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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 12, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say lives were lost in vain. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government, and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.
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the prime minister is expected to give the go ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high as the jobs market continues to recover from the pandemic. efforts to recruit young black people are failing to have an impact on racial injustice at work, according to a new report. good afternoon. one of the most important public health failures in uk history that's the damning verdict of mps on the government's early response to the pandemic. a joint report by two commons committees says both ministers and scientists waited too long to lock down last year,
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costing many lives. and it says there were thousands of avoidable deaths in care homes. the report calls the test, trace and isolate system "slow, uncertain, and often chaotic", but there is praise for the vaccine rollout. our health correspondent jim reed reports. it is completely unimaginable, and we are not at the peak yet. in the spring of 2020 the government was, says this report, working in a fog of uncertainty. i'm shaking hands. i was in a hospital the other night where i think there were a few coronavirus patients, and i shook hands with everybody. scientists did not know how many were infected with covid or how fast the new virus was spreading. doctors and nurses were already struggling to cope. when we brought back people injanuary from wuhan, i was... for months now, two groups of mps have been taking evidence on the handling
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of the pandemic in england from people involved in key decisions at the time. now, in this joint report, they criticise that early response. instead of locking down quickly like some other countries, they say the government's scientific advisers felt there was no choice but to bring in social distancing rules gradually, letting sporting events go ahead and keeping borders open, and they say ministers did not do enough to challenge that advice. what we conclude in this report is that the national response to covid was a bit like a football game with two very different halves, and in the first half, we had some serious errors, we could have avoided a lockdown, but having got into a position where we had to have one, we should have locked down earlier, but in the second half, we had the vaccine rollout, which we describe as the most effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration. some of the relatives of those who have died responded angrily to that comparison. this isn't a game.
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my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made. the final report goes on to describe the rollout of the test and trace programme in england as slow and chaotic. it claims that the uk did not impose rigourous border controls quickly, letting in high numbers of infections from overseas, and it says the risk to care homes was not recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the mantra about protecting the nhs is certainly solidified in this report, that that was what was happening. social care was very much an afterthought. the report, though, does also praise parts of the national response. the vaccine programme was picked out as a success, as were new treatments like dexamethasone, first developed for covid use in this country. the government says it has not shied away from taking quick actions when needed. we followed the scientific advice throughout, we protected the nhs
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from the surge of pressure that we saw in other countries such as italy. as you say, we got the vaccine deployed extremely quickly. but also, what we know about the pandemic now is very different to what the level of knowledge was at the start. labour, though, said the report showed monumental errors had been made. this was one of the worst public health failures in the uk. that is a damning indictment. and my thoughts are with the families who have lost people because of these failures by the government. the last year has seen the country come together in support of the nhs. this report is just the first study of its kind to look back at what mps call the biggest health crisis of the last century. next spring, a full, public inquiry will examine in detail what lessons should be learned from the pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. our political correspondent pete saulljoins us
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now from westminster. will add two voices for the inquiry to be brought forward? yes. will add two voices for the inquiry to be brought forward?— to be brought forward? yes, you heard from _ to be brought forward? yes, you heard from the _ to be brought forward? yes, you heard from the justice _ to be brought forward? yes, you heard from the justice for - to be brought forward? yes, you i heard from the justice for families group there and they feel the report does not bring them justice or closure and they want the inquiry brought forward from its scheduled start date of spring 2022. no sign of the government would do that and we are still waiting for details of that inquiry but what powers will it have, for example, what with the terms of reference b, so we heard from steve barclay, the cabinet office minister in that report, and the line for ministers is that we are prepared to take part in that inquiry and we will all give evidence and learn the lessons from that, but we need to get ready before we do that. for the government here, they have a lot on their plate at the moment, dealing with the economic aftermath of the pandemic, and other stories we have been covering throughout the day on
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bbc news in terms of labour shortages and the fuel price, that kind of thing. to see that report today, 150 pages, laying bare the various mistakes that were made over the last 18 months, it is, i think, quite something, especially given it has the names of two former conservative cabinet ministers on it, on the front cover, who carried out the inquiry. no surprise that the political opponents of the government will continue to attack on this. but i don't think this report gives them any fresh ammunition.— report gives them any fresh ammunition. ., ,._ ammunition. the government will say, but look at the — ammunition. the government will say, but look at the vaccine _ ammunition. the government will say, but look at the vaccine roll-out, - but look at the vaccine roll—out, that has been massively successful, especially compared with other parts of the world, but in terms of the science, we heard that the science was what politicians were following an at times people would not believe it but now it seems that some of the science was wrong as well. the re ort science was wrong as well. the report does _ science was wrong as well. the report does not _ science was wrong as well. tue: report does not name science was wrong as well. tte:
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report does not name names science was wrong as well. "tte: report does not name names but science was wrong as well. t'te: report does not name names but it talks about a mindset and within thatis talks about a mindset and within that is the scientific and medical advisors that are part of the government are notjust advisors that are part of the government are not just the advisors that are part of the government are notjust the senior ministers, and if you look back to the start of the pandemic, ministers are saying it is all well and good at saying this with the benefit of hindsight but there were scientific voices very early in march last year who said we need to lock down and we need to go much further, and ultimately they had to heed that. the report points out other countries did things differently, may be doing things better, certainly in the first half of the pandemic, asjeremy hunt said, and it references taiwan and south korea for their efforts in getting a functioning test and trace system up and running, something the report concludes that britain did not really manage to do. certainly early on when we did not have the testing capacity, but the second half is the vaccine roll—out and the decisions made about that were early in the pandemic as well as late because we bought up a lot of vaccines as a country and that enabled us to stay
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ahead of the game when it came to the roll—out. ahead of the game when it came to the roll-out— the roll-out. peter, thanks for “oininr the roll-out. peter, thanks for joining us- _ judy downey is chair of the relatives and residents association which represents people in care homes. she is also a former policy advisor at the department of health and was a care home inspector. what is your reaction to this report? tt what is your reaction to this re ort? , , what is your reaction to this reort? , what is your reaction to this reort? . report? it says something which we can all relate _ report? it says something which we can all relate to, _ report? it says something which we can all relate to, but _ report? it says something which we can all relate to, but the _ report? it says something which we can all relate to, but the figures - can all relate to, but the figures are actually disgusting, we are talking about over 43,000 people dying in care homes with covid on their death certificate. it also sounds a bit complacent because it isn't over. there are people in care homes now who are still not getting visits, who are being tended to by people in ppe and not recognising whether they are allowed visitors or
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not, this has had a devastating effect on the care home sector. right from the beginning, public health england wrote a letter saying that people in care homes, and these were older people in care homes, it said, they were very unlikely to get infected. they knew that older people were most at risk, where were they, what world were they in? where was the regulator in telling public health england about the needs of people in care homes? it is heartbreaking to hear them saying, the first half was awful, the second half is ok, but it still isn't ok. care homes cannot recruit workers because they are thought of as places where people go to die and people don't want to work in care homes and the government has still
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not got any plans to invest in care homes and to properly train people working in care homes. we are very worried that this is going to be a report that papers over the cracks and we still haven't learned some real lessons. aha, and we still haven't learned some real lessons.— and we still haven't learned some real lessons. a lot of people would a . ree with real lessons. a lot of people would agree with you. — real lessons. a lot of people would agree with you, that _ real lessons. a lot of people would agree with you, that there - real lessons. a lot of people would agree with you, that there needs l real lessons. a lot of people would | agree with you, that there needs to be recommendations to avoid this happening again, so what more would you want to know, what further detail would you want, and the scope of the inquiry we are supposed to be having next bring about what would you want that to be? ? next spring, what would you want that to be? t what would you want that to be? i would want them to understand what care needs are and avoid foolish examples like saying, protect the nhs, as though people going into the nhs, as though people going into the nhs are a different species from people needing care and care homes.
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they are not a different species. they are not a different species. they are not a different species. they are us needing care because we are older or because we have got learning disabilities or we are physically disabled. or we have got depression and we are being looked after in a home. we actually need to stop separating people with certain needs from other people with needs. we are one society and we are linked to each other. my brother died in a care home and it is not all right. it is still not all right. we have got to treat care homes as looking after people who need health care and other sorts of care. the turnover that there is in care homes is higher than in any other sector in the country. it is no good calling them wonderful and clapping for them. calling them wonderful and clapping forthem. if calling them wonderful and clapping
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for them. if we don't pay them properly and don't train them properly and don't train them properly and don't respect them properly. properly and don't respect them ro erl . . , properly and don't respect them --roerl. ., , ., properly and don't respect them --roerl. ., ., . properly. finally, how problematic is it that the _ properly. finally, how problematic is it that the social _ properly. finally, how problematic is it that the social care _ properly. finally, how problematic is it that the social care in - properly. finally, how problematic is it that the social care in this - is it that the social care in this country, care homes are partly run by councils and local authorities, partly run privately, and both types are necessary because we need that capacity, but they are left of their own devices and the private sector felt they were outside and having to fend for themselves, how does that need to be looked at for the future? it is another example of the sort of public health failure because their homes were competing with other sectors for ppe and we even heard stories of some homes getting supplies from casualty because they had more ppe than the home had. it is a story of care being thought of as an afterthought and is not as important as the nhs. nobody seems to understand that there is
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something like 120,000 beds in the nhs and something like 500,000 beds in the care sector. who was protecting who? it is as though the government have this skewed idea that there is a tiny little sector which hasn't got much to do with us, and it is the government that helped to create this huge disparity as well because it is notjust a small difference between publicly provided care by local authorities and privately provided care, over 80% of the care is in the private sector and about 15% in the voluntary sector and a tiny tiny percentage now in the local authority sector which means that local authorities have no longer got the experience of
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providing care. the whole business of comic if you have a complaint, you are left on your own ? the whole business of, if you have a complaint, you are left on your own, nobody is interested.— nobody is interested. thanks for “oininr nobody is interested. thanks for joining us- _ the prime minister is expected to back a financial package to support industries struggling with soaring gas prices. business ministers made a formal request for help to the treasury yesterday. the plans could involve giving affected sectors hundreds of millions of pounds�* worth of loans. ben king reports. making paper requires a lot of energy. they spend £60,000 a week on energy at this cumbria mill, where they have been rolling out sheets of paper since 1845. recent surges in energy costs are making life difficult for companies like this up and down the country. if the prices continue to go up and up, it means that you don't have the money to spend in some other areas.
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we are continuing to spend in those areas here, but some of those industries are just going to have to stop recruiting, stop investing, and hopefully they might not have to go the other way, but perhaps they do as well. this graph shows how rapidly prices have risen. gas costs more than double what it cost as recently as july. and it looks like help is on the way. the chancellor is considering a package of measures worth hundreds of millions of pounds for businesses struggling to keep factories open. it is likely to cover glass, steel and ceramics, businesses which spend huge amounts on energy, even in normal times. and it is expected to come in the form of loans, not grants. government will want to be paid back when those factories are profitable again. it is a difficult time, with people worried about energy costs, but of course we continue to engage with industry, we continue to be in talks to support the sector. but are loans the right answer for companies which have already borrowed millions to make it through the pandemic?
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obviously, any support is helpful. but we are just at a point where businesses are starting to pay back covid loans, they have got really depleted resources from covid, and loans really are not the right way to go, they absolutely need grant support and measures like reducing vat and green levies on fuel. labour says the government should have seen this crisis coming. this problem has been a long time coming. for years, the government has been warned about this energy crisis. they haven't planned, they have not got a plan now to respond. any relief will be welcome for businesses at this acute phase of the crisis. but if energy costs don't come down soon, there is only one way they will be able to live with it, and that is bypassing those costs onto their customers, and ultimately that means us. ben king, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... a damning report from mps who call
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the government's early handling of the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failure in uk history, costing thousands of lives. the report criticised the chaotic system and of test and trace, and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily. the prime minister is expected to give the go—ahead to financial support to firms struggling with the soaring costs of energy. there are more signs the jobs market is recovering in the wake of the pandemic. market is recovering the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit a record high of 1.1 million, the most since records began 20 years ago. the figures from the office for national statistics cover the three months to september. but there are some concerns that if companies offer pay rises as they compete to attract more workers, it could lead to inflation and higher interest rates. our economics corresponent andy verity reports. in this post—pandemic world, if you have this skill,
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you won't have to compete for work. employers will compete for you. since brexit, there is no longer the same flow of skilled workers from eastern europe and construction companies are having to pay more and more for the right staff. recognising they are in high demand, bricklayers in particular are going back to their contractors, asking for higher and higher pay. we are paying people what we need to pay them to attract them to come to work for us because the labour market is so hot at the moment. but what we are not seeing is the productivity of those people adding value to our business on all levels and at all times, and that is what businesses need. in order for businesses to be sustainable and to grow, particularly as a small business, we need our productivity to be reflected in the increase in wages that we're paying. construction workers' pay has jumped by 9.7% this year. in the finance and business services sector, pay is rising even faster, up 11.1%.
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overall, stripping out distortions, the official estimate is that average earnings are up somewhere between 4.1 and 5.6%. the negative affect of labour shortages is most obvious in specialised jobs, from tanker drivers to hospital workers. but economists warn that in spite of record vacancies of 1.1 million, there are still large parts of the economy where it is hard to find work. i think it is quite a complicated picture. if you are skilled and you're looking to work as a lorry driver, then, yes, there's lots of vacancies out there, but if you are, for example, doing the types of roles that many older workers do, if, for example, you're looking for work in london, actually the vacancy rates are really not very high at all and competition in the labour market is really quite fierce. with the recovery from the pandemic slowing down in recent months, the bank of england governor andrew bailey recently recognised that inflation might not be as temporary as he thought, meaning earlier rises in interest rates are now likely to try and prevent the economy
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overheating, pushing up inflation even higher. until a few weeks ago, few economists would have put money on an interest rate rise any time before the end of next year or the year after. now in the city they are giving 50—50 odds that we will get one in december, up to 0.25%, and then another one by may, up to 0.5%. post—pandemic and post—brexit, one old economic ailment — wages that don't keep up with prices — appears for now to have been cured, at least in the private sector. living standards on average are now rising, but the surge in the cost of living no longer looks as temporary as it once did. andy verity, bbc news. meanwhile, the institute for fiscal studies has warned there's no room for big spending announcements in this month's budget. the think tank said that chancellor rishi sunak will be short on money, due to growing spending on the nhs, and an economy that's smaller than projected pre—pandemic. it's despite plans for the biggest rise in taxes
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for more than 25 years. the uk will set out its demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when the brexit minister, lord frost, makes a speech in lisbon. the protocol, agreed by both sides, prevents a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu s single market for goods. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. where we always start, what is the background? the where we always start, what is the background?— background? the northern ireland -rotocol background? the northern ireland rotocol is background? the northern ireland protocol is the _ background? the northern ireland protocol is the northern _ background? the northern ireland protocol is the northern ireland i protocol is the northern ireland part of the deal that took us out of the eu and this is what it does, it sets up a series of checks and controls between great britain and northern ireland, so inside the uk, and that has made it more difficult to send stuff from great britain to northern ireland and the reason it does that is because both sides agreed there should not be a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, an important part of the peace process, and when the map zooms out you understand why that is also important to the eu because ireland
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is part of the wider eu single market, so when things are in ireland it can travel anywhere across the eu. and so for them, that is an important thing that they need to protect them at the borders to the external market, but for the uk the external market, but for the uk the government is arguing that this is preventing us trading freely between one part of the country and another and specifically for unionists in northern ireland, they say it is putting the constitutional position of northern ireland within the uk under threat, so it was a bit of a mess over all but both sides agreed to it in 2019.— of a mess over all but both sides agreed to it in 2019. what does the uk want now? _ agreed to it in 2019. what does the uk want now? wholesale _ agreed to it in 2019. what does the uk want now? wholesale change i agreed to it in 2019. what does the uk want now? wholesale change in agreed to it in 2019. what does the i uk want now? wholesale change in a coule of uk want now? wholesale change in a coople of words. _ uk want now? wholesale change in a couple of words, and _ uk want now? wholesale change in a couple of words, and there _ uk want now? wholesale change in a couple of words, and there are - couple of words, and there are several things they are asking for, they want to get rid of all customs checks because at the moment there has to be customs checks. they want a regime of dual regulations which means stuff circulating in northern ireland can either meet eu standards or uk standards but at the moment they have to meet the former but if
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they have to meet the former but if they can meet uk standards as well, you don't need those checks on sandwiches and things going across from one side to the other. one thing we will hear especially from lord frost, his speech is in about an hour, get rid of any role for the european court ofjustice in overseeing the agreement, the uk says it is not fair that the court on one side is the arbiter between two sides. the on one side is the arbiter between two sides. , .,' . ., , two sides. the eu is officially aaivin its two sides. the eu is officially giving its response _ two sides. the eu is officially giving its response tomorrowj two sides. the eu is officially - giving its response tomorrow but times have been wagging in advance and we already know quite a bit. lord frost is getting his reply in before they have even released it publicly. what the eu says is they have listened to what the uk once and they are going to scrap a lot of controls ? wants. for example, the ban on chilled meat would not be pursued, so the sausage walls would come to an end. you would be able to send the great british sausage to northern ireland and overall they are talking about more flexibility and making sure that perhaps the way
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that the agreement is interpreted is a bit less legalistic. taking account of the sensitivities and political, economic and otherwise, but the most important point, no renegotiation of the actual agreement itself which is what the uk is calling for. that will be one place where they rub up against each other, so what is the nuclear option? forthe uk other, so what is the nuclear option? for the uk we have talked about it before, article 16 of the protocol which allows either side to suspend parts of the deal if it is causing what are known as economic or social difficulties, that is what the text says, and the uk says that is happening at the moment and the eu says you have not even giving it a proper chance to implement the dealfully and you a proper chance to implement the deal fully and you are already complaining so that is another point of tension. what could the eu do in response? if the uk triggered article 16, the eu will respond, but a question of how quickly it
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ratchets up the response, the ultimate response could be to suspend entirely the free trade agreement between the whole of the uk and the eu, so you are talking fairly major trade war. but the tough talk on both sides could just be tough talk in advance of a negotiation over the next few weeks which comes up with another agreement, but either way itjust feels like the issue of northern ireland is going to drag on for years and years and its complex data is half in the eu and half out but part of the uk. is half in the eu and half out but part of the uk-— part of the uk. chris, thanks for “oininr part of the uk. chris, thanks for joining us- _ part of the uk. chris, thanks for joining us- very _ part of the uk. chris, thanks for joining us. very well— part of the uk. chris, thanks for joining us. very well explained. | g20 leaders have been holding a virtual summit to discuss afghanistan after the taliban's takeover there. leaders, including us presidentjoe biden, are exploring ways to stop afghanistan again becoming a base for international terrorism, and how they can prevent a humanitarian crisis there with food prices and unemployment sprialling.
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yogita limaye is in kabulfor us and explained what some of are the every day challenges are facing people in afghanistan. it was difficult even before august the 15th, we have seen ourselves tens of thousands of people displaced because of the fighting, who had lost theirjobs, homes, members of theirfamily, staying in open places with just a bamboo stick dug into the ground, pieces of cloth strung between them as shelter, no access to basic food, medicines, sanitation. the un says 18 million people are in urgent need of life—saving support, that was the situation prior to august the 15th. it has become even worse now because lots of the foreign funds flowing into afghanistan since then, that were through the government here, have been frozen since august 15th. a short while ago we heard the european commission president pledging 1 billion euros in aid
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to this country but specifically saying this is humanitarian assistance that will be sent through international agencies like the un and other humanitarian agencies operating on the ground. it is separate to development aid which was being given to the government of afghanistan prior to the 15th of august. it is a difficult situation in front of the global community because there are in people in dire need here, but at the same time this government has seized control of the country and it is not a government that countries around the world recognise at the moment, so the question for the global community is how to continue to support the people of afghanistan without giving funds to the hands of a government you do not recognise, without giving funds away without being sure about where they are going to be used. the other challenge is about holding the taliban to account about some of the commitments made during the doha agreement with the us in february 2020.
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for example, they said they were committed to women's rights. they were not against girls going to school, they weren't against women going to work. at the moment, most women can't go to work, girls in most of afghanistan can't attend secondary schools. yogita limaye in kabul. here's the weather with. quite a lot of cloud but there are some sunny spells as well and the clouds have been pretty thin in the north coast of scotland and some good breaks in the south as well, at the thickest of the cloud in the more central part of the uk and also along the north sea coast. temperatures between 14—15 but where the sunshine comes out it is up to around 17. not much change tonight and again we have some dampness across the north of scotland and this has been a repeating pattern for the last couple of days. where
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this sky is clear and the winds for light of that is where we will have the lowest temperatures, five degrees in parts of east anglia. tomorrow, a dry day for most, a bit of drizzle in the north—west highlands the western isles, but a dry, bright sort of day with temperatures up to around 17.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular how a slowness to lockdown, did have consequences and we have got to confront the lessons. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving
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infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died in vain. i think she lost her life because of mistakes — i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i_ government. and i want to know about that, iwant— government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial— that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial enquiry. the prime minister is expected to give the go ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high as the jobs market continues to recover from the pandemic. efforts to recruit young black people are failing to have an impact on racial injustice at work, according to a new report. sport now and let's gt a full round—up from the bbc sports centre. good afternoon. england manager gareth southgate has suggested his team dont get the credit the deserve as they look to move a step closer to qualifying for next year's world cup in qatar. they face hungary at wembley tonight after an impressive victory away
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to andorra last time out in which phil foden and jadon sancho impressed. momentum is certainly with his side, having reached the semi finals of the last world cup and the final of the euros. but southgate said appreciation for their efforts can be hard to come by. we can't be a team that has a day off and _ we can't be a team that has a day off and we — we can't be a team that has a day off and we want to keep the consistency of performances, we've had that _ consistency of performances, we've had that definitely threw this calendar year. everybody knows there is competition for places, everybody knows _ is competition for places, everybody knows they— is competition for places, everybody knows they cannot afford the off and they have _ knows they cannot afford the off and they have got pride in putting the shirt on— they have got pride in putting the shirt on every time they play and they want— shirt on every time they play and they want to show what they are capable — they want to show what they are capable of as a team. chelsea midfielder mason mount could feature later, fresh from being named on the list of nominees for football's prestigious ballon d'or. hejoins lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo alongside harry kane, raheem sterling and phil foden, who are also named on the 30 man shortlist, not that he expects to win it when the winner
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is announced at the end of november. it was special. i probably found out exactly the same time as everyone else. to see that, to see the names, to be alongside those names, it is obviously a dream and i think for all the years that you work hard, dedicate, then you see something like that, you can see that it pays off. and it's just a start, it doesn't stop now. scotland can get one of the two wins they need to secure a place in the play offs, after their thrilling comeback against israel on saturday. they're taking on the faroe islands. steve clarke's side are second in group f, seven points behind leaders denmark but four ahead of israel and austria. ijust borrow these players. i borrow them for ten days at the moment every month. and then you go into the winter and you don't see them, i don't see them in december, january, february, get them together again in march. so the fact that we can keep
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that bond, and keep that togetherness within the group is really important. if you want to be successful, the better your group of players, the more together they are, then the more chance you have to be successful. but northern ireland's world cup hopes were effectively ended by losing to switzerland on saturday. that left them third in their group on five points only above tonight's opponents bulgaria on goal difference. british number one dan evans is out of the indian wells masters in california after losing to argentina's diego schwartzman. but better news for cameron norrie, who continued his excellent run of form coming through a 3 set battle with the spaniard roberto bautista agut to reach the last 16. it's a busy few months for england's cricketers. the white ball squad are in oman preparing to add the t20 title to the 50 over world cup win. but with the ashes on the horizon too, all rounder chrisjordan says there's no danger
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of the players becoming distracted. the ashes is quite a big event and it's quite — the ashes is quite a big event and it's quite unique _ the ashes is quite a big event and it's quite unique circumstances. the ashes is quite a big event and it's quite unique circumstances asj it's quite unique circumstances as to what's— it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going _ it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on _ it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on around - it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on around it. - it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on around it. thel to what's going on around it. the talk and — to what's going on around it. the talk and all— to what's going on around it. the talk and all of _ to what's going on around it. the talk and all of the _ to what's going on around it. the talk and all of the dissecting - to what's going on around it. the talk and all of the dissecting of l to what's going on around it. the talk and all of the dissecting of itj talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty— talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal— talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal in _ talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal in this _ talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal in this day - talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal in this day and l is pretty normal in this day and age _ is pretty normal in this day and age everyone _ is pretty normal in this day and age. everyone involved - is pretty normal in this day and age. everyone involved in- is pretty normal in this day and age. everyone involved in the i is pretty normal in this day and - age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone _ age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is— age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is fully _ age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is fully focused _ age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is fully focused on - age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is fully focused on the - everyone is fully focused on the task at— everyone is fully focused on the task at hanq _ everyone is fully focused on the task at hand.— everyone is fully focused on the task at hand. katie archibald will headfine task at hand. katie archibald will headline a 19 _ task at hand. katie archibald will headline a 19 strong _ task at hand. katie archibald will headline a 19 strong gb - task at hand. katie archibald will headline a 19 strong gb squad i task at hand. katie archibald will headline a 19 strong gb squad at| task at hand. katie archibald will. headline a 19 strong gb squad at the upcoming track cycling world championships having collected three european commonwealth golds and gold in the madison at the tokyo olympics she heads up the team in france. she will bejoined by she heads up the team in france. she will be joined by fellow olympics silver list near evans in the squad.
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that's all the sport for now. i thought you had some surfing dogs. that was earlier on. i don't know how often we can roll out the surfing dogs. how often we can roll out the surfing dogs— how often we can roll out the surfing dogs-— how often we can roll out the surfing dogs. every hour for the whole day _ surfing dogs. every hour for the whole day probably! _ surfing dogs. every hour for the whole day probably! we - surfing dogs. every hour for the whole day probably! we need . surfing dogs. every hour for the - whole day probably! we need some right relief ? light relief! efforts to recruit young black people are failing to have an impact on racial injustice at work according to a new report form the institute of student employers. it's calling for more support for black graduates particularly from those in senior leadership positions. the report outlined that whilst 54% have a strategy to attract black candidates and 44% track retention, just 22% provide dedicated support during early careers. here with me now is kiki onwinde, who is the founder of the black young professionals network which helps bridge the gap between black professionals and coporations.
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we have outlined some of the problems but what are the particular barriers that you find people face? there are quite a few. as the report highlighted, a lot of black students come from diverse areas and they find themselves in a workplace that doesn't look like them and nobody understands the challenges they face because they are feeling like somebody who doesn't really belong. then within that there is people undermining them because there is nobody else that looks like them in the organisation solely already think they might not be good enough for the role or they have to micromanage them even though that's not the case. a lot of black students or professionals have to outperform or over perform to be seen but would least feel like they
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are on the same standing as their white counterparts. and within the organisation because of the lack of black leaders it is hard to see themselves being promoted for progression or they have to be a trailblazer. you can imagine all these different barriers on top of these different barriers on top of the fact that maybe they have not interacted with people in work that much so they don't understand how to engage properly in the way the organisation might want them to. companies talk about culture fit. there are a lot of barriers. hagar there are a lot of barriers. how helful there are a lot of barriers. how helpful or _ there are a lot of barriers. how helpful or otherwise _ there are a lot of barriers. how helpful or otherwise are - there are a lot of barriers. how helpful or otherwise are quotas and targets for attracting of certain number of black employees? that is one wa of number of black employees? that is one way of bringing _ number of black employees? that is one way of bringing them _ number of black employees? that is one way of bringing them in - number of black employees? that is one way of bringing them in but - number of black employees? that is one way of bringing them in but i . one way of bringing them in but i think part of the big problem is to retain black talent and the progression plans in the promotional plans. we are letting him feel like they are in the organisation. i
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actually came through an internship many years ago into investment banking but found myself as one of the only black people in the organisation and then i felt like nobody really understood that silver needs to be that kind of quota may be to get them in but how are you going to make sure they stay and feel like they belong? everyone in the organisation needs to buy in to the organisation needs to buy in to the fact you're trying improve diversity. the fact you're trying improve diversi . ., , ., , ., diversity. how helpfulwould be a reverse mentoring _ diversity. how helpfulwould be a reverse mentoring process - diversity. how helpful would be a l reverse mentoring process because often a mentally who is more senior to try and bring on some remote junior. but how useful would it be to turn the tables on that? it would be su er to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. _ to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. we _ to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. we have _ to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. we have a - to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. we have a lot - to turn the tables on that? it would be super useful. we have a lot of i be super useful. we have a lot of corporate partners that you reverse mentoring so they have their senior leaders who are predominantly white or not black being mentored by the blackjunior employee or black staff so they get to understand the black experience a bit more. we also host a mentorship programme where employees dotted that they can
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understand how to get into the firm and what it would be like. you understand how to get into the firm and what it would be like.— and what it would be like. you say understand _ and what it would be like. you say understand of _ and what it would be like. you say understand of the _ and what it would be like. you say understand of the black _ and what it would be like. you say | understand of the black experience but how can anybody ever truly understand the black experience if they are not black? thea;r understand the black experience if they are not black?— they are not black? they can understand _ they are not black? they can understand it _ they are not black? they can understand it through - they are not black? they can i understand it through learning they are not black? they can - understand it through learning and engaging. what we tend to find as if your network is diverse you won't even have an understanding of what that black employee next you might be going through. you don't know their home situation and what they have had to overcome to be in employment or be in that organisation and how they are feeling with the lack of diversity. for example last year with black lives matter a lot of them please talk to their black employees and asked them to tell the more or to educate themselves on the situation. so it does help a lot. we have a leadership conference at the end of the month which has a lot of black
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professional students attending and it's all about that education of seeing black role models and leaders but also how you can thrive in an organisation and how those who are not black can also support black students and employees.- not black can also support black students and employees. thank you ve much students and employees. thank you very much for— students and employees. thank you very much for talking _ students and employees. thank you very much for talking to _ students and employees. thank you very much for talking to us. - they have trimmed their expectations for how much the global economy will grow this year to 5.9%. michelle fleury is in new york. it sounds pretty healthy but what more are they saying? the pretty healthy but what more are they saying?— pretty healthy but what more are they saying? pretty healthy but what more are the sa in: ? , , . , they saying? the big picture here is ou are they saying? the big picture here is you are seeing _ they saying? the big picture here is you are seeing the _ they saying? the big picture here is you are seeing the global— they saying? the big picture here is you are seeing the global economy| you are seeing the global economy recovering from the pandemic but the
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easy part, the sharp bounce back is perhaps beginning to tail off. the momentum of it is slowing down. that is at the heart of it. then they go through in this report listing reasons why that momentum is slowing down. the big thing they talk about was inflation. is not an inflation ? not on how these people have been buying more goods but supply has not been able to keep up. you hear about truck driver shortages and the price of food and all sorts of problems and that has lasted longer than the anticipated leading to inflation being a bigger concern than they had previously thought and that could result in central bank raising interest rates.— result in central bank raising interest rates. also the disparity between access _ interest rates. also the disparity between access to _ interest rates. also the disparity between access to the _ interest rates. also the disparity between access to the vaccines. between access to the vaccines against covid have also been highlighted. how is that relevant? on the one hand you have got countries like the uk and the us which is seeing strong growth so
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even though they have downgraded those forecasts because inflation they are still seeing huge advantages. on the other hand, the imf is saying that developing countries and poor countries are struggling and they are worried this pandemic has widened the gap and one of the things they talk about is this vaccine divide, that you have got countries like the uk which have had strong vaccine roll—outs and it has helped their economy grow faster but encoded ? poorer countries they are still struggling to get their firstjob. so there is this note of the world needs to come together and do more to try and get access to vaccines for these poorer countries. add to that the fact that many of these polar countries have spent as much money as the government can borrow, they have rising food costs and now energy costs, the problems are becoming insurmountable to some of these countries and that is what
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the imf is concerned about. two people have been injured after a train crashed through buffers at a station in north london. around 50 people were evacuated after the incident involving a london overground train at enfield town station during rush hour this morning. safety inspectors from the rail regulator are investigating what happened. the queen has attended a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the royal british legion. for a hundred years the charity has been helping armed forces, veterans and the wider military family with its famous poppy appeal. our royal correspondent nick witchell was there. a real sense of business as usual at westminster abbey this morning with the service attended by the queen, a full—size congregation, hinge being sung and the queen attended with the princess royal and no sense at all of any lightening of the load on her six months on since the death of a
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husband. she has spent the summer at balmoral but now back beginning a busy programme of autumn engagements. this one, a service to mark the centenary of the royal british legion set up in the years after the first world war to support the service community returning from the service community returning from the western front and century of service to the armed forces. with me as the national president of the royal british legion. mercifully, no woes at the moment so what do you see as the principal role of the royal british legion now? the lesion is still dealing _ royal british legion now? the lesion is still dealing with _ royal british legion now? the lesion is still dealing with the _ royal british legion now? the lesion is still dealing with the aftermath - is still dealing with the aftermath of the _ is still dealing with the aftermath of the second world war, the korean war, northern ireland, the falklands to name _ war, northern ireland, the falklands to name a _ war, northern ireland, the falklands to name a few. many of our beneficiaries are getting old and we are sophisticated and expensive treatment and care to allow them to continue _ treatment and care to allow them to continue to— treatment and care to allow them to continue to live their lives. that is a huge — continue to live their lives. that is a huge demand on us. we are also finding _ is a huge demand on us. we are also finding a _ is a huge demand on us. we are also finding a lot — is a huge demand on us. we are also finding a lot of people who come to us for— finding a lot of people who come to us for mental injuries, certainly
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from _ us for mental injuries, certainly from recent campaigns. so the demand in 2019. _ from recent campaigns. so the demand in 2019. we _ from recent campaigns. so the demand in 2019, we raised more money and .ave in 2019, we raised more money and gave more — in 2019, we raised more money and gave more money than any other previous— gave more money than any other previous year. and gave more money than any other previous year-— previous year. and of course a critical moment _ previous year. and of course a critical moment the _ previous year. and of course a critical moment the year - previous year. and of course a critical moment the year for i previous year. and of course a i critical moment the year for you previous year. and of course a - critical moment the year for you now within the next two weeks as we approach remembrance. remembrance is one of the key — approach remembrance. remembrance is one of the key aspects _ approach remembrance. remembrance is one of the key aspects of— approach remembrance. remembrance is one of the key aspects of our— one of the key aspects of our charter~ _ one of the key aspects of our charter. we need at the nation to remember— charter. we need at the nation to remember and charter. we need at the nation to rememberand we have charter. we need at the nation to remember and we have got the festival— remember and we have got the festival of remembrance which i hope will go _ festival of remembrance which i hope will go ahead as normal and then we have the _ will go ahead as normal and then we have the big event on the cenotaph on the _ have the big event on the cenotaph on the sunday and we have a huge march— on the sunday and we have a huge march past— on the sunday and we have a huge march past the veterans plan. 30 on the sunday and we have a huge march past the veterans plan. so the lesion as relevant _ march past the veterans plan. so the lesion as relevant today _ march past the veterans plan. so the lesion as relevant today as _ march past the veterans plan. so the lesion as relevant today as it - march past the veterans plan. so the lesion as relevant today as it has - lesion as relevant today as it has been. . , ,., , ~' been. absolutely. i think we will continue to _ been. absolutely. i think we will continue to be _ been. absolutely. i think we will continue to be here. _ been. absolutely. i think we will continue to be here. we - been. absolutely. i think we will continue to be here. we are - been. absolutely. i think we will continue to be here. we are not| continue to be here. we are not going _ continue to be here. we are not going anywhere and we will continue to raise _ going anywhere and we will continue to raise money and support our veteran — to raise money and support our veteran community. the headlines on bbc news. a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst
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public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died in vain. the prime minister is expected to give the go ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. former little mix starjesy nelson has denied that she s blackfishing in the video for her new song. the term is used by some to describe people who change the way they look to appear darker. little mix are the uk s biggest girl band right now butjesy left the group last year. in a moment we'll be speak to newsbeat music reporter steve holden but first let's watch jesy�*s appearance in the music video boyz.
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let's speak to steve holden newsbeat music reporter. tell us more about this term blackfishing and how exactly she is alleged to have done it? $5 blackfishing and how exactly she is alleged to have done it?— alleged to have done it? as you mentioned. _ alleged to have done it? as you mentioned, this _ alleged to have done it? as you mentioned, this word _ alleged to have done it? as you mentioned, this word is - alleged to have done it? as you mentioned, this word is when i mentioned, this word is when somebody who is white or caucasian are accused of essentially pretending to be black or mixed race for personal gain and the profit. it can be done through the way they are dressed, dark tanning, hairstyle, certain make—up and some say it's wrong for white people to gain or profit by styling themselves and using these largely black characteristics when black people have themselves held back for having those same characteristics. so in the video, jessie, has a darker tan, she is wearing wigs, basketball shorts, lots of stereotypically
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black characteristics. she says she wants the bad boys and many of whom in the video are black. so she's got a backlash from people online and on social media saying she is blackfishing.— social media saying she is blackfishing. social media saying she is blackfishin.. ~ ., , blackfishing. what has she said about it? she _ blackfishing. what has she said about it? she denies _ blackfishing. what has she said about it? she denies it. - blackfishing. what has she said about it? she denies it. she . blackfishing. what has she said l about it? she denies it. she went blackfishing. what has she said - about it? she denies it. she went on an instagram — about it? she denies it. she went on an instagram live _ about it? she denies it. she went on an instagram live last _ about it? she denies it. she went on an instagram live last night - about it? she denies it. she went on an instagram live last night with - an instagram live last night with her collaborator and said she never intended to offend any person of colour. she said the music that she was singing about was music that she loved, it was the music she drew upon, it was the culture that she liked. almost that she wanted it to be hot marriage. on his skin tone she said she had been on holiday before she had made the video and thatis before she had made the video and that is a white person who skin tans very darkly. she did say that her former band—mate had mentioned this phrase blackfishing to her on the set of the final music video. jessie
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left little nicks last year and one final video with them and leanne pinnock had mentioned this. this was meant to be a big moment for her, her big debut solo single after leaving little nicks. her collaborator, nicky maynard, said she deserved to have this moment in the spotlight. she deserved to have this moment in the spotlight-— the spotlight. what does this mean for any future _ the spotlight. what does this mean for any future relationship - the spotlight. what does this mean for any future relationship between j for any future relationship between jesse nelson and little nicks? than? jesse nelson and little nicks? any little mix fan _ jesse nelson and little nicks? any little mix fan will _ jesse nelson and little nicks? 2'ny little mix fan will know they are built on the sisterhood. i have interviewed them many times and they are tight, they were never really in the tabloids for infighting. they got on so well. and whenjesse left because jesse has got on so well. and whenjesse left becausejesse has had her own problems with mental health and she did a documentary and her band—mate did a documentary and her band—mate did a documentary and her band—mate did a non—racism in the music industry, even whenjesse left the
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band nothing bad was said about her ljy band nothing bad was said about her by her bandmates and vice versa. so a lot of fans are struggling with this seemingly split, this and friending between little mix the band and the former band—mate. and i think for the moment whilst everybody has got their eyes on jesse nelson and her solo career they are going to be wondering what little nicks are feeling about this. the band has not said anything publicly aboutjesse nelson and this controversy and jesse nelson has not said much about little mix either. so we don't know what they are saying in private but it's being played out a lot on social media at the moment. the creators of the new superman have revealed he's bisexual in the next edition of his adventures. jonathan kent, the son of clark kent and lois lane, will share a kiss with a budding malejournalist. dc comics made the announcement on national coming out day, an annual lgbt awareness day started in the united states. courtney bembridge has more.
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a superman as we've never seen him before. dc comics say the son of clark kent and lois lane, jon kent, is coming out as bisexual. the creators say the man of steel has always stood for hope, truth and justice, and now represents something more. when i was offered this job, i thought, well, if we're going to have a new superman for the dc universe, it feels like a missed opportunity to have another straight, white saviour. dc comics publisherjim lee said in a statement... we have seen a lot of lgbt superheroes in the past couple of decades, and some of them are not quite household names, but when you can attach something like this to the name superman, who is known around the world, people will pay attention. the comic isn't due to be released until november, but there's been plenty of reaction online already.
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the reactions have been... honestly, they have been overwhelmingly positive, which i wasn't quite expecting. yes, there's a lot of trolling online, but there are so many people reaching out in so many different languages saying what this means to them. i'm seeing tweets from people saying that they burst into tears when they read the news, that they wished that superman was this when they were growing up, that they could see themselves. and people are saying for the first time ever, they are seeing themselves in superman, something they never thought was possible. his sexuality isn't the only way the character has been updated. in recent editions, he has been advocating for refugees and fighting the climate crisis. is it a bird? is it a plane? or is it social change? courtney bembridge, bbc news. a new musical based on not one, but two, famous tom jonses, is making its world premiere in birmingham.
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�*what s new pussycat�* combines music from the welsh superstar sir tom jones, with the plot of the 18th century novel tom jones by henry fielding. our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson, has been finding out more. # na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na, na...# tom jones — not that one — singing the hits of tom jones. 18th century literary creation and 20th century welsh pop sensation merged together for a new musical, what's new pussycat? tom jones was much, much, much worse. henry fielding's tom jones was published in 1749. it told the tale of a young handsome man sleeping his way through society. the 1963 film version won best picture at the oscars... # my, my, my, delilah...# ..prompting a young welsh singer who at the time was performing under the name tommy scott, to start using tom jones.
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# it's not unusual to be loved by anyone.# now, almost 60 years later, the two toms have finally collided for this show. how much do you channel the tom jones singer on stage, and how much tom jones from the novel? i'd say it's about 60% tom jones from the novel, 40% tom jones, the singer. love tom jones, the singer, but it's not an imitation. but obviously you've got to channel a bit of tom jones, otherwise you're not going to get through those amazing numbers. # i wanna die...# five, six... pony! and helping to recreate swinging london, the choreographer arlene phillips. don't you change it. how would you rate the real tom jones' dancing over the years? very interesting. i would call tom jones a great mover. and he has his own moves, his own style. he doesn't exactly do dance steps, but i could watch him all the time. and as for sir tom jones, well,
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he's given the show his blessing, and next tuesday, he will attend the premiere. how much pressure will that be, singing the hits of tom jones in front of the man himself? i don't know. for me, i kind of get a kick out of it. i think it's going to be really fun. i'm just going to shout them at him and hope he enjoys. until you hear cries of, "you're doing it wrong!" from the audience. yeah — "it's wrong, it's wrong, dom!" let's go! colin paterson, bbc news, birmingham. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. quite a lot of cloud across the uk once again today but there are some sunny spells too. in fact the clouds have been pretty thin around the north—east of scotland and we've had some decent breaks across the south as well. the thickest of the cloud
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is across this most central part of the uk and also along the north sea coast. temperatures typically around 15 degrees but where the sun comes out for any period of time is up to around 17. not much change tonight. again we have some dampness across the north of scotland and this has been a repeating pattern for the last couple of days. where the skies clear overnight is where we'll have the lowest temperature so five degrees in parts of east anglia. tomorrow on the whole, a dry day for many of us with a little bit of rain and drizzle in the north—west and the western isles but a brightest day with temperatures up to around 17.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say lives were lost in vain. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government, and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.
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the prime minister is expected to give the go ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high as the jobs market continues to recover from the pandemic. and coming up shortly, we'll be in lisbon, where brexit minister lord frost will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol. good afternoon. one of the most important public health failures in uk history — that's the damning verdict of mps on the government's early response to the pandemic. a joint report by two commons committees says both ministers and scientists waited too long to lock down last year,
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costing many lives. and it says there were thousands of avoidable deaths in care homes. the report calls the test, trace and isolate system "slow, uncertain, and often chaotic", but there is praise for the vaccine rollout. our health correspondent jim reed reports. it is completely unimaginable, and we are not at the peak yet. in the spring of 2020 the government was, says this report, working in a fog of uncertainty. i'm shaking hands. i was in a hospital the other night where i think there were a few coronavirus patients, and i shook hands with everybody. scientists did not know how many were infected with covid or how fast the new virus was spreading. doctors and nurses were already struggling to cope. when we brought back people injanuary from wuhan, i was... for months now, two groups of mps have been taking evidence on the handling of the pandemic in england from people involved in key decisions at the time.
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now, in this joint report, they criticise that early response. instead of locking down quickly, like some other countries, they say the government's scientific advisers felt there was no choice but to bring in social distancing rules gradually, letting sporting events go ahead and keeping borders open, and they say ministers did not do enough to challenge that advice. what we conclude in this report is that the national response to covid was a bit like a football game with two very different halves, and in the first half, we had some serious errors, we could have avoided a lockdown, but having got into a position where we had to have one, we should have locked down earlier. but in the second half, we had the vaccine rollout, which we describe as the most effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration. some of the relatives of those who have died responded angrily to that comparison. this isn't a game. my mother didn't lose
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her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made. the final report goes on to describe the rollout of the test and trace programme in england as slow and chaotic. it claims that the uk did not impose rigourous border controls quickly, letting in high numbers of infections from overseas, and it says the risk to care homes was not recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the mantra about protecting the nhs is certainly solidified in this report, that that was what was happening. social care was very much an afterthought. the report, though, does also praise parts of the national response. the vaccine programme was picked out as a success, as were new treatments like dexamethasone, first developed for covid use in this country. the government says it has not shied away from taking quick actions when needed. we followed the scientific advice
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throughout, we protected the nhs from the surge of pressure that we saw in other countries such as italy. as you say, we got the vaccine deployed extremely quickly. but also, what we know about the pandemic now is very different to what the level of knowledge was at the start. labour, though, said the report showed monumental errors had been made. this was one of the worst public health failures in the uk. that is a damning indictment. and my thoughts are with the families who have lost people because of these failures by the government. the last year has seen the country come together in support of the nhs. this report is just the first study of its kind to look back at what mps call the biggest health crisis of the last century. next spring, a full, public inquiry will examine in detail what lessons should be learned from the pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. our political correspondent
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pete saulljoins us now from westminster. many people say they now need much more detail, this isjust a preliminary report. more detail, this is 'ust a preliminary reporth more detail, this is 'ust a preliminary report. this report is 150 “aes preliminary report. this report is 150 pages long. _ preliminary report. this report is 150 pages long, the _ preliminary report. this report is 150 pages long, the first - preliminary report. this report is 150 pages long, the first bit - preliminary report. this report is 150 pages long, the first bit of i 150 pages long, the first bit of detailed analysis we have had it since the pandemic and the two committees of mps heard a lot of evidence over recent months, some of the seniorfigures at evidence over recent months, some of the senior figures at the heart of the senior figures at the heart of the decision—making process for the government, the most famous session was with the former top adviser, dominic cummings, perhaps, in which he really attacked an awful lot of individuals for their decisions at the time. but actually this report does not really naming names to the extent that dominic cummings did, but it does chronologically go through various different mistakes that have happened along the way. from the delay in implementing the first lockdown, the lack of border controls, the discharge of patients from hospitals into the care sector,
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the lack of a functioning test and traced programme, the problems with racial disparities, the regional tier system, there is a lot of detail in there. as we move into the second half of the pandemic, it becomes much more about praising the government for the vaccine roll—out and the fact that earlier in the pandemic we bought up a lot of supplies of vaccine to put us in a better position than other countries later on. overall it does raise some pretty profound questions for the government. but in terms of the full public inquiry, that does not get under way until spring of next year, no sign from the government they will bring that forward. we are still waiting for details about what powers the inquiry will have, for example, and then how long it potentially might go on for because it might not report back and this is important politically, until after the next general election. peter, thanks forjoining _ the next general election. peter,
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thanks forjoining us. _ joining me now is professorjonathan ball of molecular virology at the university of nottingham. thanks forjoining us. what did you learn from this report that you did not already think was the case? nothing particularly new in the report but what it did do is reaffirm our understanding of what turned out as the outbreak of the pandemic progressed. and so it is definitely the case that early on the response was to slow and it was not widespread enough, and we certainly lacked testing capacity, we were one of the first countries to develop rapid pcr tests and yet it took a very long time to roll that out throughout the nhs but also to carry out wider community testing. that meant the virus once it had got onto our shores, it started to spread rapidly, in
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february last year, so it became almost impossible to control the virus and that is when we saw a change to try and protect the nhs. why did scientists not look at the experience of other countries and lockdown faster? stop people coming into the country earlier? given the fact that if we have not got the testing capacity, that is one thing, but these things could have been done without that.— but these things could have been done without that. absolutely. as ou look done without that. absolutely. as you look back. — done without that. absolutely. as you look back, very _ done without that. absolutely. as you look back, very early - done without that. absolutely. as you look back, very early in - done without that. absolutely. as you look back, very early in the i you look back, very early in the outbreak, when you saw how rapidly the virus was spreading in china, and very early doors we started to understand little bits about how the virus was behaving, and this was a virus was behaving, and this was a virus that could spread undetected so lots of people who were infected and had mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, and they were infectious to others, so that gave the virus a great advantage in its ability to spread. anybody travelling from
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outside wuhan in those early stages could potentially be affected without knowing. you virus would be spreading to all sorts of players in all corners of the world. ? the virus. as we look to cross into northern europe and into italy in particular, we saw the problem is the virus was causing there, and we are well connected with europe so it was obvious to many that the virus was obvious to many that the virus was making its way to our shores and yet at the time our control of the borders had focused on those places where there were reported outbreaks, especially in southeast asia and east asia. so the lack of border control allowed the virus to get in. why should members of the public trust scientists who advise the public in the future when they have got it wrong to this extent this
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time? it got it wrong to this extent this time? , . , got it wrong to this extent this time? , ., , , ., time? it is a interesting point about where _ time? it is a interesting point about where the _ time? it is a interesting point about where the blame - time? it is a interesting point about where the blame lies. i time? it is a interesting point i about where the blame lies. the re ort about where the blame lies. the report suggests it is politicians and scientists working together. there is may be a lack of communication and a lack of understanding about how real the threat was, and i know many people have said it is very easy to look back and say, it was obvious there was a big threat, but too many of my colleagues, we discussed it widely in virology circles and we said it was a virus that had a huge capacity to spread widely. but scientists were working on what they understood at the time and much of that understanding was modelled on what they knew about influenza. they were giving advice to the government but the government were then deciding on what advice or how to follow through on that advice and i think there was a lot of political decisions especially to keep the economy open, and also to make sure that life
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continued as normally as possible. unfortunately those early stages when we dragged our feet and a lot of that was political, i think it meant we gave the virus the opportunity to take hold and cause devastation in that first wave of infection. ~ . ., , ., infection. much more we still want to learn, infection. much more we still want to learn. next— infection. much more we still want to learn, next year, _ infection. much more we still want to learn, next year, if— infection. much more we still want to learn, next year, if the - infection. much more we still want to learn, next year, if the inquiry i to learn, next year, if the inquiry gets under way. professor, thank you. the prime minister is expected to back a financial package to support industries struggling with soaring gas prices. business ministers made a formal request for help to the treasury yesterday. the plans could involve giving affected sectors hundreds of millions of pounds�* worth of loans. ben king reports. making paper requires a lot of energy. they spend £60,000 a week on energy at this cumbria mill, where they have been rolling out sheets of paper since 1845. recent surges in energy costs
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are making life difficult for companies like this up and down the country. if the prices continue to go up and up, it means that you don�*t have the money to spend in some other areas. we are continuing to spend in those areas here, but some of those industries are just going to have to stop recruiting, stop investing, and hopefully they might not have to go the other way, but perhaps they do as well. this graph shows how rapidly prices have risen. gas costs more than double what it cost as recently as july. and it looks like help is on the way. the chancellor is considering a package of measures worth hundreds of millions of pounds for businesses struggling to keep factories open. it is likely to cover glass, steel and ceramics, businesses which spend huge amounts on energy, even in normal times. and it is expected to come in the form of loans, not grants. government will want to be paid back when those factories are profitable again. it is a difficult time, with people worried about energy costs,
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but, of course, we continue to engage with industry, we continue to be in talks to support the sector. but are loans the right answer for companies which have already borrowed millions to make it through the pandemic? obviously, any support is helpful. but we are just at a point where businesses are starting to pay back covid loans, they have got really depleted resources from covid, and loans really are not the right way to go, they absolutely need grant support and measures like reducing vat and green levies on fuel. labour says the government should have seen this crisis coming. this problem has been a long time coming. for years, the government has been warned about this energy crisis. they haven�*t planned, they haven�*t got a plan now to respond. any relief will be welcome for businesses at this acute phase of the crisis. but if energy costs don�*t come down soon, there is only one way they will be able to live with it, and that is bypassing those costs they will be able to live with it, and that is by passing those costs
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onto their customers, and ultimately that means us. ben king, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... a damning report from mps who call the government�*s early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failure in uk history, costing thousands of lives. health failure in uk history, the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace, and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily. the prime minister is expected to give the go—ahead to financial support to firms struggling with the soaring costs of energy. there are more signs the jobs market is recovering in the wake of the pandemic. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit a record high of 1.1 million, the most since records began 20 years ago. the figures from the office for national statistics cover the three months to september. but there are some concerns that if companies offer pay rises as they compete to attract more workers, it could lead to inflation
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and higher interest rates. our economics corresponent andy verity reports. in this post—pandemic world, if you have this skill, you won�*t have to compete for work. employers will compete for you. since brexit, there�*s no longer the same flow of skilled workers from eastern europe and construction companies are having to pay more and more for the right staff. recognising they are in high demand, bricklayers in particular are going back to their contractors, asking for higher and higher pay. we�*re paying people what we need to pay them to attract them to come to work for us because the labour market is so hot at the moment. but what we are not seeing is the productivity of those people adding value to our business on all levels and at all times, and that is what businesses need. we are leaving that now. the brexit minister, lord frost, is about to make a speech in lisbon, to demand changes to the northern ireland protocol.
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after the uk left the eu, i went to brussels to give a speech which attracted some attention at the time, and i called it reflections on the revolutions in europe. that was a deliberate nod of course to the irish british politician edmund burke and his critique as regards the french revolution of what we would now call the hyper rashness creation of a new legal order in contrast to organic custom based change ? realness. my title today which is titled observations on the present state of the nation is a similarly deliberate echo of edmund burke�*s fed significant work, it was a pamphlet with that title from 1789 7 a pamphlet with that title from 1789 ? first significant work. in it he reviewed the economic condition of britain and france, the superpowers of their day, and first developed his thought that he had developed in work subsequently and i quote,
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politics should be adjusted, not to human reasoning human nature. people must be governed in a manner agreeable to their disposition and temper. in quote. that is relevant to one significant problem between us and the european union, and i mean of course northern ireland which i will come true. but i also want to develop the thought more broadly in the speech. nearly two years after we left the eu, nearly a years after we left the eu, nearly a year after leaving the transition period, having delivered brexit despite all the predictions to the contrary, where do things now stand? what is our worldview now? where do we plan to take the country as government? what is the state of the relationship with the eu? and frankly what can be done to improve it? you may wonder why i have come to portugal to say this but famously of course portugal is our oldest ally and no british minister visits
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portugal without recalling and rightly so the 1386 treaty of windsor but there�*s more to be said about that old alliance and in saying it we see something about the present as well as the past. that is because the alliance rapidly became part of a pattern, that reflected geography and fundamental interests and a pattern which is still relevant today. i mentioned in the brussels speech 18 months ago, that i have a personal interest in the history of belgium and the netherlands, especially flanders, andindeed netherlands, especially flanders, and indeed when i delivered it i was about to visit the blockbuster exhibition about the great flemish painter van dyke, he is an interesting figure because in the 15th century, artists had to be diplomats as well. nearly 600 years ago in 1428, he was here where we stand in lisbon, on a mission from the duke of burgundy to paint a picture of the princess isabella, daughter of the king of portugal. as
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the duke was interested in marrying her to cement his own alliance with portugal. an account of that mission survives in the brussels archives and i have a copy myself and it describes how the mission also stopped off in england, an ally of burgundy as well as of portugal and then got stuck there for six weeks, clearly challenges to our transport infrastructure are not a new problem... sadly the painting is lost but the marriage happened and we cant see beginning to develop in this incident a web of maritime interests, england, the low countries and portugal, and indeed the atlantic perspective, an essential part of the european history has proved remarkably durable over the years. that is what we now call geopolitics and that is why i am here in portugal in particular, geopolitics has become important again, location matters.
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i�*m not the only one to make this point. the former europe minister does as well as indeed ursula von der leyen as well, and now as we look at europe from the uk, now that we have left the eu, the geopolitics of our position as an offshore island with particular allies but global interests come back to the forefront. what are the implications forefront. what are the implications for us? in answering that question i want to make five points. there is to say that brexit has changed our international interest and hence will change our patterns of european relationships. not necessarily fundamentally but significantly. secondly that brexit means competition, we will be setting a different path on economic policy. third, the brexit was about democracy, democratic project that is bringing politics back home. fourth, that the eu and ourselves have got into a low equilibrium
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somewhat fractious relationship, but that it need not always be like that. but also that it takes two to fix it. and fierce, and finally, that fixing the serious problem we have in the northern ireland protocol is a prerequisite to getting to that next place ? fifth and finally. each point in time, furs, self evidently, our international interests have changed after brexit ? first. and so has our pattern of european relationships. most obviously we no longer have an interest in coalition building across the eu to shape eu rules, and relative power within the eu is important to countries which are members of the eu and not those which aren�*t. of course we take a strong interest in what happens within the european union and we want the member states of the eu to be prosperous and successful. we will watch how you legislate and whether you can develop effective frameworks for new areas of economic
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and scientific activity and we will always look with fascination at debates which echo hours like those in poland, germany and possibly even france about the role of the court ofjustice. but we can�*t france about the role of the court of justice. but we can�*t affect those outcomes except by example and it would not be correct for us to try and that makes a huge difference to how we look at things. in contrast, relationships with countries with which we traded directly, countries with maritime connections, customers practicalities to deal with them connections, they are going to be especially important in future and that means that at a minimum that the whole atlantic including portugal will be of renewed significance for us and that has been clear to us in some of the debates we have had since the start of the year. equally important, relationships with countries which are especially central to our geopolitical aims and alliances. that is because despite the indo pacific tilt, despite the broader
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perspective that global britain must and will have, the harvard business of european defence backed by resources and deterrence and the sharing of risks remains vital ? the hard business. that is why we are putting more money into defence, reaching 2.3% of gdp this year. brexit will strengthen our interests in deep engagement with the traditionally transatlantic countries like portugal but also the countries like portugal but also the countries of central and eastern europe that bear the burden of pressure from russia which is why we take a particular interest in working with the baltic states, poland and new concepts we see like the three season initiative. it also means that despite the very visible current difficulties, we will always look to have a constructive and productive relationship with france andindeed productive relationship with france and indeed one of the reasons why we have such strong military ties with france is i think in part that we both hold of you that the defence of
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europe also depends on our willingness and readiness to act beyond the content of europe itself. there is no contradiction between these deep relationships based on fundamental interests and are pursuing our own prosperity in our own way, and that is the second point i want to make. i said our influence on the eu now comes to the power of example and hence also through a healthy degree of competition. brexit is about doing things differently, not for the sake of it, but because it suits us and because it creates a greater variety of alternative futures, and history shows that it is genuine competition, regulatory and commercial between states, which has typically been the most reliable driver of innovation and progress. that is what some people call a hard brexit, in its original sense of leaving the eu customs union, it was essential, it was the only form of
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brexit that allow us freedom to experiment and freedom to act. that is already happening and i think you can see some themes emerging in the different political preferences in the uk and one is a renewed emphasis on the modern use of science and the benefits of research, we have set up our own pure research organisation, and on a proportionate approach to risk. we recognise that zero risk systems are a myth and sometimes even toed to most particular aspects of societal challenges. so on covid there�*s a balance between opening up and managing the health burden and we have made a set of choices now which i believe we can and must stick to which recognise the risks to society of not opening up and indeed arguably britain or at least england is now the freest country in europe in this respect. we are also going to get moving on areas like cyber and artificial intelligence and gene editing and even in the
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prosaic areas like border controls, even when our controls are fully in place, we are never going to adopt the same levels of checks and controls that the eu imposes on itself because we don�*t believe the levels of risk necessary require them. another strand is a more active state then we have got used to in britain in recent years, but always working within the confines of a liberal market economy. to take a couple of examples, we are developing a subsidy policy and framework which is less process driven and less bureaucratic and more tailored to the specific needs of the uk economy. the state is creating free ports, areas where there are tax reductions aimed at job creation, and finally we are actively looking at areas where we have inherited eu rules that we regard as unnecessarily complex, bureaucratic or just unsuited regard as unnecessarily complex, bureaucratic orjust unsuited to our present and future needs. a new agriculture system is more suited to our climate than the vast fields of
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france, and new procurement rules, and since the way we can see the debate going on equivalents in the eu, reforms to financial systems. people expect change and that is what is happening. my third point, it is about democracy and too often the debate is bureaucratic, looking at trading relationships and the merits of one visa arrangement over another, those are important issues, if now largely settled for now. but the fundamental element of the brexit project is about democracy, to bring home political debates, to allow us to set our own ways of doing things on our way, to open up the field of political and economic possibility, and this is fundamental. in most member states of the eu many things cannot be changed through elections, trade policy, monetary policy, fiscal
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policy, monetary policy, fiscal policy, important elements of immigration policy, indeed some important aspects of industrial policy, and that is your choice and it is not for us to question but our choice is that our electors should be able to debate and change policy in elections. those debates are now happening. for example they have been vigorous debates about the direction of the uk�*s independent trade policy in parliament in particular, bringing different viewpoints to the table. we have a very lively discussion of migration policy, to offer unprecedented immigration visa schemes to tens of thousands from hong kong and more recently afghanistan, and indeed a levelling up the programme is about the trade—offs between different kinds of economic policy in different parts of the country. that is why i don�*t see anything wrong with brexit being described as a populist policy because if it means doing what people want, challenging a technocratic consensus, i�*m all for it. to suggest there is
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something wrong in people deciding things for themselves is somewhat disreputable even disrespectful to the british people and our democracy, and we have always said taking back control was about the ability to make sovereign choices across a range of different areas of national life and it is not about the specifics of those choices. i personally will argue as strongly as i can that free market capitalism and low taxes and free speech and the maximum possible amount of economic and political freedom for individuals are the best choices we could make as a country. but now we have to win those arguments and persuade people, notjust write them into a treaty or into a convention and expect people to put up with them.
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so that is what i see going on in britain, genuine far—reaching political arguments, sometimes turbulent but ultimately healthy for our political debate. more needs to be said about my fourth point, where does this leave our relationship with the eu? on the one hand despite all of the current difficulties we are familiar with, they have been some good cooperation between us. we work well together on sanctions policy for example. i�*m sure we could do more together on foreign policy and defence. customs officials in member states generally work effectively in a pragmatically keeping goods moving. and of course we have compatible climate goals with net zero in mind. though there is a discussion coming on the eu�*s plans. but they should be more to it. the eu is developing as a force in international affairs beyond the traditional areas of economic
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policy, navigating the rise of china and india and the changing roles of russia and the us. as it does so, just offshore is a former member with the fifth largest economy in the world with some of the best universities, a seat on the p5, the biggest defence spender in europe and a nuclear power which shares the same fundamental liberal democratic values and the deepest of ties between peoples and cultures. that fact can be handled in different ways by the union. competition between us is likely to be helpful to us both but alienation i think would be a serious historical error. strategical autonomy if it can be achieved by the eu does not need to mean aloofness. the bent venus of the last four years cannot be doubted but the prize for entering into a new era of relations cannot be doubted either. i am aware obviously of the many criticisms that have been made of the uk and these past few years. the view from
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our perspective, we look at the un we don�*t always see an organisation that seems to want to get back to constructive working together. for example we see extreme tensions over the vaccine earlier this year and a block on our entry to horizon so far this year, some threats to our energy supplies, a needless ban on the imports of many shellfish causing significant panes for our fishermen, and resort to legal action. overall we constantly face accusations that we cannot be trusted and that we are not a reasonable international actor. so with all this in mind, we can�*t help taking with a pinch of salt when we are told the eu will stop thinking about the uk and it is we who are still obsessed with brexit. actually we are not. there is no electoral dividends and talking about brexit. that is why the prime minister
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barely mentioned it in his party conference speech last week. what we do see instead is an organisation that doesn�*t always look like it wants us to succeed. we didn�*t wanted to be like this, we just want friendly relations and is, free trade and the chance to do things our own way all within the framework of a meaningful and robust western alliance. with this in mind i do urge the eu to look at the image thatis urge the eu to look at the image that is being presented to us. if there is a trust problem as we are constantly told there is it�*s not the responsibility of one party. at some point we must both try to raise our eyes to the horizon, look up the possibilities for better relations and try to help each other solve problems not create them. which brings me to my fifth and final point. and the biggest current problem between us. the northern ireland protocol. it�*s the biggest source of mistrust between us for all kinds of reasons and we need to fix the problem. i recognise it�*s
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not easy. the history here does matter. i do understand why the eu finds it difficult to come back to an agreement that was reached only two years ago. that is far from unusual in international relations. equally there is a feeling in the uk that the eu did try to use northern ireland to encourage uk political forces to reverse the referendum result or to keep is closely aligned with the eu. and that the protocol represents a moment of eu overreach when the uk is negotiating and cannot reasonably lessen current form. whether or not you agree with either of those analyses the facts on the ground are what matter above all. maybe there was a world in which the protocol could have worked more sensitively but the world has now moved on and we now face very serious situation. the protocol is not working, it completely lost consent in one community in northern
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ireland, it�*s not doing the thing it was set up to do, to protect the belfast good friday agreement. it�*s doing the opposite. no one here is expert in northern ireland and not asking you to be. we are asking the eu to work with us to help us manage the delicate balance in the belfast agreement and not to disrupt it. to help us reflect the concerns of everyone in northern ireland from all sides of the political spectrum and to make sure the piece processed is not underlined. the key feature of the good friday agreement is balance between different communities and between their links with the rest of the uk and with the republic of ireland. that balance has been shredded by the way this protocol is working. the fundamental difficulty is that we had it been asked to run a full external boundary of the eu through the centre of our country to apply eu law without consent in one part of it and to have any dispute arising from these settled in the courts.
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the way this is happening is disrupting ordinary lives, damaging businesses and causing serious turbulence to the institutions within northern ireland. i remind you of books words i quoted at the beginning, politics should be adjusted not to human reasoning is put to human nature. people must be governed in a manner agreeable to the position. that is why we need to move on from this once and for all and that simply won�*t happen without significant change to the existing arrangements. we put forward proposals to fix things injuly. they don�*t sweep away the protocol, the work with the grain of it. they don�*t require infrastructural checks of the border between northern ireland and ireland. no one wants this. they keep irish the trade arrangements for good going into ireland and we accept responsibility to implement eu rules for those
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goods. they would allow uk and the eu standard goods to circulate in northern ireland. they protect the eu single market but crucially they would allow goods also to circulate virtually freely between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. something that every other country in the world takes for granted. we are now heading into a crucialfew weeks, we await the proposals coming tomorrow from the commission in response to our ideas. i want to be clear, we will be really ready to discuss them whatever they say and we will obviously consider them seriously, fully and positively. but i repeat, if we are going to get to a solution we must collectively deliver significant change. we need the eu to show the same ambition and willingness to tackle the fundamental issues in the protocol. that�*s why i�*m sharing with the commission today new legal text of an amended protocol reflecting proposals in our command paper and
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supporting not undermining the belfast good friday agreement. and i want to comment on a couple of aspects. first of all the new protocol we are proposing is forward—looking. the original version was agreed at a time when we didn�*t know whether they would be a trade agreement between us and the you. many of the most unusual and disproportionate provisions were agreed because we didn�*t know what the shape of our future trading relationship was going to be. in the face of uncertainty the original protocol defaulted to excessive rigidity which is now having northern ireland. we now have a very far—reaching agreement between us and the trade and cooperating agreement which regulates all aspects of our trade in the future. so it makes sense to situate the new agreement in that new trading context and bring it in line with those arrangements. they are after all the most significant science by each party so far. our proposal looks more like a normal treaty in the weights governed with international arbitration in the
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system of eu law ultimately police and the courts. i think the commission are being quick to dismiss governance as a side issue and the reality is the opposite. the role of court ofjustice and the eu institutions in northern ireland are creating a situation where there is no discretion about how provisions in the protocol are implement it. the commissions decision to launch infraction proceedings against us earlier this year on the first sign of this agreement shows why these arrangements are so hard to make work in practice. it�*s notjust about the court comments about the system of which the court is the apex, the system which means the eu can make laws which apply in northern ireland without any kind of democratic scrutiny. none of this we can now see will work as part of a durable settlement. without new arrangements in this area no protocol will ever have the support across northern ireland it needs to survive. so i do urge portugal and
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everybody in the eu to look carefully at what we are proposing as we will look carefully at what the eu proposes. may i ask everyone listening to think again about the positions taken so far will stop if we can put this protocol onto a durable footing we have got the opportunity to move past the difficulties of the past year. we have a short but real opportunity to put in place new arrangements, to defuse the political crisis that is brewing both in northern ireland and between us. if we can work on that then of course other things become possible to. have significant problems in the relationship of interest to both sides might become resolvable. we would have a chance to move forward to a new and better equilibrium. the protocol itself envisages it can be superseded by future agreements in its article 13. given the experience we now have it is clear. i ask what does it cost
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for you to put a new protocol in place. there is no threat to the single market from what we are proposing, we�*re not asking to change arrangements within eu in any way, we are not seeking to generalise special rules for northern ireland with any other aspect of our relationship. for the eu now to say the protocol drawn up an extreme haste at a time of great uncertainty can never be improved upon when it is so self—evidently causing such difficult problems would be a historical misjudgment. it would be to prioritise eu internal processes over relieving turbulence in northern ireland. to suggest that societal disruption can be disregarded. and perhaps even they are an acceptable price for northern ireland to pay to demonstrate that brexit has not worked. it would be a great disservice to northern ireland and not recognise the process of improvement that has kept the balance and sustained the peace process in northern ireland. the eu
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can insist on this but it must remember it is this government, the uk government that governs northern ireland. northern ireland is not eu territory. it is our responsibility to safeguard peace and responsibility and prosperity in northern ireland. that may include using article 16 if necessary. we would not go down this road gratuitously with any particular pleasure. but it is our responsibility to safeguard peace and prosperity in northern ireland and prosperity in northern ireland and we cannot rest until the situation has been addressed. the protocol itself is clear. it respects essential state functions of the uk. it does not create some kind of co—dominion call responsibility with the eu in northern ireland. it doesn�*t allow the eu to develop its own aspirations for northern ireland as if you are a member state.
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ensure the protocol as they to support the peace process. estate is about the basis of the good friday agreement. the article 16 safeguards are there to deal with the situation if the protocol ceases to provide that support. and we will always act with that in mind. so i repeat let us be ambitious, let�*s see if we can find a better way forward, let�*s agree on arrangements we will both implement and which can be implanted because they command acceptance across northern ireland. let�*s try and get back to normal with some effort of oil we could still despite all of the problems be in a position where the poison is drawn from this issue entirely. it is removed from the diplomatic top table once a goal 7 the diplomatic top table once a goal ? once and for all. i personally
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would be happy if i could to come here next year and talk about a new age of cooperation in which the world protocol never appears. let me return one last time to book a plasma pamphlet. he was describing the british government because my position at the previous time of deep division in british politics over policy in america and his words have resonance to all of us today. a diversity of opinion upon almost every principle of politics had indeed drawn a strong line of separation between them and some others. however, they would desire is not to extend it by unnecessary goodness, they wish to prevent a difference of opinion from festering into rancorous and incurable hostility. accordingly, they endeavoured that all past controversies should be forgotten. i think we should act in that spirit. the western alliance has got too many global challenges to spend time on internal disputes. we will face
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the same problems, we all need to stick together if we are to keep counting and making a difference. that is what we all want full ? we want to work for and we hope it will be a common effort. lard want to work for and we hope it will be a common effort.— be a common effort. lord frost the 're be a common effort. lord frost they're setting _ be a common effort. lord frost they're setting out _ be a common effort. lord frost they're setting out the - be a common effort. lord frost they're setting out the changesj be a common effort. lord frost i they're setting out the changes that they�*re setting out the changes that they�*re setting out the changes that the british government wants to see to the northern ireland protocol. our correspondent chris morris was listening to that. very measured tone with very critical of the way he believes the eu conducted the initial discussion. it he believes the eu conducted the initial discussion.— he believes the eu conducted the initial discussion. it was measured but also pugnacious _ initial discussion. it was measured but also pugnacious which - initial discussion. it was measured but also pugnacious which is i initial discussion. it was measured but also pugnacious which is his i but also pugnacious which is his style. he warmed up his audience by telling them we no longer think you are as important as we used to and we are now your competitors and we are in a low equilibrium fractious relationship. it doesn�*t have to be like that as long as you play ball with us in northern ireland. he identified the fundamental problem
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with the northern ireland protocol from the uk perspective and it�*s that we are running an eu external border through the middle of our country. that is basically true but the trouble is it was also true in 2019 when they signed up to the protocol and when borisjohnson said they would be no checks between great britain and northern ireland. so lord frost wants to change that now but they did sign up to two years ago. but now but they did sign up to two years ago-— now but they did sign up to two years ago. now but they did sign up to two earsauo. �* , , years ago. but he is saying they did it take for they _ years ago. but he is saying they did it take for they know _ years ago. but he is saying they did it take for they know what - years ago. but he is saying they did it take for they know what the i years ago. but he is saying they did | it take for they know what the shape of the trade agreement was going to be. we will talk to you again at 4pm about what lord frost has been saying this afternoon. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has called on borisjohnson to accept responsibility for the failures set out in a highly critical report on his handling of coronavirus. the inquiry carried out by mps attacked the delay in locking down at the start of the pandemic and said this led to more people dying. ministers say they followed scientific advice and people shouldn�*t apply hindsight to the challenges which they faced. joining me now is the word health organisation�*s special envoy on covid 19, dr david nabarro.
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hindsight, of course that is 2020 vision, what do you make of this report? vision, what do you make of this re ort? �* , vision, what do you make of this reort? �* , . , vision, what do you make of this reort? fl ., , vision, what do you make of this reort? �*, ., , .,, ., report? it's really good to see that there is a deep _ report? it's really good to see that there is a deep analysis _ report? it's really good to see that there is a deep analysis of - report? it's really good to see that there is a deep analysis of what i report? it's really good to see that| there is a deep analysis of what has happened _ there is a deep analysis of what has happened in the uk. in fact, within the world _ happened in the uk. in fact, within the world health organization we are encouraging all countries constantly to examine how things are going in the response. not to apportion blame, — the response. not to apportion blame, because the virus that causes this pandemic is very mature and with this — this pandemic is very mature and with this and it looks like it's going — with this and it looks like it's going to _ with this and it looks like it's going to be here and with this for some _ going to be here and with this for some time — going to be here and with this for some time to come. it's also dangerous and it's quite challenging to tackle _ dangerous and it's quite challenging to tackle it effectively, none of the techniques were used is 100% effective — the techniques were used is 100% effective and so learning how the
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different — effective and so learning how the different elements have come together in specific national situations is critical and that is why this — situations is critical and that is why this is _ situations is critical and that is why this is a very valuable report. as you _ why this is a very valuable report. as you are — why this is a very valuable report. as you are looking on from the world health organization, as different countries responded to coronavirus, what was your overriding feeling about what the uk government was doing, particularly in the early days when there was not a quick response to locking down and stopping people travelling? the first thing is _ stopping people travelling? the first thing is to say to you and all your— first thing is to say to you and all your listeners, we have never seen locking _ your listeners, we have never seen locking down as the primary way of dealing _ locking down as the primary way of dealing with a virus like this. essentially, locking down stops everything and it actually has damaging impacts on societies of all kinds _ damaging impacts on societies of all kinds and _ damaging impacts on societies of all kinds and we have seen them around the world, _ kinds and we have seen them around the world, after all they were times last year— the world, after all they were times last year when more than half the
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world _ last year when more than half the world was— last year when more than half the world was living under some form of lockdown _ world was living under some form of lockdown. so what we have said right from the _ lockdown. so what we have said right from the beginning is find ways to live with _ from the beginning is find ways to live with this virus in our midst and _ live with this virus in our midst and prevent it from causing extreme damage _ and prevent it from causing extreme damage without locking down your society~ _ damage without locking down your society. we think there is probably two or— society. we think there is probably two or three ways in which this can be two or three ways in which this can he done _ two or three ways in which this can he done and — two or three ways in which this can be done and we have seen it being done _ be done and we have seen it being done but _ be done and we have seen it being done but it's never been very easy. the first— done but it's never been very easy. the first is— done but it's never been very easy. the first is absolutely to make sure that everybody knows what's expected of them _ that everybody knows what's expected of them when dealing with this virus — of them when dealing with this virus. because the virus is the problem — virus. because the virus is the problem and people are the solution. so involving everyone and face protection and social distance and shielding — protection and social distance and shielding is central and we are saying — shielding is central and we are saying could everyone please go on doing _ saying could everyone please go on doing this _ saying could everyone please go on doing this as long as the virus is a threat _ doing this as long as the virus is a threat. don't give up too quickly.
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secondly— threat. don't give up too quickly. secondly we are seeing detect the people _ secondly we are seeing detect the people with the disease fast, enable them to— people with the disease fast, enable them to isolate quickly, stop the spread _ them to isolate quickly, stop the spread and find the contacts and isolate _ spread and find the contacts and isolate them as well. it's not very nice but— isolate them as well. it's not very nice but that is the way in which we actually— nice but that is the way in which we actually contain outbreaks and stop them _ actually contain outbreaks and stop them from — actually contain outbreaks and stop them from growing into surges. and them from growing into surges. and the third _ them from growing into surges. and the third thing is that since the beginning of this year we have got these _ beginning of this year we have got these amazing vaccines that stop people _ these amazing vaccines that stop people from dying with this disease and they— people from dying with this disease and they also prevent people from being _ and they also prevent people from being severely ill in hospital so we say make — being severely ill in hospital so we say make sure that the people most at risk— say make sure that the people most at risk can— say make sure that the people most at risk can get vaccinated because that will— at risk can get vaccinated because that will disconnect illness from death— that will disconnect illness from death and that makes a huge difference. we say keep it going on all those _ difference. we say keep it going on all those fronts and don't stop prematurely because this virus keeps changing _ prematurely because this virus keeps changing and each time it changes it also alters _ changing and each time it changes it also alters the name of the game so keep it _ also alters the name of the game so keep it up _ also alters the name of the game so keep it up and don't stop.—
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also alters the name of the game so keep it up and don't stop. thank you very much- — the shortlist for this year�*s riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco friendly mosque in cambridge, a museum in the lake district and the centrepiece of a university in south west london. what makes a good building? today we�*re travelling to the north cornwall coast. the tintagel footbridge spans a gorge about 60 metres wide and creates a link that reunites the two halves of tintagel castle for the first time in more than 500 years. when we proposed it to english heritage, i never thought they�*d accept. but sometimes, the crazy ideas are actually the best ideas. my name�*s william matthews and, along with laurent ney and matthieu mallie, from ney & partners, we are the engineers and the designers of the tintagel castle footbridge. the footbridge reconnects the two sides of the medieval castle, built in the 12th century
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by richard, earl of cornwall. the mainland ward and the island ward were connected by an isthmus of rock which, in a sense, eroded away, and the bridge recreates that link between the two sides. one of the key drivers behind the project — indeed, its very raison d�*etre — was to improve accessibility to the site. one of the major problems that tintagel has is this incredibly rocky landscape. we wanted to be able to get lots of people here who couldn't get here before. because there were so many steps up to the island, a lot of people couldn't because they had bad knees, they used wheelchairs, whatever it was. now we have essentially step—free access right from the car park all the way through onto the site. and it was so satisfying on the opening day to see literally a queue of wheelchair users from the local village queue up to be the first person to cross the bridge and onto the island. something that they might not have done for many years. well, with me are kate mavor,
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chief executive of english heritage, and also i�*m joined by professor paul gough, principal of the arts university bournemouth. kate, how daring did it feel to choose something so modern in such a historical setting? it did choose something so modern in such a historical setting?— historical setting? it did feel very darinr but historical setting? it did feel very daring but since _ historical setting? it did feel very daring but since english - historical setting? it did feel very daring but since english heritage| daring but since english heritage has become the charity we have been enthusiastic about bringing history to life in more imaginative ways because we really believe that new design could actually unlock old buildings and you heard they how they have managed to reconnect the two sides of the castle. now we have reinstated the route into the castle and the name tintagel actually means
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fortress of the narrow entrance and we have created the narrow entrance and we were building doing it but now that we have done itjust and we were building doing it but now that we have done it just feels natural. it now that we have done it 'ust feels natural. ., , ~' natural. it does look like it belon . s natural. it does look like it belongs there, _ natural. it does look like it belongs there, doesn't i natural. it does look like it belongs there, doesn't it? | natural. it does look like it i belongs there, doesn't it? paul, belongs there, doesn�*t it? paul, tell us what excites you about this design? 50 tell us what excites you about this desian? . tell us what excites you about this desijn? . . , tell us what excites you about this desian? . . , ., design? so much excites me about what has been _ design? so much excites me about what has been achieved. _ design? so much excites me about what has been achieved. bridges i design? so much excites me about i what has been achieved. bridges are fantastic— what has been achieved. bridges are fantastic examples of design meets engineering and meets the kind of leap of— engineering and meets the kind of leap of the imagination. so it's quite _ leap of the imagination. so it's quite a — leap of the imagination. so it's quite a risk to bring in such a modern _ quite a risk to bring in such a modern design but looking at it in detail— modern design but looking at it in detail with — modern design but looking at it in detail with his extraordinary slates arranged _ detail with his extraordinary slates arranged vertically and that forcing to gap— arranged vertically and that forcing to gap between the two halves i think— to gap between the two halves i think it's — to gap between the two halves i think it's a terrific addition and it compliments the environment and brings— it compliments the environment and brings something unique is only bridges — brings something unique is only bridges can do.— bridges can do. kate, it is functional _ bridges can do. kate, it is functional but _ bridges can do. kate, it is functional but it _ bridges can do. kate, it is functional but it is - bridges can do. kate, it is i functional but it is beautiful. bridges can do. kate, it is - functional but it is beautiful. how much of attention is there between those two things in a bridge? brute
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those two things in a bridge? - launched an international design competition because we realised how important it was to get this right and is part of the brief we didn�*t want any structure above the decking bridge because he would not be able to see the castle as you would have done approaching it back in the 13th century. so i think it�*s been really critical and we are delighted that they have come together and achieved what the design brief asked for which is something that would not be intrusive but on the other hand would not be deferential to what was there before. would not be deferential to what was there before-— there before. paul, have you walked across it? what's _ there before. paul, have you walked across it? what's it _ there before. paul, have you walked across it? what's it like? _ there before. paul, have you walked across it? what's it like? it- there before. paul, have you walked across it? what's it like? it closes i across it? what's it like? it closes the aa- across it? what's it like? it closes the gap between _ across it? what's it like? it closes the gap between parts _ across it? what's it like? it closes the gap between parts of - across it? what's it like? it closes the gap between parts of the i across it? what's it like? it closes the gap between parts of the past and present so it's instantly memorable in the way that most bridges — memorable in the way that most bridges are. it's a fantastic form of public— bridges are. it's a fantastic form of public art as well. it serves the purpose _ of public art as well. it serves the purpose but it stays in the mind for such a _ purpose but it stays in the mind for such a long — purpose but it stays in the mind for such a long time. it's beautiful in terms _ such a long time. it's beautiful in terms of— such a long time. it's beautiful in terms of textures in the way to create — terms of textures in the way to create space as well as covered
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space — create space as well as covered space i— create space as well as covered space. i think it's a touch of genius _ space. i think it's a touch of uenius. ~ ., ., ., ., genius. what would it mean for the bride to genius. what would it mean for the bridge to win _ genius. what would it mean for the bridge to win this _ genius. what would it mean for the bridge to win this award? _ genius. what would it mean for the bridge to win this award? we i genius. what would it mean for the | bridge to win this award? we would be absolutely _ bridge to win this award? we would be absolutely delighted _ bridge to win this award? we would be absolutely delighted for - bridge to win this award? we would be absolutely delighted for this i bridge to win this award? we would be absolutely delighted for this to i be absolutely delighted for this to win an award. we are so proud of it and we are proud of tintagel as a site. it�*s one of the jewels in the crown of english heritage�*s historic properties and to have brought something new as well, it inspires something new as well, it inspires so many people all over the world this competition and for people to come and discover online or in person heritage site that they otherwise would not have thought about being interested in would be just a great boost for us.— about being interested in would be just a great boost for us. thank you both very much- — we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7:30pm. time
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for a look at the weather forecast now. quite a lot of cloud across the uk once again today but there are some sunny spells to and in fact the clouds have been pretty thin around the north—east of scotland and we had some decent breaks across the south as well. the thickest of the cloud across this most central part of the uk and also along the north sea coast. temperatures typically around 14 to 15 but where the sun comes out for any period it�*s up to around 17. not much change tonight. again we have some dampness across the north of scotland which has been a repeating pattern for the last few days. where the skies cleared overnight that is where we will have the lowest temperature so five degrees in parts of east anglia and then tomorrow in the holy dry day for many of us. a little bit of rain and drizzle in the north west
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highlands and the west but a dry day with temperatures up to around 17.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a damning report from mps who call the government�*s early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences, and we�*ve got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say lives were lost in vain. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government, and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.
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during a speech in lisbon, the brexit minister lord frost says the northern ireland protocol must change, saying the border rules are causing serious turbulence. the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source of mistrust between us and we need to solve this. the prime minister is expected to give the go ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high as the jobs market continues to recover from the pandemic. and coming up, how camping in the church has become the latest unorthodox getaway trend.
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good afternoon. there�*s been a mixed reaction to an mps�* report on how the uk coped with coronavirus last year. the report, by two commons committees, calls the government�*s response "one of the most important public health failures" in uk history. it says both ministers and scientists waited too long to lock down last year, costing many lives. and it concludes that there were thousands of avoidable deaths in care homes. the report calls the test, trace and isolate system "slow, uncertain, and often chaotic", but there is praise for the vaccine rollout. our health correspondent jim reed reports. it is completely unimaginable, and we�*re not at the peak yet. in the spring of 2020 the government was, says this report, working in a fog of uncertainty. i'm shaking hands. i was in a hospital the other night where i think there were a few coronavirus patients, and i shook hands with everybody.
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scientists did not know how many were infected with covid or how fast the new virus was spreading. doctors and nurses were already struggling to cope. when we brought back people injanuary from wuhan, i was... for months now, two groups of mps have been taking evidence on the handling of the pandemic in england from people involved in key decisions at the time. now, in this joint report, they criticise that early response. instead of locking down quickly, like some other countries, they say the government�*s scientific advisers felt there was no choice but to bring in social distancing rules gradually, letting sporting events go ahead and keeping borders open, and they say ministers did not do enough to challenge that advice. what we conclude in this report is that the national response to covid was a bit like a football game with two very different halves, and in the first half, we had some serious errors, we could have avoided a lockdown, but having got into a position where we had to have one, we should have locked down earlier.
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but in the second half, we had the vaccine rollout, which we describe as the most effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration. some of the relatives of those who have died responded angrily to that comparison. this isn't a game. my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made. the final report goes on to describe the rollout of the test and trace programme in england as slow and chaotic. it claims that the uk did not impose rigourous border controls quickly, letting in high numbers of infections from overseas, and it says the risk to care homes was not recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the mantra about protecting the nhs is certainly solidified in this report, that that was what was happening. social care was very much an afterthought. the report, though, does also praise parts of the national response. the vaccine programme
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was picked out as a success, as were new treatments like dexamethasone, first developed for covid use in this country. the government says it has not shied away from taking quick actions when needed. we followed the scientific advice throughout, we protected the nhs from the surge of pressure that we saw in other countries such as italy. as you say, we got the vaccine deployed extremely quickly. but also, what we know about the pandemic now is very different to what the level of knowledge was at the start. labour, though, said the report showed monumental errors had been made. this was one of the worst public health failures in the uk. that is a damning indictment. and my thoughts are with the families who have lost people because of these failures by the government. the last year has seen the country come together in support of the nhs. this report is just the first study of its kind to look back at what mps
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call the biggest health crisis of the last century. next spring, a full, public inquiry will examine in detail what lessons should be learned from the pandemic. jim reed, bbc news. we have the latest daily figures on coronavirus. another 181 deaths recorded of someone who died within 28 days of a positive covid test. in terms of the number of new cases, 38,520. the number of people who have been vaccinated, the first dose, people over the age of 12, 80 5.6% of the population have received a first dose and 78.6% have now received both doses.
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our political correspondent pete saull sent this. this report is 150 pages long, the first bit of detailed analysis we have had since the pandemic and the two committees of mps heard a lot of evidence over recent months, some of the senior figures at the heart of the decision—making process for the government, the most famous session was with the former top adviser, dominic cummings, perhaps, in which he really attacked an awful lot of individuals for their decisions at the time. but actually this report does not really name names to the extent that dominic cummings did, but it does chronologically go through various different errors that have happened along the way. from the delay in implementing the first lockdown, the lack of border controls, the discharge of patients from hospitals into the care sector, the lack of a functioning test
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and trace programme, the problems with racial disparities, the regional tier system, there is a lot of detail in there. but as we move into the second half of the pandemic, it becomes much more about praising the government for the vaccine roll—out and the fact that earlier in the pandemic we bought up a lot of supplies of vaccine to put us in a better position than other countries later on. overall it does raise some pretty profound questions for the government. but in terms of the full public inquiry, that does not get under way until spring of next year, no sign from the government they will bring that forward. we are still waiting for details about what powers the inquiry will have, for example, and then how long it potentially might go on for because it might not report back and this is important politically, until after the next general election. joining me now is anthony costello,
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former director at the world health organisation and professor of global health at ucl. how of global health at ucl. useful is this report from 1 committees? how useful is this report from these committees?— how useful is this report from these committees? , , ,., . committees? they deserve some credit for caettin committees? they deserve some credit for getting to — committees? they deserve some credit for getting to the _ committees? they deserve some credit for getting to the heart _ committees? they deserve some credit for getting to the heart of _ committees? they deserve some credit for getting to the heart of this - for getting to the heart of this disaster. 160,000 families have been grieving in this pandemic and that is 50 times the casualty rate of 911. as your correspondent has just said, they pinpointed issues around testing and contact tracing, the feeling that there was nothing we could do to suppress the virus and we had to let it spread, lockdown delays. some questions are not really addressed which is why we need a judicial committee, things like, why was there no independent public health expert at the beginning on sage? they had mainly clinical academics and
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mathematicians but when i worked at who you would have experts in front like care and logistics and in nurses, community health workers, social science, nurses, community health workers, socialscience, communications, nurses, community health workers, social science, communications, so i think the other is the international lessons that we did not seem to have sufficient links or understanding of what was going on in east asia. we knew at the end of february last year before we had any of the press conferences, a month before the lockdown, that actually south korea, taiwan and china were on their way to suppressing the epidemic using good infection control methods and if we had done the same and targeted the hotspots of london and the west midlands and glasgow, we could have suppressed the epidemic by getting the r value down below one. when they asked for volunteers 750,000 came along and we could have got the
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40,000 we needed to help with the public have teams for local contact tracing. of course they have been very hard on the politicians for a lack of urgency. i don�*t know if they have mentioned in the report but the prime minister did not attend the first five cobra meetings, when a pandemic threat is the biggest threat to our country apart from war, and public health people said repeatedly that the test, trace and ice —like programme was overcentralised, privatised, not linked with the nhs ? isolate a gun. that was consistently ignored, even until now, they did delay it later knock—downs, and constantly we heard the refrain, scientists advise and they don�*t decide and then the politicians would say, we are following the science, so they both had a get out ofjail clause. it wasn�*t clear really who was in charge. it wasn't clear really who was in char: e. , wasn't clear really who was in charae. , . , wasn't clear really who was in charae. , ., _ ., ., ,,
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charge. it is easy to talk as if this is over _ charge. it is easy to talk as if this is over but _ charge. it is easy to talk as if this is over but we _ charge. it is easy to talk as if this is over but we have i charge. it is easy to talk as if this is over but we have just | this is over but we have just reported another 181 deaths and another 38,000 cases recorded in the figures for today. what should be happening right now, bearing in mind that children under 12 are not been vaccinated, we have got this high rate, and schools are still areas where there could be high transmission levels.- where there could be high transmission levels. you are absolutely — transmission levels. you are absolutely right. _ transmission levels. you are absolutely right. have i transmission levels. you are absolutely right. have we i transmission levels. you are i absolutely right. have we learned the lessons? of course we don�*t want knock—downs, we still have the same people at the top in their places, public health structures in the country remain top—down and disconnected and there is still a herd immunity mentality in our response to children, why are we only just vaccinating them response to children, why are we onlyjust vaccinating them now response to children, why are we only just vaccinating them now when it was judged safe injune two the evidence was clear injuly that the evidence was clear in july that the risks of the disease far outweigh that of the vaccine. we have got
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very large number still. we are running probably at 30, 40,000 deaths per year, and the average flu season actually of proven flow is little more than a between 502,000. 7 little more than a between 502,000. ? flu is little more. we are not doing the things they do in east asia where they have kept death rates right down and their economy is thriving and they have opened up but they do wear masks and they have safety in schools and workplaces and they do stilljump on infections very quickly. and they do very accurate testing and tracing. it is not easy with the delta variant, i accept that, but there is still more we could do to damp down this and hopefully we�*re not going go into a winter where respiratory diseases flourish and it�*s even worse figures. flourish and it's even worse fiaures. ., ,,., flourish and it's even worse fiaures. ., ., ., figures. professor, thanks for 'oininr figures. professor, thanks for
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joining us- — in the last hour, the brexit minister, lord frost, has made a speech in lisbon setting out the uk�*s demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol. it follows growing abrasion over that section of the brexit agreement that�*s intended to prevent a hard border on the island of ireland, by keeping northern ireland inside the eu s single market for goods. lord frost said: if the eu won�*t change its position, then the uk has a responsibility to preserve peace, north of the border. what does it cost the eu to keep the protocol in place? iterr;r what does it cost the eu to keep the protocol in place?— protocol in place? very little. there is no — protocol in place? very little. there is no threat _ protocol in place? very little. there is no threat to - protocol in place? very little. there is no threat to the i protocol in place? very little. i there is no threat to the single market and we are not asking them to change arrangements in any way and we are not asking them to generalise any other rules to any other aspect of our relationship and for the eu to save the protocol, drawn up an extreme haste at a time of great uncertainty, can never be improved upon, when it is self—evidently causing such difficult problems,
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would be a historic misjudgment. it would be a historic misjudgment. it would be a historic misjudgment. it would be to prioritise eu internal processes over relieving turbulence in northern ireland. to suggest that societal disruption and trade distortion can be disregarded. perhaps even that they are an acceptable price for northern ireland to pay to demonstrate that brexit is not worth it. to insist on this would be to do a great service to northern ireland and not recognise the process of improvement thatis recognise the process of improvement that is keeping the balance the peace process in northern ireland over the past decades. of course the eu can insist on this and it can insist on no change, but it must remember it is the uk government that governs northern ireland as it does the rest of the uk, and northern ireland is not eu territory and it is our responsibility to safeguard peace and prosperity in northern ireland. that may include using article 16 if necessary. we would not go down this road
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gratuitously or with any particular pleasure, but it is our fundamental responsibility to safeguard peace and prosperity in northern ireland and prosperity in northern ireland and that is why we cannot rest until the situation has been addressed. we can now speak to our ireland correspondent emma vardy. how is this likely to have been received in dublin? ., .,, this likely to have been received in dublin? ., , , , dublin? lord frost is upping the ante ahead _ dublin? lord frost is upping the ante ahead of— dublin? lord frost is upping the ante ahead of what _ dublin? lord frost is upping the ante ahead of what we - dublin? lord frost is upping the ante ahead of what we are i dublin? lord frost is upping the i ante ahead of what we are expecting tomorrow which is a response from the eu to previous demands that the uk government has made. what will be responsibly? the eu is already frustrated with the uk because one of the main things the you will state that lord frost and the uk government signed up to this brexit deal ? the eu government signed up to this brexit deal? the eu will say is government signed up to this brexit deal ? the eu will say is that lord frost. they signed up to the northern ireland protocol that the european court ofjustice would have the final say on any disputes over the final say on any disputes over the way this operates in northern
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ireland and now the eu will say you are changing the goalposts. they will safe you take unilateral action 7 will safe you take unilateral action ? they will say that you have taken unilateral action and it has gone even further now. upping the ante in the language you heard from lord frost, saying this is for the sake of peace and prosperity in northern ireland and if we don�*t get what we want, effectively they are saying we are prepared to trigger article 16 which has always been wrote referred to as a last resort and it means overriding parts of the brexit deal. we already heard frustrations coming from the eu over this kind of action from the eu over this kind of action from the eu over this kind of action from the uk and we will hear from the eu tomorrow but i don�*t think those frustrations will have got any less after the words of lord frost today. less after the words of lord frost toda . . . , less after the words of lord frost toda . ., ., , ., ., today. emma vardy, thanks for 'oinin: today. emma vardy, thanks for joining us- _
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joining me now is ireland�*s europe minister, thomas bryne. i was talking to emma vardy about reaction from dublin. we can hear from you right now. what was your, how did you receive what lord frost was saying? a lot of what he said he has set out before. we was saying? a lot of what he said he has set out before.— has set out before. we tried to listen as best _ has set out before. we tried to listen as best we _ has set out before. we tried to listen as best we could. - has set out before. we tried to listen as best we could. it i has set out before. we tried to listen as best we could. it is i listen as best we could. it is budget day in ireland so we are very busy. you can have an immediate reaction and say, the european union has always stayed calm and unified and firm in our objectives and when we start talking about red lines and positions and negotiations, our red line is the peace process and the economic development in northern ireland. to be honest about it, we were expecting a paper to come from the british this week, which was
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flagged by the british government, so that is not entirely a surprise, but clearly discussions are going on. what we have heard from business and communities is at the protocol was giving some difficulties in terms of trade between britain and northern ireland and in that direction only. there were difficulties, clearly. the european commission is going to produce tomorrow a suite of measures which will almost eliminate all of the difficulties that businesses have told us about and that we are keen told us about and that we are keen to address. told us about and that we are keen to address-— told us about and that we are keen to address._ we l to address. such as and how? we heard the issues _ to address. such as and how? we heard the issues in _ to address. such as and how? we heard the issues in the _ to address. such as and how? we heard the issues in the summer, | heard the issues in the summer, about the british sausage, and we heard the issue of customs and medicines, and i have not seen the papers from the european commission yet but we will see the practical issues that will make a real difference to people in northern ireland, who gain the benefit of being in the single market in the
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european union but also remaining part of the customs territory of the uk and that is a typical peace process northern ireland response where no one gets everything they want but everyone comes together to compromise in the name of a common progression. the compromise in the name of a common progression-— progression. the unionists in northern ireland _ progression. the unionists in northern ireland feel- progression. the unionists in northern ireland feel they i progression. the unionists in| northern ireland feel they are losing out. in constitutional terms, because of this invisible border down the irish sea, they feel that thatis down the irish sea, they feel that that is not in the spirit of the good friday agreement, because in their view it keeps northern ireland constitutionally separate from the rest of the uk. i constitutionally separate from the rest of the uk.— rest of the uk. i don't agree with that. the constitutional - rest of the uk. i don't agree with that. the constitutional positionl rest of the uk. i don't agree with i that. the constitutional position of northern ireland within the uk is entirely protected by the protocol and can only be changed if a majority of people in northern ireland so wish but that is not going to change and hasn�*t changed. the british government has jurisdiction, that is a matterfor the people of northern ireland in the people of northern ireland in the future, if they decide to change
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their minds, that is not a matter for the european union or the irish government. we have listened to the concerns of unionists about some of the difficulties and i think you will find the european commission, when it comes to tomorrow, they will be looking and seeking to almost eliminate these difficulties as best they can within the confines of the protocol but the difficulty of course is brexit but the protocol has created enormous opportunities for northern ireland to be part of the single market but also the uk. lord frost would say it would be a historic misjudgement to say that the northern ireland protocol cannot be improved and he said it was formulated before they knew the shape of the free trade agreement between britain and europe, that�*s a fair point? between britain and europe, that's a fair oint? . , between britain and europe, that's a fair oint? ., , . ., fair point? that is correct as a matter of _ fair point? that is correct as a matter of historical _ fair point? that is correct as a matter of historical record i fair point? that is correct as a matter of historical record but fair point? that is correct as a i matter of historical record but that is what the government of the uk agreed to and wished to happen. the first concern after the brexit
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referendum was, as the irish government raised before, but did not feature much in the referendum debate, unfortunately, the first issue was, what about the border in the island of ireland? everybody agreed they should be no hard border and that was one of the priorities at the start to get resolved and we resolved that with the protocol and thatis resolved that with the protocol and that is why it is necessarily complex because the situation in northern ireland is in itself complex. that is the reality. but what i know is right for northern ireland, both governments working together, and the people there, to allow the peace process to be maintained and prosperity to develop. the uncertainty is causing that the slowdown. there�*s not enough investment in northern ireland at the moment, unfortunately.— ireland at the moment, unfortunately. ireland at the moment, unfortunatel . ~ ., ., ., unfortunately. what about the idea of havin: unfortunately. what about the idea of having dual— unfortunately. what about the idea of having dual regulatory _ of having dual regulatory arrangements, that the eu�*s
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standards are acceptable but so are the uk�*s? standards are acceptable but so are the uk's? ., ., , the uk's? northern ireland is part ofthe the uk's? northern ireland is part of the single _ the uk's? northern ireland is part of the single market _ the uk's? northern ireland is part of the single market of _ the uk's? northern ireland is part of the single market of the - the uk's? northern ireland is part. of the single market of the european union of the goods so they have got to comply with european standards, they are similar at the moment, although that could change if the uk goes down a different part in terms of deregulation, but northern ireland is part of the single market of the european union giving it a significant advantages in terms of its access to the full market. but also it has access to the market of the uk, as well. it is in the single market and it is a advantage, it is not the only type of situation with this dual arrangement, there are other smaller ones, as well, but this is unique to the northern ireland situation. the truth is that the regulatory market for goods is the regulatory market for goods is the single market and that is a big advantage to northern ireland firms but also british firms who want to be part of the single market of the
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eu, they can move and set up operations in northern ireland and get the best of both worlds. we only get the best of both worlds. we only get the best for both governments if they are working on the same page which is why i hope these discussions can conclude in short order and we can all continue working together on the other issues that are affecting northern ireland, like educational attainment in some communities, which is very low in some areas. communities, which is very low in some areas-— communities, which is very low in some areas. briefly and finally, the euro ean some areas. briefly and finally, the european court _ some areas. briefly and finally, the european court of _ some areas. briefly and finally, the european court ofjustice _ some areas. briefly and finally, the european court ofjustice are i some areas. briefly and finally, the| european court ofjustice are having jurisdiction is also a problem for the uk. lord frost said he would want a new international arbitrator that was not a court from either side but a new body. surely that is a fair thing to ask now that britain is no longer part of the eu? this was agreed _ is no longer part of the eu? “in 3 was agreed between britain and the european union but let's be realistic, northern ireland is part of the single market for goods and
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the european court ofjustice is part of that single market for goods and across the entire european union there are only a handful of cases before the european court ofjustice relating to goods. this issue has not arisen in northern ireland and we have had the protocol now for ten months, but there has been no issue before the european court ofjustice and there is no threat of a case either. it is entirely a theoretical issue. any single market for regulation of goods requires an ultimate arbitrator that is common across the entire area, that is the european court ofjustice, but in northern ireland's case it is a theoretical issue and has no practical application and has not been raised by anybody in the business community and in the political world that we have listened to the last few months, especially in business and investment, as an issue for them. the issue is the european union are addressing tomorrow are issues that will have immense practical benefit for business and the people of northern ireland.— for business and the people of northern ireland. thomas byrne,
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ireland's europe _ northern ireland. thomas byrne, ireland's europe minister, - northern ireland. thomas byrne, j ireland's europe minister, thanks forjoining us. the prime minister is expected to back a financial package to support industries struggling with soaring gas prices. business ministers made a formal request for help to the treasury yesterday. ben king reports. making paper requires a lot of energy. they spend £60,000 a week on energy at this cumbria mill, where they have been rolling out sheets of paper since 181i5. recent surges in energy costs are making life difficult for companies like this up and down the country. if the prices continue to go up and up, it means that you don't have the money to spend in some other areas. we are continuing to spend in those areas here, but some of those industries are just going to have to stop recruiting, stop investing, and hopefully they might not have to go the other way, but perhaps they do as well. this graph shows how rapidly prices have risen. gas costs more than double what it cost as recently as july.
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and it looks like help is on the way. the chancellor is considering a package of measures worth hundreds of millions of pounds for businesses struggling to keep factories open. it is likely to cover glass, steel and ceramics, businesses which spend huge amounts on energy, even in normal times. and it is expected to come in the form of loans, not grants. government will want to be paid back when those factories are profitable again. it is a difficult time, with people worried about energy costs, but, of course, we continue to engage with industry, we continue to be in talks to support the sector. but are loans the right answer for companies which have already borrowed millions to make it through the pandemic? obviously, any support is helpful. but we are just at a point where businesses are starting to pay back covid loans, they have got really depleted resources from covid, and loans really are not the right way to go, they absolutely need grant support and measures like reducing vat and green levies on fuel.
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labour says the government should have seen this crisis coming. this problem has been a long time coming. for years, the government has been warned about this energy crisis. they haven't planned, they haven't got a plan now to respond. any relief will be welcome for businesses at this acute phase of the crisis. but if energy costs don't come down soon, there is only one way they will be able to live with it, and that is by passing those costs onto their customers, and ultimately that means us. ben king, bbc news. here's the weather with tomasz. hello. the weather is pretty quiet at the moment i'm not much is expected to change tonight and in tomorrow. the cloud is relatively light so we have had some sunshine around and it has not been dull and
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overcast everywhere. in the next couple of hours the thickest of the cloud in the central parts of the uk, temperatures are starting to drop, and through the night the lowest temperatures will be around east anglia and the south—east where skies could clear and where winds are like but out towards the west and the cloud and the breeze of the ocean, temperatures close to double figures. we go again tomorrow, the cloud rotating around this area of high pressure, quite stubborn cloud, and sunny spells are possible almost anywhere but more clouds in the sky certainly and temperatures up to around 15—17. that is it. goodbye.
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the headlines on bbc news. a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular how a slowness to lockdown, did have consequences and we have got to confront the lessons from that. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government. and i want to know about that,
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i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry. the brexit minister, lord frost says post brexit trade arrangements, which the uk negotiated with the eu, are not working and have to change. the northern ireland protocol is the biggest _ the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source _ the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source of _ the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source of mistrust - the northern ireland protocol is the biggest source of mistrust between| biggest source of mistrust between us and _ biggest source of mistrust between us and for— biggest source of mistrust between us and for all — biggest source of mistrust between us and for all kinds _ biggest source of mistrust between us and for all kinds of _ biggest source of mistrust between us and for all kinds of reasons - biggest source of mistrust between us and for all kinds of reasons we l us and for all kinds of reasons we need _ us and for all kinds of reasons we need to— us and for all kinds of reasons we need to fix— us and for all kinds of reasons we need to fix this _ us and for all kinds of reasons we need to fix this problem. - the prime minister is expected to give the go—ahead to financial support for firms struggling with the soaring cost of energy. the number of vacancies in the uk hits a record high as the jobs market continues to recover from the pandemic. sport now and let's gt a full round—up from the bbc sports centre. good afternoon. england manager gareth southgate has suggested his team dont get the credit the deserve as they look to move a step closer to qualifying
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for next year's world cup in qatar. manager gareth southgate says he commits a crime with every selection. phil foden and jayden sancho starred against andorra. he says why appreciation is starting to come for performances. we can't be a team that has a day off and we want to keep the consistency of performances. we've had that definitely through this calendar year. everybody knows there is competition for places, everybody knows they cannot afford a day off and they have got pride in putting the shirt on every time they play and they want to show what they are capable of as a team. chelsea midfielder mason mount could feature later, fresh from being named on the list of nominees for football's prestigious ballon d'or. hejoins lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo alongside harry kane, raheem sterling and phil foden, who are also named on the 30 man shortlist, not that he expects to win it when the winner
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is announced at the end of november. it was special. i probably found out exactly the same time as everyone else. to see that, to see the names, to be alongside those names, it is obviously a dream and i think for all the years that you work hard, dedicate, then you see something like that, you can see that it pays off. and it's just a start, it doesn't stop now. scotland can get one of the two wins they need to secure a place in the play offs, after their thrilling comeback against israel on saturday. they're taking on the faroe islands. steve clarke's side are second in group f, seven points behind leaders denmark but four ahead of israel and austria. ijust borrow these players. i borrow them for ten days at the moment every month. and then you go into the winter and you don't see them, i don't see them in december, january, february, get them together again in march. so the fact that we can keep
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that bond, and keep that togetherness within the group is really important. if you want to be successful, the better your group of players, the more together they are, then the more chance you have to be successful. but northern ireland's world cup hopes were effectively ended by losing to switzerland on saturday. that left them third in their group on five points only above tonight's opponents bulgaria on goal difference. england head coach has spoken of her excitement of her team playing their first competitive game at wembley this month. one of the world cup qualifiers they have got coming up. they play northern ireland on october the 23rd before taking on latvia away three days later. i am very excited _ latvia away three days later. i am very excited but _ latvia away three days later. i am very excited but i'm _ latvia away three days later. i am very excited but i'm also - latvia away three days later. i am very excited but i'm also calm because — very excited but i'm also calm because we play another match and we want to _ because we play another match and we want to play— because we play another match and we want to play really well, get a good win and _ want to play really well, get a good win and have people to come and watch _ win and have people to come and watch us — win and have people to come and watch us and have a very nice evening — watch us and have a very nice evening and enjoy themselves and
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people _ evening and enjoy themselves and people watch on tv and enjoy themselves. it's a busy few months for england's cricketers. the white ball squad are in oman preparing to add the t20 title to the 50 over world cup win. but with the ashes on the horizon too, all rounder chrisjordan says there's no danger of the players becoming distracted. the ashes is quite a big event - and it's quite unique circumstances as to what's going on around it. the talk and all of the dissecting of it is pretty normal— in this day and age. everyone involved in the squad, everyone is fully focused - on the task at hand. olympic and european champion katie archibald will headline a 19 strong gb squad at the upcoming track cycling world championships. having collected three european commonwealth golds and gold in the madison of the tokyo olympics, she heads up the team in france and will be joined by fellow olympic silver medallists neah evans
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and josie knight in the women's endurance squad, while academy riders megan barker and ella barnwell make their worlds debut. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. there are more signs the jobs market is recovering in the wake of the pandemic. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit a record high ofi.i million, the most since records began 20 years ago. our economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. in this post—pandemic world, if you have this skill, you won't have to compete for work. employers will compete for you. since brexit, there is no longer the same flow of skilled workers from eastern europe and construction companies are having to pay more and more for the right staff. recognising they are in high demand, bricklayers in particular are going back to their contractors, asking for higher and higher pay. we are paying people what we need
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to pay them to attract them to come to work for us because the labour market is so hot at the moment. but what we are not seeing is the productivity of those people adding value to our business on all levels and at all times, and that is what businesses need. in order for businesses to be sustainable and to grow, particularly as a small business, we need our productivity to be reflected in the increase in wages that we are paying. construction workers' pay has jumped by 9.7% this year. in the finance and business services sector, pay is rising even fasterr, up 11.1%. overall, stripping out distortions, the official estimate is that average earnings are up somewhere between 4.1 and 5.6%. the negative affect of labour shortages is most obvious in specialised jobs, from tanker drivers to hospital workers. but economists warn that in spite of record vacancies of 1.1 million, there is still large parts of the economy where it is hard to find work.
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i think it is quite a complicated picture. if you are skilled and you're looking to work as a lorry driver, then, yes, there's lots of vacancies out there, but if you are, for example, doing the types of roles that many older workers do, if, for example, you're looking for work in london, actually the vacancy rates are really not very high at all and competition in the labour market is really quite fierce. with the recovery from the pandemic slowing down in recent months, the bank of england governor andrew bailey recently recognised that inflation might not be as temporary as he thought, meaning early rises in interest rates are now likely to try and prevent the economy overheating, pushing up inflation even higher. until a few weeks ago, few economists would have put money on an rise any time before the end of next year over year after. now in the city they are giving 50—50 odds that we will get one in december, up to 0.25%, and then another one by may, up to 0.5%. post—pandemic and post—brexit, one old economic ailment —
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wages that don't keep up with prices — appears for now to have been cured, at least in the private—sector. living standards on average are now rising, but the surge in the cost of living no longer looks as temporary as it once did. andy verity, bbc news. efforts to recruit young black people are failing to have an impact on racial injustice at work according to a new report form the institute of student employers. it's calling for more support for black graduates particularly from those in senior leadership positions. the report outlined that whilst 54% have a strategy to attract black candidates and 44% track retention, just 22% provide dedicated support during early careers. let's speak to raph mokades, managing director of rare recruitment, who specialise in helping graduates from diverse backgrounds.
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thank you forjoining us. so it seems that organisations are doing well when it comes to recruiting trainees but at what point does it start to go wrong? it trainees but at what point does it start to go wrong?— start to go wrong? it goes wrong because society _ start to go wrong? it goes wrong because society is _ start to go wrong? it goes wrong because society is an _ start to go wrong? it goes wrong because society is an equal - start to go wrong? it goes wrong because society is an equal and i because society is an equal and because society is an equal and because organisations reflect society. i read the report and i think it's a very good report. i also think it would be naive to imagine thatjust recruiting a few black graduates is going suddenly to turn your organisation into one that is equal top to bottom because society doesn't look like that. and companies and employers don't look like that. i think there is another way of looking at this actually, which is that if you look for example at the top 30 or a0 law firms in england, we now see
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graduate classes that are very diverse, perhaps something approaching 30% ethnic minorities. 15 years ago you might not have thought that would be possible and it has happened. that's great. the question now is what happens next? we know what the trends are, the report sets those are clearly. but leaders in these firms are aware of what they need to do. we launched last year the race fitness commitment and the race fitness commitment and the race fitness commitment sets out clearly road map for equality, notjust about for equality, not just about recruitment for equality, notjust about recruitment but also about culture and leadership. for example, firms that have signed the commitment and in every exit and induction interview talking about race and racism instead of sweeping it under the carpet. people are discussing
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it, dealing with it and talking about it. that is a big change. the other thing is it's notjust about we have a problem with attrition, it's about looking at different areas of the business and monitoring different departments, different functions. where is the attrition happening and whose watch is it happening and whose watch is it happening on? to have that hard data, you can start to understand exactly what's going on. the way i look at this is, do we care? if you want to fix it it's an engineering job. it's notjust about commitment and notjust about job. it's notjust about commitment and not just about supporting job. it's notjust about commitment and notjust about supporting black lives matter of doing a pr event, it's a long hard slog of organisational change. and i think at least with the race fitness commitment signatories at long hard slog is now under way. haifa commitment signatories at long hard slog is now under way. how confident do employees — slog is now under way. how confident do employees feel _
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slog is now under way. how confident do employees feel when, _ slog is now under way. how confident do employees feel when, you - slog is now under way. how confident do employees feel when, you talk- do employees feel when, you talk about attrition and the retention rate, how confident are they feel about explaining why they are leaving? about explaining why they are leavina ? , i. about explaining why they are leavina ? , , ., 4. leaving? sometimes you think there is no oint leaving? sometimes you think there is no point telling _ leaving? sometimes you think there is no point telling these _ leaving? sometimes you think there is no point telling these people - leaving? sometimes you think there is no point telling these people the l is no point telling these people the truth, sometimes you think i'm out of here so i don't care any more. i think it's a bit of both. but i would say that most employers have a pretty good idea of why they might have disproportionate attrition and they are taking steps to try and deal with the issues. if you are a young black person who's had a negative experience it doesn't really matter how honest you are as long as some young black people are honest enough of the time that the employers get the picture and in my view if you are really worried about speaking out and you don't need to because enough people are speaking out the employers know what's going on. . ~' out the employers know what's going on. . ~ , ., y out the employers know what's going on. . ~' , ., , . the labour leader, sir keir starmer,
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has called on borisjohnson to accept responsibility for the failures set out in a highly critical report on his handling of coronavirus. the inquiry carried out by mps attacked the delay in locking down at the start of the pandemic and said this led to more people dying. ministers say they followed scientific advice and people shouldn't apply hindsight to the challenges which they faced. joining me now is the word health organisation's special envoy on covid 19, dr david nabarro. he said it was valuable to see how different authorities have dealt with the pandemic. it's really good to see that there is a deep analysis of what has happened in the uk. in fact, within the world health organization we are encouraging all countries constantly to examine how things are going in the response. not to apportion blame, because the virus that causes this pandemic is very much here with us and it looks like it's going to be here and with us
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for some time to come. it's also dangerous and it's quite challenging to tackle it effectively, none of the techniques were used were 100% effective and so learning how the different elements have come together in specific national situations is critical and that is why this is a very valuable report. as you were looking on from the world health organization, as different countries responded to coronavirus, what was your overriding feeling about what the uk government was doing, particularly in the early days when there was not a quick response to locking down and stopping people travelling? the first thing is to say to you and all your listeners, we have never seen locking down as the primary way of dealing with a virus like this.
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essentially, locking down stops everything and it actually has damaging impacts on societies of all kinds and we have seen them around the world, after all there were times last year when more than half the world was living under some form of lockdown. so what we have said right from the beginning is find ways to live with this virus in our midst and prevent it from causing extreme damage without locking down your society. we think there is probably two or three ways in which this can be done and we have seen it being done but it's never been very easy. the first is absolutely to make sure that everybody knows what's expected of them when dealing with this virus. because the virus is the problem and people are the solution.
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so involving everyone and face protection and social distance and shielding is central and we are saying could everyone please go on doing this as long as the virus is a threat. don't give up too quickly. secondly we are saying detect the people with the disease fast, enable them to isolate quickly, stop the spread and find the contacts and isolate them as well. it's not very nice but that is the way in which we actually contain outbreaks and stop them from growing into surges. and the third thing is that since the beginning of this year we have got these amazing vaccines that stop people from dying with this disease and they also prevent people from being severely ill in hospital so we say make sure that the people most at risk can get vaccinated because that will disconnect illness from death and that makes a huge difference. we say keep it going on all those
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fronts and don't stop prematurely because this virus keeps changing and each time it changes it also alters the name of the game so keep it up and don't stop. the queen has attended a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the royal british legion. for a hundred years the charity has been helping armed forces, veterans and the wider military family with its famous poppy appeal. our royal correspondent nick witchell was there. a real sense of business as usual at westminster abbey this morning with the service attended by the queen, a full—size congregation, hymns being sung and the queen attended with the princess royal and no sense at all of any lightening of the load on her six months on since the death of her husband. she has spent the summer
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at balmoral, but now back beginning a busy programme of autumn engagements. this one, a service to mark the centenary of the royal british legion set up in the years after the first world war to support the service community returning from the western front and a century of service to the armed forces. with me as the national president of the royal british legion. mercifully, no wars at the moment so what do you see as the principal role of the royal british legion now? the british legion are still dealing with the _ the british legion are still dealing with the aftermath of the second world _ with the aftermath of the second world war, the korean war, northern treland, _ world war, the korean war, northern trelahd, the _ world war, the korean war, northern ireland, the falklands to name a few _ ireland, the falklands to name a few many— ireland, the falklands to name a few. many of our beneficiaries are getting _ few. many of our beneficiaries are getting old and requiring sophisticated and expensive treatment and care. to allow them to continue _ treatment and care. to allow them to continue to— treatment and care. to allow them to continue to live their lives. that is a huge — continue to live their lives. that is a huge demand on us. we are also fihdihg _ is a huge demand on us. we are also finding that _ is a huge demand on us. we are also finding that a — is a huge demand on us. we are also finding that a lot more people come to us with _
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finding that a lot more people come to us with mental problems, certainly— to us with mental problems, certainly from the recent campaigns. the demand, in 2019 we raised and .ave the demand, in 2019 we raised and gave more — the demand, in 2019 we raised and gave more money to our beneficiaries than any— gave more money to our beneficiaries than any of— gave more money to our beneficiaries than any of the previous year. in than any of the previous year. in the than any of the previous year. the critical than any of the previous year. in the critical moment in the year for you now within the next few weeks as we approach remembrance time. remembrance is one of the key aspects — remembrance is one of the key aspects of our charter. we have got the festival— aspects of our charter. we have got the festival of remembrance which is --oin the festival of remembrance which is going ahead as normal hopefully. and then we _ going ahead as normal hopefully. and then we have the big event on the cenotaph— then we have the big event on the cenotaph on the sunday and we have a hu-e cenotaph on the sunday and we have a huge n1arch— cenotaph on the sunday and we have a huge march past the veterans band. so the _ huge march past the veterans band. so the legion as relevant today as it ever has been.— so the legion as relevant today as it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue _ it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue to _ it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue to be _ it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue to be here. _ it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue to be here. we - it ever has been. absolutely and we will continue to be here. we are - it ever has been. absolutely and we j will continue to be here. we are not going _ will continue to be here. we are not going anywhere and we will continue to raise _ going anywhere and we will continue to raise money and support our veteran — to raise money and support our veteran community. now how about this for a holiday with a difference? 'champing' that's camping in a church has become one of the surprise travel trends of recent months. so why is it proving so popular?
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john maguire has been to find out. there's been a church on the site in the somerset town of langport for more than 1,000 years. but, with a decreasing congregation, all saints hasn't held weekly services since the 19905. there was a huge amount of upset. it may not have been there was a regular congregation that suddenly were thrown out because the numbers were quite small. people who really didn't come to the church still saw it as something that was a precious part of their community. so to save it, in common with 350 others, it's looked after by the churches conservation trust. one way the charity raises money is through church camping — or champing, as it's known. mirren and her two young sons are the guests tonight. first priority is to explore the unique accommodation. i've seen the pillars, the golden eagle, the stained glass.
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it certainly makes a change from their usual holidays. we normally go to cornwall and stay in a bed—and—breakfast. that's been our idea of a getaway for the last two or three years. so this is different because we've never gone to sleep in a church before and this is amazing, it's everything i expected. staying here — i really shouldn't be saying this — is like staying inside a ghost story! ghost stories may attract some, but one of the volunteers here, annie, says there's no need to be scared. i've been here with a group of young people, there were about 12 of us. you would think it's scary, but it's not. it's got a really nice atmosphere. you wake up in the morning and the light is coming through the windows. it just feels really calm and relaxing. you've got this glorious space all to yourself and it's really good for hide and seek, really good. and her husband bill believes bringing young people into churches is one of champing's great advantages. if i went to church as a youngster, you were dressed in your sunday best.
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a freer and more easy way to enjoy the space is very much the whole experience of champing for people. like all charities and indeed tourist accommodation, the pandemic has has meant a severe loss in revenue. so there's a determination to bounce back and to breathe new life into history. john maguire, bbc news, somerset. the shortlist for this year's riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco friendly mosque in cambridge, a museum in the lake district and the centrepiece of a university in south west london. what makes a good building? today we're travelling to the north cornwall coast. the tintagel footbridge spans a gorge about 60 metres wide and creates a link that reunites the two halves of tintagel castle for the first time in more than 500 years. when we proposed it to english heritage,
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i never thought they'd accept. but sometimes, the crazy ideas are actually the best ideas. my name's william matthews and, along with laurent ney and matthieu mallie, from ney & partners, we are the engineers and the designers of the tintagel castle footbridge. the footbridge reconnects the two sides of the medieval castle, built in the 12th century by richard, earl of cornwall. the mainland ward and the island ward were connected by an isthmus of rock which, in a sense, eroded away, and the bridge recreates that link between the two sides. one of the key drivers behind the project — indeed, its very raison d'etre — was to improve accessibility to the site. one of the major problems that tintagel has is this incredibly rocky landscape. we wanted to be able to get lots of people here who couldn't get here before. because there were so many steps up to the island, a lot of people couldn't because they had bad knees, they used wheelchairs, whatever it was.
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now we have essentially step—free access right from the car park all the way through onto the site. and it was so satisfying on the opening day to see literally a queue of wheelchair users from the local village queue up to be the first person to cross the bridge and onto the island. something that they might not have done for many years. in my mind, this was a textbook example of how you should design the tintagel footbridge on the north cornwall coast is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain's best new building. and we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7:30pm. one lucky ticket holder could be on the verge of the biggest lottery winning history if they scoop tonight's euro millions draw. there is an estimated jackpot of £18a million. that's more than 5,000 times the average salary in the uk and enough to buy 3a0 average priced properties in london. now it's time to take a look at the weather.
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a pretty and exciting on the weather front over the next few days. it's been quite a cloudy day across most of the uk. that is how it's going to remain for the rest of the week. but there is a bit of sunshine in the forecast on friday. the sunny spells will be more prevalent than they have been in the last day or two. high pressure dominating so we are using the phrase are settled but settled doesn't always mean sunshine and if you look at the cloud cover it's rotating around this high pressure. the sunshine is further south across france. we have figured cloud which is a weather front stretching out of the north atlantic. this evening, some splits and spots of rain. clear skies this evening in the extreme north—east of scotland and thinner cloud elsewhere further south. so the focus for the night and it turns damp again if not wet for the north west highlands and
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the northern isles. rain for central scotland. the lowest temperatures tonight around five degrees in norfolk. tomorrow, the wind is blowing around the high pressure in a clockwise fashion. the clodius conditions in the north west of the uk and perhaps a bit of brightness across central and southern areas. high pressure and this cold front swings in from the north which will introduce colder airfor swings in from the north which will introduce colder air for the rest of the week so from thursday onwards this is the change. not quite so settled. some rain to come for scotland and northern ireland on thursday. behind it, the colder air sinking in from the north and then that will sweep across the country on friday morning. not much rain.
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but look at the temperatures. nine degrees in aberdeen, i3 but look at the temperatures. nine degrees in aberdeen, 13 or ia in the south. some sunshine on friday. friday could be the brightest day of the week. on the weekend, saturday is looking fine overall but the will start to go downhill saturday night into sunday and then next week i think we will get some proper autumnal weather and smells of wind and rain. so from the settled weather to something a lot more unsettled but not until next week. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. our headlines at five. our headlines at five. a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions in particular hours slow list to lock down did have consequences and we've got to confront and need to learn lessons from it. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say people died unnecessarily i think she lost her life because of mistakes — i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government and i want to know about
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that, i_ government and i want to know about that, iwant— government and i want to know about that, i want to hear

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