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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 12, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm BST

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at 6:00: the government's accused of presiding over one of the most important public health failures the uk has ever experienced. a report by mps says thousands of people died because too little was done at the start of the pandemic by the uk governmnet and its scientists to stop the spread of covid. philippa perry elaine died early in the pandemic and his daughter believes his life could have been saved. it was avoidable if action had been taken sooner, and perhaps a little more of a responsible approach had been taken sooner. but the report does heat significant praise on the government for the success of the vaccination roll—out. we will have the details. needing help — the companies struggling to find workers — asjob vacancies reach
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an all time high. the uk's increasingly violent weather — hundreds of people could die in flooding, warns the environment agency, unless there's action to make the country more resilient, fast. the queen attends a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey — using a walking stick for support for the first time at a major public event. and coming up on the bbc news channel, scotland are two wins away from a place in the world cup play—offs. they are preparing to face the faroe islands later. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. one of the worst ever public health failures — that's what a new report by mps has called the uk's failure to do more
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to stop covid spreading early in the pandemic. they said the government's approach — backed by its scientists — was to try to manage the situation and in effect achieve herd immunity by infection. the report says the delay in introducing the first lockdown cost thousands of lives, many of them elderly and vulnerable people in care homes. there was also criticism of "light—touch border controls" only on countries with high covid rates. the start of the nhs test and trace system was "slow, uncertain and often chaotic". there were "unacceptably high" death rates in ethnic minority groups, and among people with learning disabilities and autism. but there was significant praise for the uk vaccination programme, described as "one of the most successful and effective initiatives in the history of uk science and public administration." the report focuses on england, but in the early stages all four nations moved together. in response, the government said it had acted swiftly on the information available at the time.
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here's our health editor, hugh pym. empty streets during lockdown. but did the restrictions imposed both in the spring and autumn last year come too late? the most comprehensive report so far on the official response to the covid crisis concludes that mistakes were made. he was relatively young and totally fit and healthy, with no underlying health conditions. phil fit and healthy, with no underlying health conditions.— fit and healthy, with no underlying health conditions. phil got covid in march last year. _ health conditions. phil got covid in march last year. his _ health conditions. phil got covid in march last year. his condition - march last year. his condition worsened and he died in april. his daughter believes an earlier lockdown, restricting the spread of the virus, might have made all the difference. i the virus, might have made all the difference. ., , ., ., ., difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust _ difference. i do believe that a lot of not just my — difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust my family, _ difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust my family, but - difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust my family, but a - difference. i do believe that a lot of notjust my family, but a lot i difference. i do believe that a lot| of notjust my family, but a lot of otherfamilies in this of notjust my family, but a lot of other families in this situation, it was avoidable, if action had been taken sooner, and perhaps a little bit more of a responsible approach
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had been taken sooner. the bit more of a responsible approach had been taken sooner.— had been taken sooner. the report looks at decisions _ had been taken sooner. the report looks at decisions around - had been taken sooner. the report looks at decisions around the - had been taken sooner. the report. looks at decisions around the timing of the march lockdown. it says full restrictions came to light because the policy backed by government scientists and ministers was for a slow and gradual approach. the mps say this was wrong, and led to a higher death toll than would have happened with early intervention. events like the cheltenham racing festival in mid—march, the report adds, may have spread the virus. i think there is an issue there of hindsight, because at the time of the first lockdown the expectation was that the tolerance in terms of how long people would live with lockdown for was a far shorter period than actually has proven to be the case. but period than actually has proven to be the case-— period than actually has proven to be the case. but the labour leader said the report's _ be the case. but the labour leader said the report's stock _ be the case. but the labour leader said the report's stock conclusions | said the report's stock conclusions could not be ignored. to said the report's stock conclusions could not be ignored.— could not be ignored. to use language _ could not be ignored. to use language that _ could not be ignored. to use language that this _ could not be ignored. to use language that this was - could not be ignored. to use language that this was one l could not be ignored. to use | language that this was one of could not be ignored. to use - language that this was one of the worst_ language that this was one of the worst public health failures in the uk, that— worst public health failures in the uk, that is— worst public health failures in the uk, that is a damning indictment. my
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thoughts _ uk, that is a damning indictment. my thoughts are with the families who have lost— thoughts are with the families who have lost people because of these failures _ have lost people because of these failures. ~ f have lost people because of these failures. ~ a , , failures. the mps' report is highly critical of the _ failures. the mps' report is highly critical of the test _ failures. the mps' report is highly critical of the test and _ failures. the mps' report is highly critical of the test and trace - critical of the test and trace system in england. it says it will set up much too late and the capacity should have been built up much earlier in the pandemic, in line with some other countries. halting community testing in the early weeks had cost lives, according to the report. just one of the government's failings, said the former downing street adviser who had given evidence to mps. me and others ut had given evidence to mps. me and others put into _ had given evidence to mps. me and others put into place _ had given evidence to mps. me and others put into place work- had given evidence to mps. me and others put into place work to - had given evidence to mps. me and others put into place work to try - had given evidence to mps. me and others put into place work to try to | others put into place work to try to improve the system in 2020, after the first wave. unfortunately, the prime minister, being thejoker he is, has not pushed that work through. what will covid pressure on care homes is examined in the report. care homes is examined in the re ort. ~ , care homes is examined in the reort. ~ , ., , report. the mps say that sending elderly peeple — report. the mps say that sending elderly people into _ report. the mps say that sending elderly people into care - report. the mps say that sending elderly people into care homes . elderly people into care homes without prior testing may have been understandable, but it contributed to the spread of the virus. staff entering care homes also may have
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carried infections. staff shortages and problems getting ppe haven't helped. in and problems getting ppe haven't heled. ., ., ., , ., , helped. in hong kong and germany, the took helped. in hong kong and germany, they took more _ helped. in hong kong and germany, they took more precautions - helped. in hong kong and germany, they took more precautions early . helped. in hong kong and germany, they took more precautions early on i they took more precautions early on to protect care homes and they had fewer deaths as a result. that is definitely one of the most important, long—term lessons we need to learn. the important, long-term lessons we need to learn. ,., important, long-term lessons we need to learn. , important, long-term lessons we need to learn. the report says vaccine development — to learn. the report says vaccine development has _ to learn. the report says vaccine development has been - to learn. the report says vaccine development has been one - to learn. the report says vaccine development has been one of. to learn. the report says vaccine | development has been one of the to learn. the report says vaccine - development has been one of the most successful initiatives in uk science. early investment by the government in research and development is praised by mps. the vaccine task force are being set up outside government is described as a master stroke, with the success of the vaccine programme said to have redeemed many failings elsewhere. the report praises the response of the nhs to the pandemic, with a rapid increase in critical care beds. but it notes that even before covid struck, most hospitals were running at close to full capacity, and that meant that services, including some cancer care, were put on hold. the ensuing backlog has become one of the enduring legacies of the pandemic. the mps note that
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bame community experienced high levels of illness and death, which highlighted inequalities in society. the government response that they have been consistently guided by scientific experts and are committed to learning lessons from the pandemic. hugh pym, bbc news. so what's been the reaction to the new report? sophie hutchinson has been speaking to some of those who've been most affected by the pandemic. some light relief in nottingham this afternoon. butjust months ago, care home residents were among the worst hit by the pandemic, according to today's report. here, there were multiple deaths, and shortages of ppe and lack of medical support pushed staff to breaking point. it was horrendous. i think everybody was horrendous. i think everybody was just a panic stations. everybody�*s job quickly evolved from whatever they were doing, to helping
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out. staff were panicking. you know, some of them are very vulnerable themselves, they got vulnerable families. it was difficult. it themselves, they got vulnerable families. it was difficult.- families. it was difficult. it was extremely _ families. it was difficult. it was extremely scary, _ families. it was difficult. it was extremely scary, just - families. it was difficult. it was extremely scary, just a - families. it was difficult. it was extremely scary, just a huge i extremely scary, just a huge emotional and physically draining. failure _ emotional and physically draining. failure to — emotional and physically draining. failure to lockdown early enough and slow the spread of the virus he put huge pressure on the nhs and stuff, like mark, he was working on a&e. what was it about the british government that meant they thought we were invincible to this? you know, it was infuriating seeing borisjohnson on tv early on saying i shook hands with everyone. it was completely against all the guidance that was out at the time, and it was almost making a joke out of it. it was infuriating, you know? that was entirely the wrong message. this woman's father, _ entirely the wrong message. this woman's father, 68 _ entirely the wrong message. this woman's father, 68 with no underlying health conditions, was one of a significant number of people from black, asian and
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minority ethnic backgrounds to die in the pandemic. mps said today it was a result of the inequalities in our society. he was a result of the inequalities in our society-— was a result of the inequalities in our society. he had never been ill in my living _ our society. he had never been ill in my living memory, _ our society. he had never been ill in my living memory, it _ our society. he had never been ill in my living memory, it was - in my living memory, it was his first time in hospital. and it was terrifying. the government has actually spoken about levelling up, and leaving no community behind, i think was the worst that they used. that is very vague. we really need to see actual change. but that is very vague. we really need to see actual change.— that is very vague. we really need to see actual change. but while mps have called the _ to see actual change. but while mps have called the government's - to see actual change. but while mps have called the government's early l have called the government's early response to the virus one of the worst public health failures, they have praised the vaccination programme is one of the best initiatives. paul, who has cancer, got covid—i9, despite being vaccinated. but his doctors told him that the jab actually saved his life. that the 'ab actually saved his life. �* , that the 'ab actually saved his life. ~ , .. . life. after surviving the cancer scare, life. after surviving the cancer scare. and _ life. after surviving the cancer scare, and still— life. after surviving the cancer scare, and still having - life. after surviving the cancer scare, and still having it, - life. after surviving the cancer - scare, and still having it, knowing that my life is maybe shorter, getting covid was sort of the icing on the cake, really. you know, to
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survive that, the staff, the nurses, because i had had my virus injections, i had that chance, you know? it gave me the support of my body needed. without it, it would have killed me. that body needed. without it, it would have killed me.— body needed. without it, it would have killed me. . ., , ., have killed me. that while many have recovered from _ have killed me. that while many have recovered from the _ have killed me. that while many have recovered from the virus _ have killed me. that while many have recovered from the virus and - have killed me. that while many have recovered from the virus and are - have killed me. that while many have recovered from the virus and are now| recovered from the virus and are now protected by the vaccine, millions of others are still coming to terms with a profound effect it's had on them, and the lives of their loved ones. the government's latest coronavirus figures, show there were 38,520 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. that means on average there were over 38,600 new cases per day, in the last week. as of monday, there were 7,000 people in hospital in the uk, with coronavirus. another 181 deaths have been recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test result, which means on average there were 114 deaths per day, in the past week.
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there has now been a total of nearly 138,000 deaths. 0n vaccinations, 85.6% of the population aged 12 and over, have had their first dose of a vaccine, and 78.6%, have been double jabbed. let's talk to our political correspondent damian grammaticus in westminster. this report doesn't point the finger at any one person but still makes difficult reading for the government and the scientists? that's right, sophie, it is a weighty, serious report, produced by committee is chaired by two former conservative cabinet ministers. the government has been outed today, giving its defences, saying it followed scientific advice, this report says, yes, but as you heard at the outset, that was flawed and ministers should have challenged it. the gunmen back is that it acted to protect the nhs. the report said, yes, but when the nhs looked like it
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may be overwhelmed, the government saysin may be overwhelmed, the government says in the early stages evidence was then, the report says they should have looked at east asian countries that had success in controlling virus. we know there is a public inquiry coming next year. the government says it will learn lessons. but i think it has a difficulty, because this report has not satisfied the bereaved families. it has angered them. they say it shows things like the failings are in care homes, that they have been trying to point to, and they want that inquiry to have tougher powers and report back earlier, they say, to prevent more needless deaths. damian grammaticas, thank you. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit an all time high. the latest official figures show that 1.1 million jobs were available between july and september. the retail sector and motor vehicle repair businesses were among those with a sharp rise in jobs to fill as our business editor simonjack reports. help wanted. across the uk, there are a record 1.1 millionjob vacancies. this large food wholesaler
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and distributor is seeing fierce competition to attract and retain staff. all around here there is all different companies recruiting at the same time. we have recruited over the last four months 700 people. but on the other side, 400 people have gone to work for other companies. so, we've gone up in training costs, we've got 15%—20% labour costs that have increased. on top of that, retention bonuses. everything isjust making it really difficult for us to service our customers. brakes is training some of its workers, like dean, to move out of the warehouse and behind the wheel, where the shortages are acute and the terms on offer are getting more attractive. it makes you feel appreciated, you know? i think for a long while, drivers haven't been appreciated as much as they should have been. and i think the industry now has realised that, to retain people, you have to offer the right money. higher pay offers in sectors like this are evident in today's report. average wages are 6% higher than last year. but that was when many workers
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were on furlough or reduced hours. if you adjust for that, wage rises are closer to 4%, higher than inflation, which is currently at 3.2%, but that is expected to rise. it's notjust the wage bill that is going up at companies like this. there is the fuel costs in the supply chain, soaring energy bills to heat or cool their buildings. all of that will feed through into higher prices, inevitably, which means inflation will offset some of the wage rise that some people are getting, and make life very difficult for those that aren't getting them. construction is also feeling the squeeze. firms are poaching staff from each other with offers of more money. but paying more doesn't mean walls get built any faster. talk me through the programme? the boss of this construction firm says they are having to pay more, but they're not getting more productivity bang for the higher wage buck. in order for businesses to be sustainable, and to grow, particularly as a small business, we need our productivity to be reflected in the increase
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in wages that we're paying. the government said it wants a high wage, higher skill economy. at the moment, there is only evidence of the first part of that. one very encouraging aspect of today's release was the low level of redundancy notices firms are issuing. elaine fears that the end of the furlough scheme at the end of september would trigger an immediate rise injob losses. the government will argue that means the furlough scheme was £70 billion well spent. the world's finance ministers are meeting in washington this week. the international monetary fund has warned that that the global economic recovery from the pandemic is weakening. 0ur economics editor, faisal islam is there. so, more difficult times ahead? the ost so, more difficult times ahead? tie: post lockdown recovery is getting messy. that is the message of this important meeting of finance ministers and central bank governors. it's important to note that compared to this time last year
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in the depths of the pandemic, as we've been hearing, the economy is growing and job numbers are better than we thought they would be but the good news has not spread equally around the world, in particular countries with low vaccination rates are a source of concern but even in advanced economy in the uk with higher growth rates there is the concern about inflation with the imf saying the uk and other economies should be very vigilant about these rising prices that arise from the longer than expected slot ? supply chain problems we have seen in ports and around the world, and that is raising a dilemma for central bankers, because like andrew bailey, the governor of the bank of england, who is in their having meetings, we are all seeing on international markets that expectations of interest rate rises from the end of next year from emergency loans are being pulled forward even to this year, in december, so a recovery, yes, but an impeller ? imperfect one
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with a trade—off regarding interest rates and inflation. our top story this evening. 0ne one of the uk's worst other public—health failures, and report by mp says thousands die because too little was done at the start of the pandemic. and coming up — the former little mix starjesy nelson addressed accusations of "blackfishing" in her new solo music video. coming up on sportsday on the bbc news channel, england are preparing for its world cup qualifier against hungary at wembley. victory would move them one step closer to a place at the tournament in qatar next year. the uk is not ready for the impact of climate change. that's the blunt warning from the environment agency. it says hundreds of people could die in floods — unless the places where we live, work and travel are made
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more resilient to the increasingly violent weather. their data suggests even a small rise in global temperatures could mean by 2050 rivers could peak at levels almost 30% higher than nowadays — increasingly the risk of flooding hugely. but in summer a very different picture with droughts and river levels dropping dramatically — which would threaten water supplies. and towards the end of the century sea levels in the thames estuary could be almost half a metre higher — meaning a new, bigger thames barrier will be needed. 0ur science editor david shukman has this report. a street in cardiff became a dangerous river earlier this month after a massive flood. it was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there. and around the same time, london was engulfed, raising questions about how we will cope as climate change makes the
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weather even more violent. but the biggest core ? shock came in germany lastjuly, a surge of water to or through communities. 200 people were killed and the fear is of disaster here on a similar scale. the weather events that — here on a similar scale. the weather events that we _ here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw _ here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in _ here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe - here on a similar scale. the weather events that we saw in europe this i events that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england, and we need to be ready to save lives. we need to recognise that it is adapt or die. the lives. we need to recognise that it is adapt or die-— is adapt or die. the environment auen is is adapt or die. the environment agency is being _ is adapt or die. the environment agency is being deliberately - is adapt or die. the environment. agency is being deliberately blunt so that its recommendations are heard. for homeowners and businesses to take basic steps to make their property is safe. to restore landscapes like forests so that they hold rain water before it causes floods. and for big investments by governments in defences that could handle projected rises in sea
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levels. already the thames barrier, defending london, is being closed far more often than planned. a trend that will continue as the polar ice keeps melting, raising the height of the oceans. with its network of tunnels under the river, the barrier was designed decades ago and may not be big enough in future. the great steel gates are holding back a phenomenal volume of sea water that would otherwise enter the city and potentially cause disaster, which is why climate change matters so much here. they are constantly watching the projections for how much the sea is going to rise, and it is also why we will probably need a bigger barrier by 2070. but some stretches of the coast are not so lucky. homes in norfolk are being lost to the sea. the environment agency says it cannot protect everyone. but since last year, when i met lorna bevan thompson, a local business owner, the waves have come much nearer.
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they are saying we have billions of money available but it's not coming to us and our coastline is getting eroded daily, and it is irreparable damage. in eroded daily, and it is irreparable damaue. , eroded daily, and it is irreparable damaue. damage. in some parts of the uk the challenae damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will — damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will be _ damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will be too _ damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will be too little _ damage. in some parts of the uk the challenge will be too little water. - challenge will be too little water. a growing population and drier summers will strain supplies. the government says it is preparing the country for a more turbulent climate and it wants world leaders to discuss the risks when they meet at the un summit in glasgow next month. the brexit minister lord frost has called for signifcant changes to the northern ireland protocol. in a speech to diplomats in portugal he described his new legal text as "a better way forward". the protocol as it stands, which was agreed by both the uk and the eu, ensures there's no need for checks along the land border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. it was agreed that northern ireland would continue to follow eu rules
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checks would instead take place on goods entering northern ireland from england, scotland or wales with inspections taking place at northern ireland ports. this has prompted criticism that a new border has effectively been created in the irish sea. the uk also wants to change the role of the european court ofjustice has in overseeing this. lord frost said today his proposed text would amend the ni protocol and support the good friday agreement. the protocol is not working and has completely lost consent in one community in northern ireland and is not doing the thing it was set out to do, protect the belfast good friday agreement. in fact it is doing the opposite. it friday agreement. in fact it is doing the opposite.— doing the opposite. it has to chance. doing the opposite. it has to change. lord _ doing the opposite. it has to change. lord frost - doing the opposite. it has to change. lord frost there. i the eu will set out its proposal tomorrow. 0ur europe editor katya adler is in berlin. what's the reaction been? well, first of all, what i'm not hearing at all in any of the eu
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capitals that what we have here is a looming, imminent, overnight trade war between the eu and the uk. there are other priorities, i am told. here in berlin they are trying to put a government together after the election and everybody is worried about soaring gas prices but there are definite tensions and strains over the northern ireland protocol. both sides, the eu and uk admit it is not working properly on the ground in northern ireland, so lord frost has his wishes for changes on the eu says tomorrow it will come up with concrete solutions to practical problems on how to reduce checks on goods and how to ensure that medicines arrive smoothly from europe into northern ireland and they have promised to talk more to they have promised to talk more to the administration in northern ireland and business and civil society as well to try to improve relations. what the eu will not engage in, i am told, is on the request by lord frost to remove the
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oversight by the european court of justice over the protocol because the eu says that northern ireland still follows eu rules on goods, for example, so it cannot withdraw the court. this could be its red line, but for the moment, both sides say they want to talk before anything gets messier, which it could. the former little mix singer jesy neslon says she never intended to cause offence in her new music video after being accused of so—called �*blackfishing' — when a non—black person tries to appear black. the star denies using fake tan and insists her hair is naturally curly. she said her new video is intended to be a celebration of a type of music that she loves. lizo mzimba reports. # shout out to my ex, you're really quite the man...# for almost a decade, jesy nelson was part of little mix, one of music's biggest groups. she left at the end of 2020, saying that being part of the group had taken a toll on her mental health. in the video, for her first eagerly
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anticipated solo release, she appears heavily tanned, with a range of wigs showing different hairstyles, sometimes with braids. it's been criticised by some, saying that she's been taking on stereotypically black characteristics, and that it's wrong for white people to profit from adopting them — a practice that's being called "blackfishing". my intention was never, ever to offend people of colour with this video. that actually does really hurt me that i may have offended people, and actually, like, hurt people's feelings just by genuinely celebrating something that i love. nelson says she intended to celebrate 1990s and 2000s hip—hop and r&b. she added that fake tan and make—up wasn't the reason for her darker appearance. i want people to know that when i was in the video, i didn't even have any fake tan on.
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i'd been in antigua prior to that for three weeks. and i'm just really lucky, as a white girl, that when i'm in the sun i tan so dark. she's been defended by global music star nicki minaj, who also appears in the video. jesy nelson hoped that many would be talking about her first solo effort. but right now it's for reasons that she never intended. lizo mzimba, bbc news. a g20 summit has stressed the need to prevent an economic collapse in afghanistan, but also warned this wouldn't mean recognising the taliban government. leaders, including us presidentjoe biden, met virtually as part of the g20 in italy, to explore ways to stop afghanistan again becoming a base for international terrorism, and how they can prevent a humanitarian crisis there with food prices and unemployment sprialling. the european commission president, ursula von der leyen, promised a support package of more than a billion dollars, mostly to support afghans who ve fled to neighbouring countries.
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a bin strike in brighton has enters its second week after talks between the union representing the refuse collectors and the green—led council broke down. this has led to fears that the strike could last until mid—november, with piles of rubbish already blocking pavements in the city. the gmb union called the action over changes of duties, drivers being removed from long—standing rounds and pay. the queen has attended a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey to mark the centenary of the royal british legion. the queen, who's 95, used a walking stick as she arrived and left the abbey — the first time she has done so at a major public event. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph reports. good morning, your majesty. arriving good morning, your ma'esty. arriving at westminster h good morning, your ma'esty. arriving at westminster abbey, — good morning, your majesty. arriving at westminster abbey, the _ good morning, your majesty. arriving at westminster abbey, the queen - good morning, your majesty. arriving | at westminster abbey, the queen was handed a walking stick by her daughter, princess anne. at the age of 95, few would blame herfor needing a little extra support.
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service men and women of many conflicts came together to pay tribute to an organisation that has supported them and those before them for 100 years. to supported them and those before them for 100 years-— for 100 years. to the factory where 400 disabled _ for 100 years. to the factory where 400 disabled men _ for 100 years. to the factory where 400 disabled men are _ for 100 years. to the factory where 400 disabled men are working - for 100 years. to the factory where i 400 disabled men are working comes her majesty, the queen, to give them encouragement. the her majesty, the queen, to give them encouragement-— encouragement. the work of the british legion _ encouragement. the work of the british legion has _ encouragement. the work of the british legion has had _ encouragement. the work of the british legion has had the - encouragement. the work of the. british legion has had the backing of realty since it was founded. ? royalty. it's an early mission was to fight for the rights of those who had given so much, but came back to so little. and even now, that mission remains the same. but it is mental health support that so many veterans now seek. naomi hall is one of them. she served with the raf in afghanistan and says that the british legion saved her life. we don't british legion saved her life. - don't often see the realities of what it does to us. i think we've all grown up with grandparents that served where, they go through something so dreadful and they don't speak about it, so to have somebody
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to speak about it and be willing to talk about it gives people information they did not have previously. information they did not have previously-— information they did not have reviousl . �* . ., , previously. after the ceremony the queen left via _ previously. after the ceremony the queen left via the _ previously. after the ceremony the queen left via the poets _ previously. after the ceremony the queen left via the poets yard - previously. after the ceremony the | queen left via the poets yard door, a shorter walk for her than her usual route through the abbey. age may slowly catch up with many of us, but the motto of the royal british legion has enjoyed. service, not self. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. hi there. good evening. not all of us got to enjoy scenes as bright as this one today. guernsey was one place that saw a lot of sunshine and there were other sunny places as well, but as you can see from the satellite picture there was a lot of cloud around and that cloud in places has brought spots of rain and we've seen some moderately heavy rain moving across east anglia and drifting across the midlands and london area and towards wales on the west country as we head through the night and more persistent rain sliding across the far north of
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scotland and will be cloudy from most and a bit misty and murky, but where the sky is clear for any length of time, east anglia particularly could turn quite chilly, and one or two spots down to 2 . a lot of cloud around tomorrow and the cloud thick enough to produce the odd spot of rain or drizzle but it should break to give some sunny spells. north—east scotland should see some sunshine and bright eclipses for northern ireland, parts of finland and wales and temperatures respectable for the time of year between 14 and 17 although it will be breezy across the north. as we head into thursday, high pressure in charge to the south so dry weather here, but this frontal system is digging its way into ward scotland and will bring outbreaks of rain, moving southwards, and it will be a windy day across scotland and the wind will change direction and start to come down from the north. that is the sign of things to come because although thursday will be another relatively mild day, 15, 16, as we move out of thursday and friday we do see something of a change as the weather and starts to move

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