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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 13, 2021 2:00am-2:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news. our top stories: adaptor adapt or die. days ahead of a major climate conference in the uk, report finds its not ready for the problems caused by climate change. world leaders agreed to work together to avoid humanitarian catastrophe in afghanistan as the eu pledges more than $1 billion of aid at a virtual 620 summit. the governor of texas bars all covid—19 vaccine mandates in the state, defying president biden�*s nojudge, nojob no job policy. ina in a corner confirms that gabby pettito died of strangulation. she disappeared while travelling with her ponte ——
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fiance in the us. authorities are still trying to find him. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. first, pressure is growing on world leaders to make upcoming global climate talks count. there are many commitments from countries still falling short of where they need to be ahead of where they need to be ahead of the un conference called cop26. and there is a new warning that the uk is not ready from the impact of climate change from the environment agency. it's as hundreds goodbye from floods unless places where people can live, work and travel are made more resilient to the increasingly volatile weather. here is our science editor david shukman.
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a street in cardiff became a dangerous river earlier this month after a massive downpour. it was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there. and, around the same time, london was engulfed, raising questions about how we'll cope as climate change makes the weather even more violent. but the biggest shock came in germany lastjuly, a surge of water tore through communities. 200 people were killed and the fear is of disaster here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england, and we need to be ready to save lives. we need to recognise that it's adapt or die. the environment agency is being deliberately blunt so that its recommendations are heard. for homeowners and businesses to take basic steps to make their properties safe.
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to restore landscapes like forests so they hold rain water before it causes floods. and for bigger investments by governments in defences that can handle projected rises in sea levels. already the thames barrier, defending london, is being closed far more often than planned — a trend that will continue as the polar ice keeps melting, raising the height of the oceans. how long do you think it will work in protecting london? with its network of tunnels under the river, the barrier was designed decades ago and may not be big enough in future. the great steel gates are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster, which is why climate change matters so much here. they're constantly watching the projections for how much the sea is going to rise, and it's also why we'll probably need a bigger barrier by 2070. but some stretches of the coast are not so lucky.
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homes in norfolk are being lost to the sea. the environment agency says it can't protect everyone. but since last year, when i met lorna bevan thompson, a local business owner, the waves have come much nearer. they're saying we've got billions of money available but it's not coming to us and our coastline is getting eroded daily, and it's irreparable damage. in some parts of the uk, the challenge will be too little water. a growing population and drier summers will strain supplies. the government says it is preparing the country for a more turbulent climate and it wants world leaders to discuss the risks when they meet at the un summit in glasgow next month. david shukman, bbc news. next, two months after the taliban seized control of afghanistan, the country is approaching a full—blown economic collapse. fin approaching a full-blown economic collapse. on tuesday the g20 grow) _ economic collapse. on tuesday the 620 group of— economic collapse. on tuesday the 620 group of wealthier - the g20 group of wealthier nations met to try and prevent this financial crisis from
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turning into a humanitarian catastrophe. european commission president ursula von der leyen promised the eu would deliver a support package of more than $1 billion to afghanistan. the german chancellor angela merkel said despite concerns about involving the taliban, the world needs to step up and not abandon afghans in need. the un says things are getting worse due to increased conflict, a pandemic and persistent drought. 0ver pandemic and persistent drought. over 18 million afghans are now in need of humanitarian assistance. that includes more than 9.5 million children. one and two kids underfive years old children. one and two kids under five years old are facing acute malnutrition. 0verall, nearly 30% of the countries facing crisis levels of food insecurity. he was the bbc�*s yogita limaye. as the un secretary—general is warning in very strong words this is a make—or—break moment for this country. if the global community does not act quickly, the world will pay the price for it.
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18 million people in need of urgent life—saving support. so, this is just to survive. prior to the 15th of august, we've been out meeting people who were living in open fields, who didn't have anything to shelter them, who didn't know where their next meal was coming from, who didn't have access to water, basic sanitation, basic medicines. it's getting even worse now. winter will be coming in, and you still have people living like that outdoors. and all of that will feed into instability in this country, which no—one particularly wants. we did hear interestingly and significantly from the european commission president when she said that this is humanitarian aid, it will be channelled through international agencies that are operating on the ground. it is separate to development aid that was also coming into afghanistan prior to the 15th of august and being channelled through the government and through government agencies on the ground.
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so, she has made that separation very clear, trying to say that afghan people shouldn't suffer, we should be trying to help them out. but at the same time this is a government that has seized control of the country, this is a government that we do not recognise yet. so, this is a problem that the world is going to have to get together and solve. how do you reach the people of afghanistan who are really in need without that money, without that aid falling into the wrong hands or being misused? thanks to yogita there. let's go to the us now to the country's biggest airlines, both of them based in texas, are rebutting an executive order from the state's governor that seeks to ban coronavirus vaccine mandates. american airlines and southwest airlines both say their employees must prove that they are jabbed in the next few weeks. greg abbott says he supports vaccination but it's a remain voluntary. the white house said his order is political and against all public health information. earlier we spoke to steve adler who was the mayor of austin, texas and he gave us his reaction to governor abbott's
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executive order on how he felt businesses in the state would respond. multinational businesses that have announced this morning that they are not going to buy by what the governor says, that they are going to follow the federal direction from the president, so we are seeing businesses pushback. the order is confusing and inconsistent on so many different levels. it's also inconsistent with the pro—business climate and culture that we try to foster here in texas, that he would take away from businesses the freedom and liberty to be able to protect their own employees and their own customers. it's just not very texas either. to assess business reaction in texas, we can speak to david koenig in dallas. thank you so much for coming on the
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programme. much for coming on the programme-— much for coming on the rouramme. . ., programme. thanks for inviting me. programme. thanks for inviting me- there _ programme. thanks for inviting me- there is — programme. thanks for inviting me. there is little _ programme. thanks for inviting me. there is little back - programme. thanks for inviting me. there is little back and - me. there is little back and contradictory. talk as to what is going on here. on the airlines point of view, they are looking at an order from the president saying, "you will vaccinate your employees" "and then the governor of texas, where they are based, issuing a contradictory order, saying" no and ploy, no employers will be issuing requirements that they are our customers be vaccinated." both american airlines and southwest airlines have said today that they are going to follow the federal rule and they believe the federal regulations take residence over the state and i guess they are regulated by the federal government and so they are going to go and head ——go ahead and required vaccinations.- ahead and required vaccinations. . , vaccinations. that is quite clear that _ vaccinations. that is quite clear that in _ vaccinations. that is quite clear that in end, - vaccinations. that is quite clear that in end, this - clear that in end, this federal/ national law and obligations trumps the state
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ones. what about this accusation that, from governor abbott there, that there is a kind of political move in some way. kind of political move in some wa . ~ ~' , way. well, i think there is that suspicion _ way. well, i think there is that suspicion because . way. well, i think there is - that suspicion because governor abbott is up for re—election next year, he is facing primary opposition from his conservative flank in the republican party, people have criticised him for not being tough enough against vaccine mandates and mask mandates and other measures by the federal government, so that makes it a little bit easier for people to look at what he did yesterday and say, oh, there is a political angle to it. and what about the _ political angle to it. and what about the airlines _ political angle to it. and what about the airlines then, - about the airlines then, getting back to them? will they suffer locally at all by going against this?— suffer locally at all by going against this? no, i don't think so. all against this? no, i don't think s0- all of _ against this? no, i don't think so. all of their— against this? no, i don't think so. all of their competitors i so. all of their competitors are going to be following the same rules, so they were not eager to pick a fight with the governor. this is not the first issue that they've been in the
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spot, whether it was election law legislation or other controversial things, so they tread very carefully. they don't want to say anything that upsets the governor or the leaders of the republican—controlled legislature, but they should be fine. i legislature, but they should be fine. , ., , ., fine. i see. in a couple of sentences. _ fine. i see. in a couple of sentences, we _ fine. i see. in a couple of sentences, we could - fine. i see. in a couple of. sentences, we could stress fine. i see. in a couple of- sentences, we could stress the texasis sentences, we could stress the texas is perhaps behind other areas in terms of things like vaccine rollout and there are high levels of scepticism now? there is a little, there is definitely more scepticism about vaccinations here than in much of the country. find about vaccinations here than in much of the country.— much of the country. and that is art much of the country. and that is part of _ much of the country. and that is part of it- — much of the country. and that is part of it. lovely, _ much of the country. and that is part of it. lovely, thank - is part of it. lovely, thank you very much for talking to us, david, appreciated. next, a coroner in the us state of wyoming has confirmed that gabby pettito died of stimulation. she was the young woman who went missing back and set timber while travelling the country with her boyfriend. in a case that captured worldwide attention. 0ur correspondent
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peter bowes has the latest. we know from what the coroner has been saying that when she was found, when her body was found last month, he believes that she had been, her body had been out in the wilderness possibly for 3—4 weeks. so, that really puts the point of death as possibly late in august, which is about the time that the social media reports of their road trip across the american west stopped, stopped quite abruptly. and just really to remind you of their story, they had been travelling ever sincejuly, recording their trip, living in a van through social media. many, many people had been following what event happening, and then it abruptly all stopped. her boyfriend went back home to florida at the beginning of september, didn't contact the police. it wasn't until september the 11th her concerned family actually called the police and reported her missing, and her body was found just over a week after that. we don't know much more from the postmortem examination. citing local laws, the coroner said that he wasn't at liberty to reveal any other information, although he did say she wasn't pregnant
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at the time of her death. to stay with us on the bbc news. still to come. aspirin advice causes headache in the us. doctors that changed our minds on when it should be taken. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he has gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb . which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, i ripping a hole in the front of the building. this government will not weaken, democracy will prevail. it fills me with humility and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as
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the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation - held its breath for the men they called the 33. and then, bells tolled i nationwide to announce the first rescue and chile let out an almighty roar. - this is bbc news, the latest headlines: the the latest headlines: report says they are not ready the report says they are not ready for climate change is needed. the eu pledges more than1 billion 20 needed. the eu pledges more than 1 billion 20 summit. millions of people take aspirin
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to ward off heart problems and four years american doctors have been telling people over the age of a0 it has the right thing to do, but no more. a task force is ready to change the advice, following studies finding that risks may outweigh benefits. let's speak to the was manager, thank you for speaking to us today. it is a pleasure to be here. this has been around for a while, people know it, people have been taken aspirin if they are slightly older, why the change? there is new evidence. it is an important question. what we are addressing is, with people whether history —— without history of heart attack and stroke, is there a way to reduce the chance? we are finding there can be a small benefit but we need to rated
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against the potential harms of aspirin which is mainly bleeding. it is important for people between a0 and 59 to talk with their clinician as to whether aspirin is actually right for them and preventing the first heart attack or stroke. crosstalk. so that a0-59 crosstalk. so that a0—59 age group, but a different one for people over 60? yes, for people 60 and over without a history of heart attack and stroke we actually recommend against starting heart attack and stroke. it is important to remember that this really applies to people who don't have a history of heart attack and stroke. there are, as you mentioned, millions of people who can take aspirin because they have had a heart attack or stroke, it has been safe and they can continue this. and the rescue mansion is bleeding, what does that mean?
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—— the rescue mention. it is -- the rescue mention. it is mainly internal, _ -- the rescue mention. it is mainly internal, so - -- the rescue mention. it is mainly internal, so for- —— the rescue mention. it 3 mainly internal, so for example it can cause stomach ulcers, occasionally it can cause bleeding in the brain. they aren't common but when they do happen they can be serious. and the thing is, people totally understand the science advances, new studies coming out and you need to change advice based on those studies, obviously, but is there a worry that this kind of undermines trust more generally? actually, i think people should be glad that we are continuously looking at evidence and making sure that our guidelines are up—to—date. i understand there can be some confusion and we want people to understand and have a clear message about aspirin for ages a0 e-59 message about aspirin for ages a0 e—59 can be right for some people to prevent the first heart attack or stroke but they really need to talk to their clinicians to make sure it is right for them. thank you, that is clear, thank you for coming on and talking us through through that study and the latest research. thank you.
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let's get some of the other news today. the international monetary fund was that the global recovery from a global pandemic is faltering. it's as economic prospects have been dented by low vaccination rates and rising commodity prices. the body says it expects inflation to remain high for the foreseeable future. the somali government has urged kenyu to respect the international rule of law, coming as somalia was handed control of most of an area disputed in the indian ocean. can you says it is not prepared to sacrifice territorial waters. the mayor of mexico city confirms that a statue of an indigenous woman will replace the christopher columbus moment on one of the capital's main thoroughfares. the statue of the european navigator who paved the way for the colonisation and exploitation of the americas was removed last year. a petition had been signed by thousands of indigenous women.
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us vice president, harris as americans cannot shy away from the shameful fast suffered by native americans at the hands of european settlers. she said everything must be done to its legacy. those explorers ushered in a generation of devastation. stealing land and spreading disease. we must not shy away from this shameful past, and we must shed light on it and do everything we can to address the impact of the past on native communities today. we speak to the president of the national conference. what is your reaction to those comments? of all the comments that she
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of all the comments that she made, that is the one comment that really resonated with me, and the reaction across indian country was welcome, it was long overdue, and to finally have a representative of the united states acknowledge that our history is based on a premise of lies is truly the beginning of our healing, restoration and reconciliation with a very cold, dark history and the united states. and words are clearly important and powerful, especially when spoken from someone with such a position, but i am interested in the practicalities. what do you hope happens now? what we hope will happen with this president and vice president and administration is that the united states will finally live up to the fundamental values that are enshrined in at the un declaration rights of indigenous peoples. when the un adopted that document in 2007, format countries are posted — canada, australia, new zealand and the united states. under
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president 0bama, the united states was the last country to reverse its position, and so now every country in the world — we really hope that this administration moves towards and permitting that basic principle and international standards of our basic human and civil rights, our rights to sovereignty, and a right to say when it comes to land rights, which came to light with the dakota pipeline. the united states still proceeded with unilateral action. we are hoping that this administration — that'll anne. ijust want tojump — that'll anne. i just want to jump in on — that'll anne. ijust want to jump in on that, because some people may not know the background. that is the kind of practicality i am interested in. what exactly happened now what do you think went wrong? what do you hope will happen because two what happened was a multinational corporation sought to install an oil pipeline across the sacred sites of local indigenous people.-
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the sacred sites of local indigenous people. the tribes re'ected indigenous people. the tribes rejected this, _ indigenous people. the tribes rejected this, and _ indigenous people. the tribes rejected this, and even - indigenous people. the tribes rejected this, and even over. rejected this, and even over those objections the united states permitted the constructions in the sacred sites, the waterways, and so this just went right through their territory and across indian country. we consulted with united states thinking we could have a decisive say, but that action must end. i see, it is those kind of practical issues of sovereignty that you hope will follow these words from the vice president. i am afraid we have to leave it there but thank you for talking to us quickly through those things, we really appreciated. that was fawn sharp. the duke and duchess of sussex have become part of harry and meghan have impact cabinet partners, helping them to
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invest in sustainable companies. 0ne invest in sustainable companies. one of the cofounders of the company told us more. we are very excited to work them into the family and we have been very lucky and excited to have many conversations with them about what this partnership looks like. we can break it down into three primary areas they will partner with us. primarily, they will be driving a lot of awareness around the issues that we are fighting for. that is things like climate, things like human rights we can really be on the ground trying to understand how we solve those problems at a systemic level. they can then drive that conversation using the platform that they have. but they will also help us build a community, and that is a community of individuals, investors, institutions to come together to try to use the unique resources and assets and a school so that we have tried to drive towards solutions. with that, finally, partnerships. we as an organisation like to strike incredibly interesting partnerships, and where they will help us is thinking about how we partner with groups on
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the ground, having the most impact, as well as organisations and institutions that are looking to be a part of that accelerating transition to sustainable investing. 0ne one of the bestselling music artists in the world has sold her music royalties to the private equity giants blackstone, a deal that could be worth up to $1 billion. 0ther be worth up to $1 billion. other big names include neil young and blondie. they have also sold their royalties. expose the purchase is a way of tapping into the lucrative streaming business which is increasingly the way many of us enjoyed music these days rather than purchasing songs outright. a french biologist and underwater photographer has been named as the wildlife photographer of the year. the image taken in the pacific is like an explosion underwater, i
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suppose. thejunior wildlife suppose. the junior wildlife photographer took this suppose. thejunior wildlife photographer took this photo. and this picture of a young elephant underwater with an audience at a zoo in thailand, this won the photojournalism award. and this wonderful snow picture captured reindeer battling for control. he said he felt immersed in the smell, noise, fatigue and pain. you should be able to empathise was this elk in the state of colorado. it was forced to roam around the forest with around the forest a
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colorado. it was forced to roam around the forest a tyre stuck around the forest a tyre stuck around his neck, it is thought he is now some six kilograms lighter. that is it from me, this is bbc news. goodbye. hello. there were some bright spots on tuesday. some of us got to see a bit of sunshine. but for many places, extensive cloud was the main weather feature, spilling down from the northwest, thick enough at times to produce some spots of rain and drizzle. and wednesday is looking like a very similar day. it will be mostly but not completely dry, often but not completely cloudy. where the cloud has broken, it is going to be quite a chilly start to the day, but most areas beginning with a lot of cloud, some mist and murk, some spots of rain and drizzle. now, through the day, i am hopeful that cloud will break a little bit. eastern scotland should see some sunny spells. parts of northern ireland, england and wales will see the cloud thinning and breaking to reveal some brighter interludes.
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top temperatures between 1a and 17 degrees, light winds down towards the south, but it will be quite easy further north. through wednesday night into thursday, this cloud continues to feed in with some mist and hill fog, some spots of rain and temperatures of 9 to 11 degrees. some more persistent rain, though, beginning to develop in the north of scotland, and that's the first sign of a change. this weather front dropping into the picture during thursday will bring some outbreaks of rain southwards across scotland, that rain particularly heavy and persistent in the northwest highlands, some of that rain getting into northern ireland later in the day accompanied by a strong wind and a wind that will change direction and will start to come down from the north, bringing the first hint of some colder air into northern scotland. further south, england and wales mainly dry, often cloudy. once again, 16 or 17 degrees. but as we move through thursday night into friday, that weather front will make progress southwards. you can tell from the blue triangles that this is a cold front. that means it is introducing colder
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air, the blue shades spreading southwards across the chart for friday. across the northern half of the uk, friday is likely to begin with a touch of frost, and it certainly will feel chillier. but what the front is also doing is it's clearing a lot of the cloud away, so there will be more in the way of sunshine. 15 or 16 degrees down towards the south, but further north — look at that — just 9 in aberdeen. but that colder spell won't last all that long. milder conditions will return from the west during the weekend. with that, we'll start to see some outbreaks of rain.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. as the uk prepares to host the global climate change conference, there is a warning that it's not ready for the impact of climate change. the environment agency says hundreds could dine floods unless the country is made more resilient to the increasingly volatile weather. leaders and representatives from the g20 have held a virtual summit with a pledge to work together to avert a humanitarian disaster for afghanistan. the eu has pledged more than $1 billion in aid. 0ver18 pledged more than $1 billion in aid. over 18 million afghans are now in need of humanitarian help. and two of america's biggest airlines, both of them based in texas, are rebutting an executive order from the state's governor which seeks to ban coronavirus vaccine mandates. american airlines and southwest airlines says their employees must prove there jabbed in the next few weeks. this is bbc news.

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