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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: adapt or die: days ahead of a major climate conference in the uk, a report finds it's not ready for the problems caused by climate change. world leaders agree to work together to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan as the eu pledges more than $1 billion of aid at a virtual 620 summit. and a corner confirms that gabby petito died from strangulation. she went missing in the us while travelling with her fiance. police are still trying to find him. can you said it will defy a ruling from neighbouring somalia. —— kenya.
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welcome to the programme. we'll start with the issue of climate change. first, pressure is growing on world leaders to make upcoming global climate talks count. there are many commitments from countries still falling short of where they need to be ahead of the un conference called cop26. and there's a new warning that the uk is not ready for the impact of climate change. the environment agency says hundreds could die from floods unless places where people can live, work and travel are made more resilient to the increasingly volatile weather. here's our science editor david shukman. a street in cardiff became a dangerous river earlier this month after a massive downpour. there was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there. and around the same time, london was engulfed,
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raising questions about how we'll cope as climate change makes the weather even more violent. but the biggest shock came in germany lastjuly — a surge of water tore through communities. 200 people were killed and the fear is of disaster here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england, and we need to be ready to save lives. we need to recognise that it's adapt or die. the environment agency is being deliberately blunt so that its recommendations are heard. for homeowners and businesses to take basic steps to make their properties safe. to restore landscapes like forests so they hold rain water before it causes floods. and for bigger investments
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by governments in defences that can handle projected rises in sea levels. already, the thames barrier, defending london, is being closed far more often than planned — a trend that will continue as the polar ice keeps melting, raising the height of the oceans. how long do you reckon it will work in protecting london? with its network of tunnels under the river, the barrier was designed decades ago and may not be big enough in future. the great steel gates are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster, which is why climate change matters so much here. they're constantly watching the projections for how much the sea is going to rise, and it's also why we'll probably need a bigger barrier by 2070. but some stretches of the coast are not so lucky. homes in norfolk are being lost to the sea. the environment agency says it can't protect everyone. but since last year, when
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i met lorna bevan thompson, a local business owner, the waves have come much nearer. they're saying that we've got billions of money available but it's not coming to us and our coastline is getting eroded daily, and it's irreparable damage. in some parts of the uk, the challenge will be too little water. a growing population and drier summers will strain supplies. the government says it is preparing the country for a more turbulent climate and it wants world leaders to discuss the risks when they meet at the un summit in glasgow next month. david shukman, bbc news. meeting is not far away and we will have a little bit more on that meeting, more on climate change a little later in the programme. now, two months after the taliban seized control of afghanistan, the country is approaching a full—blown economic collapse. on tuesday, the g20 group of wealthier nations met to try and prevent this
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financial crisis from turning into a humanitarian catastrophe. european commission president ursula von der leyen promised that the eu would deliver a support package of more than $1 billion to afghanistan. the un says things are getting worse due to increased conflict, the pandemic and a persistent drought. over 18 million afghans are now in need of humanitarian assistance. that includes more than 9.5 million children. one in two kids younger than five years old are now facing acute malnutrition. here is the bbc�*s yogita limaye. as the un secretary—general is warning in very strong words this is a make—or—break moment for this country. if the global community does not act quickly, the world will pay the price for it. 18 million people in need of urgent life—saving support. so, this is aid just to survive. prior to august 15, we've been out meeting people who were living in open fields, who didn't have anything
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to shelter them, who didn't know where their next meal was coming from, who didn't have access to water, basic sanitation, basic medicines. it's getting even worse now. winter will be coming in and you still have people living like that outdoors. and all of that will feed into instability in this country, which no—one particularly wants. we did hear interestingly and significantly from the european commission president when she said that this is humanitarian aid, it will be channelled through international agencies that are operating on the ground. it is separate to development aid that was also coming into afghanistan prior to august 15 and being channelled through the government and through government agencies on the ground. so, she has made that separation very clear, trying to say that afghan people shouldn't suffer, we should be trying to help them out. but at the same time, this is a government that has seized control of the country, this is a government that we do not recognise yet.
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so, this is a problem that the world is going to have to get together and solve. how do you reach the people of afghanistan who are really in need without that money, without that aid falling into the wrong hands or being misused? thanks to yogita there. next, to america was the biggest airlines, both based in texas, are a buffering eight orderfrom the texas, are a buffering eight order from the state parliament governor that sees to ban vaccine mandates. airlines must prove they are jabbed in the next few weeks. the vaccination should remain voluntary. the white house is that the audit is political and against all public health information. earlier, we spoke to steve adler, the mayor of austin, texas, and he gave us his reaction to the executive order and how he felt businesses would react. multinational businesses that have announced this morning
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that they are not going to abide by what the governor says, that they are going to follow the federal direction from the president, so we are seeing businesses push back. the order is confusing and inconsistent on so many different levels. it's also inconsistent with the pro—business climate and culture that we try to foster here in texas, that we would take away from businesses the freedom and liberty to be able to protect their own employees and their own customers. it's just not very texas either. thanks to steve adler. we will stay in the us, moved to a different story in the state of wyoming. a coroner in the us state of wyoming has confirmed gabby petito died from strangulation. she was the young woman who went missing back in september while travelling across the country with her boyfriend in a case that captured worldwide attention. her boyfriend has been missing for a month after me returning home without his fiancee.
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0ur correspondent peter bowes has the latest. we know from what the coroner has been saying that when she was found, when her body was found last month, he believes that she had been — her body had been out in the wilderness possibly for three to four weeks. so, that really puts the point of death as possibly late in august, which is about the time that the social media reports of their road trip across the american west stopped, stopped quite abruptly. and just really to remind you of their story, they had been travelling ever sincejuly, recording their trip, living in a van through social media. many, many people had been following what had been happening, and then it abruptly all stopped. her boyfriend went back home to florida at the beginning of september, didn't contact the police. it wasn't until september 11 her concerned family actually called the police and reported her missing, and her body was found just over a week after that. we don't know much more from the postmortem examination.
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citing local laws, the coroner said that he wasn't at liberty to reveal any other information, although he did say that she wasn't pregnant at the time of her death. the un's top quarter given somalia control over most of the section of the indian ocean after a bitter legal battle with tenure. the ruling from international court ofjustice gives kenya only a small slice of the disputed area of the east african coast and can says it won't abide by the decision. both countries lay claim to a section of the indian ocean. can you wanted the border to run east while somalia wanted it to follow the line of the land border, and both nations claim this triangle in the middle. the icj voted to draw
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new borders putting the muted area in two, giving somalia most of it and rejecting tenure�*s argument that somalia had previously agreed its claimed border.- had previously agreed its claimed border. u, , claimed border. the court finds that there _ claimed border. the court finds that there is _ claimed border. the court finds that there is no _ claimed border. the court finds that there is no compelling - that there is no compelling evidence that somalia has acquiesced to the maritime boundary claimed by kenya and consequently there is no agreed maritime boundary between the parties that the parallel of latitude. the respect must be rejected. latitude. the respect must be re'ected. . ., rejected. the ruling could determine _ rejected. the ruling could determine who _ rejected. the ruling could determine who has - rejected. the ruling could determine who has the i rejected. the ruling could i determine who has the right rejected. the ruling could - determine who has the right to exploit gas and oil in the region and has huge diplomatic and security applications. kenya has rejected the ruling while somalia has welcomed it. translation: can while somalia has welcomed it. translation:— while somalia has welcomed it. translation: ., , ., , translation: can you should see the decision _ translation: can you should see the decision as _ translation: can you should see the decision as an _ translation: can you should see the decision as an opportunity - the decision as an opportunity to strengthen the relationship of the two countries and the collaboration of the neighbouring people. the collaboration of the neiuahbourin --eole. u, neighbouring people. the court is suwosed — neighbouring people. the court is supposed to _ neighbouring people. the court is supposed to be _ neighbouring people. the court is supposed to be the - neighbouring people. the court is supposed to be the final - is supposed to be the final arbiter in disputes between
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nations, but now that kenyon has rejected the ruling, the issue could be escalated to the un security council. courtney bembridge, bbc news. do stay with us on the bbc news. still to come: we find out where the money pumped into fossil fuels comes from in the latest in our climate change theories. —— series. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he has gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, . rapping a hole — in the front of the building. this government will not weaken. democracy will prevail. it fills me with humility and gratitude
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to know that i have been chosen as the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation held its breath - for the men they called the 33. and then, — bells tolled nationwide to announce the first rescue and chile let outi an almighty roar. welcome back. this is bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. let's take a look at the headlines: two weeks away from a major climate conference in the uk, a report finds it's not ready for the problems caused by climate change. world leaders agree to work together to avoid humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan, as the eu pledges more than $1 billion of aid for
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the virtual g20 summit. every day we're bringing you different climate story this week. we are looking towards cop26. four territories are responsible for more than half of the world's emissions. it has to involve china, europe, india and the united states. has to involve china, europe, india and the united states. us responsible for other per cent of c02 responsible for other per cent of co2 output. in the latest, my colleague ros atkins looks at the promises the us is made to reduce emissions. america is a world leader in emissions. now president guided wanted to be a leader in emissions cuts.- wanted to be a leader in emissions cuts. the united states set _ emissions cuts. the united states set out _ emissions cuts. the united states set out on _ emissions cuts. the united states set out on the - emissions cuts. the united states set out on the road | emissions cuts. the united i states set out on the road to cut greenhouse gases in half, in half by the end of this
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decade. that's where we were headed as a nation.— decade. that's where we were headed as a nation. that's the ambition- _ headed as a nation. that's the ambition. some _ headed as a nation. that's the ambition. some don't - headed as a nation. that's the ambition. some don't think i ambition. some don't think america means it. the beynon administration _ america means it. the beynon administration doesn't - america means it. the beynon administration doesn't seem l america means it. the beynonl administration doesn't seem to take the climate crisis the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure so it shows that they are not ready to take action, which is unfortunate. well, let's look at america's promises and how they compare with its actions and some progress has been made. us emissions peaked in 2005. the northern since president biden wants to reach half of the peak 2030. cristiano figueira mastered the paris climate agreement and this is her assessment.— agreement and this is her assessment. it's actually the [arc est assessment. it's actually the largest additional _ assessment. it's actually the largest additional national i largest additional national reduction proposed in this round of 2020 and 2021 climate target updates. so very significant.— target updates. so very siunificant. . �* , significant. the target 's true significance _ significant. the target 's true significance will _ significant. the target 's true significance will be _ significant. the target 's true significance will be if - significant. the target 's true | significance will be if america headset, and this projection
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shows us the us is not on course. to change that will require a major shift, as the bbc�*s north america editorjohn sobel explains. it’s bbc's north america editorjohn sobel explains.— sobel explains. it's going to reauire sobel explains. it's going to require peeple _ sobel explains. it's going to require people to _ sobel explains. it's going to require people to change i sobel explains. it's going to i require people to change their behaviour. in a gas guzzling economy, the way people eat and call their homes, the way industry operates and then of course you're going to need to get congressional approval much of this and is far from clear that the votes are there. this that the votes are there. as john that the votes are there. as john sobel says, this comes down to personal and political choices, not least on energy. president biden wants us energy to be carbon free by 2035. the key to the land is how america makes its electricity. irate key to the land is how america makes its electricity.— makes its electricity. we “ust set a record in i makes its electricity. we “ust set a record in 2020 i makes its electricity. we “ust set a record in 2020 ofh set a record in 2020 of building the most wind and solar whether the built here in the us and we need to continue growing those sources and winding down fossil fuels, especially coal—fired generation. especially coal-fired generation.- especially coal-fired aeneration. , , generation. this is about using fewer fossil _ generation. this is about using fewer fossil fuels _ generation. this is about using fewer fossil fuels and - fewer fossil fuels and producing fewer fossil fuels. the president has acted on this
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as well, announcing a moratorium on all new oil and gas leases on public lands and waters but as this headline from ap notes, us drilling approvals have increased despite the biden climate pledge. that is on land already leased. the president also cancelled the keystone xl oil pipeline but is this new york times story reports, other pipelines are being allowed to proceed. it's a decidedly mixed picture on fossil fuel picture on fossilfuel production, energy and transport. it produces more emissions than any other sector. transport emissions are going up in the us, they make up going up in the us, they make up 29% of the country's emissions. in response, by 2030, resident biden wants half of car sales to be like these, electric. right now, though, it's not hard, it's 2% of sales, so something has to change. sales, so something has to chance. , , , ., change. the big push right now is on building _ change. the big push right now is on building the _ is on building the infrastructure that gives people comfort that as they move around this big country, though be able to charge their vehicles as easily as they can
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pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push — pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push but— pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push but for— pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push but for it - pull up to the gas pump. that's the big push but for it to - the big push but for it to happen, tojoin pieces of legislation need to become law. the congress votes them through, the us is much more likely to hit its targets but the republicans aren't keen. this administration and house democrats are working frantically to propose a witches brew of reckless energy policies across the entire nation at a time when inflation is at its highest level since 2008, these policies make it more expensive for american families to heat and power their homes.— their homes. cost is one concern _ their homes. cost is one concern and _ their homes. cost is one concern and as - their homes. cost is one concern and as we - their homes. cost is one concern and as we saw. their homes. cost is one| concern and as we saw in their homes. cost is one - concern and as we saw in this campaign add last year, jobs is another. i campaign add last year, “obs is another. ., ., , ., another. i would transition from the _ another. i would transition from the oil _ another. i would transition from the oil industry, - another. i would transition from the oil industry, yes. j another. i would transition i from the oil industry, yes. no oil? that— from the oil industry, yes. no oil? that means _ from the oil industry, yes. no oil? that means no _ from the oil industry, yes. no oil? that means no jobs. - from the oil industry, yes. no| oil? that means no jobs. yes. oil? that means no “obs. yes. that means he _ oil? that means no jobs. yes. that means he states - that means he states depression. to protect our jobs. — depression. to protect our jobs, defeatjoe biden. it�*s jobs, defeat joe biden. it's not “ust jobs, defeatjoe biden. it�*s notjust republicans jobs, defeatjoe biden. it�*s not just republicans want president notjust republicans want president biden to change his plans. this is senatorjoe mansion. he's a democrat and
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chair of the energy senate committee announced thousands of dollars a year from fossil fuel investments. he wants a slower transition from fossil fuels, putting it this way. basically i'm totally committed to innovation, we can do it in a practical, responsible way. this is hard going for president biden and we already know the present in the past, america emits 16 tons of co2 per person per year, that's more than double the per capita rate of europe or china. america is responsible for 20% of all historic emissions are now america's president has ambitions to do things differently. the us is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050. that is marked by the redline, but america right now is the blue line, and again, it's track. unless more people and politicians are persuaded to do more about emissions, they will continue to be a significant gap between american targets
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and american reaction. our thanks to ros there. let's take a look at the money and its role in the climate crisis. billions of dollars are being pumped into fossil fuels, drilling, mining, tracking around the world. much of the money comes from financial institutions that claim they are embracing that zero targets, to be carbon neutral by 2050. burning coal, oil and gas produces nearly 90% of co2 emissions and is the main cause of climate change. this year the international energy agency called for a complete stop new in dirty fuels and a faster shift to renewables. fossil fuel consumption is set to hit an all—time high next year, with the world on track to warm by 2.7 degrees before the end of the century. 0k, ok, we can speak to richard brooks now, who is climate finance director with the
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environmental action group stand.earth in toronto. thanks for being on the programme. thanks to having me. so know this financial backing is crucial to any energy sector we are talking about. we have seen money going into renewables but your argument is that still too much is going into fossil fuels? , , ,, . fuels? definitely. since the paris agreement _ fuels? definitely. since the paris agreement was - fuels? definitely. since the| paris agreement was signed fuels? definitely. since the - paris agreement was signed five years ago, nearly six years ago now, nearly $3.8 trillion have gone into fossil fuel gone into fossilfuel companies, that's coal, oil and gas companies, from just 60 banks are clearly the money is blowing in the wrong direction. we need to be stepping up our investments in renewables and climate solutions and quickly phasing out investments in fossil fuels and the energy systems of the old. i think there is a lot of banks and other financial institutions that want to have both ways, but want to continue to profit off coal, oil and gas companies make a little bit of money also offer renewables. that would have been fined 30 or a0 years
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ago but we are simply running out of time, the climate science is very, very clear, now is the time to act, now is the time to step up our ambition and climate action and that means getting out of fossil fuel companies. wide that means getting out of fossilfuel companies. wide if fossil fuel companies. wide if you fossilfuel companies. wide if you want to divert money away from the fossil fuel companies, these banks clearly what they doing when it comes to finances.— doing when it comes to finances. ~ ., ., , finances. what do you do? is it a question _ finances. what do you do? is it a question government - a question government regulation, is it appealing to the moral core of these banks? do you actually want to happen? we've seen the launch of a number of voluntary initiatives, groupings of banks have come together with other financial institutions to set far ranging goals to get net zero emissions by 2050 but they continue to let the money flow into fossil fuel companies so i think we can give a little bit more space for these voluntary initiatives but you really need governments to step up. we need them to step in and regulate them to step in and regulate the banks, forcing them to win down their investments of fossil fuel companies, forcing
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them to properly assess the climate risk on their balance books. the risk to pensioners and retirees, to ourfinancial systems, by continuing to invest in the energy systems of the old. andy found able to assess that risk properly, what we need is better disclosure. we need to know what companies are emitting what and how much and what our plans are in terms of transitioning in the future, and we need to regulate the banks in terms of forcing them to decrease their fossil fuel financing emissions. in what chance do — financing emissions. in what chance do you _ financing emissions. in what chance do you think- financing emissions. in what chance do you think we - financing emissions. in what chance do you think we willl financing emissions. in what i chance do you think we will get something like that at cop26, actual hard commitments? there is a real chance _ actual hard commitments? there is a real chance that _ actual hard commitments? there is a real chance that the - actual hard commitments? there is a real chance that the cop26 i is a real chance that the cop26 is a real chance that the cop26 is going to be a flop unless we step up our emissions levels. with the glasgow financial or last—minute zero, for example, a grouping of some of the largest banks and financial institutions in the world,
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their most recent member is one of the largest banks in the world, jpmorgan chase. jpmorgan chaseis world, jpmorgan chase. jpmorgan chase is notorious for being the largest fossil fuel finance year on the planners, giving more than $317 billion to coal, oil and gas developers in the last six years since the paris agreement was signed. when you have a member like that, part of your alliance really speaks to the ambition of these types of clubs and i think... to the ambition of these types of clubs and i think. . .- of clubs and i think... there is a flipside _ of clubs and i think... there is a flipside here _ of clubs and i think... there is a flipside here of - of clubs and i think... there is a flipside here of course l is a flipside here of course that so much of our economy and jobs and people's happiness in people's wealth levels do depend on these industries and it's not a case that we can just switch overnight without enormous harm to people's actual lives right now? absolutely. but i don't think anybody suggesting we switch overnight, but what we need to do is see a scaling up of investments in renewables and climate solutions and a rapid scaling down of investments in coal, oiland
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scaling down of investments in coal, oil and gas companies. the fact that there are still banks financing new fossil fuel projects, projects that are still on the books, but are not even under construction yet, now pouring money into these projects that are going to lock us into 20,30, projects that are going to lock us into 20, 30, maybe a0 years new emissions, it'sjust new emissions, it's just ridiculous new emissions, it'sjust ridiculous that is the direction they are going. when ou have direction they are going. when you have billions _ direction they are going. when you have billions of _ direction they are going. when you have billions of dollars - you have billions of dollars going into pipelines, new coal mines, coal—fired power plants, clearly that is the wrong direction and we need to be stepping it up. thank you for your insight. for more than the ongoing climate crisis facing our planet, go to the bbc news website and find full background and analysis on the site there and of course noise down so the baby —— download the bbc news app as well. and if you are on social media, do get me there as well. i am
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at @lvaughanjones, i am lewis vaughanjones and mrs bbc news, goodbye. hello. there were some bright spots on tuesday. some of us got to see a bit of sunshine. but for many places, extensive cloud was the main weather feature, spilling down from the northwest, thick enough at times to produce some spots of rain and drizzle. and wednesday is looking like a very similar day. it will be mostly but not completely dry, often but not completely cloudy. where the cloud has broken, it is going to be quite a chilly start to the day, but most areas beginning with a lot of cloud, some mist and murk, some spots of rain and drizzle. now, through the day, i am hopeful that cloud will break a little bit. eastern scotland should see some sunny spells. parts of northern ireland, england and wales will see
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the cloud thinning and breaking to reveal some brighter interludes. top temperatures between 1a and 17 degrees, light winds down towards the south, but it will be quite easy further north. through wednesday night into thursday, this cloud continues to feed in with some mist and hill fog, some spots of rain and temperatures of 9 to 11 degrees. some more persistent rain, though, beginning to develop in the north of scotland, and that's the first sign of a change. this weather front dropping into the picture during thursday will bring some outbreaks of rain southwards across scotland, that rain particularly heavy and persistent in the northwest highlands, some of that rain getting into northern ireland later in the day accompanied by a strong wind and a wind that will change down from the north, bringing the first hint of some colder air into northern scotland. further south, england and wales mainly dry, often cloudy. but as we move through thursday night into friday, that weather front will make progress southwards. that means it is introducing colder air, the blue shades spreading southwards across the chart for friday.
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across the northern half of the uk, friday is likely to begin with a touch of frost, and it certainly will feel chillier. but what the front is also doing is it's clearing a lot of the cloud away, so there will be more in the way of sunshine. 15 or 16 degrees down towards the south, but further north — look at that — just 9 in aberdeen. but that colder spell won't last all that long. milder conditions will return from the west during the weekend. with that, we'll start to see some outbreaks of rain.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines: as the uk prepares to host the global climate change conference, there is a warning that it's not ready for the impact of climate change. the environment agency says hundreds could dine floods —— die in floods unless the country is made more resilient to the increasingly volatile weather. leaders and representatives from the g20 have held a virtual summit with a pledge to work together to avert a humanitarian disaster for afghanistan. the eu has pledged more than $1 billion in aid. over 18 million afghans are now in need of humanitarian help. two of america's biggest airlines, both of them based in texas, are rebuffing an executive order from the state's governor that seeks to ban coronavirus vaccine mandates. american airlines and southwest airlines say their employees must prove theirjab in the next few weeks.

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