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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  October 12, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. 620 leaders of the world's richest nations pledge more aid to afghanistan which is facing economic collapse. translation: to stand by and watch 40 translation: to stand by and watch a0 million people because electricity cannot be supplied to no financial system exists... the eu promised over a billion dollars in support but stressed the aid wouldn't go to the taliban directly. also in the programme: british mps accuse the government of one of the worst public health failures in history in their initial pandemic response. in the first half we had some serious errors, we could've avoided
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a lockdown but having to get into the position we should have locked down earlier. the the position we should have locked down earlier.— down earlier. the report highlight successes to _ down earlier. the report highlight successes to calling _ down earlier. the report highlight successes to calling britain's - successes to calling britain's vaccination roll—outs one of the most effective initiatives in uk history. and white british singerjesy nelson is accused of pretending she denies it in what's called a black fishing row. a 620 summit involving leaders from the world's richest nations has promised more help for afghanistan though this doesn't mean recognising the taliban as the afghan government. here's the un secretary general. we need to find ways to make the economy read that again. and this can't be done without violating international laws or compromising
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principles. we must seek ways to create the conditions that will allow afghan professionals and civil servants to continue working to serve the afghan population. i urge the world to take action and inject liquidity into the afghan economy to avoid collapse. the 620 summit was hosted by italy. it focused on shoring up the fragile afghan economy. when the taliban tookover in august, the us and other donors suspended aid. we can assess the impact of that decision when we consider that in 2019 foreign aid accounted for 75% of government spending. and as well as being short of cash, $9bn of afghanistan's foreign currency reserves have been frozen so the taliban can't access them. as part of the g20 commitments, the eu has promised a 1.1 billion dollar support package. also at the summit, germany
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said it wasn't prepared to recognise the taliban as afg hanistan�*s government. here's chancellor angela merkel. translation: to stand by and watch ao translation: to stand by and watch a0 middling people into case because electricity can't be supplied and note financial system exists that cannot and should not be the goal of the international community. the issue of getting aid to afghanistan is acute. banks are running out of cash and civil servants are not being paid. meanwhile food and fuel prices are soaring. four million afghans live in kabul. here are some residents there. translation: under the previous government that bizarre situation was good and people used to buy vegetables a lot.— vegetables a lot. another not many customers — vegetables a lot. another not many customers. since _ vegetables a lot. another not many customers. since the _ vegetables a lot. another not many customers. since the arrival - vegetables a lot. another not many customers. since the arrival of - vegetables a lot. another not many customers. since the arrival of the | customers. since the arrival of the islamic_ customers. since the arrival of the islamic emirate i believe that all our colleagues have been unemployed. meanwhile _ our colleagues have been unemployed. meanwhile our salaries have not been paid by— meanwhile our salaries have not been paid by the _ meanwhile our salaries have not been paid by the government. therefore my wrist quest— paid by the government. therefore my wrist quest to the islamic state of
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the afghanistan is to pay our salaries _ the afghanistan is to pay our salaries first because the people live in poverty. the situation for afghans was difficult well before the taliban takeover. as well as conflict, a severe drought and the coronavirus pandemic has left many struggling to feed theirfamilies according to the un food programme iam afghans or a third of the population are facing hunger, two million are children. many of them are in camps like this one in kandahar. according to the un, one in two children under five are at risk of starvation. jan egeland is the secretary general of the norwegian refugee council and was in kabul last week. this is his assessment of the situation. i'v e i've been to afghanistan many times and there has always been a crisis there the war, the displacement, the violence and the drought and disasters. at this time was different. there was really a free
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form in the economy. there is no income, there is no money, there is no economic activity at the moment because of the dramatic political changes, the new tele— band government and the sanctions and the freezing of international aid. what i think now actually in saving lives situation, i sat down in the camps around kabul and they are representative of how millions and millions of afghans now live. i spoke to the women there and of course it was concerned about girls education and women's right to work but what they were telling me was what we haven't had girls education for a very long time. we haven't had work for a very long time. but we had food and we had a little bit of income in our community. now we do not have income and we do not have food. so we will starve and freeze to death this winter unless there is
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economic activity and unless there is a great surge in humanitarian aid. , aid. ., ,, ., aid. many aid groups warn the suspension — aid. many aid groups warn the suspension of _ aid. many aid groups warn the suspension of aid _ aid. many aid groups warn the suspension of aid is _ aid. many aid groups warn the suspension of aid is affecting l aid. many aid groups warn the - suspension of aid is affecting their ability to help afghans. the international organisation for migration as providing shelter for some. ~ , ., ., _, some. winter is around the corner and of course _ some. winter is around the corner and of course the _ some. winter is around the corner and of course the roads _ some. winter is around the corner and of course the roads will- some. winter is around the corner. and of course the roads will become far more difficult due to snow and ice was up so we are making sure that we can get those shelter materials really soon. in addition to that we are providing multipurpose cash was up as is also presented in your programme for liquidity in afghanistan is a significant issue at the moment and ensuring that we can put cash in afghans hands particularly of those that have been displaced. remembering that there is around 630,000 afghans that are already been displaced this year. it's critically important and of course health, the health care system is on the verge of collapse and world bank of course made that decision a few
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weeks ago. we are trying to fill those gaps wherever we can together with others in the international community. in the past week or days we've seen the telephone hold dialogue with leaguer two leaders around the world of uk and us and germany is part of game bracket nice ink tooth that would be a key step forward to try to unblock some of those funds coming in. questions before the international community really are can you do that if to a government that disease control here to the taliban which has so far not delivered on the commitments they made publicly about women's rights, about allowing girls to go to school about allowing girls to go to school about allowing girls to go to school about allowing women to go to work. of course the affairs of if that of course the affairs of if that money were to be given back, how
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would you hold them to an account on where and how it was used? both china and russia were absent from today's g 20 meeting. russia and china are of the view that the taliban is separate in the stuff of the international community waving its finger at the taliban and say you must behave like this on human rights. large parts of the rest of the international communities aid money, it's one of the few levers that they have to try and persuade the taliban administration to change their behaviour. so i think we are at the start of the process. the problem is the people of afghanistan themselves don't have the time because winter is approaching. 0ne don't have the time because winter is approaching. one of the things that was made clear at the summit is just how grave the humanitarian situation will become when winter comes.
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here in the uk inquiry has described inquiry of parliament has described the government's initial response to coronavirus in england as one of the worst failures of public health in the uk's history. it was described by two football games and two very different house. at the first up was a very serious errors. we could've avoided a lockdown but haven't gotten to a position where we had when we should've locked down earlier. fin should've locked down earlier. on that point about timing the first cases in the uk were recorded on the 3ist cases in the uk were recorded on the 31st of january 2020. but it wasn't until eight weeks later on the 23rd of march that the prime minister ordered england's national lockdown. here's a former government adviser speaking in june about speaking injune about the consequences of that delay. had speaking in june about the consequences of that delay. had we
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introduced lockdown _ consequences of that delay. had we introduced lockdown measures - consequences of that delay. had we l introduced lockdown measures earlier we would've reduced the buyers would be reduced due to saha. the we would've reduced the buyers would be reduced due to saha._ be reduced due to saha. the early oli will be reduced due to saha. the early policy will living — be reduced due to saha. the early policy will living and _ be reduced due to saha. the early policy will living and care - be reduced due to saha. the early policy will living and care more - policy will living and care more than ai,ooo policy will living and care more than ai,000 care home residents were recorded as having died of covid between march 2020 and april 2021. this is the chair of the national care association.— chair of the national care association. ., , association. the report has actually icked u- association. the report has actually picked up things — association. the report has actually picked up things with _ association. the report has actually picked up things with the _ association. the report has actually picked up things with the same - association. the report has actually| picked up things with the same from the outset that social care was an afterthought. the mentor was nhs, we have to keep it safe and we understood some of that but we did not know was that the discharge out of hospitals was actually not through testing. and they weren't safe discharges. the through testing. and they weren't safe discharges.— safe discharges. the government dela ed safe discharges. the government delayed the _ safe discharges. the government delayed the first _ safe discharges. the government delayed the first lockdown - safe discharges. the government delayed the first lockdown and i safe discharges. the governmentl delayed the first lockdown and the report says that delay because lives with her peers greg clark and committee chair behind today's findings. ladle committee chair behind today's findinus. ~ ., ., ., , findings. we thought that there was wides - read findings. we thought that there was widespread assumption _ findings. we thought that there was widespread assumption that - findings. we thought that there was widespread assumption that people| widespread assumption that people wouldn't obey it lockdown measures for a very long period of time. so
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you had to delay imposing them until almost the last possible moment so that they could have the longest effect. what we discovered in practice was that actually people were perfectly prepared to follow instructions to stay at home because they realise the importance of it. so the lockdown delay, and many of the subsequent deaths, were partly down to an under estimation of the british public. today's report also says the government's early actions amounted to "herd immunity by infection". that's something it's always denied. here s a member of government's scientific advisory committee, speaking in a personal capacity. in my understanding as that this was always doomed to fail. for two main reasons one is that it was a huge unacceptable toll not only death but
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long time just disability and illness. second is because we had wayne eating in the community it was never going to work as a strategy. this report also says that the uk did not take enough advantage of the learning being generated out of countries. his the opposition labour parties shadow health secretary. people could see what was happening in italy. _ people could see what was happening in italy, they could see what was happening in spain and germany and france _ happening in spain and germany and france. they didn't understand why we were _ france. they didn't understand why we were not locking down sooner. for example _ we were not locking down sooner. for example were fans for madrid able to fly into— example were fans for madrid able to fly into liverpool but if it up in the other— fly into liverpool but if it up in the other will ram liverpool fans would have been able to fly into madrid — would have been able to fly into madrid but to elect to watch the game _ madrid but to elect to watch the game it— madrid but to elect to watch the game it with great? other countries when _ game it with great? other countries when making decisions we work that is because _ when making decisions we work that is because we were two embarked on a strategy— is because we were two embarked on a strategy of— is because we were two embarked on a strategy of allowing the infection to run— strategy of allowing the infection to run through the population in the hope that— to run through the population in the hope that that would build up immunity. that was a catastrophic mistake — immunity. that was a catastrophic mistake. , , , , ., immunity. that was a catastrophic mistake. , ,, , ., ., mistake. despite the uk be one of the first countries _ mistake. despite the uk be one of the first countries in _ mistake. despite the uk be one of the first countries in the _ mistake. despite the uk be one of the first countries in the world - mistake. despite the uk be one of the first countries in the world to i the first countries in the world to develop a test for covid the report describe the roll—out of the test
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and trace system as slow, uncertain and trace system as slow, uncertain and often chaotic.— and often chaotic. here's greg clark aaain. we and often chaotic. here's greg clark again- we had _ and often chaotic. here's greg clark again. we had to _ and often chaotic. here's greg clark again. we had to stop _ and often chaotic. here's greg clark again. we had to stop testing - and often chaotic. here's greg clark again. we had to stop testing in - and often chaotic. here's greg clark again. we had to stop testing in the community and if you are not testing that means you do not have information as to how quickly the virus is spreading, who is getting at, how ill they are becoming. so that meant we were operating in the dark. we should have been much quicker in developing the lead that we had in developing the test into testing capacity. it’s we had in developing the test into testing capacity-— testing capacity. it's important to know that today's _ testing capacity. it's important to know that today's report - testing capacity. it's important to know that today's report did - testing capacity. it's important to | know that today's report did point out some successes. a praise the uk's vaccination programme and called the development of vaccines one of the most effective initiatives in history that would ultimately help to save millions of lives here and across the world. here isjeremy hunt again. lives here and across the world. here is jeremy hunt again. we had the vaccine — here is jeremy hunt again. we had the vaccine roll-out _ here is jeremy hunt again. we had the vaccine roll-out which - here is jeremy hunt again. we had the vaccine roll-out which we - the vaccine roll—out which we described _ the vaccine roll—out which we described as the most effective initiative — described as the most effective initiative in the history of use case — initiative in the history of use case science and public administration, the discovery of treatments which have set iti million — treatments which have set iti million lives around the world. in
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the fascinating thing in the thing that makes it very difficult to sum up that makes it very difficult to sum up in _ that makes it very difficult to sum up in one. — that makes it very difficult to sum up in one, clean sentence or instinct— up in one, clean sentence or instinct how we did is that was very often _ instinct how we did is that was very often the _ instinct how we did is that was very often the same people who were responsible for both sets of decisions. gn responsible for both sets of decisions.— responsible for both sets of decisions. ., . . ., ., decisions. on the vaccine roll-out these are the _ decisions. on the vaccine roll-out these are the latest _ decisions. on the vaccine roll-out these are the latest figures. - decisions. on the vaccine roll-out these are the latest figures. as i decisions. on the vaccine roll-outj these are the latest figures. as of sunday october the 10th of a 73% of people in the uk ever had at least one dose of the vaccine and 67% have been fully vaccinated. in the clips that we played you herjeremy hunt comparing the uk governments covid response response to a football game or two has. that is anchored some people. here's a woman from the campaign group covid—19 bereaved for justice. if campaign group covid—19 bereaved for justice. iii campaign group covid-19 bereaved for 'ustice. .., , campaign group covid-19 bereaved for 'ustice. , ., ~ campaign group covid-19 bereaved for 'ustice. , .,~ ., justice. if i can 'ust make a mention h justice. if i can 'ust make a mention of— justice. if i can just make a mention of what _ justice. if i can just make a mention of what i - justice. if i can just make a mention of what i found i justice. if i can just make a mention of what i found to | justice. if i can just make a i mention of what i found to be a despicable remark this morning from mister hunt, the former secretary of state for help that this is a game of two halves. this isn't a game, my mother didn't lose her life in a
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game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government.— because of mistakes that were made by the government. today's report is led to fresh — by the government. today's report is led to fresh calls _ by the government. today's report is led to fresh calls for _ by the government. today's report is led to fresh calls for an _ led to fresh calls for an independent public inquiry to begin immediately but the government says it will not start before the spring. here's a leader of the opposition labour party. the here's a leader of the opposition labour party-— labour party. the prime minister should take _ labour party. the prime minister should take responsibility - labour party. the prime minister. should take responsibility because the responsibility is his and he should — the responsibility is his and he should apologise. but i'd like to 'ust should apologise. but i'd like to just start — should apologise. but i'd like to just start by acknowledging just how difficult _ just start by acknowledging just how difficult today this will be for the bereaved families learning what they will learn _ bereaved families learning what they will learn and this report. which is a damning — will learn and this report. which is a damning indictment of the government and the flaws and errors and failures — government and the flaws and errors and failures of the government. while _ and failures of the government. while the — and failures of the government. while the governments been defending its position, here's the cabinet minister stephen barclay. i its position, here's the cabinet minister stephen barclay. i think the were minister stephen barclay. i think they were difficult _ minister stephen barclay. i think they were difficult judgements . minister stephen barclay. i think| they were difficult judgements to minister stephen barclay. i think. they were difficult judgements to be they were difficultjudgements to be made. we saw follow the scientific advice throughout. we took action to protect our nhs, we get a vaccine deployed in record time. but i don't shy away from the fact that there
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will be lessons to learn. that is why we were going to have an inquiry to get to the heart of these issues and in particular to do so for the families that have suffered such devastating loss as a result of what is been a global and precedented pandemic. is been a global and precedented andemic. �* , ., ., is been a global and precedented andemic. �*, ., ., . , pandemic. let's go live to west minister, the _ pandemic. let's go live to west minister, the bbc's _ pandemic. let's go live to west minister, the bbc's political - minister, the bbc's political correspondent is with us. what is the political dimension of this, what's a political follow that we should be aware of? taste what's a political follow that we should be aware of?— what's a political follow that we should be aware of? ~ ., ., should be aware of? we heard some of these arguments _ should be aware of? we heard some of these arguments in _ should be aware of? we heard some of these arguments in public— should be aware of? we heard some of these arguments in public for - should be aware of? we heard some of these arguments in public for some - these arguments in public for some time now including some really explosive hearings that these committees had over the past few months. but this is the first detailed analysis of the uk governments response to the pandemic that we've seen. i think it matters because it really lays out in black and why some of the concerns that mps have about the way that the government and its advisers went about making decisions at the start
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of the pandemic. and yes, hearing some of the clips there was praise for the way that the vaccine was developed and rolled out. there was a lot of praise to for some of the treatments developed in the uk for covid. but there are a number of occasions where mps, and this is a group of cross party mps many from boris johnson's own group of cross party mps many from borisjohnson's own party, where they have highlighted places where they have highlighted places where they think that the government and its advisers made the wrong decisions and that had really serious implications. i’m decisions and that had really serious implications. i'm sure there are a lot of — serious implications. i'm sure there are a lot of people _ serious implications. i'm sure there are a lot of people wondering - are a lot of people wondering particularly those watching on bbc world news outside the uk why we are not seeing any resignations at this point or over the last 18 months, why the governments popularity seems relatively solid despite all this criticism. ., ., , , , criticism. one of the answers is the vaccine roll-out _ criticism. one of the answers is the vaccine roll-out quite _ criticism. one of the answers is the vaccine roll-out quite frankly. - criticism. one of the answers is the vaccine roll-out quite frankly. the | vaccine roll—out quite frankly. the government in the uk has had one of the most successful roll—outs at the initial part where there's been some
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hiccups recently. that has done a lot for the popularity. notjust boris johnson's lot for the popularity. notjust borisjohnson's government but of the devolved governments in the uk who made a big help decisions scotland, wales, northern ireland made a lot of their own pandemic decisions over the course of the 18 months where this was most serious in the uk. the health secretary here did stand down over a breach of social distancing guidelines, matt hancock quit over a newspaper report which showed him in an embrace with one of his aides. there are questions about why exactly boris johnson remains so popular. one of the answers that we've seen of the last few weeks from some of his supporters is that he remains optimistic, he is talking a lot about the post pandemic recovery, the post brexit economy as well. and for now that seems to be working. nick, thank you very much indeed. uk
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government has been setting out changes it wants to make to its brexit withdrawal deal with the european union. it's not happy with the part of the agreement and the goshen cotton drawbar island protocol. let's begin with the brexit manager ? northern island protocol. brexit manager ? northern island rotocol. ., , ., protocol. the northern island -rotocol protocol. the northern island protocol is — protocol. the northern island protocol is the _ protocol. the northern island protocol is the biggest - protocol. the northern island| protocol is the biggest source protocol. the northern island i protocol is the biggest source of mistrust between us and for all kinds of reasons we need to fix this problem. we kinds of reasons we need to fix this roblem. ~ . ~ kinds of reasons we need to fix this roblem. ~ ., ~ ., ,., problem. we talked about the northern ireland _ problem. we talked about the northern ireland protocol- problem. we talked about the i northern ireland protocol before. it was in theory a solution to one of the biggest problems the uk and the eu to negotiate a face. they both wanted to avoid a hardboard between the republic of ireland which is in the republic of ireland which is in the eu and northern ireland which is in the uk. the solution was keeping northern ireland aligned with the eu single market for goods. that created a new trade border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. and now the uk isn't happy with
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how that is set up.— how that is set up. here is lord frost again- — how that is set up. here is lord frost again. the _ how that is set up. here is lord frost again. the fundamental l frost again. the fundamental difficulties that were being asked to run a full external boundary of the eu through the centre of our country. to apply eu law without consent in one part of it and to have any dispute arising from this arrangement settled ultimately in the courts of one of the parties. the way this is happening is disrupting all of ordinary lies damaging large and small businesses and causing serious turbulence to the institutions within northern ireland. �* , the institutions within northern ireland. 3 ~ , the institutions within northern ireland. �*, ,, , ., , ., ireland. the uk's key demand is to chance to ireland. the uk's key demand is to change to the _ ireland. the uk's key demand is to change to the northern _ ireland. the uk's key demand is to change to the northern island i change to the northern island protocol is enforced by. currently oversight is from the european court ofjustice, that's a eu zydus court. lord frost as he wants to use international arbitration instead of a system of eu law ultimately policed in the court of one of the parties. the eu has already said that removing the european court of justice would simply unravel the protocol. we are expecting the eu to suggest its own changes to the northern ireland protocol. that is coming on wednesday let's hear from
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our ireland correspondent. the coming on wednesday let's hear from our ireland correspondent.— our ireland correspondent. the eu is already very — our ireland correspondent. the eu is already very frustrated _ our ireland correspondent. the eu is already very frustrated with - our ireland correspondent. the eu is already very frustrated with the i our ireland correspondent. the eu is already very frustrated with the uk l already very frustrated with the uk over this because one of the main thing that you use both say is low, lord frost of the uk government signed up to this brexit deal, this brexit deal which agreed to new checks over the i goods coming into northern island which agreed that the european court ofjustice it would have the final say on any disputes on the way those rules operated in northern island was up and now the eu says look, you are changing the uk... you take unilateral action to push back deadlines for new checks and processes coming in over the irish sea and it's gone even further now upping the ante and that language that you heard lord frost saying look, this is for the sake of peace and prosperity of northern ireland and prosperity of northern ireland and if we don't get what we want effectively they are saying they are prepared to trigger article 16. something always been referred to as a last resort, which means overriding parts of the brexit deal
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that the uk had previously signed with the eu. we've already heard over the last few days frustration coming from the eu over this kind of action from the uk for that were going to be hearing from the use response tomorrow but i don't think those restrictions will get any less after lord frost words today. let’s after lord frost words today. let's look at this _ after lord frost words today. let's look at this from _ after lord frost words today. let's look at this from the _ after lord frost words today. let's look at this from the side - after lord frost words today. let's look at this from the side of uk politics. here's our correspondent. i think for the british government it appears to be all about sovereignty and taking a very purist view of sovereignty of what they'd agree previously with the european union about a special arrangement with northern island with its sort of staying in the eu is a single market and customs union. they are no longer happy about. on the eu side i think there isjust a certain amount of mystification as to why on earth the uk government is behaving this way. and a sense that as they would see it that the uk agreed this dealjust would see it that the uk agreed this deal just a would see it that the uk agreed this dealjust a couple of would see it that the uk agreed this deal just a couple of years would see it that the uk agreed this dealjust a couple of years ago, said it was a fantastic deal, won an election on it. and that by and large they will have to stick to the
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principles of it. but large they will have to stick to the principles of it.— principles of it. but unpack that a little bit more. _ principles of it. but unpack that a little bit more. the _ principles of it. but unpack that a little bit more. the uk _ principles of it. but unpack that a l little bit more. the uk government will be aware that he signed the deal and aware of the position is taken today. so what is its justification for rejecting something that it's named to? its justification is that look, somehow the deal that is signed up to in 2019 means that northern ireland is just less a part of the united kingdom that it was before brexit. 0f kingdom that it was before brexit. of course critics would say that was one of the risks of breast we met brexit that it would really upset thanks for the people and for the academy of northern ireland. i think in many ways the mystery is, i'm not sure i can answer this question, exactly why is the uk government doing at? yes, one of the communities in northern ireland, the protestant prounion community is not happy about arrangements. but there's not some sort of massive political unrest about it here and in the rest of the uk. as a kind of an interesting one and i guess some
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people would be tempted to say this is just classic borisjohnson, classic populism that what they're trying to do is to make sure they stay on—site with the kind of people that voted for them, the people that voted for them in 2019 and 2016 who would perfectly happy to see a bit of brussels passion. brute would perfectly happy to see a bit of brussels passion.— would perfectly happy to see a bit of brussels passion. we may get an a . reement of brussels passion. we may get an agreement because _ of brussels passion. we may get an agreement because often _ of brussels passion. we may get an agreement because often the i of brussels passion. we may get an i agreement because often the harshest words orjust before political deals are done. let's assume there is not in agreement, what is the most radical approach the uk could take in this scenario?— in this scenario? what lord frost started to do _ in this scenario? what lord frost started to do is _ in this scenario? what lord frost started to do isjust _ in this scenario? what lord frost started to do is just walk - in this scenario? what lord frost started to do is just walk away i in this scenario? what lord frost i started to do is just walk away from the agreement and say it's not working, is making life difficult for the protestant community and northern ireland and for business or walking away. that's basically what they do. but i think we need to go back to all of this. you asked let's imagine that the eu won't agree. i think in some ways the uk government is working under the assumption that
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the european union won't be very happy with the brits but they've got no intention of putting a border between the north of ireland and the south of arlen given the history of trouble there and they won't really be interested in a trade war. at this point, if you ask, what is good happen, will they resolve these issues? i think we just don't know. but there is one point like some help clearing up. let's imagine that this protocol is not enforced that the uk and the eu cannot find a way to agree, does that impact the trade deal that was done alongside it or do those two things sick quite separately? cuts the northern ireland issuejust separately? cuts the northern ireland issue just not function and feature a political follow—up while the rest of all of those arrangements redo the uk and the eu continue to function? is a arrangements redo the uk and the eu continue to function?— continue to function? is a crack in question- — continue to function? is a crack in question- i _ continue to function? is a crack in question. i guess _ continue to function? is a crack in question. i guess the _ continue to function? is a crack in question. i guess the answer i continue to function? is a crack in question. i guess the answer is i continue to function? is a crack in l question. i guess the answer is it's hard to imagine and functioning completely separately.- hard to imagine and functioning completely separately. plenty more on the northern _ completely separately. plenty more on the northern island _ completely separately. plenty more on the northern island protocol- completely separately. plenty more on the northern island protocol on l on the northern island protocol on the bbc news website. i will see you
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in a couple minutes' time. good evening. for many of us today has been a quite a cloudy affair. that certainly not the whole story. it's been a bit of sunshine around as well. there was a scene for a weather watcher in guernsey earlier on. beautiful blue skies ahead. similar story in the far north of scotland was up you can see from the earlier satellite picture that while we did have extensive cloud in a crowded time to give some spots in particular through parts of england there was some sunshine around as well. through tomorrow a similar sort a day for some mostly but not completely dry, often but not completely dry, often but not completely cloudy. it will have a lot of cloud around through tonight. some mist murk the old spot of rain or drizzle answer more persistent rain moving across the north of
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scotland, particularly across the northern isles. where we do see this skies clearing for any length of time across is doing in southern temperatures will dip away maybe down to around two degrees and parts of east anglia tomorrow morning. through the day tomorrow as you can see a lot of cloud across the charts. that cloud producing the odd pocket of light rain or drizzle at a time. but i'm hopeful that cloud will break and places to get some sunshine, maybe across northeast scotland and one or two sunny spells for northern ireland, england and wales with the top temperatures between 1a and 17 degrees. it will between 1a and 17 degrees. it will be quite a breezy day across parts of scotland was up as we move out of wednesday to thursday high pressure holds on to the stock keeping things largely dry to hear about this frontal system pushing him toward scotland will bring some outbreaks of rain southwards through the day. it's going tojerry quite windy across parts of scotland. later in the day that wind is going to start to dig down from the north that's a sign of things to come. thursday itself we will see temperatures a pretty reasonable shape of the time of year. 16 or 17 degrees the
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expected high. through thursday night that what run in the north is going to push its way southwards. it is a cold front and as the name suggests the air behind this front is going to turn colder. you can see the blue colour spilling southwards as we head into friday. quite a different feel to the weather. we are likely to start friday morning with a touch of frost across the northern parts of the uk. but as well as introducing colder air that front will sweep away a lot of the cloud. more sunshine and the forecast for friday. but lower temperatures particularly in the north just nine degrees in aberdeen.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. t20 leaders are pledging more aid to afghanistan which is facing economic collapse. to afghanistan which is facing economic collase. ., , ., _ ., ., . :: collapse. to stand by and watch 40 million people _ collapse. to stand by and watch 40 million people fall _ collapse. to stand by and watch 40 million people fall into _ collapse. to stand by and watch 40 million people fall into chaos i million people fall into chaos because electricity cannot be supplied and no financial system exists. ., , ., ., , exists. the european union is permitting — exists. the european union is permitting over _ exists. the european union is permitting over $1 _ exists. the european union is permitting over $1 billion i exists. the european union is permitting over $1 billion in i exists. the european union is. permitting over $1 billion in his but a stressing aid will not go directly to the taliban. also a covering british mps accusing the government of one of the worst public health failures in their initial pandemic response. in public health failures in their initial pandemic response. in the first half we _ initial pandemic response. in the first half we had _ initial pandemic response. in the first half we had some _ initial pandemic response. in the first half we had some serious i first half we had some serious errors. he could have avoided a lockdown but having got into the
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position where we had to have one where we should have left on earlier. �* , , . ,, earlier. british singerjesse nelson who is white _ earlier. british singerjesse nelson who is white is _ earlier. british singerjesse nelson who is white is being _ earlier. british singerjesse nelson who is white is being accused i earlier. british singerjesse nelson who is white is being accused of i who is white is being accused of pretending to be back in herfirst solo single since leaving the band little mix. we will expand back fishing. three weeks until world leaders meet in glasgow for a major climate summit. it would look at america and what it's doing about its omissions. ? admissions. less tha n less than three weeks until world leaders gather for this crucial climate summit in glasgow. it's called cup 26 and the bbc will be covering it extensively. you don t address climate change without the world s biggest emitters changing course. four territories are responsible for more than half of the world s emissions. america is a world leader in emissions. president biden now wants it to be a world leader in emissions cuts. it s less than three weeks now until world leaders gather
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for a crucial climate summit in the united states sets out on the road to cut greenhouse gases in half by the end of this decade. and that's where we are headed as a nation. the biden administration does not seem to take the climate crisis that he speaks serious since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure so it shows they are not ready to take action which is unfortunate. well look at america s promises — and how they compare with its actions — because some progress has been made. us emissions peaked in 2005. they've fallen since and president biden wants to reach half of that peak by 2030. christiana figueres masterminded the paris climate agreement. this is her assessment. it's actually the largest additional
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national reduction proposed in this round of 2020 and 2021 climates take updates. so, very significant. the target's true significance though will be decided by whether the americans hits it. and this projection shows us — the us is not on course. and to change that will require a major shift as the bbc's north america editor jon sopel explains. it s going to require people to change their behaviour — the way they drive in a gas guzzling economy, the way people heat and cool their homes, the way industry operates. asjon says, this comes down to personal and political choices. not least on energy. president biden wants us energy to be carbon free by 2035. key to the plan is how america makes its electricity. we just set a record in 2020 of building the most wind and solar
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we've ever built here in the us and we've ever built here in the us and we need to continue growing those sources and clamping down fossil fuels especially coal—fired generation. using fewerfossil fuels is one thing. producing fewer is another. the president has acted on this too. he announced a moratorium on all new oil and gas leases on public lands and waters. but as the ap notes here — us drilling approvals increase despite biden climate pledge — that s on land already leased. the president also cancelled the keystone xl oil pipeline. but as the new york times notes here: — other pipelines are being allowed to proceed. it's a decidedly mixed picture fossil fuel production, on energy — and another crucial sector — transport. here you'll find emissions above any other sector. transport�*s emissions are going up and they make up 29% of us emissions. president biden wants tougher rules on emissions. and he wants half of cars sales to be electric by 2030. right not though, it's not half —
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it's 2% of sales. something has to change. the big push right now is building the infrastructure that gives people comfort that moving around this big country they ll be able to charge their vehicles as easily as they can pull up to the gas pump. paul bodner was an adviser to the obama administration on climate change, he's now at a green think tank — the rocky mountain institute — in colorado that's the big push. but for it to happen — two giant piece of legislation need to become law. if congress votes them through, the us is much likely to hit its targets. but the republicans aren t keen. this administration and house dems are working frantically to impose a witches brew of reckless energy policies across the entire nation. at a time when inflation is at its highest level since 2008 these policies make it more expensive for american families to heat and power their homes. cost is one concern. another isjobs. here's how republicans in lousiana seized on that issue in a campaign ad, ahead of last year's election. i would transition from the oil industry, yes. no oil — nojobs. that means a state depression. to protect ourjobs,
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defeatjoe biden. that's a republican campaign ad — but it's notjust republicans who want biden s plans changed. this is senatorjoe manchin. he s a democrat, is chair of the senate energy committee — and earns thousands of dollars a year from fossil fuel investments. he wants a slower transition from fossil fuels. putting it this way. i m totally committed to innovation, not elimination, because i believe we can do it in a practical, responsible way. politically, this is hard going for president biden. and while congress decides america's contribution to ou climate in the future, we already know the present and the past. america emits 16 tonnes of co2 per person per year. that s more than than double the per capita rate of europe or china. america is responsible for 20% of all historic emissions. and now, america's president has ambitions to do things differently — in the short and long—term. just like the uk, the us is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050. but once — look at the red line —
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america is off the pace. and unless more of its people and politicians are persuaded to do more, the gap between american targets and american reality will continue to be wide. mike o'boyle is director of director of electricity policy at the energy innovation think tank. how can the us get to decarbonised electricity by 2035? right now the federal government is debating something called the cream participant programme which is part of the build back better acts and that programme needs to pass in full and it provides incentives and payments for electric utilities to achieve an 80% clean electricity grid by 2030 which is on pace to 100% clean electricity system by 2035. i 10096 clean electricity system by 2035. ., ., , ., 10096 clean electricity system by 2035. ., ., ,, 2035. i wonder what your assessment would be of america's _ 2035. i wonder what your assessment would be of america's chances i 2035. i wonder what your assessment would be of america's chances of- would be of america's chances of reaching joe biden's gorrer in 2035 if that legislation does not go through?
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if that legislation does not go throu~h? ., , ., ., , if that legislation does not go throuuh? ., , ., ., , ., if that legislation does not go throu~h? ., , ., ., , ., through? that legislation is a top riori of through? that legislation is a top priority of the _ through? that legislation is a top priority of the biden _ through? that legislation is a top i priority of the biden administration and we will certainly be better off if it passes. however, companies and subnational governance states like california are also mobilizing to meet these goals as well and that federal government has significant power fillets federal government has significant powerfillets agencies federal government has significant power fillets agencies to reduce emissions at the same time and we may still be able to achieve those targets but the top priority right now is passing to clean electricity payment programme. abs, now is passing to clean electricity payment programme. abs. lat now is passing to clean electricity payment programme.— now is passing to clean electricity payment programme. a lot of this is driven by the — payment programme. a lot of this is driven by the attitudes _ payment programme. a lot of this is driven by the attitudes of _ driven by the attitudes of individuals whether politicians or corporate leaders. he worked in the sector for some corporate leaders. he worked in the sectorfor some time. how corporate leaders. he worked in the sector for some time. how do you compare the mindset of the americans that you deal with when it comes to climate change now versus five or ten years ago? i climate change now versus five or ten years ago?— ten years ago? i think the us has evolved significantly. _ ten years ago? i think the us has evolved significantly. we - ten years ago? i think the us has evolved significantly. we have i
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ten years ago? i think the us has i evolved significantly. we have seen a lot of really devastating events like wildfires in the western us or strong hurricanes over the last five years that have shifted public opinion. folks are starting to feel the effects of climate change first hand and it's really increasing support for measures to deal with the climate crisis. if support for measures to deal with the climate crisis. iii support for measures to deal with the climate crisis.— the climate crisis. if i asked you to access _ the climate crisis. if i asked you to access the _ the climate crisis. if i asked you to access the chances _ the climate crisis. if i asked you to access the chances of i the climate crisis. if i asked you | to access the chances of america reaching its goal in 2035 as you look across the electricity sector and the energy sector, how would you rate those chances? i am and the energy sector, how would you rate those chances?— rate those chances? i am optimistic, the benefits — rate those chances? i am optimistic, the benefits of _ rate those chances? i am optimistic, the benefits of transitioning - rate those chances? i am optimistic, the benefits of transitioning to i rate those chances? i am optimistic, the benefits of transitioning to a i the benefits of transitioning to a clean electricity system are tremendous from air quality benefits, avoiding tens of thousands of deaths to creating up to a millionjobs each year to of deaths to creating up to a million jobs each year to reach these targets. it's an economic development and modernization strategy at the same time as it would deal with climate change. so, because those things and i and i am optimistic we can get there.
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here in the uk, the environment agency has warned that the four nations are not ready for the impact of climate change. it says hundreds of people could die in floods — unless the places where we live, work and travel are made more resilient to the increasingly violent weather. their data suggests even a small rise in global temperatures could mean by 2050 rivers could peak at levels almost 30% higher than nowadays — increasingly the risk of flooding hugely. but in summer a very different picture with droughts and river levels dropping dramatically — which would threaten water supplies. and towards the end of the century sea levels in the thames estuary could be almost half a metre higher — meaning a new, bigger thames barrier will be needed. our science editor david shukman has this report. a street in cardiff became a dangerous river earlier this month after a massive downpour. it was a seminary seam in newcastle after torrential rain there. and around
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the same time london was raising questions about how we will cope as climate change makes the letter even more violent. their biggest shock came in germany lastjuly. a search of water attracted communities and 200 people were killed and the fear is of disaster here on ice and a similar scale.— is of disaster here on ice and a similar scale. the weather events that we saw _ similar scale. the weather events that we saw in — similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe _ similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe this i similar scale. the weather events i that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england. and we need to be ready to save lives and we need to recognize that it's about or die. ., ., . , , or die. the environment agency is bein: or die. the environment agency is being deliberately _ or die. the environment agency is being deliberately front _ or die. the environment agency is being deliberately front said - or die. the environment agency is being deliberately front said thatl being deliberately front said that its recommendations are heard. for homeowners and businesses to take basic steps to make their property safe, to mystery landscapes like forests so they hold rainwater before it causes floods. and for big
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investments like governments and defenses that can handle protected rises in fee levels. already the thames barrier defending london is being closed far more often than planned. i train that will continue as the polar ice caps melting raising the height of the oceans. with its network of tunnels under the river, the barrier was designed decades ago and may not be big enoughin decades ago and may not be big enough in future. the great steel gates are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster. which is why climate change matters so much here. constantly watching the projections for how much this he is going to rise and it's also why we will probably need a bigger barrier by 2070. some stretches of the coast are not so lucky. homes in norfolk are not so lucky. homes in norfolk are being lost to the fee. environment agency said they cannot
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protect everyone. but since last year when i met alina bevan thompson, a local business owner, the waves have come much narrower. they seeing we have got billions of dollars available but it's not coming to us and our coastline is getting eroded daily and it's irreparable damage.- getting eroded daily and it's irreparable damage. some parts of the uk the challenge _ irreparable damage. some parts of the uk the challenge will— irreparable damage. some parts of the uk the challenge will be - irreparable damage. some parts of the uk the challenge will be too i the uk the challenge will be too little water. fix, the uk the challenge will be too little water-— the uk the challenge will be too little water. �* ., , . ., little water. a growing population and d er little water. a growing population and dryer summarize _ little water. a growing population and dryer summarize will- little water. a growing population and dryer summarize will strain i and dryer summarize will strain supplies. the government says it's preparing the country for a more turbulence climate and it wants world leaders to discuss the risks when they meet at the un summit in glasgow next month. the singerjesy nelson — formerly of little mix — has denied 'blackfishing' in the video for her new single. in case you're unfamiliar with the term blackfishing, it's used to accuse someone of pretending to be black or mixed—race in order
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to promote themselves let's have a look at the video in question for the song ""boyz". things quickly got heated on social media. eventually the rapper nicki minaj, who appears in the music video, intervened to defend herfriend. posting on instagram she said: "if you know someone has been for her part, jesy nelson also defended the video. jesy nelson famously quit little mix last year after saying she was 'miserable�* and 'close to breaking point�*. this is her with the other band members before things turned sour. let's speak to kirsty grant, who's been covering this story for bbc radio 1's newsbeat programme. what's in the video
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to make it controversial? what is blackfishing 7 what reaction has there been? black fishing is pretending to be back to have some sort of personal game with the express no gain in popularity or financial gain that is whatjesse has been accused of in this new single blaze. it supposed to be a big moment for her. it's her first debut release as a solo artist and in the video you can see she has got a heavy tan and reads on and wear braids in some parts and she wears basketball shorts and has a gold tooth and i think the content of the song is important as whether it's how she looks and things about wanting a bad boy, a boy from the hood and i think that's what some people found a bit insensitive. and i think the idea mainly from people on social media speaking out about it is that they feel it's wrong to style yourself on stereotypically black characteristics which in history that people i've not always
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been celebrated for an obviously jesseis been celebrated for an obviously jesse is getting a lot of use and money from this video and this song. did this issue come out of nowhere or is this an accusation which has been leveled atjesse before? it’s been leveled at jesse before? it's been leveled atjesse before? it�*s been leveled atjesse before? it�*s been leveled atjesse before? it�*s been leveled at a few people before, mainly people like rita or ora kim kardashian had been suggested and it's definitely been a conversation online for a few years. there has been rumblings of it aboutjesse and she did say last night when she took the instagram live with nicki minaj that her band—mate spoke to her about it in the last music video together. she started to explain how liam brought the issue up to her but she, this is the first time it's been really directed atjesse. in terms of the other bandmates because this pic in little mix was high—profile when it happened. had they had anything to say since the video came out? this they had anything to say since the video came out?—
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video came out? this is an interesting _ video came out? this is an interesting one _ video came out? this is an interesting one because i video came out? this is an i interesting one because prior video came out? this is an - interesting one because prior to this, later nicks had always seem to vary together and always been really solid group and they seem to genuinely really like each other and this is the first time we've seen a crack, even afterjesse left the group. there was no bad blood or bad words said between each other and there is still not been anything on there is still not been anything on the record publicly said by either parties about the other party. but jesse dictate the instagram lied and said that liam had brought up the issue but is not been any public statement. they have unfollowed each other on social media but we do not know exactly what they are thinking at the moment.— know exactly what they are thinking at the moment. thank you for coming on and taking — at the moment. thank you for coming on and taking us _ at the moment. thank you for coming on and taking us through _ at the moment. thank you for coming on and taking us through it. _ stay with us on outside source — still to come: we will hear from one of the rescuers of this elk that has been living for three years with a car tire stuck around its neck.
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the clean used a walking stick, the first time she has done so at a major public event. our loyal correspondence reports. arriving at westminster abby, the queen was handed a walking stick by her daughter princess anne. at the age of 95, few would blame herfor a meeting that an extra support. servicemen and women of many conflicts came together to pay tribute to an organization that has appointed them and those before them for a hundred years. the work of the british legion has had the backing of royalty since it was founded. it's early mission was to fight for the rights of those who have given
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so much but came back to so little. and even now that mission remains the same. it is mental health support that so many veterans now seek. naomi hall is one of them. she served with the raf in afghanistan says that british legion saved her life. ~ ., �* ., , . , life. we don't often see the reality of what it does _ life. we don't often see the reality of what it does to _ life. we don't often see the reality of what it does to us. _ life. we don't often see the reality of what it does to us. i _ life. we don't often see the reality of what it does to us. i think - life. we don't often see the reality of what it does to us. i think we've all grown up with grandparents that served where they go for something so dreadful they don't speak about it. and so to have somebody to speak about it and be willing to talk about it and be willing to talk about it and be willing to talk about it gives people information they did not have previously. bitter they did not have previously. after they did not have previously. after the service. _ they did not have previously. after the service, the _ they did not have previously. after the service, the queen _ they did not have previously. after the service, the queen left the value at the door, a short walk for her than her usual route to the abbey. age may slow to catch up with many of us but the story has endured. service, not self.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is g20 leaders of the world's richest nations pledge more aid to afghanistan which is facing economic collapse. that g20 summit on afghanistan comes as turkish authorities boost security on their border with iran — and warn they won t accept an influx of people fleeing the taliban in afghanistan. many afghans make the journey through iran to turkey — hoping to travel onwards to other european countries. turkey already has the world s largest refugee population — of around four million people. our international correspondent orla guerin has been to the turkish border province of van and sent this report. turkey is cracking down. on those
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who sneak across the border. even those in this smugly safe house who may have fled in fear from the taliban. the operation here has takenjust a few taliban. the operation here has taken just a few minutes, there are about a0 men inside sitting down looking tired, some looking quite scared, the conditions are pretty squalid and the police aren't telling us to believe these men have come from afghanistan. we were flown across the province to turkey's are most eastern border where many try to enter. if they can get past this, turkey's border war with iran built years ago and now being extended. since the fall of couple, reinforcements have arrived. there's been an about—face and turkey on refugees and migrants. the country have already observed 8.6 million
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syrians. the local governor says that it no influx across this border. the watchtower is here where funded by the european union. it does not want a new wave of arrivals we its stories. take a look at the terrain here. this is a mountainous region. it's exposed, the ground is rough and crossing iran to reach the turkish border here can take a month or more. thejourney turkish border here can take a month or more. the journey is full of risk and some afghans still feel this is their best hope. that this group
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will be found on turkish soil. among them, men who stood against the taliban including a police commander with couple. we are concealing his identity. he is proud of his time in uniform since the taliban took over, he says they have killed some of his brothers in arms. despite promising and amnesty. soon they were on the move and on the run. hoping to avoid capture by the run. hoping to avoid capture by the turkish police. ok, ok we are coming he tells the waiting smuggler. since we found these
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pictures, some of the men have been detained. they can no longer go forward and they dare not go back. let's go to ethiopia. it's go to a story from colorado. it contains a wild elk and a car tire and some work by... this weekend he was finally tracked down and the tire was removed. it starts he is now some 16 kilograms lighter and a man who freed the elk is wildlife officer scott murdoch and he has been speaking to the bbc. it was a challenging situation. we had some issues cutting the tire off. because of this deal that was in the tire and we resulted in cutting the
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antlers off and able to barely get that tire off the top of it's head. we do annual surveys of wildlife populations and happened to run into the sky and he was really far back in and he did not expect to be able to get to him and then of years we would get more sightings and he would get more sightings and he would try and get close to him and he would be any act like a wild elk and would not let us close. tearing their breeding season which happens in september and october, they tend to lose a lot of their innovations and that was the way that we were able to sneak in closer because he was much more concerned with getting close to the female elk that he was hanging around and that was ultimately the way we were able to get a tranquilizer dart in him and eventually get the tire off his neck. , , ., .
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neck. he finished the programme in colorado. thank _ neck. he finished the programme in colorado. thank you _ neck. he finished the programme in colorado. thank you for _ neck. he finished the programme in colorado. thank you for watching i neck. he finished the programme in | colorado. thank you for watching and see you tomorrow. for many of us today it has been a cloudy affair. but that is not the whole story. there's been some sunshine around as well and that's the scene for a weather watchers earlier on. blue skies overhead with us and story in the north of scotland. you can see from the satellite pictures while he had cloudiness it did give some spots of rain through the afternoon across parts of england there was some sunshine around as well. there was a scene for a weather watcher in guernsey earlier on. beautiful blue skies ahead. similar story in the far north of scotland was up you can see from the earlier satellite picture that while we did have extensive cloud
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through tomorrow a similar sort a day for some mostly but not completely dry, often but not completely cloudy. it will have a lot of cloud around through tonight. some mist murk the old spot of rain or drizzle answer more persistent rain moving across the north of scotland, particularly across the northern isles. where we do see this skies clearing for any length of time across is doing in southern temperatures will dip away maybe down to around two degrees and parts of east anglia tomorrow morning. through the day tomorrow as you can see a lot of cloud across the charts. that cloud producing the odd pocket of light rain or drizzle at a time. but i'm hopeful that cloud will break and places to get some sunshine, maybe across northeast scotland and one or two sunny spells for northern ireland, england and wales with the top temperatures between ia and 17 degrees. it will be quite a breezy day across parts of scotland was up as we move out of wednesday to thursday high pressure holds on to the stock keeping things largely dry to hear about this frontal system pushing him toward scotland will bring some outbreaks of rain southwards through the day. it's going tojerry quite windy across parts of scotland. later in the day that wind is going to start to dig down from the north that's a sign of things to come. thursday itself we will
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see temperatures a pretty reasonable shape of the time of year. 16 or 17 degrees the expected high. through thursday night that what run in the north is going to push its way southwards. it is a cold front and as the name suggests the air behind this front is going to turn colder. you can see the blue colour spilling southwards as we head into friday. quite a different feel to the weather. we are likely to start friday morning with a touch of frost across the northern parts of the uk. but as well as introducing colder air that front will sweep away a lot of the cloud. more sunshine and the forecast for friday. but lower temperatures particularly in the north just nine degrees in aberdeen.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm... a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lockdown, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from this. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily. i think she lost her life because mistakes were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.

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