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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines this wednesday morning... the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland. it is to try to end the row with the uk about post brexit checks. it is incumbent upon us as a government and i think it incumbent on the eu to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it's not working at the moment and it's not working at the moment and it is in the interests of both sides to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages at christmas at britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care —
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a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care, and the number of vacancies is still rising. are they affecting the care of you or your relatives? if you work in the sector, how are these shortages impacting on you trying to do your job on a daily basis? let me know and give us your experience, we will feed it into the conversation. you can e—mail me or message me on twitter or instagram. violent clashes between travelling fans and police overshadow england's 1—1 draw with hungary at wembley. why does a man living in blackpool died 27 years before a man living in chelsea? parts of the north of england saw a fall in life expectancy before the pandemic. also coming up this hour, the finalfrontier. william shatner is to boldy go where no 90—year—old man has gone before, as he becomes the oldest person to travel to the edge of space.
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good morning. the eu will this afternoon put forward what it's called far reaching proposals to address the dispute about northern ireland's trading arrangements. the uk has complained that the current system, called the northern ireland protocol, puts too many barriers in the sale of chilled meat and other products and wanted be replaced. the eu is expected to suggest cutting the number of checks on goods and medicines moving between great britain and northern ireland. the proposals are understood to include a deal around agrifood, which includes agriculture, horticulture, and food and drink processing.
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there will also be an arrangement to allow the continued sale of chilled meats from great britain in northern ireland. these products had been facing a ban. and the eu is expected to propose changes to its laws ito ensure the free flow of medicines in to northern ireland. yesterday, uk brexit minister lord frost proposed plans for an entirely new protocol to replace the existing northern ireland protocol, saying it was put in place to make sure the invisible border between the northern ireland and republic of ireland was not to protect the peace process. he said keeping the existing protocol would be an historic error. this morning, the conservative party co—chair, 0liver dowden, said the uk government would wait to see the eu porposals in full but that the uk government will "engage fully constructively" with the eu on the matter. it is the case that we do need to look fundamentally at this protocol simply because it is not working,
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particularly for one of the communities in northern ireland, and that must include also looking at the role of the european court of justice. it is highly anomalous that a treaty between two effectively parties is being adjudicated by the courts of one party. 0ur chief political correspondent, adam fleming, has more on this. you can talk about this in plain english! what has been the problem until now and what is the eu now are suggesting? although we get these proposals officially later we know quite a bit of detail already. we will not quite a bit of detail already. - will not get them in black and white until 5:30pm so there was a long time to wait but luckily a lot has been leaking out so we can work out what's going on. it's good to have a bit of a recap. this is about the northern ireland protocol which is a bit of the brexit deal, the divorce treaty, signed by the eu and uk in
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2019, rememberthat? it means treaty, signed by the eu and uk in 2019, remember that? it means that some aspect of the eu single market law continue to apply in northern ireland. that is so you can still have free movement of goods, plant and animal products and livestock, from northern ireland to ireland, which preserves the good friday agreement. however, it means there are additional checks on things as they go from great britain to northern ireland and it means northern ireland and it means northern ireland's status in the uk is a slightly different to what it was before brexit, and also on the issue of sausages, it means the eu's ban on the import of chilled meats, sausages from other countries, applies in northern ireland as well, even though it is still technically part of the uk. so it is that constitutional issue, that logistical issue, and the bureaucracy that traders are facing, and the effect that things like the potential sausage ban is having on the communities in northern ireland thatis the communities in northern ireland that is making the uk say to the eu, we have to rip this up and start
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again. rip it up and start again is what they are —— not what they will propose but they will propose some quite big changes to how the protocol is limited which in brussels they feel is going a long way towards what the uk has been asking for. way towards what the uk has been askin: for. . , asking for. 0k, and remind us, this rotocol asking for. 0k, and remind us, this protocol was _ asking for. 0k, and remind us, this protocol was what _ asking for. 0k, and remind us, this protocol was what most _ asking for. 0k, and remind us, this protocol was what most politiciansl protocol was what most politicians in this country voted for, the particular brexit most of them voted for and some viewers might remember borisjohnson saying there will be no border down the irish sea, over my dead body, and saying to northern ireland businesses, if somebody ask you to fill in a customs declaration form, ring up the prime minister and i will direct them to throw it in the bin. he said there was no question of their being checks on goods going from great britain to northern ireland. fix, goods going from great britain to northern ireland.— northern ireland. a few things to sa about northern ireland. a few things to say about that, _ northern ireland. a few things to say about that, looking _ northern ireland. a few things to say about that, looking at - northern ireland. a few things to say about that, looking at some l northern ireland. a few things to l say about that, looking at some of the prime mr �*s previous statements, you can see that what he was doing at the time was accentuating the positive —— the prime minister. there was a deal, the government managed to get some tweaks to the backstop that theresa may was going to sign to, and there were positives
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to sign to, and there were positives to this that would help people in northern ireland benefit from uk trade deals but also have fairly seamless trade with the rest of the eu as well. that was in the period when the uk was optimistic that the protocol might not be that bad and could be livable with. but now, as it is being introduced, there are definitely effects being felt on businesses that trade between great britain and northern ireland and on people who live in northern ireland and the european commission recognises that. there is a big argument as well about what is happening at that time. david frost will tell you that it felt like the eu had a gun to the uk's head in 2019... he eu had a gun to the uk's head in 2019... ., , ., eu had a gun to the uk's head in 2019... ., �* eu had a gun to the uk's head in 2019... .,, ., �* , 2019. .. he was our brexit minister? he was doing _ 2019. .. he was our brexit minister? he was doing the _ 2019. .. he was our brexit minister? he was doing the negotiating. - he was doing the negotiating. exactly and he still is, overseeing the relationship, but the eu would say to that that it was the uk holding a gun to its own head because they were desperate to get a brexit deal and perhaps sign up to
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things they did not like just to get the overall deal over the line. then you get is like tweets last night from dominic cummings, the former chief adviser to the pm, saying my intention was never to respect this protocol in full and that's why we introduced legislation like the inter nil market built to start and doing bits of it which now has led to accusations that the government was acting in bad faith with the negotiators in the first place —— internal market bill. what i should say, in the next few weeks, this stuff today trigger a couple of couple of weeks of quite intense negotiations with both sight seeing if they can bridge differences. if they can, we might be in a world where they agree to disagree and life stumbles on as normal for another few months or years, or if the differences cannot be bridged, we could face quite a confrontation and we could see the uk using the bit of the northern ireland protocol that allows parts of it to be suspended by one side or the other
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in an emergency, and if the uk did that, the eu would probably retaliate somehow and that is what we could be looking at, some think that looked a bit like a uk eu trade war. . ~' that looked a bit like a uk eu trade war. ., ~ , ., that looked a bit like a uk eu trade war. . ~ , ., y that looked a bit like a uk eu trade war. ., ~ y., , . let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page. tell us what it has been like in the ground across northern ireland in terms of the impact of these checks on goods being taken from gb to where you are?— where you are? here in northern ireland, where _ where you are? here in northern ireland, where again _ where you are? here in northern ireland, where again this - where you are? here in northern ireland, where again this part . where you are? here in northern ireland, where again this part of| ireland, where again this part of the uk is finding itself at the sharp end of relations between the uk and eu, the impact of the protocol works on two levels, practical and political. the practical and political. the practical is about the degree of disruption which has been suffered by businesses, particularly those who have been getting most of their supplies from england, scotland and wales. they have been saying they have had delays in deliveries, and now some companies in the rest of the uk have stopped delivering to northern ireland altogether because
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they say it is simply too much hassle with the extra work and paperwork and checks. they are having to look at how they get their goods, for example, trying to get more supplies from northern ireland or the republic of ireland, so they don't have to cross that border in the irish sea, that trade barrier. 0n the political side, unionists simply do not like anything which they see as a separating northern ireland of the uk so they see this as an economic border within their own country which is not acceptable to them, as they say it threatens northern ireland as a part of the union. so they say the protocol has to go. nationalists and the cross unity alliance party who opposed brexit, they say the protocol is the least worst option, they would say that unionists are exaggerating the practical effect of the protocol on the ground in northern ireland and that there hasn't been, for example, really widespread disruption for
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consumers here. but that means that this protocol has become a huge political battle ground and the future of the devolved government itself is at stake because the biggest unionist party, the dup, has said that if the protocol is not significantly changed, if the sea border is not in effect scrapped, they will pull their ministers out of the devolved government and stormont�*s devolved power sharing executive cannot function without the dup. ., ~ , ., , executive cannot function without the dup. ., ~ y . i'm joined by charles baughan, managing director and owner of westaway sausages. good morning. you are based in the south of england, your firm has good morning. you are based in the south of england, yourfirm has been making sausages for over 100 years. before brexit, describe what you sold to northern ireland. we sold wholesale. _ sold to northern ireland. we sold wholesale, fresh _ sold to northern ireland. we sold wholesale, fresh sausage, - sold to northern ireland. we sold wholesale, fresh sausage, and i sold to northern ireland. we sold i wholesale, fresh sausage, and also to a couple of retailers as well.
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not a huge amount of business but still significant. bud not a huge amount of business but still significant.— still significant. and after brexit? i decided that _ still significant. and after brexit? i decided that i _ still significant. and after brexit? i decided that i would _ still significant. and after brexit? i decided that i would pick- still significant. and after brexit? i decided that i would pick my - i decided that i would pick my battles and i felt the resources we had were better used elsewhere so actually we withdrew from that market. ~ , actually we withdrew from that market-- just _ actually we withdrew from that market.- just the - actually we withdrew from that market. why? just the bureaucracy involved and _ market. why? just the bureaucracy involved and eye _ market. why? just the bureaucracy involved and eye could _ market. why? just the bureaucracy involved and eye could see there was uncertainty going forward and i felt that we export a lot all over the world, and i picked my own battles and ifeel that, you know, i could see i was going to put my managers under stress trying to deal with a situation that wasn't clear. can you ex - lain to situation that wasn't clear. can you exolain to our— situation that wasn't clear. can you explain to our audience, _ situation that wasn't clear. can you explain to our audience, give - situation that wasn't clear. can you explain to our audience, give us i situation that wasn't clear. can you explain to our audience, give us an insight into what makes trading chilled meat and otherfood goods in
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northern ireland from the south of england so challenging. i northern ireland from the south of england so challenging.— northern ireland from the south of england so challenging. i think what one has is a — england so challenging. i think what one has is a lorry _ england so challenging. i think what one has is a lorry that _ england so challenging. i think what one has is a lorry that might - england so challenging. i think what one has is a lorry that might have i england so challenging. i think what one has is a lorry that might have a | one has is a lorry that might have a number of different commodity codes on it, travelling across the sea to northern ireland, and there will be restrictions on trade and the trade will not be free and frictionless. and if there is a problem with the yoghurt that is in the same chilled delivery, then the whole consignment can get held up. and when you have a short shelf life product like shield meets, with maybe ten days life on it, you haven't got the discretion of time. i it, you haven't got the discretion of time. ., �* ~ ., ,., it, you haven't got the discretion oftime. ., �* ~ ., ., of time. i don't know if you voted to remain — of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or— of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or lead, _ of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or lead, can _ of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or lead, can i - of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or lead, can i ask? - of time. i don't know if you voted to remain or lead, can i ask? asl of time. i don't know if you voted i
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to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see, to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see. i'm — to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see. i'm not— to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see, i'm not a _ to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see, i'm not a spring _ to remain or lead, can i ask? as you can see, i'm not a spring chicken i can see, i'm not a spring chicken and therefore i was looking forward to a period of stress free making sausages in a lifestyle manner! and therefore i voted to remain in the eu because i thought that was, in my personal interests, the best, i could see less problems emerging. did you have genuine concerns then that trading even with northern ireland might become a bit more complex and bureaucratic? yes. ireland might become a bit more complex and bureaucratic? yes, sure, i did. i'm complex and bureaucratic? yes, sure, idid- i'm sorry. _ complex and bureaucratic? yes, sure, i did. i'm sorry, but _ complex and bureaucratic? yes, sure, i did. i'm sorry, but dealing _ complex and bureaucratic? yes, sure, i did. i'm sorry, but dealing with i i did. i'm sorry, but dealing with however many eu countries there are is going to be difficult. there are too many interested parties. to my mind, it was more simple if we were
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on the same team. but i'm very happy to fight whatever challenges there are, but ijust felt to fight whatever challenges there are, but i just felt that to fight whatever challenges there are, but ijust felt that northern ireland was one i would actually bow out of and the point is, there are plenty of pigs in northern ireland and in the uk and in actual fact, plenty of pigs in northern ireland and in the uk and in actualfact, it might help me in terms of their would be less competition in the uk market, if the northern ireland producers had similar problems getting into the uk. fik. producers had similar problems getting into the uk.— producers had similar problems getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask ou, the getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you. the eu — getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you. the eu are _ getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you, the eu are going _ getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you, the eu are going to _ getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you, the eu are going to offer- getting into the uk. 0k. let me ask you, the eu are going to offer to i you, the eu are going to offer to cut the number of checks on goods going from great britain to northern ireland so will you make any different decisions in the future if that turns out to be true? at}! that turns out to be true? of course, we are a small company, we are flexible and we will review our decisions on a daily if not hourly basis. and if we can see a situation thatis basis. and if we can see a situation that is workable, yes, we will leap in debt with both feet and relish
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the opportunity. but at the moment, my suspicion is the can will be kicked down the road further and there will be a lack of clarity and you need crystal clarity is a business —— we will leap in their. and key talking to us, charles baughan, the manager king director and owner of westaway sausages. officials at the uk's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, say the log jam of shipping containers is easing. 0ne majorfirm, maersk, has diverted its largest ships to ports in belgium and the netherlands. the port blamed the shortage of haulage drivers, brexit border changes, and the pandemic. graham satchell reports. a logjam at felixstowe, the uk's biggest commercial port. the situation is so serious some larger ships are being re—routed to other ports in europe. morning, mate. how are you doing? morning. i'm 0k. you? adam runs a haulage firm with 85 lorries. instead of taking empty containers back to felixstowe as normal, he's had to take them to liverpool
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as there is no space. there is a massive backlog of deliveries created by the driver shortage, brexit and a number of other things. it has just all created a perfect storm. in normal circumstances it takes two or three days for a container to be collected and driven away once it has been unloaded to the dock. the so—called dwell time is now closer to ten days. the worry now is what impact all this will have on christmas. will there be a shortage of toys and other gifts this year? i think that there will be some disruption this christmas as a result of the hgv shortage. but retailers are really adept at making sure that they prioritise the things people want, making sure that people's christmas favourites are available to buy. there are difficulties in the supply chain in other countries, america and china. this is a global problem. the government says it is working closely with the freight industry to work through the challenges. graham satchell, bbc news.
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joining me now is peter wilson, group managing director of shipping agency cory brothers. tell us what that means your company does, mrwilson. tell us what that means your company does, mr wilson.— does, mr wilson. good morning. we handle import _ does, mr wilson. good morning. we handle import and _ does, mr wilson. good morning. we handle import and export _ does, mr wilson. good morning. we handle import and export of - does, mr wilson. good morning. we handle import and export of bulk i does, mr wilson. good morning. we| handle import and export of bulk and containers in and out of the united kingdom. d0 containers in and out of the united kinudom. ,, containers in and out of the united kinudom. y., , containers in and out of the united kinudom. , , ., ., kingdom. do you see the situation easin: ? kingdom. do you see the situation easing? has _ kingdom. do you see the situation easing? has been _ kingdom. do you see the situation easing? has been some _ kingdom. do you see the situation easing? has been some easing, i kingdom. do you see the situation | easing? has been some easing, we have had 19 — easing? has been some easing, we have had 19 months _ easing? has been some easing, we have had 19 months significant i have had 19 months significant difficulties over sea freight due to covid, an element of brexit, and general consumer demand being a lot higher because of the home staycation mentality. find higher because of the home staycation mentality. higher because of the home sta cation mentali . �* , ., staycation mentality. and give us an insiaht staycation mentality. and give us an insi . ht we staycation mentality. and give us an insight we are _ staycation mentality. and give us an insight we are all— staycation mentality. and give us an insight we are all laypeople - staycation mentality. and give us an insight we are all laypeople when i staycation mentality. and give us an insight we are all laypeople when it | insight we are all laypeople when it comes to the shipping container world and the kind of things you do on a daily basis, so give us some insight into the consequences of those three areas.— insight into the consequences of those three areas. covid was very difficult for _ those three areas. covid was very difficult for us, _ those three areas. covid was very difficult for us, with _
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those three areas. covid was very difficult for us, with the _ those three areas. covid was very difficult for us, with the far i those three areas. covid was very difficult for us, with the far east l difficult for us, with the far east shutting down at the start, and then, as a reopened reopened, europe went into shutdown and we have been in a period of flux throughout covid where we have had a shortage of containers, difficulty in the ports. felixstowe, yes, but all of the major seaport, gateway, southampton, some of the smaller ones in the uk, they have all struggled because it's very difficult to sustain the same level of working when you have the health and safety measures in place to protect staff. brexit has been a difficult period of transition but it is something the supply chain industry has handled extremely well and i think it is important to say at this point that supply chain services will not fail, it will continue, it is under huge strain but it will continue to work. i}!(. but it will continue to work. ok. but it but it will continue to work. 0k. iout it cannot — but it will continue to work. ok. but it cannot if _ but it will continue to work. ok. but it cannot if there _ but it will continue to work. ok. but it cannot if there is a shortage of haulage drivers put that you need the drivers to drive the lorries to felixstowe to get the containers on
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the back to drive them to shops so we can buy toys for christmas. absolutely, and the hgv driver situation is extremely difficult in the uk. the shortage is clear, we are seeing significant delays in getting boxes into distribution centres and of course then getting them out to stores. what we have seen it for the importers in particular in the build—up to christmas, that they have been early, getting boxes in now rather than early november, so we have time to distribute what we need to get to stores. i will be very honest, we will not have the overall choice that we had in store, but we will not see empty shelves. can that we had in store, but we will not see empty shelves.- that we had in store, but we will not see empty shelves. can you be secific? not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what _ not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what will _ not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what will we _ not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what will we not - not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what will we not have i not see empty shelves. can you be specific? what will we not have a l specific? what will we not have a choice between? what are we talking about? different types of pigs in blankets or toys? that's nail it. this will be around the christmas toys, clothing, gifts and the
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christmas present experience, if you like. ithink christmas present experience, if you like. i think food will continue to move, pigs in blankets, turkeys, what we have in the uk from europe will sustain us more than happily. but toys, electrical goods, white goods, it will be difficult to get them in but the importers are working on this and have brought boxes early so we can weather this storm and it is a perfect storm. find storm and it is a perfect storm. and a final thought _ storm and it is a perfect storm. and a final thought on the driver situation, the government has intervened and released these temporary visas to get some drivers from the rest of the eu, the prime minister told us in the week of the conservative party conference that 127 drivers had so far applied so do you know if it has gone up, what the situation is? you might not, i was interested. i situation is? you might not, i was interested-— situation is? you might not, i was interested. ~ ., ., , interested. i don't know the details but i do interested. i don't know the details but i do know _ interested. i don't know the details but i do know we _ interested. i don't know the details but i do know we need _ interested. i don't know the details but i do know we need a _ interested. i don't know the details but i do know we need a sustained | but i do know we need a sustained plan that attracts people into the
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haulage industry and supply chain so we don't have to suffer the consequences of shortage moving forward. and it will take time for this to be fixed. but i reiterate that the supply chain, the drivers are working extremely hard to ensure that the consumer can all enjoy christmas. that the consumer can all en'oy chumsfi that the consumer can all en'oy christmas. ., ,, , ., , . ., christmas. thank you very much for talkin: to christmas. thank you very much for talking to us- _ christmas. thank you very much for talking to us. peter— christmas. thank you very much for talking to us. peter wilson, - christmas. thank you very much for talking to us. peter wilson, group l talking to us. peter wilson, group managing director of cory brothers which is a shipping agency. is a disproportionate amount of attention on pigs in blankets, there, i do apologise, i do like them! to set its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about a post brexit checks —— at the uk —— the uk about a post brexit checks —— at the uk -- eu the uk about a post brexit checks —— at the uk —— eu is set out its plan. felixstowe struggle to a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care we want to hear from you about this, particular if you work in the sector. it needs more than 100,000
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workers and the consequence of not having enough care workers is that people are waiting longer for care and the number of vacancies is still rising production e—mail me. we look forward to your contribution, particularly if you are a care worker and you have had such a difficult almost two years so what is it like coping with so many vacancies? what it means to the people you are looking after? a charity has warned that care organisations in england are struggling to recruit staff, with more jobs unfilled than before the pandemic. skills for care says there are more than 100,000 vacancies and that the number is rising. the government says it has provided extra funding and is running regular recruitment campaigns. with more on this, here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. so nurses have been up today, the bandages were too tight but they are all right now? yeah, they're fine. this visit to 103—year—old margaret will help her with her
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lunch and personal care. she has recently returned home after a four—week stay in hospital. how do you feel about being home now, rather than being in hospital? oh, i am glad to be home, definitely. after four weeks away. the amount of support she needs has increased, but here in buckinghamshire finding enough staff to cover all the demand for home care is now extremely difficult. it means care supervisor charlotte and manager vicky are having to step in to fill gaps in the rota. we are struggling for staff at the moment, so i'm finding, i think last week, every night i think i was out doing one or two care calls. we do have to pick up the phone and change times, we do have to be creative with the care that we provide. and until we can get some more people through the door to support us with that, then that's the way things will have to stay. there you go. today's report says whilst
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recruitment of care staff improved during the lockdowns, absence because of sickness has doubled and staff vacancies are now rising steadily, with existing staff exhausted and much better pay on offer elsewhere. how many sicknesses have we had today? the doctor who runs this care company also worked on hospital wards helping to discharge patients during the pandemic. with such a shortage of care staff in the community, he worries about the knock—on effect on the nhs. we normally are having to turn down eight new patients a day because we don't have the capacity of staff to be able to help them. for us to be in this position before the winter, before the christmas period, is terrifying. so looking after patients now is hard. can you imagine when the winter comes, when the cold weather comes, people will become more unwell? the government says it is running regular recruitment campaigns and is putting an extra £500 million into training and developing the skills of care staff. alison holt, bbc news.
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thank you for your messages, i'll just read one which is from simon who says he is in the north of england, saying, "this has been ongoing for years now but it is worse put it as a family, we have been failed by four successive residential care placements and several local authority social services departments and failed by central government. i am services departments and failed by central government. iam now services departments and failed by central government. i am now caring 24/7 for my disabled brother who is deaf, blind, autistic, epileptic and has complex multiple disabilities, and i'm also caring for my frail 92—year—old mother in her home, having had to abandon my home and job on the other side of the country to do so. we have no support and we having to contemplate moving house to be in a different local authority area to try and get some support." hillary says there is a crisis in the number of care workers in the uk because as a society we do not value the work they do for the most vulnerable and fragile members of society. we behave as if their work
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carers do for the elderly is not impressive enough for us to pay them a decent salary. let me know your own experiences this morning. william shatner, famous for playing captain kirk in star trek, is due to blast off to the edge of space later. the 90—year—old will become the oldest person to fly into orbit when he joins the crew aboard thejeff bezos owned new shepard rocket. 0ur los angeles correspondent sophie long has been following his final preparations. i'm going up into space. i don't know how many people can say that. it's life changing in its way. interest in space exploration has waned over the last few decades. the fact that william shatner is making this journey has renewed some of that sense of wonder. there is an adventure in my life that i would not have had had i not done this. and it looks like there's a great
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deal of curiosity about this fictional character, captain kirk, going into space. for those who never watched an episode of star trek, here's why. captain kirk is possibly one of the most known, iconic, mythological characters in our sort of collective pop culture. the idea that the man who portrayed this daring captain, pushing us to the limits of our knowledge and exploring the deepest frontiers of space, gets to go into space himself, itjust makes me laugh. i wish william shatner the best of luck on his voyage. it's reignited interest in space travel and also in the series that broke so many boundaries all those decades ago. in the original series, i you had a black woman and asian—american man in spacej during the civil rights movement. in its way star trek has always pushed a more progressive i vision of inclusion, _ whatever the conversation is at the time, it pushes that forward.
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it says, look at what we could do if we work together! _ over the years, trekkers and trekkies have found much to bond over, including their own language. i was hoping i might be able to learn a few phrases. do you think that's a bit ambitious or not? i think, if you have the desire, then we can make it happen. as it happens here and now, you have your very own personal klingon language coach. how about, this might be a nice one... he's going to be a rocket man. they speak klingon. so say g. now say g, g, g, g. g, g, g. now make blade of your hand and lightly, because i don't know what the bbc insurance is like. lightly g, g, g, bounce it against your throat. ger, ger, ger, ger. you're doing it. that is the sound.
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becoming a rocket man. i'm confident i'll be able to practise that one. a little more tricky than i thought. if all goes according to plan, he won't be exploring strange new worlds or making first contact with new life forms. william shatner�*s historic flight to space will be extraordinary for science, for culture, for the future of space travel and for him. we're just at the beginning but how miraculous that beginning is! how extraordinary it is to be part of that beginning. there is this mystique of being in space and that much closer to the stars and being weightless. i shall be entranced by the view of space. sophie long, bbc news, west texas. let's bring you the weather with carol. everyone seems to be going
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into space, are you going? certainly not, i am happyjust where i am! today, a fairly cloudy day for most of us. still light rain from a week where the front that continues to journey southwards. it should brighten up later across the midlands, parts of wales and northern england. the showers will persist, coming in off a south—westerly breeze across the north and west of scotland. these are our temperatures, 12—17 , feeling warmer today along the east coast of the country. through the evening and overnight, there will still be a fair bit of cloud around the brakes on places and in rural areas, temperatures fall lower than you are about to see on the charts. these represents towns and cities. by these represents towns and cities. by the end of the night, a band of rain affects the northern isles and the wind here will be strengthening. this is a weather front sinking southwards. eventually getting into northern ireland as a weaker
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feature. behind it, heavy showers and gusty winds. for england and where is, still a lot of cloud around and still spots of rain, temperatures up to 17 and turning cool in the north. hello, this is bbc news, with victoria derbyshire. the headlines: the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about brexit checks. it is incumbent upon a sun is a government and i think it is incumbent upon the eu to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it isn't working at the moment, it is both our interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas
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as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care, and the number of vacanices is still rising. of vacancies is still rising. violent clashes between travelling fans and police overshadow england's 1 all draw with hungary at wembley. good morning. england drew1 all with hungary in their world cup qualifier at wembley, but the match was marred by clashes between visiting fans and police. elsewhere, scotland narrowly beat the faroe islands, but northern ireland lost to bulgaria, ending their faint hopes of qualifying. joe wilson reports. england versus hungary at wembley.
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in the crowd, one banner symbolising objection to an act of anti—racism. early in the game, spectators in the hungarian section clashed with police. this was a reaction, police say, after they arrested a man for racially—aggravated abuse towards a steward. it was the backdrop. it is the context. sima 0n the pitch, there was a penalty for hungary, given for this challenge by luke shaw, the height of the foot was enough. and england were behind. commentary: it's an - unexpected turn of events. well, after the plain sailing of their qualifying, now they had to respond. reaction from john stones... 1—1 at half—time. stones came close to winning it. england's draw will require analysis. what happened in the crowd will, say the fa, be investigated. 200 miles north of home, scotland and their followers knew the reputation of the faroe islands. population of 50,000, almost 1—0 up here. thank you, craig gordon in goal.
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scotland's position, all their optimism, demanded a win. there were four minutes left, there was lyndon dykes. one goal was as good as ten. qualifying ambition sustained. northern ireland's focus lies on tournaments beyond 2022. they led in bulgaria, lost 2—1. well, more experience for challenges to come. joe wilson, bbc news. speaking about those ugly scenes at wembley, the england defender tyrone mings says he hopes those responsible will be dealt with appropriately. every time we speak about racial abuse, the punishments that then follow never seem to quite be in line with what's happened. but i ruess i line with what's happened. but i guess i can't _ line with what's happened. but i guess i can't speak _ line with what's happened. but i guess i can't speak too - line with what's happened. emit i guess i can't speak too freely unless i know the facts, and i sincerely hope that if that was the case, then the punishments this time for what's happened.
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andy murray says he's not planning to play in next month's david cup finals, after losing his third round match at indian wells. murray lost in straight sets 6—4, 7—6 to third seed alexander zverev. afterwards, he said he needs to rest his body, and also believes he doesn't deserve to make the team, given how well cameron norrie and dan evans are playing. this is physically the best i have felt for a while. but i'm sort of battling my game a little bit. it's just not... yeah, the consistency isn't there and, i don't know. the decision—making isn't great in the important moments still. the defending championjudd trump eased into the second round of the northern ireland 0pen without his opponent scoring a single point! trump won all four frames against china's gao yang, who couldn't get a footing at the table in belfast. the englishman will play another chinese player, lu ning, for a place in the last 16.
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golf commentator and journalist renton laidlaw has day, he reported on 165 majors, including 158 open championships. he on 165 majors, including 158 open championships.— on 165 majors, including 158 open championships. he also presented sorts championships. he also presented sports report _ championships. he also presented sports report for _ championships. he also presented sports report for bbc _ championships. he also presented sports report for bbc radio i championships. he also presented sports report for bbc radio and l championships. he also presented. sports report for bbc radio and did commentary for the bbc for many years. he was 82. remembering renton laidlaw, who has day. that is all the sport for now. back to you, victoria. thank you very much. new figures released by the office for national statistics show that the uk economy grew by 0.4% in august. as more of us went out and went on holiday. the 0ns says the services sector made the biggest contribution to economic growth. in the first full month after all covid restrictions were lifted in england. but the uk economy remains 0.8% smaller than it was in february 2020, the milder before we went into the first lockdown. —— the month
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before. rebecca harding is an independent economist and ceo of coriolis technologies which supplies data and analysis to firms on trade and supply chains. good morning, rebecca, in layman terms, what does this mean in terms of the uk economy? 50 terms, what does this mean in terms of the uk economy?— terms, what does this mean in terms of the uk economy? so the uk economy is clearly doing — of the uk economy? so the uk economy is clearly doing well. _ of the uk economy? so the uk economy is clearly doing well. it _ of the uk economy? so the uk economy is clearly doing well. it is _ is clearly doing well. it is recovering from the pandemic, but not quite as quickly as economists would have wanted it to. so i think the major concern here is obviously rising prices, inflation, and the rising prices, inflation, and the rising cost of living. but we are seeing some very definite signs that the service sector has driven recovery. the service sector has driven recovery-— the service sector has driven recovery. the service sector has driven recove. , ,,, recovery. ok, so businesses, give me examles recovery. ok, so businesses, give me examples of— recovery. ok, so businesses, give me examples of businesses _ recovery. ok, so businesses, give me examples of businesses driving i recovery. ok, so businesses, give me examples of businesses driving this i examples of businesses driving this recovery in the services sector. particularly hotels, accommodation, a lot of festivals over the summer have helped to drive the recovery. so a lot of entertainment sector, we have seen growth in that sector by
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nearly 9%. growth in hotels and accommodation by 10%. so a lot of these things are actually driven to some extent by the fact that we were out of restrictions during the summer. out of restrictions during the summer-— out of restrictions during the summer. ., , ., summer. how is the uk doing compared to other big economies? _ summer. how is the uk doing compared to other big economies? so, _ summer. how is the uk doing compared to other big economies? so, we - summer. how is the uk doing compared to other big economies? so, we are i to other big economies? so, we are rurowin , to other big economies? so, we are growing. but _ to other big economies? so, we are growing. but we _ to other big economies? so, we are growing, but we are _ to other big economies? so, we are growing, but we are not _ to other big economies? so, we are growing, but we are not growing i to other big economies? so, we are growing, but we are not growing as| growing, but we are not growing as fast as the other g7 economies. so the international monetary fund came out with the report yesterday of world economic output and they were pointing to the tough conditions in the uk at the moment, particularly around supply chains and labour and driver shortages and how that was affecting our long—term recovery from the pandemic. so affecting our long-term recovery from the pandemic.— affecting our long-term recovery from the pandemic. so what are your thou . hts from the pandemic. so what are your thoughts when _ from the pandemic. so what are your thoughts when we _ from the pandemic. so what are your thoughts when we take _ from the pandemic. so what are your thoughts when we take into - from the pandemic. so what are your thoughts when we take into account. thoughts when we take into account the vacancies in various sectors, the vacancies in various sectors, the shortages in various sectors, the shortages in various sectors, the fact that inflation could potentially go over 4% by the end of the year, which might lead to a very small rise in interest rates, all of which is going to affect people's
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desire to spend money, how could that affect growth in the next few months? i that affect growth in the next few months? ~ ., , , ., months? i think most economists are thinkin: months? i think most economists are thinking growth _ months? i think most economists are thinking growth will _ months? i think most economists are thinking growth will not _ months? i think most economists are thinking growth will not grow, - months? i think most economists are thinking growth will not grow, i i thinking growth will not grow, i mean, we won't see the economy grow quite as much as we have done and things will slow down towards christmas. a lot of the uk economy is dependent on very strong consumer demand so what we go out and buy for christmas and so on, and because we are beginning to see some uncertainty notjust are beginning to see some uncertainty not just around are beginning to see some uncertainty notjust around covid and the pandemic and the new delta variant and everything and the number of cases, but also around rising costs. we are seeing an escalating cost of living, rising gas prices as well, and that is having an impact on consumer confidence. so we will all be watching that very closely. the other thing to say is that we have actually seen the number of shipments from the uk to abroad, our exports, full back. and imports as well. so there is something around supply chains we need to watch very
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carefully. supply chains we need to watch very carefull . . ~ supply chains we need to watch very carefull . ., ,, , ., , . carefully. thank you very much, rebecca an _ carefully. thank you very much, rebecca an independent - carefully. thank you very much, i rebecca an independent economist. sarah everard's killing has led closely to the culture in the police and there are two enquiries which will see what needs to change. and how people like sarah everard's murderer can be stopped getting into the police. this takes time and change won't happen straightaway, in the meantime, women continue to work in the police and in some cases don't enjoy what they do or who they work with because of the culture. newsnight�*s reporter sima kotecha has been speaking to former and current police women up and down the country and joins me now. sima, what were they saying? i'm really sorry, i don't know if you can hear me, but we can't hear you can hear me, but we can't hear you at this moment so i do apologise, we will sort out your
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sound, unless it is a question of just on muting yourself. can you hear me? no, it's still not working, we will sort it out and come back to you because it is a really important story in terms of looking at the culture within the police and what women who work for police forces, officers and civilian staff, are feeling now we welcome back 22 a moment. in the us state of wyoming, a coroner has said the young woman who vanished on a road trip with her boyfriend, and was later found dead, was strangled. travel blogger gabby petito's death had already been ruled to be a homicide. her boyfriend, brian laundrie, has been missing for nearly a month, after returning home without his fiancee. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the sequence of events that led to gabby petito's death are still far from clear. she disappeared while on a road trip in the western united states with her boyfriend, brian laundrie.
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so, tell me what's going on. this video emerged after the police responded to reports that the pair had been seen arguing, as they travelled through the state of utah. there's two people that came to us and told us that they saw him hit you. they were interviewed, but no further action was taken. the couple had been sharing details of their trip through social media, but their blog post abruptly ended in august. mr laundrie later returned home, alone. he has since disappeared. his family say he went for a hike and never came back. gabby petito's body was found last month, in a remote area of a wyoming park that the couple had visited. few details have been revealed, except now the cause of death. the teton county coroner's office is filing the following verdict. in the matter of the death of gabrielle venora petito, we find the cause and manner to be cause, death by strangulation,
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and manner is homicide. by wyoming state statute, only the cause and manner of death are released. the autopsy findings and photographs and that sort of material is not released by state statute. the coroner added that miss petito's body, which was found in mid—september, had been outside in the wilderness for three to four weeks. he also confirmed that the 22—year—old was not pregnant at the time of her death. the case has attracted a huge amount of media coverage in the united states, and some criticism that it's received a disproportionate level of attention. unfortunately, this is only one of many deaths around the country of people who are involved in domestic violence, and it's unfortunate that these other deaths do not get as much coverage as this one. the fbi has named brian laundrie as a person of interest, and a warrant has been issued
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for his arrest. police and federal agents have been searching a wildlife reserve close to his parents�* home in florida but, so far, there has been no sign of him. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. the european union will set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as britain's biggest commercial port felixstowe struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. a crisis in care, a shortfall of more than 100,000 workers means people are waiting longerfor care 100,000 workers means people are waiting longer for care and the number of vacancies is still rising. thank you for your messages regarding care, whether you work in
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the care sector or your relatives are looked after by people in the care sector and what is becoming clear is there are a number of very elderly people caring for more elderly people caring for more elderly people. nick says, i am 73, from bristol, and i care, unpaid, for my 91—year—old friend in surrey. he has got dementia, and i am trying to keep him in his own home. he used to keep him in his own home. he used to pay for care is two nights a week so i could get home for arrest. he is clinically extremely vulnerable so for 15 months during covid, i shielded him by caring for him 20 47 without paid respite. nick himself is 73. vaccination meant we could hire paid carers to give me respite, but we can't recruit suitable carers, they are no longer out there. even at the good pay rates we offer. i am there. even at the good pay rates we offer. iam becoming there. even at the good pay rates we offer. i am becoming exhausted and unwell. nick, i'm really sorry to hear that. michelle says, unwell. nick, i'm really sorry to hearthat. michelle says, my unwell. nick, i'm really sorry to hear that. michelle says, my dad has beenin hear that. michelle says, my dad has been in hospitalfor nearly four months and he is bed blocking
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because a suitable care home can't because a suitable care home can't be found for him. he has alzheimer's and challenging behaviour. he therefore takes nhs bed and takes a 24—hour security company watching over him. we have a critical situation across the uk. we live in torbay and we were offered this week a place in county durham for my dad. needless to say, i had to decline. the care system is broken and not fit for purpose. thanks for taking the time to read this. do keep those coming in. we will go back to newsnight reporter sima kotecha who has been talking to women who work for the police, both officers and civilian staff, about the culture within the police, as we wait for these two enquiries report which could be some time. we can now hear you, tells what these women have been reporting. you, tells what these women have been reporting-— been reporting. yes, i have spent the last week _ been reporting. yes, i have spent the last week speaking _ been reporting. yes, i have spent the last week speaking to - been reporting. yes, i have spent the last week speaking to former| the last week speaking to former policewomen and current policewomen to dry and fine out what sort of culture they are spending much of
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their lives as they go to work on a daily basis, and i'm afraid some of the stuff i have heard has been incredibly disturbing, some have portrayed a culture of misogyny, sexism, sexual assault and harassment. just to give you an example, some of the women who are currently serving who didn't want to go on camera for obvious reasons, they were very worried they would lose theirjobs, they told me they feel it has got worse over the last five years, one woman said, it is constant poking fun, saying i am not up constant poking fun, saying i am not up to thejob constant poking fun, saying i am not up to the job because i constant poking fun, saying i am not up to thejob because i have got breasts. some buses even laughing when these sorts of comments flying around just makes you feel belittled and constantly harassed. another one saying that the bat and was appointed in her private areas by a male officer, and it made herfeel very uncomfortable, she said it was wrong and stormed out of the room. ? baton. 0ne wrong and stormed out of the room. ? baton. one woman i had a very
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lengthy chat with recently left the metropolitan police in 2019 after serving for decades. her name is patricia fenton and this is what she had to say about her experience during that time. mr; had to say about her experience during that time.— had to say about her experience during that time. my bra strap was inued during that time. my bra strap was pinged when _ during that time. my bra strap was pinged when i _ during that time. my bra strap was pinged when i was _ during that time. my bra strap was pinged when i was actually - during that time. my bra strap was pinged when i was actually an i pinged when i was actually an operator— pinged when i was actually an operator when another officer was in the car— operator when another officer was in the car driving and he was trying to rip my— the car driving and he was trying to rip my tights while we were stationary. what i did was i punched him, _ stationary. what i did was i punched him. i_ stationary. what i did was i punched him. i said. — stationary. what i did was i punched him, isaid, soft stationary. what i did was i punched him, i said, soft —— stop it, sort ofthing — him, i said, soft —— stop it, sort ofthing i— him, i said, soft —— stop it, sort of thing. i have had in the changing rooms_ of thing. i have had in the changing rooms at— of thing. i have had in the changing rooms at a — of thing. i have had in the changing rooms at a police station on an early— rooms at a police station on an early turn, _ rooms at a police station on an early turn, i_ rooms at a police station on an early turn, i finished at 130, changing _ early turn, i finished at 130, changing out of my police close, someone — changing out of my police close, someone was trying to open the door and it— someone was trying to open the door and it was— someone was trying to open the door and it was insecure because there was no _ and it was insecure because there was no lock— and it was insecure because there was no lock on it. the locker room. so i was no lock on it. the locker room. so i literally— was no lock on it. the locker room. so i literallyjust went to the door and it_ so i literallyjust went to the door and it was— so i literallyjust went to the door and it wasjust so i literallyjust went to the door and it was just the officer that was pinging _ and it was just the officer that was pinging my bra strap and trying to rip my— pinging my bra strap and trying to rip my tights that was trying to open _ rip my tights that was trying to open the — rip my tights that was trying to open the door while i was getting changed — open the door while i was getting changed sort of thing, you know? you 'ust changed sort of thing, you know? you just get— changed sort of thing, you know? you just get fed _ changed sort of thing, you know? you just get fed up with it, it really grinds— just get fed up with it, it really grinds you down after a while. i was on night _ grinds you down after a while. i was on night duty and i was actually studying — on night duty and i was actually studying and i thought, i will have
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a break— studying and i thought, i will have a break from studying, went into the refreshment room and there was a big screen _ refreshment room and there was a big screen tv, _ refreshment room and there was a big screen tv, a _ refreshment room and there was a big screen tv, a monthly club, and i was the only— screen tv, a monthly club, and i was the only female in the room of about 15 male _ the only female in the room of about 15 male officers and i was literally reading _ 15 male officers and i was literally reading a — 15 male officers and i was literally reading a magazine and all i could hear was — reading a magazine and all i could hear was lots of laughing. i looked up hear was lots of laughing. i looked up to— hear was lots of laughing. i looked up to think. — hear was lots of laughing. i looked up to think, what are they laughing about? _ up to think, what are they laughing about? there was pawn being played on the _ about? there was pawn being played on the w _ about? there was pawn being played on the w i— about? there was pawn being played on the tv. i was absolutely shocked and disgusted. it on the tv. i was absolutely shocked and disgusted-— and disgusted. it feels like something _ and disgusted. it feels like something from _ and disgusted. it feels like something from the i and disgusted. it feels like| something from the 1970s, and disgusted. it feels like i something from the 1970s, but it and disgusted. it feels like _ something from the 1970s, but it was britain, i appreciate she left a couple of years ago, it is shocking, isn't it? , . ., , isn't it? yes, and i have been listening _ isn't it? yes, and i have been listening to — isn't it? yes, and i have been listening to stories _ isn't it? yes, and i have been listening to stories and i isn't it? yes, and i have been i listening to stories and anecdotes like this over the last week. some of it, as you rightly say, is historic, it isn't all contemporary. however, these women were talking about decades long careers. where they were subjected to the sort of behaviour. and three of the women actually were adamant that it is
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still very contemporary, this sort of misogyny, it is still happening today, but women are still very fearful to talk about it. and they are saying that what they really hope for is that going forward, through what happened with sarah everard and how there is now a focus and culture and these two enquiries as you rightly say that are going to be carried out in the coming months, more women welcome forward. patricia fenton served in the metropolitan police and they did come back with a statement saying the metropolitan police says it takes these allegations extremely seriously, there is no place for this kind of behaviour in the metropolitan police, we actively encouraging reporting of incidents and we expect all our officers and staff to challenge inappropriate behaviour and not to be a bystander. thank you very much. — and not to be a bystander. thank you very much. thank— and not to be a bystander. thank you very much, thank you, _ and not to be a bystander. thank you very much, thank you, sima - and not to be a bystander. thank you very much, thank you, sima kotecha| very much, thank you, sima kotecha reporting. the shortlist for this year's riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco—friendly mosque in cambridge, a footbridge on the cornish coast, and the centrepiece of a university in south west london.
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today, it's the turn of the windermere jetty museum in the lake district. the museum is home to a unique collection of boats. and the building itself boasts black oxidised copper—clad walls and large cantilevered overhangs. easy for me to say! and it's the first contemporary building on the shore of windermere for more than 50 years. ifound it an enormous privilege being trusted to imagine a building in such a beautiful setting. this building is intentionally a very atmospheric visitor experience. i'm rowan seaford. i'm an associate director at carmody groarke. i'm andy groarke, of carmody groarke architects, and we are the architects for the windermerejetty museum.
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the museum is seen and approached from all sides, so you can arrive by boat to one of the jetties, or you can arrive by foot or by car by land. the centrepiece of the wooden wet dock is surrounded by a cluster of copper—clad buildings. we spent a year up here to understand the seasons and how different materials weather in the lake district environment. overtime, the building will develop, it's inevitable, oxidisation, in order to give the building quite a timeless quality. the brief for this building i was to create a world—class building in which to house the internationally- significant boat collection. it needs to be a building that - could accommodate large—scale boats, that was exciting for the public to want to visit, but also, i importantly, because it sat within one of our great i national parks, the lake district national park, i it had to be part of the landscape it was within. sustainability has been really central to the concept of the building. we have systems such as the lake—source heat pump that heats the whole museum,
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underpinning the energy strategy. we've selected, wherever possible, local materials, so that the travel from source to site is as short as possible. the building has a zero—waste strategy so, actually, all of the domestic waste water is treated on—site and it's filtered through the landscape and reed beds, so it can then be discharged back into the lake as clean water. the site isjust amazing. it reflects boat—building, it reflects restoration, i it reflects conservation. some of the success of what the team has achieved here is a building that is simultaneously foreground and background. foreground's the visitor experience, it's the building that's here. and yet, it's the background, it's the backdrop to a beautiful landscape setting and immersing yourself in a fantastic collection. the windermerejetty museum in the lake district is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain's
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best new building. and we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7.30pm. do you remember that volcano in la palma? it is still going and hundreds more people have had to leave their homes in la palma in the canary islands as lava continues to flow from the erupting volcano. these are live pictures that i am seeing for the first time as you are. the authorities have ordered more than 700 people to leave their homes, to leave their possessions, to leave their pets, the volcano began erupting more than three weeks ago and since then, lava has covered about six square kilometres of the surrounding area, destroying around 1200 homes, as well as factories and crops. now it's time for a look at the weather.
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good morning, it is a cloudy day, many of us started that way and some of us or clear skies. in parts of the south—east, temperatures fell close to freezing, but the cloud will build through the rest of the day. it will be mostly dry, mostly because there are spots of rain in the forecast here and there and that is going to see off a weather front. to take this front all the way towards the south, that is where we see the odd spot. the cloud pushes away onto the near continent. a lot of cloud around this morning, rain here and there, but through the day, it should dry up but through the day, it should dry up and the cloud should break across parts of the midlands, wales, and also northern ireland. showers across the north and west of scotland, and temperature range today, 12 to 17 degrees. milder than it was yesterday in eastern areas. this evening and overnight, we hang on to a lot of cloud and where it
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breaks, temperatures will fall away. we carry on with the showers packing in across the north and west. by the end of the night, we will have rain. again, cross the far north of scotland. in the northern isles, more notably, where the wind will strengthen. these are the overnight lows in towns and cities. tomorrow, this is the weather front producing the rain in the northern isles by the rain in the northern isles by the end of the night. slowly, it slips southwards through the day. the isobars tell you it will also be windy. ahead it, a lot of cloud, we see the odd spot of rain across parts of the midlands, wales, into northern england. but for most, the rain is going to be in the north. heavy at first, weakening the touch as eventually it makes it down into southern scotland and northern ireland. behind it, hefty showers and gusty winds, to gale force, cross the far north of mainland scotland and the northern isles. we pull in cooler air. ahead of it, still in mild conditions with 16 or 17. 0vernight thursday and friday,
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confront continues to sink southwards. bringing rain with it and dragging in clear conditions as well. high pressure building on from the atlantic. by friday morning come at this very roughly is where the weather front will be. producing not much more than a band of cloud, the odd spot of rain. behind it, a fair bit of sunshine. areas of cloud possible specially across the north of the country, but one thing you will notice is it will be cooler across the board, 9—16 . it will warm up a little bit again into the weekend.
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the european union is to set out its plan to cut red tape and reduce checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, to try to end the row with the uk about post—brexit checks. it is incumbent upon us as a government, and i think it is incumbent on the eu, to make sure we have a sustainable future arrangement and it is not working at the moment. it is in both our sides' interests to get on that stable footing. fears of stock shortages in the run—up to christmas as britain's biggest commercial port, felixstowe, struggles with a backlog of shipping containers. £4 trillion a year — that's the sum countries will have to spend on clean energy
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if the world is to reach its target of becoming net zero by 2050.

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