Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 12, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm... a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lockdown, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from this. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily. i think she lost her life because mistakes were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.
8:01 pm
we will also ask, shouldn't many lessons have been learned even before covid struck? the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high, as the jobs market continues to recoverfrom the pandemic. the brexit minister lord frost says post—brexit trade arrangements, which the uk negotiated with the eu, aren't working and have to change. the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source of mistrust between us. and for all kinds of reasons, we need to fix this problem. former little mix singer jesy nelson has denied accusations of "blackfishing" — when a non—black person tries to appear black in her new music video. the queen attends a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey, using a walking stick for support for the first time at a major public event.
8:02 pm
good evening to you, welcome if you're just good evening to you, welcome if you'rejustjoining us. one of the worst ever public health failures — that's what a new report by mps has called the uk's failure to do more to stop covid spreading early in the pandemic. they said the government's approach, backed by its scientists, was to try to manage the situation and, in effect, achieve herd immunity by infection. the report says the delay in introducing the first lockdown cost thousands of lives many of them elderly and vulnerable people in care homes. there was also criticism of "light touch border controls" only on countries with high covid rates. the start of the nhs test and trace system was "slow, uncertain, and often chaotic". there were "unacceptably high" death rates in ethnic minority groups,
8:03 pm
and among people with learning disabilities and autism. but there was significant praise for the uk vaccination programme, described as "one of the most successful and effective initiatives in the history of uk science and public administration." the report focuses on england, but in the early stages, all four nations moved together. in response, the government said it had acted swiftly on the information available at the time. here's our health editor, hugh pym. empty streets during lockdown. but did the restrictions imposed both in the spring and autumn last year come too late? the most comprehensive report so far on the official response to the covid crisis concludes that mistakes were made. he was relatively young and totally fit and healthy, with no underlying health conditions. phil got covid in march last year. his condition worsened and he died in april. his daughter, sara, believes
8:04 pm
an earlier lockdown, restricting the spread of the virus, might have made all the difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust my family, a lot of other families that are in this situation, it was avoidable, if action had been taken sooner, and perhaps a little bit more of a responsible approach had been taken sooner. the report looks at decisions around the timing of the march lockdown. it says full restrictions came too late because the policy backed by government scientists and ministers was for a slow and gradual approach. the mps say this was wrong, and led to a higher death toll than would have happened with earlier intervention. come on, this is deadly here, love. get that down you, lads, ey? events like the cheltenham racing festival in mid—march, the report adds, may have spread the virus. i think there is an issue there of hindsight, because at the time of the first lockdown, the expectation was that the tolerance in terms of how long people would live with lockdown for was a far shorter period than actually has
8:05 pm
proven to be the case. but the labour leader said the report's stark conclusions couldn't be ignored. to use language that this was one of the worst public health failures in the uk, that is a damning indictment. and my thoughts are with the families who've lost people because of these failures. the mps' report is highly critical of the test and trace system in england. it says it was set up much too late and that capacity should have been built up much earlier in the pandemic, in line with some other countries. halting community testing in the early weeks had cost lives, according to the report. just one of the government's failings, said the former downing street adviser who'd given evidence to mps. me and others put into place work to try and improve the system in 2020, after the first wave. unfortunately, the prime minister, being the joker that he is, has not pushed that work through. the covid pressure on care homes
8:06 pm
is examined in the report. the mps say that sending elderly people from hospitals into care homes without prior testing may have been understandable, but it contributed to the spread of the virus. staff entering care homes also may have carried infections. staff shortages and problems getting ppe haven't helped. in hong kong and germany, they took more precautions early on to protect care homes and they had fewer deaths as a result. that's definitely one of the most important, long—term lessons we need to learn. the report says vaccine development has been one of the most successful initiatives in uk science. early investment by the government in research and development is praised by mps. the vaccine taskforce being set up outside government is described as a master stroke, with the success of the vaccine programme said to have redeemed many failings elsewhere. the report praises the response of the nhs to the pandemic,
8:07 pm
with a rapid increase in critical care beds. but it notes that even before covid struck, most hospitals were running at close to full capacity, and that meant that services, including some cancer care, were put on hold. the ensuing backlog has become one of the enduring legacies of the pandemic. the mps note that bame communities experienced high levels of severe illness and death, which highlighted inequalities in society. the government response is that they have been consistently guided by scientific experts and are committed to learning lessons from the pandemic. hugh pym, bbc news. our political correspondent, damian grammaticus, has been telling us this report doesn't point the finger at any one individual, but still makes difficult reading for the government and the scientists. it is a weighty, serious report produced by committees chaired by two former conservative cabinet ministers. now the government has been out
8:08 pm
today giving its defences, saying it followed scientific advice. this report says yes but, at the outset, that was flawed, and ministers should have challenged it. the government says it to protect the nhs — the report says yes, but when the nhs looked like it might be overwhelmed. -- it —— it acted to protect the nhs. the government says that in the early stages, evidence was thin — the report says they should've looked up east asian countries that had in controlling the virus. now we know there is a public inquiry coming next year, the government says it will learn lessons — but i think it will have difficulty because this report has not satisfied the bereaved families, it has angered them. it says it shows things like the failings around care homes been trying to point to — and they want that inquiry to have tougher powers and report back earlier, they say, to prevent more needless deaths. and at 8.30pm, we'll be gauging more
8:09 pm
reaction to today's report. so hutchinson reports on some of those reactions later —— sophie hutchinson. meanwhile, these are the government's latest coronavirus figures. 38,520 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average, there were over 38,600 new cases per day in the last week. as of monday, there were 7,000 people in hospital in the uk with coronavirus. another 181 deaths have been recorded — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test result — which means on average, there were 114 deaths per day, in the past week. the death toll now stands at nearly 138,000. 0n vaccinations, 85.6% of the population aged 12 and over, have had their first dose of a vaccine, and 78.6%, have been double jabbed. some of the most serious early failings, the covid response report suggests, resulted from apparent "group think"
8:10 pm
among scientists and ministers, which meant the uk was not as open to different approaches on earlier lockdowns, border controls, and test and trace as it should have been. let's speak now to dame deirdre hine — she led the review into how the uk responded to the swine flu pandemic in 2009. john drury alsojoins us. a warm welcome to you both. first of all, what strikes you most from this report in terms of things that perhaps were concerned about 14 or so years ago when you wrote your report which continued to affect us in how handled covid? i report which continued to affect us in how handled covid?— in how handled covid? i think robabl in how handled covid? i think probably the _ in how handled covid? i think probably the most _ in how handled covid? i think probably the most striking i in how handled covid? i think. probably the most striking point that this report makes is the danger of groupthink. and i did highlight
8:11 pm
that, it's on page 75 of my report reviewing the hi and one pandemic, where i detected there was a danger of groupthink. if you get a whole lot of scientists together in sage, they'll examine things very carefully but, over time, they'll begin to develop a group way of thinking. i suggested that the discussions at sage should be left open to a much wider group of scientists who could comment on them and may be some of them, and ask them to think again. and i think that that would've helped particularly in this one so little was known in the early stages about the virus. , ., , , ,. was known in the early stages about the virus. , ., , , y., ., the virus. john drury, you are a social psychology _
8:12 pm
the virus. john drury, you are a social psychology professor - the virus. john drury, you are a social psychology professor at l the virus. john drury, you are a i social psychology professor at the university of sussex — this phrase of groupthink is one we've heard a lot in the past. what does it mean and what's the evidence for it. 7 it's one of those psychology terms that's _ it's one of those psychology terms that's become popular, and we did hear it_ that's become popular, and we did hear it a _ that's become popular, and we did hear it a lot — that's become popular, and we did hear it a lot injune when dominic cummings appeared as a witness for one of— cummings appeared as a witness for one of the _ cummings appeared as a witness for one of the committees — he said it 15 times, — one of the committees — he said it 15 times, and it was picked up then too. 15 times, and it was picked up then toe what— 15 times, and it was picked up then too. what people often mean by it and what — too. what people often mean by it and what the original theory suggested was that when people fall apart of— suggested was that when people fall apart of cohesive groups and the more _ apart of cohesive groups and the more cohesive the group, the less discriminating they become, less critical, _ discriminating they become, less critical, and you get a mindless conformity. what this conforms to is the bay— conformity. what this conforms to is the bay of— conformity. what this conforms to is the bay of pigs fiasco in 1971 when the bay of pigs fiasco in 1971 when the us— the bay of pigs fiasco in 1971 when the us attempted to invade cuba and failed miserably. that was the early evidence, _ failed miserably. that was the early evidence, but ever since that study
8:13 pm
was published, there's been contradictory evidence, as in many cohesive _ contradictory evidence, as in many cohesive groups, seeming to be able to be sceptical, critical, and thoughtful — and in fact, the bay of pils thoughtful — and in fact, the bay of pigs fiasco— thoughtful — and in fact, the bay of pigs fiasco itself has been explained for other reasons, as well, _ explained for other reasons, as well, such_ explained for other reasons, as well, such as the desire ofjohn f kennedy— well, such as the desire ofjohn f kennedy for political popularity rather — kennedy for political popularity rather than cohesion within the grouo — rather than cohesion within the grouo so— rather than cohesion within the group. so it's a concept that the public— group. so it's a concept that the public seems to like but doesn't have _ public seems to like but doesn't have a _ public seems to like but doesn't have a lot — public seems to like but doesn't have a lot of consistent evidence. in the _ have a lot of consistent evidence. in the context of covid, what worries you that this is being used in this report from mps7— worries you that this is being used in this report from mps? when it was used by dominic— in this report from mps? when it was used by dominic cummings, - in this report from mps? when it was used by dominic cummings, it - used by dominic cummings, it was used _ used by dominic cummings, it was used to— used by dominic cummings, it was used to the — used by dominic cummings, it was used to the kind of say, "well, we shoutdn't— used to the kind of say, "well, we shouldn't have collective decision—making, we should be rugged individualists where you bring in all these — individualists where you bring in all these mavericks to make decisions _ all these mavericks to make decisions because groups are bad." in decisions because groups are bad." in the _ decisions because groups are bad." in the case — decisions because groups are bad." in the case of the report, i heard jeremy— in the case of the report, i heard jeremy hunt on the radio this morning. _ jeremy hunt on the radio this morning, and it was being used in quite _ morning, and it was being used in quite a _ morning, and it was being used in quite a different way — because if
8:14 pm
one says — quite a different way — because if one says anyone who gets involved in a group _ one says anyone who gets involved in a group starts to become less discriminating, then we can blame poor decisions on group process and group _ poor decisions on group process and group psychology rather than individuals. and i think one of the takeaways — individuals. and i think one of the takeaways from this morning was that no individuals are being blamed, instead _ no individuals are being blamed, instead it's group psychology being blamed _ instead it's group psychology being blamed. what worries me as a psychologist is that it is part of an anti- — psychologist is that it is part of an anti— collective bias that exists out there — an anti— collective bias that exists out there. there are groups that make _ out there. there are groups that make bad — out there. there are groups that make bad decisions, but there are other— make bad decisions, but there are other expeditions for it — your other— other expeditions for it — your other guest indicated why, because what's _ other guest indicated why, because what's going on with some of the groups— what's going on with some of the groups is— what's going on with some of the groups is not that they are making poor decisions because they are a group, _ poor decisions because they are a group, but — poor decisions because they are a group, but because of the particular norms— group, but because of the particular norms within that group, the particular— norms within that group, the particular values, the identity of that group that leads them to agree with each— that group that leads them to agree with each other. just that group that leads them to agree with each other.— with each other. just to separate the scientists _ with each other. just to separate the scientists from _ with each other. just to separate the scientists from the _ with each other. just to separate | the scientists from the politicians at this point, your concern is that
8:15 pm
maybe it covers up the fact that some politicians had a perspective which comes from their politics that, perhaps being against lockdown and nand state —— nanny state —ism, worried about the concept of the government banning people from doing things, that might have made them reticent to act in a particular way? it can be used that way. it's a bit like when — it can be used that way. it's a bit like when you go into court, if you are accused — like when you go into court, if you are accused of writing and you say, "well, _ are accused of writing and you say, "well, i_ are accused of writing and you say, "well, igot — are accused of writing and you say, "well, i got swept up in the crowd, i did "well, i got swept up in the crowd, i did make — "well, i got swept up in the crowd, i did make a — "well, i got swept up in the crowd, i did make a personal decision to do this, i_ i did make a personal decision to do this, i got— i did make a personal decision to do this, i got carried away." it's not your— this, i got carried away." it's not your fault— this, i got carried away." it's not your fault as _ this, i got carried away." it's not your fault as an individual, it's a group _ your fault as an individual, it's a group process that is to blame. let me group process that is to blame. me bring it group process that is to blame. let me bring it back it is a political — a lot of these decisions were political in the end, ministers say they followed the science but in the end, they had to makejudgements, that's the price to pay for leadership, isn't it? absolutely. and they had — leadership, isn't it? absolutely. and they had to _ leadership, isn't it? absolutely. and they had to balance - leadership, isn't it? absolutely. and they had to balance two - leadership, isn't it? absolutely. | and they had to balance two bad
8:16 pm
situations — on one hand, the pandemic, and the illnesses in the death, and the other is the economic damage they knew would come from lockdown. ., ,., ., ., , ., ~ lockdown. how soon do you think we can move on — lockdown. how soon do you think we can move on from _ lockdown. how soon do you think we can move on from this _ lockdown. how soon do you think we can move on from this experience? i can move on from this experience? heard your report into h1 in one, we had the whole pandemic exercise. the government carried out in 2016 designed to test out our ability to respond to a major public health crisis of some kind, because we all got distracted by terrorism in the years before, like that would be the source of our problems — how do we ensure we don't find ourselves in a similar situation again. ensure we don't find ourselves in a similarsituation again. 7 i ensure we don't find ourselves in a similar situation again. 7— similar situation again. 7 i think that's the question _ similar situation again. 7 i think that's the question that - similar situation again. 7 i think that's the question that needs l similar situation again. 7 i think| that's the question that needs to similar situation again. 7 i think - that's the question that needs to be answered by the public inquiry, and that will be the main task of the inquiry, to look at what went wrong and to make recommendations at how it should be made better in the future. i have to say... sarri.
8:17 pm
havin: future. i have to say... sarri. having done _ future. i have to say... sarri. having done my _ future. i have to say... sarri. having done my report - future. i have to say... sarri. having done my report and l future. i have to say... sarri. - having done my report and taking some time over it, i was disappointed, quite seriously disappointed, quite seriously disappointed that some of the lessons that i had pointed out were not taken up by government at the time. �* , ., ~' not taken up by government at the time. �* ,, ~' ., , time. and you think it would be worth some _ time. and you think it would be worth some dusting down - time. and you think it would be worth some dusting down the l time. and you think it would be - worth some dusting down the report again when they look at the public inquiry and see where some of these things have been repeated? repeated, es indeed. things have been repeated? repeated, yes indeed- to — things have been repeated? repeated, yes indeed. to be _ things have been repeated? repeated, yes indeed. to be absurdly _ things have been repeated? repeated, yes indeed. to be absurdly fair, - yes indeed. to be absurdly fair, this pandemic was something on a scale and seriousness that had not been experienced before, particularly in this country —— absolutely fair. and there was quite absolutely fair. and there was quite a lot about this virus which is not known at the time some of these decisions had to be taken. it was not known that you could have asymptomatic transmissibility, for asymptomatic tra nsmissibility, for instance. asymptomatic transmissibility, for instance. i think if that had been known, and if indeed a faster test
8:18 pm
and trace had been set up, and particularly if the abilities and experience, and the know—how of local directors of public health and their teams had been brought in much earlier, that would've helped. particularly, we have plenty of experience in this country, going back decades in terms of using those local directors of public health as the chief medical officers in local areas to take actions. let me ask you finally what would hope most might be learned as we move into the public inquiry stage7 as we hope to move into it sooner rather than later? ., , ., . later? one of the things i noticed in the report _ later? one of the things i noticed in the report today _ later? one of the things i noticed in the report today was _ later? one of the things i noticed in the report today was the - later? one of the things i noticed in the report today was the lack l later? one of the things i noticed | in the report today was the lack of learning from other countries, other countries _ learning from other countries, other countries that have been often more successful— countries that have been often more successful than britain. it's not down _ successful than britain. it's not
8:19 pm
down to— successful than britain. it's not down to groupthink, it's down to british— down to groupthink, it's down to british exceptionalism. the belief, it seems, — british exceptionalism. the belief, it seems, that the british and the uk government don't need to listen — because _ uk government don't need to listen — because in— uk government don't need to listen — because in fact, we could've learned a lot from _ because in fact, we could've learned a lot from some other countries that were quicker to respond in the uk was _ were quicker to respond in the uk was. . ~' were quicker to respond in the uk was. . ~ , ., were quicker to respond in the uk was. . ~ i., were quicker to respond in the uk was. . ~ ,. y were quicker to respond in the uk was. . ~ , . was. thank you both very much indeed for bein: was. thank you both very much indeed for being with — was. thank you both very much indeed for being with this _ was. thank you both very much indeed for being with this evening. _ sport now — and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's tulsen. hello, good evening. three home nations are in qualifying action this weekend. england are at home to hungary. they trail to a penalty in the first half, hungry are 1— zero up with around 32 minutes played. scotland and group f are looking to build on that last win, israel on saturday. they are way to the fair islands, no score on that one. and no score in the game
8:20 pm
between bulgaria and northern ireland — they play in sophia. announcing her squad today, england head coach serena wiegman has spoken of her excitement of the women's team playing their first competitive game at wembley this month, one of two world cup qualifiers coming up. they play northern ireland there on 23 october, before travelling to latvia three days later. 0bviously obviously it is very, very special to play at wembley. and yes, although i'm very excited, i'm also calm because we played another match and we just want to play really well and we just want to play really well and have a good win. and if people who come to watch us have a very nice evening and enjoy themselves, and also people who watch on the tv enjoy themselves, then we will be happy. yet, just a special occasion because you are playing at wembley. it's a busy few months for england's cricketers. the white ball squad are in oman hoping to add the t20 title to the 50—over world cup. but with the ashes on the horizon
8:21 pm
too, all rounder chrisjordan says there's no danger of the players becoming distracted. the ashes is quite a big event, as well, and it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on around it. so all the talking and dissecting of it is pretty normal in this day and age now. i can firmly say that everyone involved in the squad, everyone here is fully focused on the task at hand. now to snooker, where three—time defending champion judd trump has eased into the second round of the northern ireland 0pen without his opponent scoring a point. trump won all four frames against china's gao yang, who couldn't get a footing at the table in belfast, and the englishman will now play another chinese player, lu ning, for a place in the last 16. olympic and european champion katie archibald will headline a 19 strong gb squad at the up coming track cycling world championships. having collected three golds at the last week's european championships and gold
8:22 pm
in the maddison at the tokyo 0lympics, she heads up the team in roubaix in france. the 27—year—old will be joined by fellow 0lympic silver medallists neah evans and josie knight in the women's endurance squad, while academy riders megan barker and ella barnwell make their world debuts. the board will assess the financial viability, the board will assess the financial viabili , , ., ., , ., viability, strength of opposition, and scheduling _ viability, strength of opposition, and scheduling in _ viability, strength of opposition, and scheduling in weighing - viability, strength of opposition, and scheduling in weighing up i viability, strength of opposition, l and scheduling in weighing up the merits of studying that women's equivalent to a men's side that's been taught since 1888. the nfl has confirmed that dusseldorf, frankfurt, and munich are the three german cities in talks to stage regular season games. the move is part of a bid to expand its international operation into mainland europe. germany willjoin the uk, which has successfully hosted games in london since 2007. the league is due to play its 30th game in the capital on sunday, when the jacksonville jaguars face the miami dolphins at tottenham hotspur stadium.
8:23 pm
and that is all the sport for now, but everything else, including those world cup qualifiers at the bbc sport website. but that's all i have for now, back to you. all he has asked mike that was very generous. tulsen tollett, thank you very much. matt hancock has been appointed as un... from the united nations. mister hancock announced on twitter that he was honoured to take up the new role. you'll continue to serve as a of parliament. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit an all—time high. the latest official figures show that 1.1 million jobs were available between july and september. the retail sector and motor vehicle repair businesses were among those with a sharp rise in jobs to fill — as our business editor simonjack reports. help wanted. across the uk, there are a record
8:24 pm
1.1millionjob vacancies. this large food wholesaler and distributor is seeing fierce competition to attract and retain staff. all around here there is all different companies recruiting at the same time. we have recruited over the last four months 700 people. but on the other side, 400 people have gone to work for other companies. so, we've gone up in training costs, we've got 15%—20% labour costs that we've increased. on top of that, retention bonuses. everything isjust making it really difficult for us to service our customers. brakes is training some of its workers, like dean, to move out of the warehouse and behind the wheel, where the shortages are acute and the terms on offer are getting more attractive. it makes you feel appreciated, you know? i think for a long while, drivers haven't been appreciated as much as they should have been. and i think the industry now has realised that, to retain people, you have to offer the right money. higher pay offers in sectors like this are evident in today's report. average wages are 6%
8:25 pm
higher than last year. but that was when many workers were on furlough or reduced hours. if you adjust for that, wage rises are closer to 4%, higher than inflation, which is currently at 3.2%, but that is expected to rise. it's notjust the wage bill that is going up in companies like this. there is the fuel costs in the supply chain, soaring energy bills to heat or cool their buildings. all of that will feed through into higher prices, inevitably, which means inflation will offset some of the wage rise that some people are getting, and make life very difficult for those that aren't getting them. construction is also feeling the squeeze. firms are poaching staff from each other with offers of more money. but paying more doesn't mean walls get built any faster. talk me through the programme? the boss of this construction firm says they are having to pay more, but they're not getting more productivity bang for the higher wage buck. in order for businesses to be sustainable, and to grow, particularly as a small business, we need our productivity to be
8:26 pm
reflected in the increase in wages that we're paying. the government said it wants a high—wage, higher skill economy. at the moment, there is only evidence of the first part of that. one very encouraging aspect of today's release was the low level of redundancy notices firms are issuing. elaine fears that the end of the furlough scheme at the end of september would trigger an immediate rise injob losses. the government will argue that means the furlough scheme was £70 billion well spent. simon jack, bbc news. and we'll be talking a little bit about implications for those looking for a job and those helping to train them in a discussion in a few minutes here on bbc news. stay with us for that. the brexit minister, lord frost, has called for significant changes to the northern ireland protocol. in a speech to diplomats in portugal, he described his new legal text as "a better way forward". as it stands, the protocol that was agreed by both the uk
8:27 pm
and the eu ensures there's no need for checks along the land border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. that agreement meant northern ireland continuing to follow eu rules on product standards. instead, checks would take place on goods entering northern ireland from england, scotland, or wales, with inspections taking place at northern ireland ports. but that's prompted criticism that a new border has effectively been created in the irish sea. the uk also wants to change the role the european court ofjustice, the eu's highest court, has in overseeing all of this. lord frost said today his proposed text would amend the ni protocol and support the good friday agreement. the protocol is not working. it's completely lost consent in one community in northern ireland. it's not doing the thing it was set up to do 7 protect the belfast (good friday) agreement. in fact, it's doing the opposite. it has to change.
8:28 pm
they are expected on wednesday so we will know tomorrow how they are responding to this. we can speak now to stephen kelly, the chief executive of manufacturing ni. he represents manufacturing businesses in northern ireland. thank you very much for talking to us. what are the members of your organisation manufacturing, saying to you about how it's working now? we are several months into this experience of applying the protocol after the transition period from the european union — how are they finding it, how is it changing things? finding it, how is it changing thins? �* , finding it, how is it changing thins? v , finding it, how is it changing thins? �*, , ., f. things? it's been a difficult experience. _ things? it's been a difficult experience. these - things? it's been a difficult experience. these new - things? it's been a difficult _ experience. these new arrangements arrived on the first of january, and it was a bit of a shock to the system for money. many who would bring goods across from great britain and northern ireland — equally. there's many people out
8:29 pm
there seeing opportunities created by this. for instance, trade on the island of ireland between derry and further afield has actually increased by 77% this year. so for many, there's been some benefit, but for everyone there's been and some considerable pain. the for everyone there's been and some considerable pain.— considerable pain. the whole . uestion considerable pain. the whole question of. _ considerable pain. the whole question of, i— considerable pain. the whole question of, i know - considerable pain. the whole question of, i know there's . considerable pain. the whole i question of, i know there's been this debate about the amount of checks, how the checks take place, how much form filling is required — has any of that settled down? the onl thin has any of that settled down? tie: only thing that's has any of that settled down? tte: only thing that's really has any of that settled down? "tte: only thing that's really settled has any of that settled down? t'te: only thing that's really settled is that people have gotten used to the rhythm of the requirements. but that doesn't take away the pain that's actually developed for business. the way that the border works in areas is stage one, a very simple fight process, basic information about what's moving, when it's moving, what's moving, when it's moving, what vehicle it's in, etc. that's followed up by supplementary declarations, at least 25 separate data fuels a very... that's a huge
8:30 pm
and ministry of burden. those people are playing international with the eu... the majority of businesses and northern ireland will trade only within northern ireland or back into the rest of the uk, and for those people, there's all the pain but none of the positivity here. fin people, there's all the pain but none of the positivity here. on the other side. — none of the positivity here. on the other side. i _ none of the positivity here. on the other side, i suppose _ none of the positivity here. on the other side, i suppose you - none of the positivity here. on the other side, i suppose you can - none of the positivity here. on the other side, i suppose you can see| other side, i suppose you can see the difficulty of the eu of other member countries also in the single market, saying, "hang on a second, if this isn't policed correctly, what's to prevent products being brought into the european union, effectively via britain that undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our sinale undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our single biggest — undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our single biggest benefit _ undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our single biggest benefit of— undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our single biggest benefit of being - undercut manufacturers. 7 that's our single biggest benefit of being part . single biggest benefit of being part of the european union, access to that single market, that free circulation of goods. in northern ireland they have that currently. it's the biggest worry and our biggest concern because our biggest benefit they'll actually have. of
8:31 pm
the protocol is that belfast is the most usual external border outside the eu, there's a reason it came to within common terms of the protocol to protect the good friday agreement, to ensure that trade on the island continues to flow with no disruptions to normal lives across the border. so belfast and calais are completely different.- are completely different. clearly both sides have _ are completely different. clearly both sides have positions - are completely different. clearly both sides have positions and i are completely different. clearly i both sides have positions and there will be negotiations, hopefully they come to something so we get a bit of the sound and fury this week and hopefully move together. but what recommendations would you make? your organisation has looked at it, how would you change it. 7 ittrui’ith organisation has looked at it, how would you change it. 7— organisation has looked at it, how would you change it. 7 with not “ust look at it, we've i would you change it. 7 with not “ust look at it, we've collectively i look at it, we've collectively joined with colleagues across northern ireland who engage deeply with the uk government. just ten days ago we sent a very detailed report to both the uk and eu to
8:32 pm
inform the type of position and the type of conversations we will have in the coming weeks. the really practical idea is that only business can deliver. this won't be sorted just by change to the european rules or changes to the uk legislative package. some of this will have to be delivered by businesses themselves and businesses are willing to claim that part. this is a very pragmatic part of what's been agreed. they want simplicity around how they can actually function in this environment. all we've gotten this environment. all we've gotten this week so far as accusations and ultimatums, etc, etc. we hope after that you publish the proposals tomorrow, we hope that once they see the colour of lord frost's only in terms of what happens after today, that they'll get together and be mindful of the community and the economy here in northern ireland and come to an agreement before the end of this year. .
8:33 pm
come to an agreement before the end of this year- -— of this year. . john kelly, thank ou ve of this year. . john kelly, thank you very much _ of this year. . john kelly, thank you very much -- _ of this year. . john kelly, thank you very much -- stephen i you very much —— stephen kelly, thank you very much for giving us your assessment from northern ireland of how this works, and some hope that we can get down to some practical negotiating sooner rather than later. thank you very much. the uk is not ready for the impact of climate change. that's the blunt warning from the environment agency. it says hundreds of people could die in floods unless the places where we live, work and travel are made more resilient to the increasingly violent weather. their data suggests even a small rise in global temperatures could mean by 2050 rivers could peak at levels almost 30% higher than nowadays increasing the risk of flooding hugely. but in summer a very different picture with droughts and river levels dropping dramatically which would threaten water supplies. and towards the end of the century sea levels in the thames estuary could be almost half a metre higher meaning a new, bigger thames barrier will be needed. 0ur science editor david shukman has this report. a street in cardiff became a dangerous river earlier this month after a massive downpour.
8:34 pm
it was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there. and, around the same time, london was engulfed, raising questions about how we'll cope as climate change makes the weather even more violent. but the biggest shock came in germany lastjuly, a surge of water tore through communities. 200 people were killed and the fear is of disaster here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england, and we need to be ready to save lives. we need to recognise that it's adapt or die. the environment agency is being deliberately blunt so that its recommendations are heard. for homeowners and businesses to take basic steps to make their properties safe. to restore landscapes like forests
8:35 pm
so that they hold rain water before it causes floods. and for bigger investments by governments in defences that can handle projected rises in sea levels. already the thames barrier, defending london, is being closed far more often than planned — a trend that will continue as the polar ice keeps melting, raising the height of the oceans. with its network of tunnels under the river, the barrier was designed decades ago and may not be big enough in future. the great steel gates are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster, which is why climate change matters so much here. they're constantly watching the projections for how much the sea is going to rise, and it's also why we'll probably need a bigger barrier by 2070.
8:36 pm
but some stretches of the coast are not so lucky. homes in norfolk are being lost to the sea. the environment agency says it can't protect everyone. but since last year, when i met lorna bevan thompson, a local business owner, the waves have come much nearer. they're saying we've got billions of money available but it's not coming to us and our coastline is getting eroded daily, and it's irreparable damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will be too little water. a growing population and drier summers will strain supplies. the government says it is preparing the country for a more turbulent climate and it wants world leaders to discuss the risks when they meet at the un summit in glasgow next month. david shukman, bbc news. more now on the report accusing the government of overseeing "one of the most important public health failures" during the initial
8:37 pm
outbreak in england. sophie hutchinson has been getting reaction to the report from some of those who've been most affected by the pandemic. some light relief in nottingham this afternoon. butjust months ago, care home residents were among the worst hit by the pandemic, according to today's report. here, there were multiple deaths, and shortages of ppe and lack of medical support pushed staff to breaking point. it was horrendous. i think everybody was just panic stations. everybody�*sjob kind of quickly evolved from whatever they were doing, to helping out. staff were panicking. you know, some of them are very vulnerable themselves, they've got vulnerable families. it was difficult... it was extremely scary, just a huge... hugely emotional and physically draining. failure to lockdown early enough and slow the spread of the virus heaped huge pressure on the nhs and its staff, like mark,
8:38 pm
who was working in a&e. what was it about the british government that meant they thought we were invincible to this thing? you know, it was infuriating seeing borisjohnson on tv early on saying, "oh, i shook hands with everyone." it was completely against all the guidance that was out at the time, and it was almost making a joke out of it. it was infuriating, you know? that was entirely the wrong message. safiah ngah's father, who was 68 with no underlying health conditions, was one of a significant number of people from black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds to die in the pandemic. mps said today said it's a result of the inequalities in our society. he had never been ill in my living memory, so it was his first time in hospital. and it was terrifying. the government has actually spoken about levelling up, and about leaving no community behind, i think was the words that they used.
8:39 pm
but that's very vague. we really need to see actual change. but while mps have called the government's early response to the virus one of the worst public health failures, they've praised the vaccination programme as one of the best initiatives. paul lutrell, who has cancer, got covid—19, despite being vaccinated. but his doctors told him the jab actually saved his life. after surviving the cancer scare, and still having it, knowing that my life is maybe shorter, getting covid was sort of the icing on the cake, really. you know, to survive that, and the staff, the nurses... because i had had my virus injections, i had that chance, you know? it gave me the support of my body needed. without it, it would have killed me. but while many have recovered from the virus and are now protected by the vaccine, millions of others are still coming
8:40 pm
to terms with the profound effect it's had on them, and the lives of their loved ones. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the former little mix singer, jesy neslon, says she never intended to cause offence in her new music video after being accused of so called �*blackfishing' when a non black person tries to appear black. the star denies using fake tan and insists her hair is naturally curly. she said her new video is intended to be a celebration of a type of music that she loves. lizo mzimba reports. # shout out to my ex, you're really quite the man...# for almost a decade, jesy nelson was part of little mix, one of music's biggest groups. she left at the end of 2020, saying that being part of the group had taken a toll on her mental health. in the video, for her first eagerly
8:41 pm
anticipated solo release, she appears heavily tanned, with a range of wigs showing different hairstyles, sometimes with braids. it's been criticised by some, saying that she's been taking on stereotypically black characteristics, and that it's wrong for white people to profit from adopting them — a practice that's being called "blackfishing". my intention was never, ever to offend people of colour with this video. that actually does really hurt me that i may have offended people, and actually, like, hurt people's feelings just by genuinely celebrating something that i love. nelson says she intended to celebrate 1990s and 2000s hip—hop and r&b. she added that fake tan and make—up wasn't the reason for her darker appearance. i want people to know that when i was in the video, i didn't even have any fake tan on. i've been in antigua prior to that for three weeks.
8:42 pm
and i'm just really lucky, as a white girl, that when i'm in the sun i tan so dark. she's been defended by global music star nicki minaj, who also appears in the video. jesy nelson hoped that many would be talking about her first solo effort. but right now it's for reasons that she never intended. lizo mzimba, bbc news. let's speak now to emma dabiri social historian and author she is written about blackfishing and gives more details about the criticism being levelled atjosie nelson. in criticism being levelled at josie nelson. ., . , ., nelson. in the video which is about bad bo s, nelson. in the video which is about bad boys. it _ nelson. in the video which is about bad boys. it is _ nelson. in the video which is about bad boys, it is jesy _ nelson. in the video which is about bad boys, it is jesy turning - nelson. in the video which is about bad boys, it is jesy turning up i nelson. in the video which is about bad boys, it is jesy turning up with | bad boys, it isjesy turning up with a crew of racially ambiguous women and shows a lot of black man and kind of glaze into a stereotype, a negative stereotype about black men. and she uses the word hood, and taboo and her new look, i don't know
8:43 pm
if people remember her from the x factor but she looks very different. she has had some work done, turned herface, has a curly she has had some work done, turned her face, has a curly weave, etc and those two things combined left people feeling uncomfortable after watching the video. it's quite interesting what she said. she is booking about these blackfishing accusations a couple of times in the past and said that she has never said that she is not a white woman which i think whether purposely or not the kind of misses the point. because blackfishing is not necessarily about a lying outright about your heritage, it's about appearing racially ambiguous rather than pretending that you are actually black. she won a instagram live yesterday with dickenmann eyes were she said she apologised if she cause any offence but that she was trying to appreciate rather than appropriate black culture.
8:44 pm
more now on the number ofjob vacancies in the uk hitting an all time high. the latest official figures show that 1.1 million jobs were available between july and september. yet at the same time there's a persistent level of unemployment. a bit of a paradox here. why is of the jobs are available but the people who are available or not rights to fill thejobs7 with me isjeremy hara who is a construction tutor at bishop burton college in east yorkshire. also i'm joined by daniel greenwood who is doing a level two bricklaying apprenticeship at the same college. welcome to you both. daniel, can i ask you first what was the attraction for you of going for a bricklaying apprenticeship7 ittrui’eiiii attraction for you of going for a bricklaying apprenticeship? well it was mainly give — bricklaying apprenticeship? well it was mainly give it _ bricklaying apprenticeship? well it was mainly give it to _ bricklaying apprenticeship? well it was mainly give it to be _ bricklaying apprenticeship? well it was mainly give it to be honest i bricklaying apprenticeship? -tt it was mainly give it to be honest when i first started i was mainly give it to be honest when ifirst started i did not what was mainly give it to be honest when i first started i did not what i wanted to do. ijust wanted an outsidejob with some wanted to do. ijust wanted an outside job with some good money. so
8:45 pm
i decided i would do bricklaying and see if i like it, i really enjoyed it and i learned that quite quickly. i did a year in level one full time and then onto an apprenticeship which gave me the opportunity to do a competition called world skills and that's where you compete with other apprentices around the country and complete a well within a certain amount of time. and whoever has the most accurate well will go through to the final which is what i managed to the final which is what i managed to do. it gives me four days to do another competition to do more
8:46 pm
pretences in the country. i feel like it would be good for my cv to do well in it. like it would be good for my cv to do well in it— do well in it. jeremy, let me ask you since _ do well in it. jeremy, let me ask you since you — do well in it. jeremy, let me ask you since you are _ do well in it. jeremy, let me ask you since you are involved i do well in it. jeremy, let me ask you since you are involved in i do well in it. jeremy, let me askl you since you are involved in the, having to run the apprenticeship schemes the sort of thing that he is doing right now, what is the demand at the moment, how much interest is there in some of the skills and secondly where are the shortage is coming from? i hearfrom construction companies that they just can't find talented young people like daniel already in the trade to actually do the jobs. there's so many people who are leaving for retirement who have not got people like daniel to fill the jobs. it's an issue really... brute got people like daniel to fill the jobs. it's an issue really... we are still having _ jobs. it's an issue really... we are still having problems _ jobs. it's an issue really... we are still having problems with - jobs. it's an issue really... we are still having problems with your i still having problems with your sound, let me go back to daniel. 0ne sound, let me go back to daniel. one of the thingsjeremy
8:47 pm
sound, let me go back to daniel. one of the things jeremy was telling sound, let me go back to daniel. one of the thingsjeremy was telling our of the things jeremy was telling our producers when he spoke to her before this interview earlier this evening was that pei has gone from about 20p of brick to 75 pence a brick. were you surprised when you discovered how well—paid this could be if you get the qualification and if you are prepared to put in the hours? , . , , , , hours? yes, it was quite surprising to think that _ hours? yes, it was quite surprising to think that you _ hours? yes, it was quite surprising to think that you could _ hours? yes, it was quite surprising to think that you could earn - hours? yes, it was quite surprising to think that you could earn up i to think that you could earn up to £450 injust a day to think that you could earn up to £450 in just a day if you are quick brick layer and a good bricklayer. i decided not to go with being paid by the brick but more by the hour. just so i can produce better quality piece of work that a customer would want and want to look at instead of a new build where itjust has been thrown up as quick as possible and no one looks at it. i was not
8:48 pm
particularly worried about the money in that aspect, i just wanted to particularly worried about the money in that aspect, ijust wanted to do something that i enjoyed and could look back at and think, i did that. do you think our attitudes has started, or will have to change like jobs on construction sites? a lot of british people have not been interested in them and haven't felt that they needed to be interested because there has been a good pool of talented labour much of it coming from a continental europe which has filled that demand. and so the parents assent to the look elsewhere. do you think we will have to readdress our attitudes? definitely... primary school children _ definitely... primary school children and planting the seed therem —
8:49 pm
children and planting the seed there... �* , �* �* ~ , children and planting the seed there... �* fl �* . , , there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this, — there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this. we _ there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this, we are _ there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this, we are have _ there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this, we are have the - there... inaudible. i'm really sorry about this, we are have the same i about this, we are have the same problems. i'm going to go back to daniel, trying to put the same point you were hoping to make to daniel. thank you ever so much for bearing with us and you have been very patient as we are trying to get this to work. daniel, when you look to the future, now that you have been going on to sites and doing and talking to other people in the industry, meeting some of the older quys industry, meeting some of the older guys and women who work there, it do you get the sense that this is going to prepare you well for what you will face when you a full—time bricklayer? will face when you a full-time bricklayer?— will face when you a full-time brickla er? , , �* ., , bricklayer? definitely. being able to seak bricklayer? definitely. being able to speak to _ bricklayer? definitely. being able to speak to the _ bricklayer? definitely. being able to speak to the people _ bricklayer? definitely. being able to speak to the people who i bricklayer? definitely. being able to speak to the people who have | bricklayer? definitely. being able i to speak to the people who have been doing it for years and years they can tell you the proper way to do a job and little tips and tricks to make a job easierfor you job and little tips and tricks to make a job easier for you and the safest way. if it wasn't for them i
8:50 pm
wouldn't have learned anywhere near what i have learned now.— what i have learned now. thank you very much- — what i have learned now. thank you very much- good — what i have learned now. thank you very much. good luck— what i have learned now. thank you very much. good luck with - what i have learned now. thank you very much. good luck with the i what i have learned now. thank you very much. good luck with the rest| very much. good luck with the rest of the apprenticeship and also with the competition and you will hopefully have the pride one day of being able to look at buildings and say, yeah, i did that, i built that, i was part of that. it is my great granddad was actually that and we found plenty, in 1925 he had one with his name scratch on it which was on a road down in devon. for us it was a big sense of pride and may be for your kids and grandchildren it will do the same. thank you both very much. daniel green
8:51 pm
the brexit minister, lord frost, has called for significant changes to the northern ireland protocol. catherine bernard is professor eu law and cambridge. always a pleasure to speak to you and pick some of the stuff. is this a bit of a preemptive strike by lord frost? t stuff. is this a bit of a preemptive strike by lord frost?— strike by lord frost? i think that must be right. _ strike by lord frost? i think that must be right. the _ strike by lord frost? i think that must be right. the governmentl strike by lord frost? i think that i must be right. the government did put this on proposals back injuly and the eu was given time to respond to them, and there do to respond to them tomorrow as you said. slightly unclear white lord frost got started today, perhaps he wanted to get his defence in first. and it was a pretty robust speech that he gave making pretty clear that he did not think the northern ireland protocol was working. $1150 think the northern ireland protocol was working-— think the northern ireland protocol was workinu. �* ., ., ,, , was working. also heard from stephen kell “ust was working. also heard from stephen kelly just now —
8:52 pm
was working. also heard from stephen kellyjust now from _ was working. also heard from stephen kellyjust now from manufacturing, i kellyjust now from manufacturing, and he said that the big differences are from companies able to export products over the border, effectively i know it's not a physical border but the border between the european, between northern ireland and the republic of ireland and since both places are in the single market. and the losers have been those exporting or perhaps importing from great britain. you can see from the british point of view why this is not working. that's ri . ht. the view why this is not working. that's right- the thing _ view why this is not working. that's right. the thing is _ view why this is not working. that's right. the thing is there _ view why this is not working. that's right. the thing is there was i view why this is not working. that's right. the thing is there was the i right. the thing is there was the thing to be called the brexit dilemma. there had to be a border somewhere if we left this single market and the customs union. theresa may we would stay in the cost of eating and then boris johnson said we would not have any of that and also that would not have a board up in the north of ireland and the south which would violate the good friday agreement. they said it was an east—west border, the
8:53 pm
border between gb and northern ireland. that's what they say is not working. we should not be having checks, he said he did not want a border which dissected, bisected his own country. and he said we have got to rip this up and start again. he has sent a draught text to the eu and that draught text he said he would like the eu to adopt which replace the northern ireland particle already in existence. it's really important that we get rid of the text and remember a text negotiated less than two years ago by borisjohnson and david frost. and replace it with the new one to we don't know what is in the new one but good idea. from what he said in the summer. but replace it with what the summer. but replace it with what the uk wants and crucially he says the uk wants and crucially he says the uk wants rid of any role for the european court ofjustice.-
8:54 pm
european court ofjustice. which is not european court ofjustice. which is rrot actually _ european court ofjustice. which is not actually played _ european court ofjustice. which is not actually played any _ european court ofjustice. which is not actually played any role i european court ofjustice. which is not actually played any role as i european court ofjustice. which is not actually played any role as of. not actually played any role as of yet? not actually played any role as of et? , , ., , ,., , yet? this is the thing, absolutely northern ireland _ yet? this is the thing, absolutely northern ireland protocol- yet? this is the thing, absolutely northern ireland protocol says i yet? this is the thing, absolutely i northern ireland protocol says there is a role for the european court of justice but has not heard any cases in what we did discover today from the speech from lord frost is that he remembered de wanted to start enforcement proceedings? go back in time and this is back in march. because we had unilaterally extended some of the grace periods over checks over things like sausages, started proceedings against us which would have ended up at the court of justice add that clearly upset lord frost, he refers to it today and says this is unacceptable. it’s frost, he refers to it today and says this is unacceptable. it's a very interesting _ says this is unacceptable. it's a very interesting to _ says this is unacceptable. it's a very interesting to see - says this is unacceptable. it's a very interesting to see how i says this is unacceptable. it's a very interesting to see how the commission response to this tomorrow. i know we will talk again about this, brexit is never really over. catherine bernard there of the university of cambridge. the queen has attended a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey to mark the
8:55 pm
centenary of the royal british legion. the queen, who's 95, used a walking stick as she arrived and left the abbey the first time she has done so at a major public event. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports. good morning, your majesty. arriving at westminster abbey, the queen was handed a walking stick by her daughter, princess anne. at the age of 95, few would blame herfor needing a little extra support. servicemen and women of many conflicts came together to pay tribute to an organisation that has supported them and those before them for 100 years. to the factory where 400 disabled men are working comes her majesty, the queen, to give them royal encouragement. the work of the british legion has had the backing of royalty since it was founded. it's an early mission was to fight for the rights of those who had given so much, but came back to so little. and even now, that mission remains the same.
8:56 pm
but it is mental health support that so many veterans now seek. naomi hall is one of them. she served with the raf in afghanistan and says that the british legion saved her life. we don't often see the realities of what it does to us. i think we've all grown up with grandparents that served where, they go through something so dreadful and they don't speak about it. so to have somebody to speak about it and be willing to talk about it gives people information they didn't have previously. after the service, the queen left via the poet's yard door, a shorter walk for her than her usual route through the abbey. age may slowly catch up with many of us, but the motto of the royal british legion has endured — service, not self. daniela relph, bbc news, westminster abbey. 0ne lucky ticket holder could be
8:57 pm
on the verge of the biggest lottery win in history if they scoop tonight's euromillions draw. there's an estimated jackpot of £184 million that's more than 5,000 times the average salary in the uk, and enough to buy 340 average priced properties in london. it is not going to be me. now time for a look at the weather. good evening. for many places it was a predominantly cloudy affair and we take a lot of clout with us through the night and into tomorrow. through the night and into tomorrow. through the small hours of wednesday it outbreaks of rain are going to push across the far north of the onslaught of drizzle but we have cloud elsewhere, submits an american health fog. this guys do clear for any length of time in the south and southeast, to purchase will drop away. parts of east anglia down to two degrees tomorrow morning. through tomorrow i gained extensive
8:58 pm
thought for many in places that producing the odd pocket of a light rain or drizzle but the cloud should break at times. parts northern ireland, england and wales will see some sunny glances at times. top temperatures for most of us between 14 and 17 degrees. to thursday we are going to see some rain pushing southwards across scotland, windy here as well, drier further south and to end the week things are going to turn a little bit colder for all of us.
8:59 pm
9:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm christian fraser. the british government's bungled response to covid was one of the worst public health failures the country has ever seen — the verdict of two commitees chaired by conservatives. their damning report says thousands died because too little was done at the start of the pandemic by ministers and scientists who'd decided the virus could not be effectively suppressed. britain's brexit minister says the eu must renegotiate parts of the deal relating to northern ireland, to avert the risk it poses to the good friday agreement. a grisly conclusion to a story that captivated the world — a coroner has confirmed that gabby petito died from strangulation. herformer boyfriend is still missing. and texas showdown — the governor, greg abbot, has signed an order banning all vaccine mandates which the president had imposed on all federal workers

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on