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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 12, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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yeah — "it's wrong, it's wrong, dom!" let's go! colin paterson, bbc news, birmingham. from tom jones to our own tomasz schafernaker. not known as tom, but anyway. you have the northern lights in scotland? it was spectacular, we had a light spectacle. this is an example from... i can't remember, here it is, highland scotland, and the next is, highland scotland, and the next is from shetland, a bit more subdued but still the most beautiful spectacle. there is a chance of the northern lights in the next three nights, but for most of us, nowhere nearas nights, but for most of us, nowhere near as exciting, just overcast, settled, but settled weather does not necessarily mean sunshine. it is all to do with how the wind flows
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around, flowing in such a way that it is dragging or extending this weather front it is dragging or extending this weatherfront in the it is dragging or extending this weather front in the north atlantic and throwing it over the uk. there are clear spots, it is clear in the north—east of scotland and it was last night for that viewing of the northern lights, quite clear in the south of the country but most others are stuck underneath the clouds and it is thick enough to produce fine rain, bits and pieces of drizzle. where the sun sticks around it is about 70 degrees this afternoon, not bad. tonight will be awfully cloudy in the north of scotland, outbreaks of rain too, milder in the western isles, 10 degrees —— while the sun sticks around it is about 17 degrees. winds will be light, a bit nippy first thing, around five degrees. tomorrow the high pressure is with us, often cloudy with a few glimmers of brightness here and
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there, almost anywhere. it is what it is, 17 degrees in central england, 15 in the north. a subtle change in the weather, the high pressure splits. in the middle we have a weather front bringing freshening winds, outbreaks of rain and slightly colder weather. you can see that changing the wind direction, it whips around, the front moves through, colder air, 12 or 13 degrees in northern scotland, 16 or 17 in the south with sunny spells. the weather front will weaken, it is moving into belgium and holland, friday is not looking bad for most of us, decent sunny spells but temperatures lower, single figures in scotland, 15, may be 16 in the south because the fresh air from the north atlantic has spread. staying relatively settled for most of us until saturday, on sunday into next week i think it will turn autumnal, wind and rain on the way. make the most of this week.
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thank you. a reminder of our top story... a damning report from mps who call the government early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. that's all from the bbc news at one, so it's goodbye from me, and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. good afternoon. it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. germany became the first country to qualify for the world cup in qatar last night. england will move another step closer to automatic qualification if they can beat hungary later. they're back at wembley after an impressive victory over andorra last time out, in which phil foden
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and jadon sancho impressed. momentum is certainly with his side, having reached the semifinals of the last world cup and then the final of the euros, but does gareth southagte feel his side are getting the credit they dserve? across europe have gathered a lot of respect. in europe there is probably a greater appreciation of what we have done in the way we have played that there has been here. that is reassuring because you want the respect of your peers and i think they have recognised where we have been over the last 30 years or so and there are signs that we are starting to show and the ability of the players to play in a certain style. chelsea midfielder mason mount could feature later, fresh from his place on the shortlist of nominees for football's prestigious ballon d'0r. he joins the likes of lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo, alongside harry kane,
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raheem sterling and phil foden, who are also nominated. not that he expects to win it. it was special. i probably found out exactly the same time as everyone else. to see that and to see the names, to be alongside those names, it is obviously a dream and i think for all the years that you work hard, dedicate, then you see something like that, you can see that it pays off. and it's just a start, it doesn't stop now. scotland can get one of the two wins they need to secure a place in the play—offs after their thrilling comeback against israel on saturday. they're taking on the faroe islands. steve clarke's side are second in group f, seven points behind leaders denmark, but four ahead of israel and austria. ijust borrow these players. i borrow them for ten days at the moment every month. and then you go into the winter and you don't see them, i don't see them in december, january, february, get them together again in march.
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so the fact that we can keep that bond, and keep that togetherness within the group is really important. if you want to be successful, the better your group of players, the more together they are, then the more chance you have to be successful. british number one dan evans is out of the indian wells masters in california after losing to argentina's diego schwartzman. cameron norrie continued his excellent run of form coming through a three set battle with the spaniard roberto bautista agut to reach the last 16. the white ball england cricket squad are in oman at the minutes. with the ashes on the horizon, allrounder chris jordan says ashes on the horizon, allrounder chrisjordan says there is no danger of the players becoming distracted.
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yes, it is quite a big event as well, and quite unique circumstances. the talk and all the dissecting of it is pretty normal and to, but i can firmly say that everyone involved in the squad is fully focused on the task at hand. a panel will hold discussions over the feasibility of a woman's british and irish lions team. england and harlequins prop shaunagh brown will also be part of the group, which will be chaired by former lion ieuan evans. the men's lions have been touring since 1888 and most recently played south africa in a series. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's at bbc.co.uk/sport.
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there is a special summit about to be held on how to deal with afghanistan.— be held on how to deal with afuhanistan. ., ., ., afghanistan. the international community — afghanistan. the international community has _ afghanistan. the international community has been - afghanistan. the international community has been urged . afghanistan. the international community has been urged to | afghanistan. the international- community has been urged to find ways to get money into the afghan economy to stop its collapse. we need to economy to stop its collapse. - need to find ways to make the economy back again. this can be done without violating its national laws or compromising principles. we must seek ways to get the conditions to allow civil servants to keep working to serve the afghan population. i urge the world to take action and inject liquidity into the afghan economy to avoid collapse. that is the a- eal economy to avoid collapse. that is the appeal from — economy to avoid collapse. that is the appeal from the _ economy to avoid collapse. that is the appeal from the united - economy to avoid collapse. that is i the appeal from the united nations. 0ur correspondent is in capital. this is a virtual summit of g20 nation, an extraordinary meeting on
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afghanistan. at the top of the agenda is expected to be humanitarian assistance for afghanistan. it comes a few weeks ahead of a full g20 summit in rome. the big challenge before the international community is how do they continue to provide and deliver humanitarian aid in this country to millions of people in dire need of it, but without it falling into the wrong hands are being misused. the taliban seized control of this country on the 15th of august. countries around the world do not recognise the taliban government. that makes this particularly difficult. how do you continue to reach the civilians in afghanistan when you do not want to transfer the money or humanitarian aid when you feel it might be misused.
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in the united states, the republican governor of texas, greg abbott, has issued an executive order banning any and all covid vaccine mandates in the state, including private businesses. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has the details. this is a sweeping ban in texas on covid—19 mandates and it means that, for now, through an executive order being brought in by governor abbott, that private entities, private companies, whether they be restaurants or gyms or stores, along with government agencies, as well, will not be able to require that their employees have the covid—19 vaccination or indeed customers of businesses. now, previously, there was an order in effect that essentially applied this ban on the covid—19 mandate to government agencies, but it didn't apply to private companies, so that is the change now being brought in by executive order with the governor urging the state legislature to pass a law to the same effect. governor abbott has been tweeting about this, saying the covid—19 vaccine is safe,
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effective and he said "our best defence against the virus, but should always remain voluntary and never forced". this seems, at least in part, to be a response to what president biden announced last month at the national and federal level, that companies with more than 100 employees should indeed require those employees to have the vaccination, or at least have regular tests. it prompted a couple of major the airlines, american airlines and southwest airlines, to say they would go along with that mandate, but in texas governor abbott says it amounts to the bullying of companies and certainly, as far as he sees it, hampering those companies as they try to recover from the pandemic. i government support package for businesses struggling with the
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soaring cost of energy could be an answer within days. there is the way that some businesses could be forced to shut down without financial help. this is croppers in cumbria, using the power of the river, they have been making paper here since 18115. they have diversified over the years. this is a silicon material, man—made fibres, that gets pushed into the rules you can see down here, and that will end up insulating boilers. looking up and down, you can only imagine how much it costs to run this place. they spent £60,000 every week on energy bills. that translates to over 3 million a year. when prices go up they keep a keen eye on what is happening, and haven't they been
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going up? 250% since the beginning ofjanuary. for businesses going up? 250% since the beginning of january. for businesses like this, unlike for us at home, there is no energy price gap. the wholesale suppliers need to get their money back somehow and through businesses is one way to do it. there is a warning that as businesses try to absorb the cost of energy prices, jobs will have to grow. we have had a warning from the head of british glass. taste employs 6,000 people. they foresee if things don't change, a ofjobs in that industry would go. suzanne is from the cumbrian chamber of commerce. 0ften the cumbrian chamber of commerce. often we get accused of scaremongering, but what are businesses saying to you about energy bills? it businesses saying to you about energy bills?— energy bills? it is not scaremongering. - energy bills? it is not. scaremongering. every energy bills? it is not _ scaremongering. every business we talk to is really concerned about their energy bill. it is important to remember it is notjust the
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energy bills, we also have spiralling wage cost, raw material costs and transport costs, just at a time when many of them are still recovering from covid.— recovering from covid. there is a ossible recovering from covid. there is a possible deal— recovering from covid. there is a possible deal of _ recovering from covid. there is a possible deal of the _ recovering from covid. there is a | possible deal of the government, recovering from covid. there is a - possible deal of the government, but that might come the form of a loan. any support is helpful, but alone is the wrong way to go. we are just at the wrong way to go. we are just at the point where a lot of businesses are having to pay back their covid loans. another loan is not helpful. what we need is support in the form of grants, vat reductions, may be temporarily removing the green levy. the government could look at its contract with businesses, and number of them are fixed—price, particularly so in the nuclear supply chain. it is fundamental that we protect that because that is a key part of our energy security. [30 key part of our energy security. do ou key part of our energy security. do
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you think this period could be fatal for some of the businesses you have been talking to? it for some of the businesses you have been talking to?— been talking to? it could. a lot of businesses _ been talking to? it could. a lot of businesses are _ been talking to? it could. a lot of businesses are really _ been talking to? it could. a lot of businesses are really concerned. | businesses are really concerned. they don't operate on big margins and these are not small price increases, it is doubling and more, and it could be fatal. it increases, it is doubling and more, and it could be fatal.— and it could be fatal. it would be such a shame — and it could be fatal. it would be such a shame after _ and it could be fatal. it would be such a shame after coming - and it could be fatal. it would be i such a shame after coming through this period, to falter at this final moment. it is notjust paper, glass, ceramic that are energy intensive, but think about downstream. this company provides to businesses in aerospace, construction, hospitals, retail, so that dripped on the supply chain will affect everyone. 0ver there for example is insulation thatis 0ver there for example is insulation that is needed in construction at the moment. there are thousands of businesses waiting to steal what this deal will look like, but also wondering when and how they will be able to pay back the loans. wondering when and how they will be the headlines on bbc news:
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0ur report criticises the government response of the early stages of the pandemic. relatives of those who died said that a public enquiry should begin right away. ideal to support uk company struggling with high energy bills, the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. the shortlist for this year's riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco—friendly mosque in cambridge, a museum in the lake district and the centrepiece of a university in south west london. what makes a good building? today, we're travelling to the north cornwall coast. the tintagel footbridge spans a gorge about 60 metres wide and creates a link that reunites the two halves of tintagel castle for the first time in more than 500 years: more than 500 years.
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when we proposed it to english heritage, i never thought they'd accept. but sometimes, the crazy ideas are actually the best ideas. my name's william matthews and, along with laurent ney and matthieu mallie, from ney & partners, we are the engineers and the designers of the tintagel castle footbridge. the footbridge reconnects the two sides of the medieval castle, built in the 12th century by richard, earl of cornwall. the mainland ward and the island ward were connected by an isthmus of rock which, in a sense, eroded away, and the bridge recreates that link between the two sides. one of the key drivers behind the project — indeed, its very raison d'etre — was to improve accessibility to the site. one of the major problems that tintagel has is this incredibly rocky landscape. we wanted to be able to get lots of people here who couldn't get here before. because there were so many steps up to the island, a lot of people couldn't because they had bad knees, they used wheelchairs, whatever it was.
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now we have essentially step—free access right from the car park all the way through onto the site. and it was so satisfying on the opening day to see literally a queue of wheelchair users from the local village queue up to be the first person to cross the bridge and onto the island. something that they might not have done for many years. in my mind, this was a textbook example of how you should design a major piece of engineering, on a really sensitive heritage or archaeological site. you can look at all sorts of designs for bridges that would have to go through the archaeology on the surface of the island. the elegance of this solution was that it is anchored into the rock on either side, below the sensitive archaeology. very, very clever. the materials we used were important not just structurally, but also, how it would tie into its landscape, its situation. for the bridge deck, we've used slate which is mined from the quarryjust two miles away. 40,000 hand—split and hand—cut
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slates will have been laid. and it gives that wonderful sound as you walk across and that unique experience that you feel under your foot. when you step out onto the bridge, it is really amazing _ because you hear clitter—clatter of the slate _ it's such a clever design. and the views are - absolutely astonishing. it's wonderful. one word that sort of encapsulates the building, its not a very architectural word, but for me, it's fun. and it's a kind of project that you can see easily in the fases of users. the fun and enjoyment that they are getting from the project, that's extremely gratifying. the tintagel footbridge on the north cornwall coast is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain's best new building. we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7.30pm.
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time now for across the uk. "it was one of the best days of my life." the words of a woman from hull who is finally been able to reunite with her family after almost two years apart. coronavirus restrictions have meant that many people have been unable to see their loved ones, but carla dyson, who lives in australia, has finally made it home. gemma dawson reports. i always consider myself to be a mentally strong person, but this has taken its toll. there is no end in sight. taken its toll. there is no end in siuht. ~ , ., ., sight. we first met carla last month, sight. we first met carla last month. a _ sight. we first met carla last month, a make-up- sight. we first met carla last month, a make-up artist - sight. we first met carla last. month, a make-up artist from sight. we first met carla last - month, a make-up artist from how he month, a make—up artist from how he now lives in melbourne, which last week, it was reported, became the most lockdown city in the world. it is usually one of our favourite places in the world, but during lockdown, it went on forever. there were riots every day in melbourne.
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it was too much for anyone. earlier this month, _ it was too much for anyone. earlier this month, carla _ it was too much for anyone. earlier this month, carla and _ it was too much for anyone. earlier this month, carla and her- it was too much for anyone. earlier this month, carla and her husband | this month, carla and her husband finally managed to fly home after being given a travel exemption. after nearly two years, this very emotional reunion with her sister. that was the best thing ever, one of the best days of my life coming home and seeing my sister at the airport. i was staring through these two doors _ i was staring through these two doors waiting for the doors to open. i doors waiting for the doors to open. i dived _ doors waiting for the doors to open. i dived onto — doors waiting for the doors to open. i dived onto a barrier and just grabbed — i dived onto a barrier and just grabbed her. i could barely let her no. ,, . ., , ., , go. since then there have been many more reuniens— go. since then there have been many more reunions and _ go. since then there have been many more reunions and lots _ go. since then there have been many more reunions and lots of— go. since then there have been many more reunions and lots of catching i more reunions and lots of catching up. more reunions and lots of catching u -. more reunions and lots of catching u . _ ., , [w more reunions and lots of catching u. . , [w ., , more reunions and lots of catching up. over the last 18 months i would have given — up. over the last 18 months i would have given everything _ up. over the last 18 months i would have given everything to _ up. over the last 18 months i would have given everything to get - up. over the last 18 months i would have given everything to get her- have given everything to get her back. i have given everything to get her back. ~ ., have given everything to get her back. ~' ., �* , have given everything to get her back. ~ ., �*, , ., .,. back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel like — back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel like i'm _ back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel like i'm alive. _ back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel like i'm alive. i - back. i know it's sounds dramatic, but i feel like i'm alive. i have - but i feel like i'm alive. i have not air but i feel like i'm alive. i have get air and — but i feel like i'm alive. i have get air and i — but i feel like i'm alive. i have got air and i can _ but i feel like i'm alive. i have got air and i can live - but i feel like i'm alive. i have got air and i can live again - but i feel like i'm alive. i have| got air and i can live again and there isa got air and i can live again and there is a reason for me to be here, really. there is a reason for me to be here, reall . ., there is a reason for me to be here, reall . . , ., , there is a reason for me to be here, reall . . , .,, ~ , ., ., really. leaving people in australia was really hard. _ really. leaving people in australia was really hard. i _ really. leaving people in australia was really hard. i felt _ really. leaving people in australia was really hard. i felt so - really. leaving people in australiaj was really hard. i felt so fortunate
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to get _ was really hard. i felt so fortunate to get the — was really hard. i felt so fortunate to get the extension. i have been fighting _ to get the extension. i have been fighting for this for a long time so i did fighting for this for a long time so i did feel— fighting for this for a long time so i did feel really sad and a lot of guilt— i did feel really sad and a lot of guilt to — i did feel really sad and a lot of guilt to leave the country, but family— guilt to leave the country, but family comes first and it was a choice — family comes first and it was a choice we _ family comes first and it was a choice we have to make. today, carla is fl in: to choice we have to make. today, carla is flying to spain _ choice we have to make. today, carla is flying to spain to _ choice we have to make. today, carla is flying to spain to finally _ choice we have to make. today, carla is flying to spain to finally see - is flying to spain to finally see her parents again, but she still plans to return to australia next year. people in brighton and hove have been warned that bin strikes in the city could last for six months. rubbish has started to build up in the street after members of the gmb union walked out last week in a dispute over pay and conditions. leaders say they now have a mandate to continue industrial action until next april. the city council has urged them to resume negotiations. bbc london has been given rare, exclusive access inside a women's prison in sutton. statistics show that many of them go on to re—offend, so to break that cycle downview prison runs workshops which train women in the skills they need to turn their lives around.
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our home affairs correspondent lauren moss went to see how it works. pinning, stitching and drafting patterns for top designers, not the usual activities you would associate with the woman does not present, but it is one of the courses run here, teaching qualifications that can be put to use when inmates are released. mchale is halfway through a seven—year sentence. she says she is choosing the time to turn her life around. i is choosing the time to turn her life around-— life around. i definitely made a mistake and _ life around. i definitely made a mistake and a _ life around. i definitely made a mistake and a belief _ life around. i definitely made a mistake and a belief i - life around. i definitely made a mistake and a belief i deserve | life around. i definitely made a i mistake and a belief i deserve to life around. i definitely made a - mistake and a belief i deserve to be here. what can i do to better myself as a person? what can i do to grow and evolve and go out and have a successful career in something that i really enjoy. in successful career in something that i really enjoy-— i really en'oy. in collaboration with the i really enjoy. in collaboration with the london _ i really enjoy. in collaboration with the london college - i really enjoy. in collaboration with the london college of. i really enjoy. in collaboration - with the london college of fashion, women spent four hours a day in the workshop also honing maths and entrance ? english skills. across
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the court, another group is developing photographs, t—shirt and mug printing, hopefully getting ready to work in a shop after prison. finding a job as one of the biggest challenges for x offenders. it is good that they encourage people to be able to work on the outside. that was my main concern, that i have always worked, i didn't want to go out and think i am a criminal now and not be able to get a job. criminal now and not be able to get a 'ob. ., ' . .,, criminal now and not be able to get a'ob. 'j~ criminal now and not be able to get a'ob. ., a 'ob. reoffending cost £18 billion a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a ear. in a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a year- in her— a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a year. in her first _ a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a year. in her first visit _ a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a year. in her first visit here - a job. reoffending cost £18 billion a year. in her first visit here the l a year. in her first visit here the new prisons minister says she hopes these new projects will help reduce that. if these new pro'ects will help reduce that. ., ., ,, , that. if we do that, we keep the ublic that. if we do that, we keep the public safe. _ that. if we do that, we keep the public safe, we _ that. if we do that, we keep the public safe, we cut _ that. if we do that, we keep the public safe, we cut crime - that. if we do that, we keep the public safe, we cut crime and i that. if we do that, we keep the| public safe, we cut crime and we offer opportunities to these prisoners. offer opportunities to these prisoners-— offer opportunities to these prisoners. offer opportunities to these risoners. ~ ., , ., prisoners. with roughly one in ten women employed _ prisoners. with roughly one in ten women employed after _ prisoners. with roughly one in ten women employed after leaving i prisoners. with roughly one in ten| women employed after leaving the prison after six weeks, that is
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something that is going to have to change. archaeologists in israel have excavated a 1,500—year—old wine—making site. the huge byzantine era winery produced two million litres a year. the bbc�*s tim allman has more. it's the size of a football pitch, a warren of previously hidden rooms and chambers — an insight into how life was lived more than 1,000 years ago. in these spaces, grapes were fermented, wine was stored, drink was produced on an almost industrial scale. there are many many wine presses that have been found during excavations. you could say, there are hundreds of wine presses, so what's the big deal? the big deal is the size of this complex and also the fact that it's
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all clustered together to create one sort of whole unit. the byzantine empire lasted more than 1,000 years and covered much of the mediterranean, north africa and the middle east. at its peak, its estimated to have had a population of more than 25 million people — around one in ten of the planet's population. and in an age where unclean water could carry disease, almost everyone was obliged to seek an alternative. even babies and small children drank water with wine, and the sweet taste of the wine, the sweetness of the water, it was a real hit during the byzantine period. dozens ofjugs and kilns were also uncovered and dna analysis of grape pips might help scientists understand the kinds of wine produced here. as to its taste, it remains a mystery, but ancient texts describe it as light and agreeable.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. it remains very quiet on the weather front with variable amounts of the cloud. it will not change for the rest of the week. a little bit of rain for scotland on thursday, but generally speaking it is high pressure dominating the scene. the amount of cloud is linked to how the wind blows around this high pressure. the wind is blowing in a clockwise fashion, dragging in this extended weather front from the north atlantic, which is keeping things over ice across the uk. in the extreme north—east of the country it will be brights with some sunshine. also the clouds breaking up sunshine. also the clouds breaking up across the south today and focus
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on pop site it will be around 17 degrees. at times, the cloud is thick enough to produce a few spots of rain, nothing too heavy. with the breeze blowing off the atlantic we keep getting back thick cloud rolling in so at times it will be wet and wild, particularly in western parts of scotland, but in the south and south—east with the winds are light and the sky is clear, temperatures will fall to five degrees. 0n clear, temperatures will fall to five degrees. on wednesday, we are more or less in the centre of the area of high pressure so a lot of dry weather. the cloud should break, temperatures should rise to 17 degrees. if it does stay overcast where you are, it won't feel particularly warm because of the lack of sunshine. 0n particularly warm because of the lack of sunshine. on thursday, a bit of rain heading towards scotland. we have this cold front which sneaks in, so some rain around on thursday and an increasing breeze. the wind switch direction, introducing colder
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air to the north of scotland. it remains relatively mild, at least in the sunny spells across the bulk of england and wales. we are not expecting much rain at all on the cold front and it'll be out of the way by friday afternoon. friday afternoon for many of us looks dry and bright, but will be lower, 11-13 , that is and bright, but will be lower, 11—13 , that is because the culture areas being introduced from the north atlantic. it will stay dry through saturday, but saturday night into sunday it will turn unsettled.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... a damning report from mps who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing thousands of lives. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. the report criticised the chaotic system of test and trace and moving infected patients into care homes. families of the victims say lives were lost in vain. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government, and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry.

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