it is a maiical it is quite a magical story. it is a magical story — it is quite a magical story. it is a magical story and _ it is quite a magical story. it is a magical story and some - it is quite a magical story. it is a magical story and some would i it is quite a magical story. it is a i magical story and some would say it is quite a magical story. it is a - magical story and some would say a pretty amazing pr stunt byjeff bizos. pretty amazing pr
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stunt byjeff bezos. but it is a massive day for blue origin, startrek but it is a massive day for blue origin, star trek fans and william shatner himself. he seems pretty relaxed but he says he is terrified. this has been delayed by 24—hour is. it was supposed to happen yesterday morning but the weather here has been very windy and they had delayed it. it is due to take off now and just over two and a half hours times. it is still pitch black here in the west texas desert but the new shepard rocket is on the launch pad me just out of sight for you guys. in a couple of hours william shatner will make his way out there, not of course with the crew of the starship enterprise, but with three other passengers and the rocket will take off. the whole journey should take less then 11 minutes. serve all goes according to plan he won't be making first contact with any alien species are anything like that, instead he will experience just over three minutes of weightlessness. that is
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one of the things that he is really looking forward to. looking at that view of planet earth as well which he believes will be in —— entrancing. so a major day for the man who first donned a spacesuit over 50 years ago playing captain kirk but now the age of 90 he is actually going into space and going where no nonagenarian has gone before. abs where no nonagenarian has gone before. �* , ,, where no nonagenarian has gone before. ~ , i. where no nonagenarian has gone before. a , , . , before. as you say, huge publicity cou for before. as you say, huge publicity coup for jeff _ before. as you say, huge publicity coup forjeff bezos. _ before. as you say, huge publicity coup forjeff bezos. what - before. as you say, huge publicity coup forjeff bezos. what sort - before. as you say, huge publicity coup forjeff bezos. what sort of i coup forjeff bezos. what sort of training has he done for this? he has training has he done for this? the: has been here on site at the blue origin launch for a few days now. this is a second passenger flight after the inauguralflight took after the inaugural flight took place after the inauguralflight took place injuly withjeff bezos
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place in july with jeff bezos himself and his brother. they say safety goes first and despite the fact that it william shatner is 90 years old they say he has gone through the fitness test and medical tests. we are very much looking forward to speaking to him afterwards when the capture comes back to earth in what is called a stable freefall and it will be slowed by three parachutes and an upthrust as it comes back to earth. we hope to speak to just a few moments after that has happened. iaide moments after that has happened. we look forward to it. sophie, thank you very much. sophie long in texas waiting for the launch. joining me now is a social and political sciences expert from nottingham university. great to have you with us. people are fascinated by the fact that william shatner, captain kirk himself, is going into space. it leads to bigger questions though about whether what we are seeing really is the advent of space tourism is this going to be pretty
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exclusive club open only to the super—rich? you are absolutely right, so at the moment, it is a privilege for the few and the prohibitive prices of a single ticket on these space ventures is still something that most cannot afford. however, even if it brings other questions because evenif it brings other questions because even if this could be expanded, become commercially viable for the average person, it brings up concerns about the environmental impact of these lunches because the average rugged lunch uses so much carbon dioxide.— carbon dioxide. essentially, are these vanity — carbon dioxide. essentially, are these vanity projects _ carbon dioxide. essentially, are these vanity projects by - carbon dioxide. essentially, are these vanity projects by some i these vanity projects by some wealthy individuals? what you are saying is, when we think about the planet, we are very much thinking about the planet in the run—up to cup 26, some space tourism programme would not be a desirable thing? precisely, especially on the eve of
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the conference and all the things that we have made a lack of progress stop it recently came out that the clean climate fund which was set up to help developing nations adapt to climate change, this fund is chronically underfunded and when you consider that buildings are being poured into these space excursions, it doesn't look too good. it's an invasion of our responsibility to do what we can to fix the mess that we have at the moment on earth. lip have at the moment on earth. up until now, space travel, the cosmonauts and astronauts we have seen, we have viewed them as pretty otherworldly in a way, notjust because of the fact that they have got into space but because of the years of training, the selection and incredibly competitive selection process to get to that point. is there something in our nature as humans that is always going to be fascinated by individuals who have not gone through this training
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process, being able to go into space to see the curvature of the earth, to see the curvature of the earth, to experience that which so few people have experienced before? yes. people have experienced before? yes, there is definitely _ people have experienced before? ies there is definitely an element of it, this long—standing curiosity looking beyond and this feeds into the story with william shatner which is why it is so interesting, this cultural figure associated with this narrative of the beyond actually goes into space. that aspect of space travel is not inherently problematic of the beyond and unknown, it is, i think, problematic of the beyond and unknown, it is, ithink, some problematic of the beyond and unknown, it is, i think, some of the political and ethical implications that have become problematic when it diverts our attention away from the chronic issues of inequality, the fact that most people are struggling to afford housing, access to education, that we need funding to help people adapt and that is our resources and attention is extensively being diverted elsewhere.—
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extensively being diverted elsewhere. . , , ., elsewhere. really interesting to talk to you- _ elsewhere. really interesting to talk to you. thank _ elsewhere. really interesting to talk to you. thank you - elsewhere. really interesting to talk to you. thank you for - elsewhere. really interesting to talk to you. thank you for your i talk to you. thank you for your time. time now for the weather. if you like cloudy days, you are in for a treat. the cloud will be thick enough to produce rain on and off. temperatures, ten to 17 degrees. through this evening and overnight, there will be some clear skies but still a lot of cloud, still showers persisting. by the end of the night, the wind will be picking up. these are the overnight low temperatures. in rural areas, they will be lower than that. tomorrow, we pick up our weather front. it is
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a cold front bringing in some rain, some of that will be heavy. gusty winds around it and behind it but we will see some hefty showers will stop just the odd spot of rain. this is bbc news. the headlines: the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. later the two sides will hold face—to—face talks in an attempt to resolve the dispute over post brexit trade. it is incumbent upon us as a government and the eu to make sure that we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as felixstowe
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port struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care, a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care and the number of vacancies is still rising. william shatner is to boldly go where no 90—year—old man has gone before as he becomes the oldest person to travel to the edge of space in the next few hours. racism in the british music industry is serious, upfront and personal according to the author of a new report about the experiences of black musicians. the report by the black lives in music initiative found six in ten black music creators have experienced racism while 86% said they have faced barriers to their career because of their race. they also earn £299 less per month on average than their white colleagues. the report was compiled from the biggest ever survey of black musicians and music
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industry professionals in the uk. we can speak now to the report author, rogerwilson. thank we can speak now to the report author, roger wilson. thank you for joining us. i am struck by that phrase, that this is serious upfront and personal. there is nothing hidden about this, is there, that is what you are saying?— what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely _ what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely right. _ what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely right. it _ what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely right. it is _ what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely right. it is the - what you are saying? yes, that is absolutely right. it is the black. absolutely right. it is the black experience, it is notjust my experience. i have been a musician and someone working in the industry for the last 30 years. it has actually been the experience shared by black people across the industry and it really does feel very personal and it is something that the industry needs to know and do something about. you the industry needs to know and do something about.— the industry needs to know and do something about. you obviously have talked to a lot — something about. you obviously have talked to a lot of _ something about. you obviously have talked to a lot of people _ something about. you obviously have talked to a lot of people in _ talked to a lot of people in compiling this report. before i discuss with you what you want to be done, can you perhaps share one or
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two stories about the experiences of some of the people you have spoken to. . . some of the people you have spoken to. , , ., ., “ some of the people you have spoken to. , , ., to. yes, just looking at the statistics — to. yes, just looking at the statistics for _ to. yes, just looking at the statistics for example, - to. yes, just looking at the statistics for example, to i to. yes, just looking at the i statistics for example, to five black professionals have felt the need to change their appearance because of their race ethnicity and thatis because of their race ethnicity and that is rising to 44% of black women. it isjust that is rising to 44% of black women. it is just not unusual that people feel the need to change their identity, change who they are. we have anecdotal evidence of the musicians who are attempting to lighten their skin as a result of that. we have musicians who are told that. we have musicians who are told that there is already an r and b artist on the roster for that particular label and as such, they won't be taking any more, yet there will be any number of indie artists
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of caucasian persuasion on the roster for those labels. so of caucasian persuasion on the rosterfor those labels. so it really is notjust facts, it is also the way that people feel. this is real. ~ ., . . . the way that people feel. this is real. . . , , , , real. what is behind this, is it that there _ real. what is behind this, is it that there are _ real. what is behind this, is it that there are not _ real. what is behind this, is it that there are not enough - real. what is behind this, is it i that there are not enough black executives in them using industry? obviously we are talking about something much wider and cultural issues here, but in terms of bringing about change in the industry, is it that there are not enough black executives in the meeting industry who perhaps can't mentor and support people involved in various aspects of the industry? yes, i think that is a great point that you make. it is absolutely right but we also need to understand that this is across the industry. the industry needs to be honest, it needs to wake up to this as being a real problem and something that it has a responsibility to address collectively and i think it is not
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just looking at mentoring, it is also looking at pay disparity. you have already mentioned that. let us have already mentioned that. let us have some transparency in this industry so we all understand who is earning what at what level and in terms of gender ethnicity and representation more generally. these are really important aspects. we also need the industry to put its hand in its state pocket and give more support at grassroots level as well. ~ ., ., more support at grassroots level as well. . . ., more support at grassroots level as well. ~ . ., ., more support at grassroots level as well. . . . ., ., more support at grassroots level as well. . ., ., ., ., ., well. what are you going to do to t to well. what are you going to do to try to build _ well. what are you going to do to try to build on — well. what are you going to do to try to build on this _ well. what are you going to do to try to build on this report - well. what are you going to do to try to build on this report by - try to build on this report by way of discussions with the industry? that is a great question because of course, this is the most significant data gathering exercise of its kind. we don't want it to just stop doors unless it is the door to the gateway for equality in the industry, so we are aiming to get industry leaders around the table in the next couple
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of weeks have some discussions and see where we can begin with this because we know that this is not a quick fix, is not going to happen tomorrow, but we know that it does need to happen and we need to begin discussing what that looks like and how we make change happen. haste discussing what that looks like and how we make change happen. have you seen any changes. _ how we make change happen. have you seen any changes, the _ how we make change happen. have you seen any changes, the beginning - how we make change happen. have you seen any changes, the beginning of - seen any changes, the beginning of any changes since the rise to prominence of the black lives matter movement, or have changes, if there are any, not filtered in any meaningful way yet?- are any, not filtered in any meaningful way yet? you are absolutely — meaningful way yet? you are absolutely right, _ meaningful way yet? you are absolutely right, last - meaningful way yet? you are absolutely right, last year i meaningful way yet? you are i absolutely right, last year there were a number of impassioned statements and black squares posted online. i think the awareness has begun and you've seen some interesting articles from some very notable and high—profile female pop stars who have been talking about theissue stars who have been talking about the issue of racism in the industry. i think these discussions, these talks have begun. that is how change
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starts. so between that, and i have seen that there are a number of the big hitters who have become and began social injustice fans. we just need to accelerate that and move that forward. change takes time. we have to understand that. this is hundreds of years in terms of the way that black people have been treated more generally and in terms of this industry, there is structural prejudice, there are mechanisms in place that need to be broken down and rebuilt.— broken down and rebuilt. roger, thank ou broken down and rebuilt. roger, thank you very — broken down and rebuilt. roger, thank you very much _ broken down and rebuilt. roger, thank you very much for - broken down and rebuilt. roger, thank you very much for talking i broken down and rebuilt. roger, i thank you very much for talking to us, really interesting to hear your thoughts on the report. there's a warning that care companies are struggling to recruit enough staff — and that a shortfall of more than 100—thousand employees in england means some people are having to wait longer for care.
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there are now more vacantjobs than before the pandemic, and a new report says the incoming mandatory vaccination policy could prompt more resignations. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her lunch and personal care. she has recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i'm finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times,
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we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? dr kris 0wden runs this care company and also worked on hospital wards, helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard. can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes,
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people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news. the headlines: the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. later the two sides will hold face—to—face talks in an attempt to resolve the dispute over post brexit trade. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as felixstowe port struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care, a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care and the number of vacancies is still rising.
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the korean drama squid game has officially reached 111 users, making it the biggest series launch ever for netflix. british and previously held the top spot, being watched by 82 million users. netflix's vice president for content says the show�*s success is beyond our wildest dreams. let us speak now to the tv critic, scott brian. hello to you. i smiled at your tweet a moment ago saying you were going to be on here talking to us about this little show that not many people have watched! why is it so huge netflix? this that not many people have watched! why is it so huge netflix?— why is it so huge netflix? this show has one why is it so huge netflix? this show has gone beyond — why is it so huge netflix? this show has gone beyond netflix's _ has gone beyond netflix's expectations. it is a word—of—mouth hit but it has become a social media word—of—mouth hit in terms of the fact that so many people have been sharing memes, small scenes from it. i initially thought it was going to
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be a gory version of the hunger games. but that is the show�*s real trick, it manages to defy your expectations by going into a load of issues with far more complexity than you everything. it looks at division between the very, very rich and the very poor. it looks at capitalism, it looks at different forms of political structure and i think it is the fact that it will make you think about these universal themes and how it applies to your own life. even though this show is a violent show, i would even though this show is a violent show, iwould not even though this show is a violent show, i would not recommend watching it with young children, but i would say it does put the idea of violence within entertainment also within the spotlight. it is quite original this is one of the darkest shows that you will see on tv this year. but as a result, that means its own
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distinctive compared to a lot of reboots and revivals which until now have been very much the assumption of what different broadcasters think that audiences have been wanting. is it successful for the same reasons as budget and has been so successful for netflix? , ., , , ., , for netflix? obviously a very different show. _ for netflix? obviously a very different show. a _ for netflix? obviously a very different show. a very - for netflix? obviously a very i different show. a very different show. we are in the point now where we are having the most competition tv have ever had. i think at the moment, tvs spitting into directions. either it is, that is reboot popular franchises that have been around forever, or let us take a risk on new shows from different perspectives or providing something that has not been shown before. that is what you get in a big risk. summer success, some are failures. shows such as squid game is, very highly original, thought—provoking
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tv. it is a show that only netflix can only pull off, notjust having a show that can be in every single country, lodged all on the same day, that everybody gets infatuated by, but also the fact it can be dubbed, should you watch it adapt. i am a firm believer in watching things with subtitles on! me, too! so you can really be absorbed by it. the fact that this show, which is a south korean show, has been able to captivate the world essentially, even though it is not an english anguish. fin even though it is not an english aniuish. ., ,., ., even though it is not an english aniuish. ., ., ,~. ,, anguish. on that point, do you think netflix is now— anguish. on that point, do you think netflix is now going _ anguish. on that point, do you think netflix is now going to _ anguish. on that point, do you think netflix is now going to be _ anguish. on that point, do you think netflix is now going to be looking i netflix is now going to be looking for content, whether from netflix is now going to be looking for content, whetherfrom south korea or from other for content, whetherfrom south korea orfrom other countries, which we haven't traditionally looked to, for our tv content, we see more of that now? . for our tv content, we see more of that now?— that now? yes, netflix have been s-iendin that now? yes, netflix have been spending half _ that now? yes, netflix have been spending half $1 _ that now? yes, netflix have been spending half $1 billion _ that now? yes, netflix have been spending half $1 billion over - that now? yes, netflix have been spending half $1 billion over the i spending half $1 billion over the last five years in tv in south korea
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generally. they are notjust aiming to have the best shows from that region on their platform but it is also because they are aiming to international massively. audiences are now getting much more accustomed to shows. we have seen scanned dramas on bbc four. now we are having the popularity of shows within asia. viewers are getting much more used to watching shows not in english, too. i would expect netflix to be spending and showing much more shows from that region. i think the issue that might come from this is, a lot of rivals will go, oh, what viewers want are really depressing stories. there might be a little competition of who can have the most depressing and original programme! i think the mentality until now has been, we have to have uplifting shows, we have to have
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shows to make you feel good and i think squid game has come along and showing that actually, they were do want darker stuff as well. rgreat showing that actually, they were do want darker stuff as well.— want darker stuff as well. great to let our want darker stuff as well. great to get your take _ want darker stuff as well. great to get your take on _ want darker stuff as well. great to get your take on that, _ want darker stuff as well. great to get your take on that, thank - want darker stuff as well. great to get your take on that, thank you i get your take on that, thank you very much. apple is reported to be cutting production of its latest iphone because of a shortage of chips. the tech giant had expected to make 90 million units.. in the final quarter of this year but has now told its partners that the total will be lower — by as many as 10 million phones. manufacturers in many sectors are facing a shortage of computer chips as demand surges with covid lockdowns lifting. pressure is growing on world leaders on climate change in the run up to the cop26 un climate change summit. the international energy agency says trillions of dollars more must be spent globally, on new sources of energy, to hit agreed targets on climate change. courtney bembridge reports. less of this, and more of this. the international energy agency says we need to drastically change the way we generate energy.
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glasgow is preparing to welcome world leaders later this month for a crucial climate summit as they try to limit the rise in global temperatures to 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels. the international energy agency says for that target to be met, spending on clean energy projects must reach $4 trillion a year by 2030. it is very, very clear, in terms of what areas of our energy economy we need to accelerate materially versus where we need to start pulling back, and i think it is a really helpful summary to show the extent to which we really need to drive renewable investment quite heavily over the coming period. the pandemic has hindered efforts to cut down on coal and oil and this year the world is on track to record the second largest increase in emissions in history. it comes as energy prices hit record highs and there are warnings of further price hikes to come. since the paris agreement
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was signed four, five, - the iea says renewable energy spending would pay for itself and create 26 millionjobs by 2030. courtney bembridge, bbc news. we have been looking at the six contenders for the price which will be awarded tomorrow. the shortlist includes a cambridge and a mixed office and residential development that at one point was earmarked for demolition by a london council. todayit demolition by a london council. today it is the turn of the windermerejetty museum in the registry. it is the first contemporary building over 50 years.
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ifound it an enormous privilege being trusted to imagine a building in such a beautiful setting. this building is intentionally a very atmospheric visitor experience. i'm rowan seaford. i'm an associate director at carmody groarke. i'm andy groarke, of carmody groarke architects, and we are the architects for the windermerejetty museum. the museum is seen and approached from all sides, so you can arrive by boat to one of the jetties, or you can arrive by foot or by car by land. the centrepiece of the wooden wet dock is surrounded by a cluster of copper—clad buildings. we spent a year up here to understand the seasons and how different materials weather in the lake district environment. over time, the building will develop, it's inevitable, oxidisation, in order to give the building quite a timeless quality. the brief for this building i
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was to create a world—class building in which to house the internationally- significant boat collection. it needs to be a building that - could accommodate large—scale boats, that was exciting for the public to want to visit, but also, - importantly, because it sat within one of our great - national parks, the lake district national park, i it had to be part of the landscape it was within. sustainability has been really central to the concept of the building. we have systems such as the lake—source heat pump that heats the whole museum, underpinning the energy strategy. we've selected, wherever possible, local materials, so that the travel from source to site is as short as possible. the building has a zero—waste strategy so, actually, all of the domestic waste water is treated on—site and it's filtered through the landscape and reed beds, so it can then be discharged back into the lake as clean water. the site isjust amazing. it reflects boat—building, it reflects restoration, i it reflects conservation.
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some of the success of what the team has achieved here is a building that is simultaneously foreground and background. foreground's the visitor experience, it's the building that's here. and yet, it's the background, it's the backdrop to a beautiful landscape setting and immersing yourself in a fantastic collection. one of the shortlist entries and we will be live at the awards ceremony with a special programme tomorrow night at 7:30pm. time for the weather. the amount of cloud we see is going to vary a lot from place to place this afternoon. it is across
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southern england that will have the best of the afternoon sunshine. across western areas, it will continue to be pretty grey and damp with drizzle around the coast and hills. temperatures on the mild side everywhere but particularly in the sunshine across the south which images into the high teens. overnight tonight, a grey one again with luke cloud around, some mist and full patches and drizzle. heavy rain is starting to encroach into the shetlands from a weather front and that will continue to bring wet weather as we start the day on thursday. there will also be strong winds reaching gale force at times. the rain trickling southwards. northern ireland, england and wales, the clouded big enough for the odd spot of drizzle but there will be breaks in the cloud. central areas have the best of the sun. that is the weather.
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officials from brussels head to london to discuss reducing checks on goods moving between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. the row about post—brexit checks has caused delay and consternation, now the eu says it has far—reaching proposals. to resolve the issue. it is incumbent upon us as a government — and i think it is incumbent upon the eu — to make sure that we have a sustainable future arrangement, and it is not working at the moment. we will explain what is going on and talk to our correspondent in brussels, belfast and westminster. fears of christmas shortages, as britain's biggest commercial port struggles to shift a backlog of shipping containers. care homes in england are struggling to recruit staff, and there are now more than 100,000 vacantjobs. the final frontierfor
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captain kirk, as he prepares to blast off into space.

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