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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 12, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. "one of the worst public health failures ever" — a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, had consequences, and we have to confront the need to learn lessons from that. there was praise for the uk's vaccine roll—out — described as one of the most effective initiatives in british scienctific history. we want to know what you think. how would you rate the government's response to the pandemic? get in touch with me on twitter @lukwesaburak, or use
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the hashtag, #bbcyourquestions. a deal to support uk companies struggling with high energy bills — the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. finding a way forward for afghanistan the world's major economies will hold talks to try and avert a crisis. the uk will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today, when brexit minister lord frost makes a speech in lisbon. superman's creators announce that the superhero�*s son will reveal he's bisexual in the next edition of the comic. and coming up this hour... a room with a pew — how camping in a church has become the latest unorthodox getaway trend.
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hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. an inquiry by uk politicians has described the government's initial response to coronavirus in england as one of the worst failures of public health in the country's history. the report mainly focuses on the response to the pandemic the study was carried out by two house of commons committees, both chaired by former conservative cabinet ministers, and is highly critical. it says both ministers and scientists waited too long to bring in lockdowns last year, costing many lives. the first lab—identified cases of covid 19 in the uk were recorded the report mainly focuses on the response to the pandemic in england and did not look at steps taken individually by wales, scotland and northern ireland. the first lab—identified cases of covid 19 in the uk were recorded
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on 31st january 2020. but it wasn't until eight weeks later, on the 23rd march, that the prime minister ordered the uk's first national lockdown. the report said too little was done in the early weeks, and the uk did not take enough advantage of the learning being generated in other countries. the committee said the response ranked as one of the most important public health failures the uk has ever experienced. despite the uk being one of the first countries in the world to develop a test for covid, the report described the roll—out of the test and trace system as slow, uncertain and often chaotic. but the report has praised the uk's vaccination programme and government support for the development of vaccines desribing the programme as one of the most effective
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initiatives in history. a government spokesperson said that it never shied away from taking quick and decisive action to save lives, protect the nhs and bring in restrictions. this report is from our health correspondent, jim reed. we are still living through, says this report, the biggest health crisis of the last 100 years. millions have been infected, many thousands of lives have been lost to covid. when we brought back people from wuhan injanuary... for a year now, two influential groups of mps have been taking evidence on the pandemic from people involved in key decisions at the time. now in this report, they strongly criticise the early response. instead of locking down hard and fast like some other countries, they say ministers, guided by scientific advisers,
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made a deliberate decision to introduce social distancing rules gradually until it was clear the nhs could be overwhelmed. mps describe that as a serious error which proved fatal to many. we were too slow in that initial lockdown. we were operating in a fog of uncertainty. even the government's advisers, professor neil ferguson, in evidence to my committee said, if we had locked down a week earlier we might even have saved half the number of deaths in that initial wave. everyone accepts that we locked down too late. across 150 pages of the report, there is more criticism. it describes the roll—out of the test and trace programme in england as slow and chaotic. it says the uk did not impose rigorous border controls, letting in high numbers of infections from france and spain. it criticises the treatment of care homes, saying the risks were not
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recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the report has actually picked up things we were saying from the outset, that social care was an afterthought. the mantra was nhs, we have to keep it safe. we understood some of that. what we did not know was the discharge out of hospitals was actually not through testing. they were not safe discharges. there was though praise for parts of the national response. the vaccine programme was described as one of the most effective initiatives in the history of uk science. treatments for covid were also singled out as well. 0ne, dexamethasone, was widely used first in this country and has saved more than a million lives around the world. the government says throughout the pandemic it has been guided by scientific experts and has not shied away from taking quick action, including on lockdowns.
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it says it is committed to learning lessons and will hold a full public inquiry in the spring. jim reed, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent is in westminster. this is a really damning report but it does not contain any surprises for many? 140. contain any surprises for many? no, it is not really _ contain any surprises for many? iirr, it is not really point fingers at individuals. we have heard a lot of this over the last 18 months through news reports, leaks from government, in newspapers and also through the evidence sessions the committees have heard, but for the first time it sets out in detail, 150 pages long, the various issues that have been with the handling of the pandemic. it starts off before the pandemic. it starts off before the pandemic hits our shores, the fact the uk was not properly prepared, it
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was ready for a flu —type pandemic and in the early stages the fact the consensus now seems to be the uk was far too slow to lockdown and many lives were lost as a result, it talks about the handling of the pandemic in care homes, saying there were devastating repercussions because of that, the chaotic test and trace programme. it talks about problems in terms of racial disparities and other elements. it is not all bad and jeremy hunt, the former health secretary and a chair of a commons committee, describes the response is a game of two hearts. ., ., ., , , ., hearts. the national response to covid was _ hearts. the national response to covid was a _ hearts. the national response to covid was a bit _ hearts. the national response to covid was a bit like _ hearts. the national response to covid was a bit like a _ hearts. the national response to covid was a bit like a football - hearts. the national response to i covid was a bit like a football game with two— covid was a bit like a football game with two very different hearts, in the first — with two very different hearts, in the first half we had some serious errors. _ the first half we had some serious errors. we — the first half we had some serious errors, we could have avoided the lock tab _ errors, we could have avoided the lock tab but having got into the position — lock tab but having got into the position where we had to have one we should _ position where we had to have one we should have _ position where we had to have one we should have lockdown earlier, but in the second _ should have lockdown earlier, but in the second half we had the vaccine roll-out, _ the second half we had the vaccine roll—out, which we describe as the most _
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roll—out, which we describe as the most effective initiative in the history— most effective initiative in the history of— most effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration, the discovery of treatments which had saved a million tights _ treatments which had saved a million lights around the world and the fascinating thing which makes it very difficult to sum up in one clean — very difficult to sum up in one clean sentence or instinct how we did is— clean sentence or instinct how we did is that — clean sentence or instinct how we did is that it was very often the same _ did is that it was very often the same people responsible for both sets of— same people responsible for both sets of decisions.— same people responsible for both sets of decisions. jeremy hunt under the mps heard _ sets of decisions. jeremy hunt under the mps heard evidence _ sets of decisions. jeremy hunt under the mps heard evidence from - sets of decisions. jeremy hunt under the mps heard evidence from mps i sets of decisions. jeremy hunt under| the mps heard evidence from mps no individuals at the heart of government at the start of the pandemic threats, including health secretary matt hancock, but perhaps the most famous evidence session was with the former adviser to the prime minister, dominic cummings. he has been speaking to reporters outside his north london home this morning and was asked whether he felt lessons had been learned. thea;r and was asked whether he felt lessons had been learned. they and others ut lessons had been learned. they and others put into _ lessons had been learned. they and others put into place _ lessons had been learned. they and others put into place work— lessons had been learned. they and others put into place work to - lessons had been learned. they and others put into place work to try - lessons had been learned. they and others put into place work to try to l others put into place work to try to improve _ others put into place work to try to improve the system in 2020 after the first wave. _ improve the system in 2020 after the first wave, unfortunately the prime minister. _ first wave, unfortunately the prime minister, being the joke that years, has not _ minister, being the joke that years, has not pushed that through. we had a joke _ has not pushed that through. we had a joke prime minister and a joke
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leading — a joke prime minister and a joke leading the labour party, we need a new political system.— new political system. dominic cummings — new political system. dominic cummings not _ new political system. dominic cummings not mincing - new political system. dominic cummings not mincing his - new political system. dominic- cummings not mincing his words, as ever. in response the government said it had acted decisively and quickly throughout the pandemic. ministers have a lot on their plates in the era now dealing with the economic fallout the pandemic and the after—effects of brexit, so perhaps not too much time to look back at mistakes that may or may not have been made over the past 18 months but this isjust have been made over the past 18 months but this is just the beginning in terms of looking back at the pandemic, the full public inquiry is due to get under way in the spring and could go on for years. the spring and could go on for ears. ., ~' the spring and could go on for ears. . ~ , ., borisjohnson is expected to give his backing to a support package for firms struggling with the soaring cost of wholesale gas. the treasury is considering a proposal submitted by the business secretary yesterday. ceramic, paper and steel manufacturing firms have warned that without an energy price cap some factories could be forced to close.
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our business correspondent theo leggett reports. forging steel requires a lot of heat, and that consumes a great deal of energy. small wonder then that steelmakers want the government to help them cope with a steep rise in energy costs. it isn't just steel. cement manufacturers, chemicals firms, glass—makers and ceramics businesses are also appealing for support. not all companies are affected in the same way by rising costs. some have bought their gas and electricity in advance and are protected from price rises, at least for the time being. 0thers though are not. for them, this is an incredibly serious predicament, leading some to scale back production or to raise product prices. of course the longer this period of high prices continues, the more companies are impacted and the more severe those impacts are and, at some point, it starts to threaten their company viability. the government faces a dilemma.
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it wants to help viable businesses cope with soaring costs but it doesn't want to prop up failing companies. direct subsidies would add to the burden on taxpayers, while a cap on electricity or gas prices would risk simply passing on extra costs to energy companies. but labour says what businesses are asking for is reasonable. they felt a package of support is needed through the winter when gas and electricity prices are usually higher and to get through this temporary spike in gas and electricity prices. that's what they're looking for. they're not looking for a permanent bailout or a subsidy. what they are looking for is targeted support now, which is what is happening in other european countries. the chancellor now does at least have concrete proposals to look at, passed on by the business secretary after consultations with industry. whatever options he chooses, someone, somewhere is going to have to pay in the end. theo leggett, bbc news.
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the world's major economies are coming together to try to stave off the crisis in afghanistan. in a virtual summit hosted by italy the current president of the g20 countries will be trying to lighten strategies for aid and to try to stop afghanistan from becoming a haven for militants. the un secretary general has urged the international community to find ways to get money into the afghan economy to avert its collapse. we need to find ways to make the economy breathe again. this can be done without violating its national laws or compromising principles. we must seek ways to create the conditions that will allow afghan professionals and civil servants to continue working to serve the afghan population. i urge the world to take action and inject liquidity into the afghan economy to avoid collapse.
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0ur correspondent yogita limaye in kabul says it is a risk that funds given to the taliban may be misused. this is a government not recognised tjy this is a government not recognised by the world. the taliban seized control of this country on the 15th of august, said that lots of international funds flowing into the country have been frozen —— since then, lots of international funds. we have seen the taliban hold dialogue with leaders from countries around the world including the uk, the us and germany as part of a series of efforts from them to try to gain international recognition, which would be a key step forward to try to unlock some of the funds coming in, but the questions for the international community really are, can you do that to a government that has seized control here, to the
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taliban which has so far not delivered on commitments they made publicly about women's rights and allowing girls to go to school, allowing girls to go to school, allowing women to go to work. then there is the fear that if that money were to be given back, how would you hold them to account on where and how it was used? but what is quite clear on the ground is that the situation is dire, it was very difficult prior to the 15th of august and is worse now. yogita lima e in august and is worse now. yogita limaye in kabul. _ august and is worse now. yogita limaye in kabul. the _ august and is worse now. yogita limaye in kabul. the headline i august and is worse now. yogita i limaye in kabul. the headline stance one of the worst public health failures ever, a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. there was praise for the vaccine roll—out, described as one of the most effective initiatives in british scientific history. a deal to support companies struggling with high energy bills, the government is
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expected to announce details in the coming days. the uk will set out its demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when the brexit minister, lord frost, makes a speech in lisbon. the protocol, agreed by both sides, prevents a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods. 0ur brussels correspondent jessica parker told 0ur brussels correspondentjessica parker told me more. the timing is quite interesting, we only learned the speech was happening over the weekend and it will happen later today, a day before the eu will set out it response to the uk's demands for significant change to the northern ireland protocol. some might remember that the northern ireland protocol is designed to prevent checks on the border between
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the republic of ireland and northern ireland, so you have checks on the irish sea border of goods going from great britain into northern ireland. we expect the eu to offer some concessions on that issue, looking at things like allowing the continued import of chilled meat from great britain to northern ireland, but they are not really expected to shift on the issue of oversight of the treaty. the uk's brexit minister lord frost will push that today, suggesting this issue of how the treaty is policed is not a side issue for him but a very fundamental one. what about the ecj? that gets to the heart of it, the european coated justice's wrote in oversight of this treaty. in the uk perspective they are arguing that for a european to have oversight of an agreement affecting northern ireland is an issue in terms of sovereignty, but from an eu perspective they are saying that you signed up to this agreement not so
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long ago knowing what it entailed and the northern ireland protocol means that northern ireland is effectively in the eu single market for good, the eu are very keen to protect the single market and the ultimate arbiter of those rules is the european justice, ultimate arbiter of those rules is the europeanjustice, so those ultimate arbiter of those rules is the european justice, so those are some of the issues, i think the british will argue that it northern ireland you can'tjust apply british will argue that it northern ireland you can't just apply the strict rules according to the european cortical you have to look at a more pragmatic, flexible approach, but the two sides will probably enter talks fairly soon on all of these issues and we will have to see how far they get.— to see how far they get. jessica parker. in the united states the republican governor of texas, greg abbott, has issued an executive order barring all covid vaccine mandates in the state, including private businesses. the move pits mr abbott against president biden who last month called on employers to require their workers to be vaccinated. 0ur north america correspondent
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peter bowes has the details. this is a sweeping ban in texas on covid—19 mandates and it means that from now through an executive order being brought in by governor greg abbott that private companies, whether they be restaurants or chins or stores, along with government agencies too, will not be able to require that their employees have the covid—19 vaccination or indeed customers of businesses. previously there was an order in fact that's essentially applied this ban on the covid—19 mandate to government agencies but it did not apply to private companies, so that is the change now being brought in by executive order with the governor urging the state legislature to pass a law to the same effect. governor
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abbott has said the covid—19 vaccine is safe, effective in our best defence against the virus but should always remain voluntary and never forced. this seems at least in part a response to president biden's announcement last month at a national and federal level by companies with more than 100 employees should indeed require those employees to have the vaccination or at least regular tests. it prompted a couple of major airlines, american airlines and southwest airlines, to say they would go along with that mandate but in texas governor abbott said it amounted to the bullying of companies and hampering those companies and hampering those companies as they try to recover from the pandemic. that was peter bowes. back now to our top story. an inquiry by uk politicians has described the government's initial response to covid 19 as one of the worst failures
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of public health in the country's history. joining me now is lindsayjackson. her mother died during the first wave of coroaonvirus in april 2020. she's part of the group covid 19 bereaved families forjustice. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. firstly i need your reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it. it reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it- it shows — reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it- it shows it _ reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it. it shows it can _ reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it. it shows it can be _ reaction to this inquiry? i welcome it. it shows it can be done, - it. it shows it can be done, contrary to what mrjohnson has been saying about the judicial inquiry and government not having time to do that, they obviously have had time over the last year to produce this report, so i welcome it. i over the last year to produce this report, so i welcome it.— over the last year to produce this report, so i welcome it. iwas going to sa , report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say. does— report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say. does it _ report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say. does it go — report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say, does it go far— report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say, does it go far enough, i report, so i welcome it. iwas going to say, does it go far enough, but l to say, does it go far enough, but do you think they should have spoken to bereaved families as part of this? , , ., .,
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this? yes, why not? there are 160,000 _ this? yes, why not? there are 160,000 others, _ this? yes, why not? there are 160,000 others, they - this? yes, why not? there are 160,000 others, they had - this? yes, why not? there are i 160,000 others, they had spoken to some individuals who had family members in care homes which i think was important, it seems a mistake not to have spoken to people who had direct personal experience of the failures of the government handling of the pandemic.— failures of the government handling of the pandemic. what would you have told them if you _ of the pandemic. what would you have told them if you have _ of the pandemic. what would you have told them if you have been _ of the pandemic. what would you have told them if you have been part - of the pandemic. what would you have told them if you have been part of- told them if you have been part of that inquiry giving evidence? what told them if you have been part of that inquiry giving evidence? what i find interesting _ that inquiry giving evidence? what i find interesting as _ that inquiry giving evidence? what i find interesting as i _ that inquiry giving evidence? what i find interesting as i don't _ that inquiry giving evidence? what i find interesting as i don't think i would have said anything very much different than the evidence they have apparently received in producing this report, because lots of things in this reportjust confirm my own personal thoughts based on losing my mum, the things they are talking about like being slow to lock down, i remember visiting my mum in march 2020 and every time i went, calling beforehand the care home to say, and
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i still like to visit? they would say, yes. iwould i still like to visit? they would say, yes. i would turn up at the door and say, are you sure i can come in? they would say, yes, the government says we are still allowed to receive visitors. i knew in my own mind about is too slow, i knew the social care sector was not being looked after, i knew people should not have been released from hospital without tests, and this just confirms that. i do not think i would have told the committee anything new but i would have reinforced what they have been told tjy reinforced what they have been told by others, i am sure.— reinforced what they have been told by others, i am sure. would you have exected by others, i am sure. would you have exoected some _ by others, i am sure. would you have expected some form _ by others, i am sure. would you have expected some form of _ expected some form of accountability? they say they do not want to blame anyone. what should happen? i want to blame anyone. what should ha--en? ~ want to blame anyone. what should ha en? ~ , ., ., .,, happen? i think it is unavoidable now that we _ happen? i think it is unavoidable now that we need _ happen? i think it is unavoidable now that we need to _ happen? i think it is unavoidable now that we need to proceed i happen? i think it is unavoidable now that we need to proceed to | happen? i think it is unavoidable| now that we need to proceed to a fulljudicial inquiry now. this
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report says right at the beginning that the learning needs to take place rapidly. i am sorry, we're almost two years into this pandemic, is too late to be rapid. my definition of rapid is not that. thisjudicial inquiry definition of rapid is not that. this judicial inquiry needs to happen because this report is based on the evidence of people who were willing to appear before it, who had the option of providing evidence or not. goodness knows what we will find out of there is a fulljudicial inquiry and people are compelled to attend and compelled to provide evidence and written materials. what more might come out then? it is only on the basis of that, a proper judicial inquiry, that we can see if people are culpable, and fao, i want to see them brought to justice, but thatis to see them brought to justice, but that is not where this report leads us, it is a start but it is not
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sufficient. us, it is a start but it is not sufficient-— us, it is a start but it is not sufficient. . ., ., , , . sufficient. we have heard a public inuui sufficient. we have heard a public inquiry could _ sufficient. we have heard a public inquiry could take _ sufficient. we have heard a public inquiry could take years _ sufficient. we have heard a public inquiry could take years and i sufficient. we have heard a publicj inquiry could take years and likely to start in the new year. earlier this morning i spoke to professor susan michie and she said that yet again we are over 40,000 cases. from your experience, you have lost someone as part of this pandemic, do you feel the achieving things differently now moving forward? i think the stakes are being made now. i think the sense that it is a free for all now —— i think mistakes are being made now. people are abusing doctors now because they are asking them to turn up for their appointments in masks. i have friends in the rest of europe for him masks are now a regular requirement. they were as a matter of course, and lots of people here still deep but the requirement is not there, the government has moved too quickly. if i can make mention
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of what i had seen to be a despicable remark from mr hunt, the former secretary of state, that this is a game of two hearts, this is not a game. my mother did not lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry and i don't want political decisions being taken now which are not based on the best advice. we know from this report that in autumn last year, this time last year, later than this last year, the government did not follow scientific advice and that seems to me to have led to a larger loss of life in the second
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wave than even the first, and i fear those mistakes are being made again. lindsay jackson, those mistakes are being made again. lindsayjackson, i will those mistakes are being made again. lindsay jackson, i will pass on my condolences, i know you lost your mum last year but that pain does not go away. thank you very much for joining us this morning on bbc news. thank you. you are watching bbc news. from blackouts in china to lack of power in the us, the energy crisis is being felt around the world. there is a surge in demand as countries try to move away from coal and oil towards cleaner natural gas. that has created shortages and, of course, driven up the prices. let's discuss this further. to discuss this further, i'm joined by afia malik who's a senior research economist at the pakistan institute of development economics.
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also professor vladimir kutcherov from gubkin russian state university of oil and gas and kth royal institute of technology. and marco siddi, senior research fellow at the finnish institute of international affairs. good morning to all three of you, thank you forjoining us on bbc news. afia, the situation in pakistan is interesting because you had enough gas, you are now having to import it. had enough gas, you are now having to import it— to import it. what went wrong? our as to import it. what went wrong? our gas resources _ to import it. what went wrong? our gas resources are _ to import it. what went wrong? our gas resources are depleting - to import it. what went wrong? our gas resources are depleting and i to import it. what went wrong? our gas resources are depleting and in i gas resources are depleting and in the absence of any new discovery we are relying on imports. we are trying our best to discover more gas resources but so far we are unable thatis resources but so far we are unable that is why our gas consumption is
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increasing at the rate of 5% per annum, so we have to rely on gas imports because our production is almost stagnant since 2008. so from the microphone several years we have been importing gas. the microphone several years we have been importing gas-— been importing gas. water cistern to the economy? _ been importing gas. water cistern to the economy? -- — been importing gas. water cistern to the economy? -- water— been importing gas. water cistern to the economy? -- water cistern i been importing gas. water cistern to the economy? -- water cistern to i been importing gas. water cistern to | the economy? -- water cistern to the the economy? —— water cistern to the economy? it the economy? -- water cistern to the econom ? ., the economy? -- water cistern to the econom ? . ., ., economy? it will have a negative im act economy? it will have a negative impact on _ economy? it will have a negative impact on the — economy? it will have a negative impact on the existing _ impact on the existing foreign—exchange reserves. it will affect the industrial consumers.
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before i turn to our next guest, professor vladimir, what is the government strategy in dealing with this, long—term? in government strategy in dealing with this, long-term?— this, long-term? in the long-term the government _ this, long-term? in the long-term the government is _ this, long-term? in the long-term the government is planning - this, long-term? in the long-term the government is planning to i this, long-term? in the long-term i the government is planning to switch to renewables. the government is trying to minimise its reliance on gas and oil and increase its reliance on renewable energy and other resources to overcome this trouble in the long run, the medium to long run. irate trouble in the long run, the medium to long run-— trouble in the long run, the medium to [on run. . ., , ., . , to long run. we had seen for example in the uk the — to long run. we had seen for example in the uk the use _ to long run. we had seen for example in the uk the use of— to long run. we had seen for example in the uk the use of renewables, i in the uk the use of renewables, being able to fill the gap from, for example, coal—fired energy. with that filled the gap and meet the demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, demand in pakistan? renewables? of course. why — demand in pakistan? renewables? of course. why not? _ demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, why not? we _ demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, why not? we have _ demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, why not? we have a - demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, why not? we have a lot i demand in pakistan? renewables? of course, why not? we have a lot of- course, why not? we have a lot of potential for renewable energy, it
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will definitely be that amount of energy resources.— energy resources. what is the timeframe? — the target is to increase its share by 25% to 30% by 2030 energy wise. i would like to turn now to professor vladimir kutcherov. russia, as everyone knows, has a rich supply of gas. where do you think the supply of natural gas sits, moving forward, when we look at energy supply, for example, for europe?— when we look at energy supply, for example, for europe? well, russia is the main supplier _ example, for europe? well, russia is the main supplier of _ example, for europe? well, russia is the main supplier of natural - example, for europe? well, russia is the main supplier of natural gas i example, for europe? well, russia is the main supplier of natural gas for i the main supplier of natural gas for europe _ the main supplier of natural gas for europe. and now prices, price is
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very. _ europe. and now prices, price is very. very— europe. and now prices, price is very, very high. and only to give my opinion— very, very high. and only to give my opinion why. — very, very high. and only to give my opinion why, what is the reason, what _ opinion why, what is the reason, what is _ opinion why, what is the reason, what is the — opinion why, what is the reason, what is the main reasons for this? first _ what is the main reasons for this? first of— what is the main reasons for this? first of all. — what is the main reasons for this? first of all. it— what is the main reasons for this? first of all, it is the demand in the first— first of all, it is the demand in the first half of 2021 due to the unusual— the first half of 2021 due to the unusual weather conditions. a cold winter. _ unusual weather conditions. a cold winter, heating for summer in 2021. by winter, heating for summer in 2021. by the _ winter, heating for summer in 2021. by the way, — winter, heating for summer in 2021. by the way, the generation of electricity from renewable energy sources _ electricity from renewable energy sources fell hardly. the absence of usual— sources fell hardly. the absence of usual strong winds in the north sea, where _ usual strong winds in the north sea, where the _ usual strong winds in the north sea, where the main windmills are located _ where the main windmills are located. the second reason why this flotation _ located. the second reason why this flotation is— located. the second reason why this flotation is so sharp, so big, is the demand of gas and liquefied natural— the demand of gas and liquefied natural gas in asia. the price in
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asia _ natural gas in asia. the price in asia is— natural gas in asia. the price in asia is higher than in europe and as a result, _ asia is higher than in europe and as a result, almost all lng suppliers send _ a result, almost all lng suppliers send lng — a result, almost all lng suppliers send lng to europe. but one of the most _ send lng to europe. but one of the most important reasons, it is nothing — most important reasons, it is nothing to— most important reasons, it is nothing to do with russia, but this is my— nothing to do with russia, but this is my personal opinion, this is their— is my personal opinion, this is their own _ is my personal opinion, this is their own energy strategy, this is one of— their own energy strategy, this is one of the — their own energy strategy, this is one of the main reasons. they tried to accelerate the transition to green — to accelerate the transition to green energy. 0k, to accelerate the transition to green energy. ok, it's good. green energy. _ green energy. ok, it's good. green energy. it's— green energy. ok, it's good. green energy, it's good, but it is too fast _ eheng, it's good, but it is too fast if_ energy, it's good, but it is too fast. if these conditions, these weather— fast. if these conditions, these weather conditions will be repeated in a couple — weather conditions will be repeated in a couple of years, you could imagine — in a couple of years, you could imagine what would happen. what is the solution? well, i think one of the solution? well, i think one of the most — the solution? well, i think one of the most important things is to start— the most important things is to start to — the most important things is to start to supply natural gas fire
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nord _ start to supply natural gas fire nord stream two. it will help to decrease — nord stream two. it will help to decrease the influence... professor, let me just — decrease the influence... professor, let me justjump _ decrease the influence... professor, let me justjump in _ decrease the influence... professor, let me justjump in there _ decrease the influence... professor, let me justjump in there very i let me justjump in there very quickly. where are we with the status of nord stream two? well, the ro'ect is status of nord stream two? well, the project is waiting _ status of nord stream two? well, the project is waiting for _ status of nord stream two? well, the project is waiting for some _ status of nord stream two? well, the project is waiting for some solution i project is waiting for some solution from european and german governments. in my opinion, it will be starting — governments. in my opinion, it will be starting very, very soon, in a couple _ be starting very, very soon, in a couple or— be starting very, very soon, in a couple or three months.- be starting very, very soon, in a couple or three months. does that mean, i couple or three months. does that mean. i mean _ couple or three months. does that mean, i mean we _ couple or three months. does that mean, i mean we saw _ couple or three months. does that mean, i mean we saw what - couple or three months. does that i mean, i mean we saw what happened last week. all it took was for president putin to stand up and make one statement and gas prices shifted. president putin does have a lot of power. it is russia playing a role in gas supply. for example, to get nord stream to push through? well, i don't think so. this is a
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market — well, i don't think so. this is a market the _ well, i don't think so. this is a market. the market would like to get such price _ market. the market would like to get such price. and this is influenced by both— such price. and this is influenced by both political factors, economic factors, _ by both political factors, economic factors, but now the main factors is this is— factors, but now the main factors is this is a _ factors, but now the main factors is this is a protection from this kind of uncertain situation. i am going to ut of uncertain situation. i am going to put that _ of uncertain situation. i am going to put that question _ of uncertain situation. i am going to put that question 23. - of uncertain situation. i am going to put that question 23. we i of uncertain situation. i am going| to put that question 23. we heard the professor say part of the problem was that brussels had the run strategy. you are based in finland, what is your take on that, marco siddi?— finland, what is your take on that, marco siddi? . , , ., ., ., marco siddi? there has been a lot of o- osition marco siddi? there has been a lot of opposition to — marco siddi? there has been a lot of opposition to this _ marco siddi? there has been a lot of opposition to this from _ marco siddi? there has been a lot of opposition to this from brussels. i marco siddi? there has been a lot of opposition to this from brussels. a l opposition to this from brussels. a lot of— opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays — opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays. and _ opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays. and this _ opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays. and this is _ opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays. and this is part- opposition to this from brussels. a lot of delays. and this is part of. lot of delays. and this is part of the broader— lot of delays. and this is part of the broader consultation - lot of delays. and this is part of. the broader consultation between russia _ the broader consultation between russia and — the broader consultation between russia and the _ the broader consultation between russia and the european - the broader consultation between russia and the european union. i the broader consultation between- russia and the european union. some countries _ russia and the european union. some
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countries are — russia and the european union. some countries are especially— russia and the european union. some countries are especially opposed. in . countries are especially opposed. in europe, _ countries are especially opposed. in europe we — countries are especially opposed. in europe. we have _ countries are especially opposed. in europe, we have countries - countries are especially opposed. in europe, we have countries such- countries are especially opposed. in europe, we have countries such as i europe, we have countries such as poland. _ europe, we have countries such as poland. the — europe, we have countries such as poland, the baltic— europe, we have countries such as poland, the baltic states - europe, we have countries such as poland, the baltic states on - europe, we have countries such as poland, the baltic states on the i europe, we have countries such as. poland, the baltic states on the one hand _ poland, the baltic states on the one hand the _ poland, the baltic states on the one hand. the european _ poland, the baltic states on the one hand. the european institutions, i poland, the baltic states on the onel hand. the european institutions, the european _ hand. the european institutions, the european commission— hand. the european institutions, the european commission is— hand. the european institutions, the european commission is very - european commission is very sceptical— european commission is very sceptical about— european commission is very sceptical about the _ european commission is very sceptical about the project. l european commission is veryl sceptical about the project. at european commission is very i sceptical about the project. at the same _ sceptical about the project. at the same time — sceptical about the project. at the same time, there _ sceptical about the project. at the same time, there are _ sceptical about the project. at the same time, there are also - sceptical about the project. at the i same time, there are also supporters of the _ same time, there are also supporters of the pipeline — same time, there are also supporters of the pipeline in— same time, there are also supporters of the pipeline in germany— same time, there are also supporters of the pipeline in germany is- same time, there are also supporters of the pipeline in germany is the i of the pipeline in germany is the main _ of the pipeline in germany is the main example _ of the pipeline in germany is the main example. but _ of the pipeline in germany is the main example. but let _ of the pipeline in germany is the main example. but let me - of the pipeline in germany is the main example. but let me add l of the pipeline in germany is the - main example. but let me add another element _ main example. but let me add another element to— main example. but let me add another element to the — main example. but let me add another element to the picture _ main example. but let me add another element to the picture that _ main example. but let me add another element to the picture that my- element to the picture that my colleague _ element to the picture that my colleague has_ element to the picture that my colleague has drawn. - element to the picture that my colleague has drawn. the - element to the picture that my- colleague has drawn. the situation has been _ colleague has drawn. the situation has been made _ colleague has drawn. the situation has been made more _ colleague has drawn. the situation has been made more complicatedl colleague has drawn. the situation- has been made more complicated also by the _ has been made more complicated also by the fact— has been made more complicated also by the fact that — has been made more complicated also by the fact that germany, _ has been made more complicated also by the fact that germany, so - has been made more complicated also by the fact that germany, so the - by the fact that germany, so the largest— by the fact that germany, so the largest consumer— by the fact that germany, so the largest consumer of— by the fact that germany, so the largest consumer of natural - by the fact that germany, so the largest consumer of natural gasl by the fact that germany, so the i largest consumer of natural gas in eumpe, _ largest consumer of natural gas in europe, has— largest consumer of natural gas in europe, has decided _ largest consumer of natural gas in europe, has decided to _ europe, has decided to simultaneously- europe, has decided to simultaneously phase i europe, has decided to . simultaneously phase out europe, has decided to _ simultaneously phase out nuclear power _ simultaneously phase out nuclear power by — simultaneously phase out nuclear power by 2022 _ simultaneously phase out nuclear power by 2022 as _ simultaneously phase out nuclear power by 2022 as a _ simultaneously phase out nuclear power by 2022 as a consequence i simultaneously phase out nuclear. power by 2022 as a consequence of the nuclear— power by 2022 as a consequence of the nuclear accident, _ power by 2022 as a consequence of the nuclear accident, and _ power by 2022 as a consequence of the nuclear accident, and to - power by 2022 as a consequence of the nuclear accident, and to reduce local consumption— the nuclear accident, and to reduce local consumption to _ the nuclear accident, and to reduce local consumption to meet - the nuclear accident, and to reduce local consumption to meet the - local consumption to meet the climate — local consumption to meet the climate goals _ local consumption to meet the climate goals. so _ local consumption to meet the climate goals. so this - local consumption to meet the climate goals. so this has- local consumption to meet the climate goals. so this has leftl local consumption to meet the i climate goals. so this has left gas as the _ climate goals. so this has left gas as the math—
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climate goals. so this has left gas as the main source, _ climate goals. so this has left gas as the main source, also- climate goals. so this has left gas as the main source, also because| climate goals. so this has left gas. as the main source, also because it is less— as the main source, also because it is less polluting _ as the main source, also because it is less polluting than _ as the main source, also because it is less polluting than coal - as the main source, also because it is less polluting than coal and - as the main source, also because it is less polluting than coal and oil. i is less polluting than coal and oil. so is less polluting than coal and oil. 50 germahy— is less polluting than coal and oil. 50 germahy cah— is less polluting than coal and oil. so germany can rely— is less polluting than coal and oil. so germany can rely on _ is less polluting than coal and oil. so germany can rely on the - is less polluting than coal and oil. l so germany can rely on the russian suribly_ so germany can rely on the russian supply of— so germany can rely on the russian supply of gas — so germany can rely on the russian stibply of gas but _ so germany can rely on the russian stibply of gas but of_ so germany can rely on the russian supply of gas. but of course, - so germany can rely on the russian supply of gas. but of course, the i supply of gas. but of course, the russian — supply of gas. but of course, the russian state _ supply of gas. but of course, the russian state company _ supply of gas. but of course, the russian state company gas - supply of gas. but of course, the | russian state company gas pump supply of gas. but of course, the - russian state company gas pump also plays the _ russian state company gas pump also plays the market _ russian state company gas pump also plays the market game, _ russian state company gas pump also plays the market game, trying - russian state company gas pump also plays the market game, trying to - plays the market game, trying to sell at _ plays the market game, trying to sell at higher— plays the market game, trying to sell at higher prices— plays the market game, trying to sell at higher prices if— plays the market game, trying to sell at higher prices if there - plays the market game, trying to sell at higher prices if there is i plays the market game, trying to sell at higher prices if there is ani sell at higher prices if there is an opportunity _ sell at higher prices if there is an opportunity. and _ sell at higher prices if there is an opportunity. and the _ sell at higher prices if there is an opportunity. and the current- opportunity. and the current situation _ opportunity. and the current situation with— opportunity. and the current situation with liquefied - opportunity. and the current- situation with liquefied mushroom -as situation with liquefied mushroom gas going — situation with liquefied mushroom gas going to — situation with liquefied mushroom gas going to asia _ situation with liquefied mushroom gas going to asia rather— situation with liquefied mushroom gas going to asia rather than - situation with liquefied mushroom . gas going to asia rather than europe because _ gas going to asia rather than europe because asians _ gas going to asia rather than europe because asians are _ gas going to asia rather than europe because asians are willing _ gas going to asia rather than europe because asians are willing to - gas going to asia rather than europe because asians are willing to pay- because asians are willing to pay more _ because asians are willing to pay more for— because asians are willing to pay more for lng. _ because asians are willing to pay more for lng, this _ because asians are willing to pay more for lng, this scenario- because asians are willing to pay more for lng, this scenario has. more for lng, this scenario has allowed — more for lng, this scenario has allowed russia _ more for lng, this scenario has allowed russia to _ more for lng, this scenario has allowed russia to play - more for lng, this scenario has allowed russia to play this - more for lng, this scenario hasi allowed russia to play this game very well — allowed russia to play this game very well so _ allowed russia to play this game ve well. ., allowed russia to play this game ve well, ., ., allowed russia to play this game ve well. ., ., i. allowed russia to play this game ve well. ., ., , , very well. so how do you then step away from — very well. so how do you then step away from the _ very well. so how do you then step away from the game _ very well. so how do you then step away from the game and _ very well. so how do you then step away from the game and ensure i very well. so how do you then step i away from the game and ensure that you have a long—term strategy? if you have a long—term strategy? if you don't want that reliance on countries that are rich in gas like russia, what is the long term strategy for example in finland, or should be for europe? 50 strategy for example in finland, or should be for europe?— should be for europe? so the long-term —
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should be for europe? so the long-term strategy _ should be for europe? so the long-term strategy is - should be for europe? so the long-term strategy is the - should be for europe? so the - long-term strategy is the energy long—term strategy is the energy transition — long—term strategy is the energy transition switching _ long—term strategy is the energy transition switching to _ long—term strategy is the energy . transition switching to renewables. and this _ transition switching to renewables. and this is — transition switching to renewables. and this is by— transition switching to renewables. and this is by the _ transition switching to renewables. and this is by the way— transition switching to renewables. and this is by the way not - transition switching to renewables. and this is by the way notjust- and this is by the way notjust about— and this is by the way notjust about a — and this is by the way notjust about a lack— and this is by the way notjust about a lack of— and this is by the way notjust about a lack of supply, - and this is by the way notjust about a lack of supply, it - and this is by the way notjust about a lack of supply, it is i and this is by the way notjusti about a lack of supply, it is also about— about a lack of supply, it is also about tackling _ about a lack of supply, it is also about tackling climate - about a lack of supply, it is also about tackling climate change, i about a lack of supply, it is also - about tackling climate change, which is the _ about tackling climate change, which is the biggest — about tackling climate change, which is the biggest issue. _ about tackling climate change, which is the biggest issue. while _ about tackling climate change, which is the biggest issue. while you - is the biggest issue. while you implement— is the biggest issue. while you implement this _ is the biggest issue. while you implement this long—term - is the biggest issue. while you - implement this long—term strategy, you will— implement this long—term strategy, you will of— implement this long—term strategy, you will of course _ implement this long—term strategy, you will of course need _ implement this long—term strategy, you will of course need to _ implement this long—term strategy, you will of course need to rely - implement this long—term strategy, you will of course need to rely on i you will of course need to rely on steel— you will of course need to rely on steel and — you will of course need to rely on steel and fossil— you will of course need to rely on steel and fossil fuels, _ you will of course need to rely on steel and fossil fuels, so - you will of course need to rely on steel and fossil fuels, so gas - you will of course need to rely on steel and fossil fuels, so gas will| steel and fossil fuels, so gas will remain— steel and fossil fuels, so gas will remain an — steel and fossil fuels, so gas will remain an important _ steel and fossil fuels, so gas will remain an important source - steel and fossil fuels, so gas will remain an important source for. steel and fossil fuels, so gas will . remain an important source for the time _ remain an important source for the time being — remain an important source for the time being and— remain an important source for the time being and for— remain an important source for the time being and for presumably- remain an important source for the time being and for presumably at. time being and for presumably at least _ time being and for presumably at least another— time being and for presumably at least another ten, _ time being and for presumably at least another ten, 15 _ time being and for presumably at least another ten, 15 years, - time being and for presumably at least another ten, 15 years, if- time being and for presumably ati least another ten, 15 years, if not more _ least another ten, 15 years, if not more and — least another ten, 15 years, if not more and the _ least another ten, 15 years, if not more. and the best— least another ten, 15 years, if not more. and the best way- least another ten, 15 years, if not more. and the best way to - least another ten, 15 years, if not| more. and the best way to ensure least another ten, 15 years, if not - more. and the best way to ensure the supply— more. and the best way to ensure the supply is— more. and the best way to ensure the supply is to _ more. and the best way to ensure the supply is to try— more. and the best way to ensure the supply is to try to _ more. and the best way to ensure the supply is to try to depoliticise - supply is to try to depoliticise this, — supply is to try to depoliticise this, especially— supply is to try to depoliticise this, especially with - supply is to try to depoliticise this, especially with russia, i supply is to try to depoliticise l this, especially with russia, try supply is to try to depoliticise - this, especially with russia, try to keep— this, especially with russia, try to keep it _ this, especially with russia, try to keep it separate~ _ this, especially with russia, try to keep it separate. europe - this, especially with russia, try to keep it separate. europe has - this, especially with russia, try to| keep it separate. europe has done this quite — keep it separate. europe has done this quite well— keep it separate. europe has done this quite well for— keep it separate. europe has done this quite well for several- keep it separate. europe has donei this quite well for several decades, now it _ this quite well for several decades, now it has — this quite well for several decades, now it has become _ this quite well for several decades, now it has become more _ this quite well for several decades, now it has become more difficult. now it has become more difficult because — now it has become more difficult because of— now it has become more difficult because of the _ now it has become more difficult because of the crisis _ now it has become more difficult because of the crisis with - now it has become more difficult| because of the crisis with russia, but it— because of the crisis with russia, but it is— because of the crisis with russia, but it is still— because of the crisis with russia, but it is still possible _ because of the crisis with russia, but it is still possible to - because of the crisis with russia, but it is still possible to keep - but it is still possible to keep this in— but it is still possible to keep this in a _ but it is still possible to keep this in a commercial- but it is still possible to keep this in a commercial level. i but it is still possible to keep i this in a commercial level. 0k, marco siddi, — this in a commercial level. marco siddi, speaking to us this in a commercial level.“ marco siddi, speaking to us from the finnish institute of national
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affairs, thank you very much. also thank you to professor vladimir kutcherov, speaking to us from the russian state university of oil and gas, speaking to us in sweden. and afia malik, thank you, you have been joining us from islamabad in pakistan. thank you to all three of you, have a very good day. thailand is planning to end covid quarantine requirements for fully—vaccinated travellers from at least ten low—risk nations from november. the move is seen as a key step in reviving the country's collapsed tourism sector. now, thailand took the drastic decision to seal its borders in april 2020. our south east asia correspondent in bangkok, jonathan head, has more on what is being planned. what's going to happen is for the first time since april last year, foreign visitors from these ten countries... now, they say that they're low—risk countries. i mean, they've got countries like the united states and the uk which, actually, have got very high covid rates,
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so i think what they're looking to is countries that normally provide large numbers of visitors to thailand. from the ist of november, they will be able to come and quarantine freely. so long as they're vaccinated and they have a pcr test before they leave and on arrival and that's negative, they are then free to travel in the country. this hasn't happened now for 18 months in thailand, so it's a big start for them, but it is only ten countries. now, they're saying that from the start of next year, they want to widen that much more. but this is really a cautious start, and i think many people have been surprised at how hardline thailand has been towards what was an absolutely vital industry. it's about one fifth of gdp in this country. it's massively, had a massive impact on range of businesses. and those in the hospitality sector have been screaming at the government to reopen. but, you know, thailand has been hit very hard this year. having contained covid last year, it's had very rapid increases of infections of the delta variant this year and, like so many countries, its health service was very quickly overwhelmed. so, it's a cautious start, but it is a very important beginning
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for one of the world's biggest tourist markets. as we've been hearing, the uk will set out its demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when the brexit minister, lord frost, makes a speech in lisbon. the protocol, agreed by both sides, prevents a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. remind us what this is all about. yes, the northern ireland protocol is part of the brexit withdrawal deal, the bit of the deal dealing with northern ireland and it was agreed by both sides in 2019. and what it does, in effect, is set up a series of checks and controls on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, which has made it a lot more difficult to supply a whole range of things into northern ireland. the reason those controls were agreed is both sides were
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determined there shouldn't be any hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. of course, that is in the eu. an open border on the island of ireland is a very important part of the northern ireland peace process. as the map zooms out, we can see another problem from the eu perspective. once goods get into ireland, they are in effect in the whole of the eu single market, they can go anywhere without being checked further. so the eu is very protective of its single market. for the uk, of course, what this deal does is set—up limitations on trade within one country, within the uk. and for unionists in northern ireland in particular, they feel it undermines the position, the constitutional position of northern ireland in the united kingdom. 50 position of northern ireland in the united kingdom.— united kingdom. so what are we exectinu united kingdom. so what are we earpecting to _ united kingdom. so what are we expecting to hear— united kingdom. so what are we expecting to hear later - united kingdom. so what are we expecting to hear later today, i united kingdom. so what are we i expecting to hear later today, what does the uk want? taste expecting to hear later today, what does the uk want?— expecting to hear later today, what does the uk want? we already know a lot of what they _ does the uk want? we already know a lot of what they want, _ does the uk want? we already know a lot of what they want, which is - lot of what they want, which is basically wholesale change. they put forward some proposals injuly and i
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think lord frost welcome back to them with a vengeance again today. firstly, no customs checks, they want to get rid of customs checks and introduce what they call a dual regulatory regime, which means goods in northern ireland can circulate freely as long as they meet the standards either of the eu or of the uk, which would mean sandwiches, dairy products etc could meet —— move from great britain to northern ireland without being checked to meet eu standards because they would already meet uk standards. the bottom one will really be reemphasised today, the uk doesn't want any role for the european court ofjustice and the other eu institutions in overseeing the deal. now, lord frost has essentially said thatis now, lord frost has essentially said that is a big red line today. the eu is a little bit unhappy with that saying it wasn't like that before, but his argument will be this afternoon it has always been the case that this has not been satisfactory for us.- case that this has not been satisfactory for us. the timing is interesting. _ satisfactory for us. the timing is interesting, isn't _ satisfactory for us. the timing is interesting, isn't it? _ satisfactory for us. the timing is interesting, isn't it? we - satisfactory for us. the timing is interesting, isn't it? we are - satisfactory for us. the timing is. interesting, isn't it? we are likely to hear from the
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interesting, isn't it? we are likely to hearfrom the eu interesting, isn't it? we are likely to hear from the eu tomorrow. interesting, isn't it? we are likely to hearfrom the eu tomorrow. yes. to hear from the eu tomorrow. yes, it is what is — to hear from the eu tomorrow. yes, it is what is known _ to hear from the eu tomorrow. yes, it is what is known as _ to hear from the eu tomorrow. yes, it is what is known as a _ to hear from the eu tomorrow. is: it is what is known as a pre—bottle. we know a bit about what the eu will respond to the uk proposals because it has been briefed out a little bit, but not published. they will suggest many controls should be scrapped, but not all of them. and in general, they talk about a lot more flexibility in the way the protocol is interpreted. that should mean, for example, the end of the prospective ban on the sending of sausages from great britain and northern ireland. the sausage war, in tabloid speak. but they have ruled out renegotiating the whole thing. they say that isn't possible, it is an international treaty, both sides agreed it a little while ago, we are not going to rip it up and start again. so what does that mean? there is a nuclear option for the uk, to invoke article 16 of the northern ireland protocol. and what that does is allow either side to
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take unilateral safeguard measures, which means that parts of the protocol can be suspended. if it is regarded to be creating economic or social problems. in the uk certainly argues that it is. if the uk does that, then the eu has to say well, there is a big red nuclear button and we will press that and they could potentially escalate to suspending the whole of the free trade agreement between the uk and the eu. i think we are quite a long way from those things and it is possible the tough talk at the moment is just possible the tough talk at the moment isjust a possible the tough talk at the moment is just a precursor to an agreement on what is going to be discussed behind the scenes over the next few weeks. but it has been pretty clear from the beginning that since 2016, the issue of northern ireland has really, really difficult to resolve in terms of how you keep the island of ireland open and get the island of ireland open and get the uk outside the eu is all part of the uk outside the eu is all part of the same structure. so it is possible this could get a lot worse in the next few weeks. filth.
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possible this could get a lot worse in the next few weeks.— possible this could get a lot worse in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank — in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank you _ in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank you very _ in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank you very much. - in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank you very much. we - in the next few weeks. 0h, don't say that! thank you very much. we will. that! thank you very much. we will have you to explain it all, chris morris, thank you very much indeed. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk has hit a record high, according to the latest official figures. the largest increase in vacancies was in the retail sector and in motor vehicle repair. meanwhile, last month's unemployment figures showed the the unemployment rate in the uk was a.6% in the three months tojuly. compared to 4% before the covid lockdown. the number ofjob lockdown. the number of job vacancies lockdown. the number ofjob vacancies hitting a record high. we are going to speak to alice baxter. take us through what ijust described. take us through what i 'ust describedi take us through what i 'ust described. , ., described. yes, good morning. the latest official _ described. yes, good morning. the latest official figures _ described. yes, good morning. the latest official figures out _ described. yes, good morning. the latest official figures out this - latest official figures out this morning from the office for national statistics showed the number ofjob
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vacancies across the uk hitting that record 20 year high betweenjuly and september ofjust over! million. the highest number since records began in 2001 and the most prevalent number ofjob vacancies in the retail sector and motor repair sector, unemployment is up 4.5% compared to 4% pre—pandemic. but also crucially from the ons this morning, the number of employees on payroll, that showed another monthly increase, rising by over 200,000 to 29.2 million in september. the ons say that shows the job market is in recovery, that the number of employees on payroll now exceeds pre—pandemic levels. the chancellor has welcomed these numbers and says it shows the job market is in recovery, saying it shows the government strategy is working. let's talk live now to dr arun
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advani. assistant professor of economics at university of warwick. does this show the strategy is working and the job market is does this show the strategy is working and thejob market is in recovery? working and the 'ob market is in recove ? , ., ., ., recovery? the show the good, the bad and the uncertain _ recovery? the show the good, the bad and the uncertain in _ recovery? the show the good, the bad and the uncertain in the _ recovery? the show the good, the bad and the uncertain in the job _ recovery? the show the good, the bad and the uncertain in the job market. . and the uncertain in the job market. we have _ and the uncertain in the job market. we have now hit an all—time high, the five _ we have now hit an all—time high, the five pre—pandemic and we shall -- we _ the five pre—pandemic and we shall -- we saw— the five pre—pandemic and we shall —— we saw levels creeping up and the pandemic— —— we saw levels creeping up and the pandemic led to a drop and now we have as _ pandemic led to a drop and now we have as of— pandemic led to a drop and now we have as of last month got back to a level— have as of last month got back to a level of— have as of last month got back to a level of employment higher than it was pre—pandemic so that is the good news _ was pre—pandemic so that is the good news the _ was pre—pandemic so that is the good news. the bad news is that part of the reason — news. the bad news is that part of the reason that for those five years before _ the reason that for those five years before the — the reason that for those five years before the pandemic we were already seeing _ before the pandemic we were already seeing employment numbers creeping up seeing employment numbers creeping up was _ seeing employment numbers creeping up was the _ seeing employment numbers creeping up was the fact that the workforce is growing — up was the fact that the workforce is growing. the workforce continued to grow. _ is growing. the workforce continued to grow, people got older during the pandemic— to grow, people got older during the pandemic even and even though the number— pandemic even and even though the number of— pandemic even and even though the number of employees is higher, the number— number of employees is higher, the number of— number of employees is higher, the number of people in employment isn't as high, _ number of people in employment isn't as high, the _ number of people in employment isn't as high, the rate of employment isn't _ as high, the rate of employment isn't as— as high, the rate of employment isn't as high, lots of people out there _ isn't as high, lots of people out there still— isn't as high, lots of people out there still looking for work. so that is—
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there still looking for work. so that is kind of the bad news. that isn't _ that is kind of the bad news. that isn't solved~ _ that is kind of the bad news. that isn't solved. the number of hours people _ isn't solved. the number of hours people are — isn't solved. the number of hours people are working... was isn't solved. the number of hours people are working. . ._ isn't solved. the number of hours people are working... was going to ask ou people are working... was going to ask you that. _ people are working... was going to ask you that, exactly. _ people are working... was going to ask you that, exactly. precisely, i ask you that, exactly. precisely, looking at the detail of the number of hours showing a lot of people out there might be on payroll, but they might be part—time, they might be in precarious work, that is an important detail to look at, as is also the regional breakdown of these numbers. . ~ also the regional breakdown of these numbers. , ,, ., ., , numbers. yes, i think one of the big stories and — numbers. yes, i think one of the big stories and the _ numbers. yes, i think one of the big stories and the government - numbers. yes, i think one of the big stories and the government has - numbers. yes, i think one of the big l stories and the government has been talking _ stories and the government has been talking a _ stories and the government has been talking a lot _ stories and the government has been talking a lot about levelling up i'm looking _ talking a lot about levelling up i'm looking after the various regions of the country. one of the thing still striking _ the country. one of the thing still striking is— the country. one of the thing still striking is one area of the country still doing — striking is one area of the country still doing worse in a sense is london. _ still doing worse in a sense is london. it— still doing worse in a sense is london, it hasn't recovered. it still— london, it hasn't recovered. it still hasn't _ london, it hasn't recovered. it still hasn't recovered back to where it was, _ still hasn't recovered back to where it was, scotland also hasn't recovered. and that is sort of striking — recovered. and that is sort of striking because it tells you something about what we expect to see in— something about what we expect to see in next— something about what we expect to see in next month's figures. one of the big _ see in next month's figures. one of the big uncertain things about these figures _ the big uncertain things about these figures is _ the big uncertain things about these figures is these are right before but -- — figures is these are right before but —— furlough ended and we are about— but —— furlough ended and we are about to — but —— furlough ended and we are about to find out what happened to the 13 _ about to find out what happened to the 1.3 million people still on
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furlough _ the 1.3 million people still on furlough at the end and a lot will have _ furlough at the end and a lot will have been— furlough at the end and a lot will have been injobs like working in cafes— have been injobs like working in cafes and — have been injobs like working in cafes and parks in london that haven't— cafes and parks in london that haven't recovered and we still don't haven't recovered and we still don't have the _ haven't recovered and we still don't have the footfall yet back in london _ have the footfall yet back in london. ifjobs don't come back to london _ london. ifjobs don't come back to london and — london. ifjobs don't come back to london and other cities, but london is striking. — london and other cities, but london is striking, that still will affect people — is striking, that still will affect people going from furlough and back into those _ people going from furlough and back into those kind ofjobs. we�*ll people going from furlough and back into those kind of jobs.— into those kind of “obs. we'll have to leave it there, — into those kind of jobs. we'll have to leave it there, but _ into those kind of jobs. we'll have to leave it there, but fascinating i to leave it there, but fascinating and another huge factor to take into account with others will furlough ending at the end of september. dr arun advani, it is good to talk to you, walking us through those numbers, job vacancies across the uk hitting a record 20 year high. many thanks, back to you, programmer crow. �* . . ~' , ., thanks, back to you, programmer crow. ~ . . ,, , ., ,, crow. alice, thank you. the queen accompanied _ crow. alice, thank you. the queen accompanied by — crow. alice, thank you. the queen accompanied by the _ crow. alice, thank you. the queen accompanied by the princess - crow. alice, thank you. the queenj accompanied by the princess royal crow. alice, thank you. the queen i accompanied by the princess royal is attending a service of thanksgiving attending a service of thanksgiving at westminster abbey to mark the centenary of the royal british legion, which has been a lifeline to the nation's armed forces, veterans
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and wider military family since may 1921. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is at the abbey. yes, and a realand nicholas witchell is at the abbey. yes, and a real and further sense of a return to business as normal. with, as you say, the queen attending the service at westminster abbey to mark the centenary of the royal british legion. and not the slightest suggestion of any lessening of the load on her. it is six months since the death of her husband, the duke of edinburgh. she has been in scotland at balmoral for several months over the summer, but is now back. we saw her last week outside buckingham palace for the launch of the commonwealth bat on relay. and today at the start of a busy programme of engagements throughout the autumn, she will be here to mark the centenary of the royal british legion, set up in the years after the first world war to help the tens of thousands of service personnel returning from the western front, many of them injured,
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many of them withoutjobs. and it was then the british, royal british legion came into existence in 1921 as a focus and with a mission to assist the british service community and that is something it has been doing in the 100 years since. the queen is patron of the royal british legion and it is one of her many patronages and one she takes very seriously, particularly of course as we lead up to remembrance time and the launch of the poppy appeal from which the royal british legion raises millions of pounds, with which it helps the service community. but this morning at westminster abbey, we will see a real return to this sense of business as usual, with the queen accompanied by the princess royal attending this service to mark the 100 years of the royal british legion. 100 years of the royal british leaion. . ., ., 100 years of the royal british le.ion_ . ., .,,~ . 100 years of the royal british leaion. . ., ._ . . ,, 100 years of the royal british leaion. . .,._ . . legion. nicholas witchell, thank you very much- — the creators of superman have announced that the superhero will come out as bisexual in the next edition of his adventures.
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jonathan kent, the son of clark and lois lane, will share a kiss with a budding journalist. he's the latest superhero to come out. courtney bembridge reports. a superman as we've never seen him before. dc comics say the son of clark kent and lois lane, jon kent, is coming out as bisexual. the creators say the man of steel has always stood for hope, truth and justice, and now represents something more. when i was offered this job, i thought, well, if we're going to have a new superman for the dc universe, it feels like a missed opportunity to have another straight white saviour. dc comics publisherjim lee said in a statement, "we couldn't be prouder to tell this important story." we've seen a lot of lgbt superheroes in the past couple of decades and some of them are not quite household names, but when you can attach something like this to the name superman, who's known around the world, people will pay attention.
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the comic isn't due to be released until november, but there's been plenty of reaction online already. look, the reactions have been, honestly, they've been overwhelmingly positive, which i wasn't quite expecting. yes, there's a lot of trolling online, but there are so many people reaching out in so many different languages, saying what this means to them. you know, i'm seeing tweets of people saying they burst into tears when they read the news, that they wished that superman was this when they were growing up, that they could see themselves. and people saying for the first time ever that they're seeing themselves in superman — something they never thought was possible. his sexuality isn't the only way the character has been updated. in recent editions, he's been advocating for refugees and fighting the climate crisis. is ita bird, is ita plane, or is it social change? courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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senior black scientists have told bbc news they believe there is systemic bias. latest figures show black scientists are more likely to drop out of their field and are less likely to become professors. the president of the royal society, professor adrian smith, described the situation as unacceptable. the acclaimed irish author sally rooney is reported to be refusing to allow her new novel to be translated into hebrew by the publishers of the previous two books. the writer, perhaps most famous for her book normal people was one of hundreds of authors, artists and performers who signed a letter accusing israel of apartheid and calling for its international isolation. the israeli publisher of her first two books has told local media that her latest novel, beautifulworld, told local media that her latest novel, beautiful world, where are you, will not appear in hebrew. and
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one lucky ticket holder could be on the verge of the biggest lottery history if they scoop tonight's euromillions draw. there is an estimated jackpot of £181; million, more than 5000 times the average salary. you're watching bbc news. now, carol is here with the weather. today isn't as wet in scotland as it was yesterday and it won't be as mild as it was in the ease today as yesterday either. a fair bit of cloud around. we have a weather front currently draped across parts of western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, through the midlands, north wales and in towards east anglia. and it is gradually moving westwards. so behind it, beautiful afternoon across the north—east of scotland with some sunshine. increasing sunshine across north—east england.
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for western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, wales, the midlands and the south—east, a bit more cloud with patchy light rain. south—west seeing more sunshine, as will south wales. even with this cloud, at times, we see brighter skies. temperatures today 9-14 in brighter skies. temperatures today 9—11; in the east, that will feel quite chilly. inland, about 16 or 17. this evening and overnight, a fair bit of cloud across central and eastern areas, we drizzle in the west, a band of rain moving across scotland will be heavy, especially in the northern isles, and these are the overnight lows in towns and cities, less than those in the countryside. tomorrow, we say goodbye to the rain early on and tomorrow will be a mixture of variable cloud, some sunshine, and some showers, blowing in the breeze across north—west, northern ireland and north—west scotland. temperatures 12—17, but milder in the east compared to today. on thursday, we have a change afoot. a
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cold front sinking southwards across northern scotland, getting into northern scotland, getting into northern england and northern ireland by the end of the day. accompanied by a brisk wind. cooler conditions follow, but ahead of it, still a fair bit of cloud, some sunny spells and still relatively mild. overnight thursday and friday, the weather front makes it down towards the south as the band of cloud, dry weather, sunshine, cloud at times flirting with the north and also the west, but all of us by then it will be in the cooler conditions. temperatures 9—16 . then into the weekend, if you recall last weekend, some of us had temperatures up to 20, 20 one some of us had temperatures up to 20,20 one degree. some of us had temperatures up to 20, 20 one degree. this weekend, it will be quite different, it will be cooler, but dry for many.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: "one of the worst public health failures ever" — a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. early decisions, in particular slowness to lockdown, did have consequences and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. and while there was praise for the uk's vaccine roll—out relatives of those who died, say a public inquiry should begin right away. my my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear
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about it in a fulljudicial enquiry. in other news, a deal to support uk companies struggling with high energy bills the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. the uk will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when brexit minister lord frost makes a speech in lisbon. superman's creators announce that the superhero's son will reveal he's bisexual in the next edition of the comic. and coming up this hour, a room with a pew — how camping in a church has become the latest unorthodox getaway trend. an inquiry by mps has described
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the government's initial response to coronavirus in england as one of the worst failures of public health in the uk's history. the study was carried out by two commons committees, both chaired by former conservative cabinet ministers, and is highly critical. it says both ministers and scientists waited too long to bring in lockdowns last year, costing many lives. the report mainly focuses on the response to the pandemic in england and did not look at steps taken individually by wales, scotland and northern ireland. the first lab—identified cases of covid 19 in the uk were recorded on 3ist january 2020. but it wasn't until eight weeks later, on the 23rd of march, that the prime minister ordered the uk's first national lockdown. the report said too little was done in the early weeks, and the "uk did not take enough advantage of the learning being generated in other countries". the committee said the response ranked as "one of the most important
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public health failures the uk has ever experienced". despite the uk being one of the first countries in the world to develop a test for covid, the report described the roll—out of the test and trace system as "slow, uncertain and often chaotic." but, the report has praised the uk's vaccination programme and government support for the development of vaccines, describing the programme as "one of the most effective initiatives in history". a government spokesperson said that it never shied away from taking quick and decisive action to save lives, protect the nhs and bring in restrictions. this report is from our health correspondent, jim reed. we are still living through, says this report, the biggest health crisis of the last 100 years. millions have been infected, many thousands of lives have been lost to covid. when we brought back people from wuhan injanuary... for a year now, two influential groups of mps have been taking evidence on the pandemic from people
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involved in key decisions at the time. now in this report, they strongly criticise the early response. instead of locking down hard and fast like some other countries, they say ministers, guided by scientific advisers, made a deliberate decision to introduce social distancing rules gradually until it was clear the nhs could be overwhelmed. the mp5 describe that as a serious error which proved fatal to many. we were too slow in that initial lockdown. we were operating in a fog of uncertainty. even the government's advisers, professor neil ferguson, in evidence to my committee said, if we had locked down a week earlier we might even have saved half the number of deaths in that initial wave. everyone accepts that we locked down too late. across 150 pages of the report,
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there is more criticism. it describes the roll—out of the test and trace programme in england as "slow and chaotic". it says the uk did not impose rigorous border controls, letting in high numbers of infections from france and spain. and it criticises the treatment of care homes, saying the risks were not recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the report has actually picked up things we were saying from the outset, that social care was an afterthought. the mantra was "nhs, we have to keep it safe." we understood some of that. what we did not know was the discharge out of hospitals was actually not through testing. they were not safe discharges. there was, though, praise for parts of the national response. the vaccine programme was described as one of the most effective initiatives in the history of uk science. treatments for covid were also
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singled out as well. one, dexamethasone, was widely used first in this country and has saved more than a million lives around the world. the government says throughout the pandemic it has been guided by scientific experts and has not shied away from taking quick action, including on lockdowns. it says it is committed to learning lessons and will hold a full public inquiry in the spring. jim reed, bbc news. lindsey jackson's mother died in lindseyjackson's mother died in a care home during the first wave of. in 2020. she is part of a bereaved families forjustice group and says the government is still taking unnecessary risks. i the government is still taking unnecessary risks.— the government is still taking unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are bein: unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made — unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made now. _ unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made now. i _ unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made now. ithink- unnecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made now. i think the i are being made now. i think the sense that it's a free for all now, people are abusing doctors now because they are asking them to turn up because they are asking them to turn up for their appointments and masks. i have friends in the rest of europe for whom masks are now a regular
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requirement. they wear them as a matter of cause and a lot of people here still do by the requirement isn't there, the government has moved too quickly and if i can just make mention of what i find to be a despicable remark this morning from mr hunt, the former secretary of state for health, that this is a game of two halves... this isn't a game. my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government and i want to know about that. i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial enquiry and i don't want political decisions being taken now which are not based on the best advice. we know from this report that in autumn last year,
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this time last year, later than this last year, the government did not follow scientific advice and that seems, to me, to have lead to a larger loss of life in the second wave than even in the first, and i fear those mistakes are being made again. it]! fear those mistakes are being made aaain. �* . fear those mistakes are being made aaain. �* , ,, .,~ fear those mistakes are being made aaain. �* , ,, ., again. i'll be speaking to the reneral again. i'll be speaking to the general manager— again. i'll be speaking to the general manager of- again. i'll be speaking to the general manager of a - again. i'll be speaking to the general manager of a care i again. i'll be speaking to the i general manager of a care home again. i'll be speaking to the - general manager of a care home in a few minutes but let's talk to our political correspondent, joining us from westminster. a government spokesperson in reaction to this report said it had never shied away from taking quick and decisive action on bringing in restrictions yet the report says both ministers and scientists waited too long to bring in lockdown is, costing many lives, certainly a mismatch in what's being said there. what are the implications of that? could it lead to a public enquiry happening sooner than planned? i lead to a public enquiry happening sooner than planned?— lead to a public enquiry happening sooner than planned? i don't think first and foremost _ sooner than planned? i don't think first and foremost there _ sooner than planned? i don't think first and foremost there is - sooner than planned? i don't think first and foremost there is much . sooner than planned? i don't think i first and foremost there is much new in this report we've had today but
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it makes for sober reading for the government, to see the various stages of the pandemic sat out in factual language. it is that criticism of the early decision making that seems to be consensus that the uk was too slow to enter the first lockdown. that is the single most damning verdict in their but the report also criticises the approach to care homes, racial disparity, the test and trace programme, the regional tier system. there are obviously bits of praise in there but the report also says there were other countries that were doing things differently and perhaps handling the pandemic better than we were and we failed to learn the lessons from that and failed to learn the lessons earlier from the pandemic in terms of subsequent decision—making. as we heard, of the health select committee, jeremy
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hunt, former conservative health secretary himself, used a football analogy to sum up his findings. the national response to. was a bit like a football_ national response to. was a bit like a football game with two very different halves and in the first half. _ different halves and in the first half. we — different halves and in the first half, we had some serious errors. we could _ half, we had some serious errors. we could have _ half, we had some serious errors. we could have avoided a lockdown, but having _ could have avoided a lockdown, but having got — could have avoided a lockdown, but having got into the position where we had _ having got into the position where we had to— having got into the position where we had to have one, we should have locked _ we had to have one, we should have locked down — we had to have one, we should have locked down earlier but in the second — locked down earlier but in the second half, we had the vaccine will outreach _ second half, we had the vaccine will outreach we described as the most effective _ outreach we described as the most effective initiative in the history of uk _ effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration, the discovery of treatments which have saved a million — treatments which have saved a million lives around the world. on the fascinating thing that makes it very difficult to sum up in one, ciean _ very difficult to sum up in one, clean sentence or instinct, how we did, is— clean sentence or instinct, how we did, is it _ clean sentence or instinct, how we did, is it was— clean sentence or instinct, how we did, is it was very often the same people _ did, is it was very often the same people who — did, is it was very often the same people who are responsible for both sets of— people who are responsible for both sets of decisions.— sets of decisions. jeremy hunt and the other mp5 _ sets of decisions. jeremy hunt and the other mps on _ sets of decisions. jeremy hunt and the other mps on the _ sets of decisions. jeremy hunt and the other mps on the two - sets of decisions. jeremy hunt and i the other mps on the two committees heard an awful lot of evidence but perhaps the most famous session was
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with the prime minister's former top adviser dominic cummings. he said this morning that he feels that the prime minister and the government were widely —— have widely not learned any lessons from what has gone wrong and said the prime minister was a joke. in fairness, he also said the leader of the opposition, keir starmer, was a joke but the cabinet office minister steve barclay was sent out to do the unenviable task of defending the government on the airwaves this morning. taste government on the airwaves this morninu. ~ ., ., ,. . morning. we follow the scientific advice well. _ morning. we follow the scientific advice well, we _ morning. we follow the scientific advice well, we protected - morning. we follow the scientific advice well, we protected the - morning. we follow the scientific. advice well, we protected the nhs from the _ advice well, we protected the nhs from the surge of pressure that we saw in _ from the surge of pressure that we saw in other countries and one cannot— saw in other countries and one cannot apply hindsight. at the time of the _ cannot apply hindsight. at the time of the first— cannot apply hindsight. at the time of the first lockdown, the expectation in terms of the tolerance in terms of how long people — tolerance in terms of how long people would live with lockdown was a far shorter period than has proven to he _ a far shorter period than has proven to he the _ a far shorter period than has proven to be the case and there is an initiat— to be the case and there is an initial timing of the lockdown to
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make _ initial timing of the lockdown to make sure it was done at the point of optimal— make sure it was done at the point of optimal impact so it is a point of optimal impact so it is a point of hindsight to now say the way that decision— of hindsight to now say the way that decision was shaped and how long we could lockdown for because we now know _ could lockdown for because we now know that _ could lockdown for because we now know that there was a much more willingness — know that there was a much more willingness for the country to ensure — willingness for the country to ensure that that was originally envisioned.— ensure that that was originally envisioned. ,, . , envisioned. steve barclay accepting the government _ envisioned. steve barclay accepting the government takes _ envisioned. steve barclay accepting the government takes full - the government takes full responsibility for the decisions it has made but there is more to come on this. we've had this report today, the full. enquiry isn't due today, the full. enquiry isn't due to get under way until spring —— the full covert —— covid enquiry. families are suggesting it's a slap in the face for the mps to use the vaccine roll—out to redeem the fact that 150,000 people have lost their lives over the past 18 months to.
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covid. they hope they will get justice when the covid enquiry gets under way. you justice when the covid enquiry gets under wa . ., ., ,, ., under way. you might not know the answer to this _ under way. you might not know the answer to this question _ under way. you might not know the answer to this question at - under way. you might not know the answer to this question at this - answer to this question at this point but are we expecting to hear from the prime minister himself in response to this report? hat from the prime minister himself in response to this report?— from the prime minister himself in response to this report? not at this sta . e. the response to this report? not at this stage. the prime _ response to this report? not at this stage. the prime minister - response to this report? not at this stage. the prime minister is - response to this report? not at this stage. the prime minister is on - stage. the prime minister is on holiday in spain, he is working there, he has been making phone calls with other world leaders but as far as the government response so far, we've heard from steve barclay and i suppose they're focuses on the here and now, the aftermath of the covid pandemic, the shortage problems we've been talking about a lot in recent weeks and the after—effects of brexit so there is perhaps a reluctance to spend too much time looking back although they are very much stressing, government ministers this morning, that they will go through and be prepared to take part in evidence sessions for
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that covid enquiry when it gets under way. that covid enquiry when it gets under way-— gez 0ssai is general manager at wentworth court in cheltenham a care home for people with dementia. hejoins me now. thank you for your time. i'm sure you've been looking at this report with great interest. it says a lack of priority was attached to care homes and the rapid discharge of people from hospital into care homes without adequate testing for covid was a prime example of this. how is this all making you feel today? it doesn't inspire me with confidence but it's just telling us what we already knew that we were an afterthought. i think that's a word that's already been used today and we are playing russian roulette with people's lives, are we where at the time. . ~ , people's lives, are we where at the time. ., ,, , . ~ people's lives, are we where at the time. ., ,, , . ,, ., people's lives, are we where at the time. , ., ~ people's lives, are we where at the time. ., ~ , ., time. take us back to la last year and the conversation _ time. take us back to la last year and the conversation you - time. take us back to la last year and the conversation you are - time. take us back to la last year. and the conversation you are having with your colleagues about what you
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should do —— early last year, to keep residents and yourself safe. irate keep residents and yourself safe. , made the decision at the end of february, possibly the ist of march we made it official that we lockdown and that was four weeks before the government said that we had to. because we look after a particularly vulnerable sector of individuals, we made that decision that it was in their best interests and we had a duty of care to do so.— duty of care to do so. tells a little bit _ duty of care to do so. tells a little bit more _ duty of care to do so. tells a little bit more about - duty of care to do so. tells a little bit more about your - duty of care to do so. tells a - little bit more about your thinking. that was three and a half weeks before the prime minister announced the first full uk lockdown, national lockdown, but you took the decision to lockdown much earlier, obviously because of the vulnerable residents but what were you looking at in terms of news from abroad, what was happening in italy to the elderly population there? we're looking at that and thinking we need to do
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something?— that and thinking we need to do somethina ? ~ ,,., , ., , something? absolutely, we to be forward thinking _ something? absolutely, we to be forward thinking and _ something? absolutely, we to be forward thinking and the - something? absolutely, we to be| forward thinking and the statistics were there for everybody to see in europe. it was a matter of time before a pandemic and i think the clue is in the name, pandemic. it was only a matter of time before it reached this country in the numbers that it was in italy, spain and other european countries so we had to be forward thinking and we had a duty, the staff here, the people that live here and the relatives of the people that live here, to make everybody safe as we possibly could. did it surprise you that the full national lockdown wasn't announced until several weeks later? would you have expected the government to demonstrate the same foresight that you did? demonstrate the same foresight that ou did? ~ ., demonstrate the same foresight that oudid?~ ., ., you did? without politicising the situation, yes. _ you did? without politicising the situation, yes. we, _ you did? without politicising the situation, yes. we, as— you did? without politicising the situation, yes. we, as a - you did? without politicising the - situation, yes. we, as a management team here, looked at what was happening elsewhere and we make that
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judgment call, we proved to be right, but i would expect other people to have done the same. 5612111? people to have done the same. sadly ou did, people to have done the same. sadly you did. despite _ people to have done the same. sadly you did, despite your— people to have done the same. sadly you did, despite your best efforts, lose a number of residents to covid. you were very ill as well. i lose a number of residents to covid. you were very ill as well.— you were very ill as well. i was ve ill, you were very ill as well. i was very ill. i _ you were very ill as well. i was very ill. i was _ you were very ill as well. i was very ill, i was in _ you were very ill as well. i was very ill, i was in hospital- you were very ill as well. i was very ill, i was in hospital and i very ill, i was in hospital and ventilated and i now have health issues as a result that i didn't have before. i inject insulin four times a day and i have to wear glasses but i'm alive. having gone through what i go through, it makes me more passionate because i believe i'm fairly fit and healthy and the people we look after, the co—morbidity would be devastating if they were exposed to the illness as i got it. they were exposed to the illness as i ot it. ., ., 4' they were exposed to the illness as i ot it. ., ., ~ ., ., ., they were exposed to the illness as i ot it. ., ., ., ., i got it. looking ahead, what would ou like to i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? _ i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would _ i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you - i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you like - i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you like to. you like to see? would you like to see a public enquiry into this sooner than next spring? do you think risks are still being taken or
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do you feel in terms of the communication you get that the government is now handling the situation as you would like it to be? ~ . situation as you would like it to be? . ., . ., , be? we here at wentwlo believe in reflective practice, _ be? we here at wentwlo believe in reflective practice, whether - be? we here at wentwlo believe in reflective practice, whether it's - reflective practice, whether it's good or bad. we reflect on what we have done well and what we have done not so well and we improve upon it. a year is a bit too long to wait. yes, i think there are lessons to be learned and we have to accept that and move forward with it but at the centre of love this —— of all of this as i was extremely pearly but there are people who have lost loved ones —— i was poorly. but i can only speak about what we do here at
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wentworth and we still wear masks all the time because we look after vulnerable groups. so we haven't lost sight of the dangers and we haven't taken our foot off the pedal, we are extremely cautious. thank you for talking to us, we wish you and your colleagues the very best. borisjohnson is expected to give his backing to a support package for firms struggling with the soaring cost of wholesale gas. the treasury is considering a proposal submitted by the business secretary yesterday. ceramic, paper and steel manufacturing firms have warned that without an energy price cap, some factories could be forced to close. our business correspondent, theo leggett, reports. forging steel requires a lot of heat and that consumes a great deal of energy. small wonder then that steelmakers
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want the government to help them cope with a steep rise in energy costs. it isn't just steel. cement manufacturers, chemicals firms, glass—makers and ceramics businesses are also appealing for support. not all companies are affected in the same way by rising costs. some have bought their gas and electricity in advance and are protected from price rises, at least for the time being. others though are not. for them, this is an incredibly serious predicament, leading some to scale back production or to raise product prices. of course the longer this period of high prices continues, the more companies are impacted and the more severe those impacts are and, at some point, it starts to threaten their company viability. the government faces a dilemma. it wants to help viable businesses cope with soaring costs but it doesn't want to prop up failing companies. direct subsidies would add to the burden on taxpayers, while a cap on electricity or gas prices would risk simply passing on extra costs to energy companies.
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but labour says what businesses are asking for is reasonable. they felt a package of support is needed through the winter when gas and electricity prices are usually higher and to get through this temporary spike in gas and electricity prices. that's what they're looking for. they're not looking for a permanent bailout or a subsidy. what they are looking for is targeted support now, which is what is happening in other european countries. the chancellor now does at least have concrete proposals to look at, passed on by the business secretary after consultations with industry. whatever options he chooses, someone, somewhere is going to have to pay in the end. theo leggett, bbc news. i'm joined by chief executive of build uk, the trade body for the construction industry. we've heard
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from a number of sectors from steel to recycling about the impact of higher gas prices on what they do so what do these price rises mean for the construction industry? it what do these price rises mean for the construction industry?- the construction industry? it really does feel like _ the construction industry? it really does feel like we're _ the construction industry? it really does feel like we're bouncing - the construction industry? it really does feel like we're bouncing from one crisis to the at the moment and it's difficult for businesses of all sizes. they have to react at such a fast rate of change, it's really difficult to absorb changes like this. construction uses a huge amount of materials, and we are encouraged to manufacture and invest in the uk. the cost of energy impacts the whole construction supply chain, projects get delayed, the hospital, roeder school isn't ready when you want it. costs may increase and that affects all of us. i think the real damaging impact is that companies react by outsourcing. they will start to import materials and products because they are cheaper and that affects employment in the uk, companies go out of
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business because they can't continue, jobs are lost, there is a burden on the state, and the support required to support both businesses and individuals, and at the time of with cop26 on the line it increases our carbon footprint at a time when we are looking to reach ambitious targets full stop it's not good for anybody. targets full stop it's not good for an bod . ., ., ., anybody. you mention the long-term viabili of anybody. you mention the long-term viability of some _ anybody. you mention the long-term viability of some businesses - anybody. you mention the long-term viability of some businesses because | viability of some businesses because of this. if we look at a big project like a road project or building a hospital, these projects, given their size, typically last for a long period of time so is there some delay got into those schedules? can they cope with some delays and interruption of supplies, caused by this rising price of gas? every construction project has a programme. construction pro'ect has a programme._ construction pro'ect has a programme. construction pro'ect has a rouramme. , ., , programme. usually a very tight programme _ programme. usually a very tight programme and _ programme. usually a very tight programme and this _ programme. usually a very tight programme and this is _ programme. usually a very tight programme and this isjust - programme. usually a very tight programme and this isjust one | programme. usually a very tight l programme and this isjust one of programme and this is just one of the expected factors that we have to content with when you are out on a small project or a large project.
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this is a massive increase in both the supply and material which can delay a project beyond its programme but it also increases its cost and often there is a smaller company in the middle who will feel the squeeze. their projects will be agreed on a fixed price. as the cost of energy and materials rise, somebody has to pay for that and it's often specialist contractors caught in the middle. the business department — caught in the middle. the business department expects _ caught in the middle. the business department expects to _ caught in the middle. the business department expects to get - caught in the middle. the business department expects to get the - caught in the middle. the business l department expects to get the prime minister's backing for a package of support to help industries that are energy intensive. what does build uk want to see the government do to try to ensure less future volatility in energy costs and the knock—on effects that can bring? you mentioned _ effects that can bring? you mentioned a _ effects that can bring? you mentioned a cap _ effects that can bring? you mentioned a cap on - effects that can bring? gm. mentioned a cap on energy crisis, there are downsides to that but it would help businesses at the moment. you've mentioned loans. that's alone, it's got a grant, so business
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ultimately has to pay. my members would be saying, get a grip on the gas supply to the uk so we don't face the situation in future. are ou face the situation in future. are you currently — face the situation in future. are you currently hearing about projects which are if not grinding to a halt, then where work is slowing down, falling well behind the planned schedule because of the cost of energy at the moment and the knock—on impacts for the construction industry which relies on so many other sectors? construction is pretty resilient and there will be site managers and project managers doing their best to keep their projects on track, it's one more thing we have to juggle after covid and material and labour shortages stop this is something that will start to hit them over the next few weeks because it is affecting manufacturers and raising their prices but it's yet to quite hit projects but that will be coming down the track.— down the track. susannah nichol, chief executive _ down the track. susannah nichol, chief executive of _ down the track. susannah nichol, chief executive of build _ down the track. susannah nichol, chief executive of build uk, - down the track. susannah nichol, | chief executive of build uk, thank
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you. the latestjobs figures show that vacancies in the uk have hit a record high, at one point one million between july and september. that's the highest level since records began in 2001. the biggest rise in vacancies was in the retail sector and in car repair. unemployment was estimated at four and a half per cent, compared to four per cent before the covid lockdowns. early indicators for august suggest that the number of employeeson payrolls was up by 21r1,000 that's a return to february 2020 levels. leaders and senior ministers from 20 of the world's biggest economies are holding a special summit to discuss afghanistan. they'll consider financial support and how best to contain the threat of terrorism. the un secretary general has urged the international community to find ways to get money into the afghan economy to avert its collapse. we need to find ways to make the economy breathe again and this can
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be done without violating international laws or compromising principles. we must seek ways to create the conditions to allow afghan professionals and civil servants to continue working to serve the afghan population. i urge the world to take action and inject liquidity into the afghan economy to avoid its collapse. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in the afghan capital, kabul. this is the virtual summit of g20 nations, it's an x in ordinary meeting on afghanistan —— it's an extraordinary agenda with afghanistan at the top. it comes ahead of a full g20 summit in rome at the end of this month and i think the big challenge before the international community is, how do they continue to provide and deliver humanitarian aid in this country to millions of people who are in dire need of it without it falling into
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the wrong hands are being misused? the taliban seized control of this country on the 15th of august, countries around the world do not recognise the taliban government and that's what makes this particularly difficult, how do you continue to reach the civilians, the people of afghanistan when you do not want to transfer the money or humanitarian aid to the taliban for fear it might be misused? now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello. if you're taking a stroll around eastern counties today you will notice it will be pretty cool but it's short lived, temperatures will be up again tomorrow. still a fair bit of cloud around under weak weather front fair bit of cloud around under weak weatherfront producing fair bit of cloud around under weak weather front producing some splashes of rain across the central part of the country. some sunshine across southern and south—western england and wales and brightening up tjy england and wales and brightening up by the end of the day across eastern areas but temperatures will be lower
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here. in the west, up to 16 or 17. this evening and overnight, still a fair amount this evening and overnight, still a fairamount of this evening and overnight, still a fair amount of cloud and patchy drizzle across western hills, i weather front moving across northern scotland which will introduce rain which will be heavy across the northern isles and these are the overnight lows, between five and ii, overnight lows, between five and 11, although some sheltered areas could see lower. tomorrow we say goodbye to the rain. it's been a day of variable amounts of cloud, sunny skies breaking through, some showers towards the west and temperatures of 12 to 16 but milder in the east.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: one of the worst public health failures ever�* a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. early decisions, in particular our early decisions to lock down, because consequences and we have to confront that. and while there was praise for the uk's vaccine rollout relatives of those who died, say a public inquiry should begin right away. my my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made tjy because of mistakes that were made by the government. i want to know
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about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial enquiry. in other news, a deal to support uk companies struggling with high energy bills the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. the uk will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today, when brexit minister, lord frost makes a speech in lisbon. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn. good morning. four points from their remaining two world cup qualifers should be enough for wales to qualify for the next tournament in qatar after last night's 1—0 win over estonia in tallin. it was this scrappy goal that secured a much—needed win. it means
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wheels can still secure that play—off place. it has been a great camp for us, two away games, the performance we gave on friday in the czech republic was outstanding. we are still a young group as well. they are learning from these experiences. to come to a place like this, we knew we were never going to dominate. we knew it was going to be an ugly game. we had to match that first and foremost. with the players we have on the pitch we knew we would cause them problems. germany became the first country to qualify for qatar 2022. tonight, scotland can get one of the two wins they need to secure a place in the play offs, after their thrilling comeback against israel on saturday. they're taking on the faroe islands. steve clarke's side are second in group f, seven points behind leaders denmark but four ahead of israel and austria. ijust borrow these players. i borrow them for ten days at the moment every month. and then you go into the winter and you don't see them,
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i don't see them in december, january, february, get them together again in march. so the fact that we can keep that bond, and keep that togetherness within the group is really important. if you want to be successful, the better your group of players, the more together they are, then the more chance you have to be successful. england top their group another victory will move them a step closer to automatic qualification. they take hungary at wembley after an impressive victory over andorra last time out in which phil foden and jadon sancho impressed. signs again of the potential he has at his disposal in the squad. we can't be a team that has a day off and we want to keep the consistency of performances. we've had that definitely throughout calendar year. everybody knows there is that competition for places, everybody knows that they can't afford a day off. and they've got pride in putting the shirt on every time they play, and they want to show what they're capable of as a team.
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chelsea midfielder mason mount could feature later, fresh from his place on the shortlist of nominees for football's ballon d'or. he joins the likes of lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo alongside harry kane, raheem sterling and phil foden, who are also nominated. not that he expects to win it. it was special. i probably find out exactly the same time as everyone else. to see that, to see the names, to be alongside those names, it is obviously a dream and i think for all the years that you work hard, dedicates, then you see something like that, you can see that it pays off and it is just a start, it doesn't stop now. british number one dan evans is out of the indian wells masters in california after losing to argentina's diego schwartzman. having beaten former us open
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finalist kei nishikori in the previous round, his game fell apart. he took the first set and was a break up in the second, but lost eight consecutive games, losing the deciding set 6 love, while cameron norrie continued his excellent run of form coming through a 3 set battle with the spaniard roberto bautista agut to reach the last 16. former british and irish lion ieuan evans will chair a 13 person group that will decide whether a women's lions team would be feasible. england and harlequins prop shaunagh brown will also be part of the group, whose aim will be to determine if a women's team could be formed, as the game continues to grow. the men's lions have been touring since 1888 and most recently played south africa in a series. that is all for now. we will be back in the next hour.
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today, lord frost will make a speech on the northern irish protocol. let's get more on this with a reality check correspondence, chris morris, who has been following this in great detail. for everyone who hasn't been following it, in as much detail as you have, bring us right up detail as you have, bring us right up to date with where we are at and what this is all about. it is up to date with where we are at and what this is all about.— what this is all about. it is good to take a step _ what this is all about. it is good to take a step back, _ what this is all about. it is good to take a step back, otherwise. to take a step back, otherwise people get lost. it is part of the brexit withdrawal agreement that the deal to take it out of the eu and it deals specifically with out. it sets up deals specifically with out. it sets up a series of checks on goods travelling between the uk and northern ireland. the reason to assert there is because both sides agreed there should not be the
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return of a hardboard between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, which is in the eu. it is a reminder that once goods get into the republic of ireland they can move anywhere across the eu single market. that is why it is saying if you do not have jets market. that is why it is saying if you do not havejets going between northern ireland into ireland you need to have jacks going from between great britain and northern ireland. it the british government is saying that is restricting trade within country. for unionists in northern ireland to pitch questions on northern ireland because constitutional place within the united kingdom. tell constitutional place within the united kingdom.— constitutional place within the united kinudom. , ., ., united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk — united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk once _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk once in _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk once in terms _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk once in terms of- what the uk once in terms of changes. what the uk once in terms of chances. ~ �* what the uk once in terms of changes-— what the uk once in terms of chances. ~ �* ., ., ., ., changes. we'll hear more from lord this afternoon. _ changes. we'll hear more from lord this afternoon. first _ changes. we'll hear more from lord this afternoon. first of _ changes. we'll hear more from lord this afternoon. first of all, - changes. we'll hear more from lord this afternoon. first of all, no - this afternoon. first of all, no more custom checks on goods going between great britain and northern ireland, instead businesses would self regulate. they wanted dual regulatory regime, which means that
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goods that circulate in northern ireland can either meet eu standards or eu standards. if that was the case, most of those checks would disappear. crucially, in terms of what lord frost will say today, no role for the european court of justice and overseeing the implementation of the deal. the uk doesn't want the eu institutions involved, even though they did sign up involved, even though they did sign up to that in 2019, because they don't believe they are neutral arbiters. ~ ., , . ., arbiters. we are expecting a response — arbiters. we are expecting a response from _ arbiters. we are expecting a response from the _ arbiters. we are expecting a response from the eu - arbiters. we are expecting a - response from the eu tomorrow but arbiters. we are expecting a _ response from the eu tomorrow but we have a good idea of what that is going to be. lgale have a good idea of what that is going to toe-— have a good idea of what that is auoin to be. . ., ., . . going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost _ going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to _ going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak _ going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on _ going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on one - going to be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on one day l that lord frost to speak on one day before the eu releases its proposals. the eu is saying what we can go further than a lot of people would expect, we will scrap the need
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for many of the controls, so things like the idea that it could be a ban on sausages and other chilled meats moving between great britain and northern ireland would disappear. overall, a lot more flexibility. they have reflected on the accusation that they are paying way too legalistic in the way they are approaching a very sensitive situation. the critical dates is that they had made it very clear from the start that no overall renegotiation of the protocol itself, which is part of an international treaty. the uk want to rewrite parts of it, the eu is saying no, we will find ways to implement it in a more practical way. the nuclear option for the uk is to trigger article 16 of the northern ireland protocol which allows either side to suspend parts of the deal and take unilateral safeguard measures if it is perceived that there are economic or social difficulties being created by the way the protocol is being
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implemented. the eu would see that as a declaration of a trade war in many ways. if you ratchet right up, it would be to suspend the terms of the overall free trade deal. so things could get quite nasty quite quickly in the next few weeks. on the other hand, tough talk from both sides, lord frost had a twitter spat with the irish foreign minister over the weekend. this may be what we have heard before, tough talk before a negotiation, then some sort of dealer mergers, or it could be that the uk wants to get rid of the protocol altogether, and that would put it on a collision course with the rest of the eu. as we've been hearing, a government support package for businesses struggling with the soaring cost of energy could be announced within days. industry bosses are worried some businesses could be forced to shut down without financial help.
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nina warhurst has been visiting a paper manufacturer in cumbria. this is croppers in cumbria, using the power of the river, they have been making paper here since i8li5. incredible. they have diversified over the years. this is a silicon material, so man—made fibres, that gets pushed into the roles you can see down here, and that will end up insulating boilers, so are really important part of the business. have a look up and down, you can only imagine how much it cost to run this place. you canjust stick imagine how much it cost to run this place. you can just stick on another jumper to keep the prices down. they spent £60,000 a week on energy bills. that is over 3 million a year. when prices go up they keep a keen eye on what is happening and, oh, my, they have been going up, oh, my, they have been going up, haven't they? 250% since the
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beginning ofjanuary. it is haven't they? 250% since the beginning of january. it is worth reiterating that. other businesses like this, there is no energy price cap. the wholesale buyers need to get their money back somehow and through businesses is one of the ways that they do it. there is a warning that as businesses try to absorb the cost of energy prices rocketing, thenjobs absorb the cost of energy prices rocketing, then jobs will have to go. we have had a warning from the head of british class. they employ 6,000 people. they first see if things don't change around a quarter ofjobs in that industry would go. suzannejoins me from ofjobs in that industry would go. suzanne joins me from the chamber of commerce in cumbria. often we get accused of scaremongering and saying we are in this problem, but what's our business is sent to you about energy bills? it our business is sent to you about energy bills?— energy bills? it is absolutely not scaremongering. _ energy bills? it is absolutely not scaremongering. almost - energy bills? it is absolutely not scaremongering. almost every l scaremongering. almost every business we talk to is really concerned about their energy bill, immediately and moving forward. it is important to remember it is not just the energy bill crisis, we also
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have sparrows ? spiralling wage costs, transport costs, just at a time when many of them are still recovering from covid. lgale time when many of them are still recovering from covid.— time when many of them are still recovering from covid. we have been heafina recovering from covid. we have been hearing about — recovering from covid. we have been hearing about this _ recovering from covid. we have been hearing about this possible _ recovering from covid. we have been hearing about this possible deal - hearing about this possible deal from the government. i could come in terms of the loan.— terms of the loan. alone is absolutely _ terms of the loan. alone is absolutely the _ terms of the loan. alone is absolutely the wrong - terms of the loan. alone is absolutely the wrong way i terms of the loan. alone is l absolutely the wrong way to terms of the loan. alone is - absolutely the wrong way to go. we are at the point where lots of businesses are starting to have to pay back their covid loans, so another loan isn't helpful. what we need to support in the form of grants, perhaps a vat reduction, removing the green levy temporarily. and number of the businesses are suffering are on fixed priced contract with the government and thatis contract with the government and that is particularly so in the nuclear supply chain. it is fundamental that we protect that because that is a key part of our energy security moving forward. [30 energy security moving forward. do you think this period could be fatal for some of the businesses you have
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been talking to?— been talking to? absolutely it could. a lot _ been talking to? absolutely it could. a lot of _ been talking to? absolutely it could. a lot of businesses - been talking to? absolutely it could. a lot of businesses are j could. a lot of businesses are really concerned. they don't operate on big margins and these are not saw price increases we are talking about, this is more than double, and it could be fatal.— it could be fatal. wouldn't that be a shame when — it could be fatal. wouldn't that be a shame when they _ it could be fatal. wouldn't that be a shame when they come - it could be fatal. wouldn't that be a shame when they come through it could be fatal. wouldn't that be - a shame when they come through this period to falter at the final moment. it is notjust the industries like this, paper, glass, ceramic starter energy intensive. think about downstream. this alone provides to aerospace, construction, retail, so that drip effect further down the supply chain will affect everyone. that is insulation that is neededin everyone. that is insulation that is needed in construction. these energy prices matter and there are thousands of businesses waiting to see what that deal looks like, but also wondering when and how they will be able to pay back the loans. the economic think tank, the institute for fiscal studies, has warned there may be no room for big spending announcements on public services in this month's budget. the ifs says the chancellor
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will need to keep a tight rein on government finances despite planned tax rises. a treasury spokesman said the budget would reflect the public�*s key priorities. carl emmerson, the deputy director of the ifs, explained its assessment of the economy as it emerges from covid measures. actually, if you look at the headline numbers, it looks like the chancellor should have lots of money to spend. he has put up taxes significantly in the last year, big tax rises announced. the uk has not seen levels like this very often outside of unusual gears. the reason why we still think it it will be pretty tough for many government departments is that low growth over the next few years combined with pressures on many public services, combined with the fact he has already tied to sam by allocating monies to areas like the nhs, schools, defence and eight, means
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that the rest of the budget, about a third of the budget, actually faces a bit of a spending squeeze over the next two years. that includes areas like prisons, local authorities, where there has been a considerable squeeze over the last ten years, so it will be a tough spending review for at least the next two years in those areas. the shortlist for this year's riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco friendly mosque in cambridge, a museum in the lake district and the centrepiece of a university in south—west london. what makes a good building? today we're travelling to the north cornwall coast. the tintagel footbridge spans a gorge about 60 metres wide and creates a link that reunites the two halves of tintagel castle for the first time in more than 500 years. when we proposed it to english heritage, i never thought they'd accept. but sometimes, the crazy ideas are actually the best ideas.
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my name's william matthews and, along with laurent ney and matthieu mallie, from ney & partners, we are the engineers and the designers of the tintagel castle footbridge. the footbridge reconnects the two sides of the medieval castle, built in the 12th century by richard, earl of cornwall. the mainland ward and the island ward were connected by an isthmus of rock which, in a sense, eroded away, and the bridge recreates that link between the two sides. one of the key drivers behind the project — indeed, its very raison d'etre — was to improve accessibility to the site. one of the major problems that tintagel has is this incredibly rocky landscape. we wanted to be able to get lots of people here who couldn't get here before. because there were so many steps up to the island, a lot of people couldn't because they had bad knees, they used wheelchairs, whatever it was. now we have essentially step—free access right from the car park all the way through onto the site.
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and it was so satisfying on the opening day to see literally a queue of wheelchair users from the local village queue up to be the first person to cross the bridge and onto the island. something that they might not have done for many years. in my mind, this was a textbook example of how you should design a major piece of engineering, on a really sensitive heritage or archaeological site. you can look at all sorts of designs for bridges that would have to go through the archaeology on the surface of the island. the elegance of this solution was that it is anchored into the rock on either side, below the sensitive archaeology. very, very clever. the materials we used were important not just structurally, but also, how it would tie into its landscape, its situation. for the bridge deck, we've used slate which is mined from the quarryjust two miles away. 40,000 hand—split and hand—cut slates will have been laid. and it gives that wonderful sound as you walk across and that unique experience that you feel
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under your foot. when you step out onto the bridge, it is really amazing _ because you hear clitter—clatter of the slate _ it's such a clever design. and the views are - absolutely astonishing. it's wonderful. one word that sort of encapsulates the building, it's not a very architectural word, but for me, it's fun. and it's a kind of project that you can see easily in the cases of users. the fun and enjoyment that they are getting from the project, that's extremely gratifying. the tintagel footbridge on the north cornwall coast is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize for britain's best new building. we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7.30pm. now how about this for a holiday with a difference? �*champing' that's camping
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in a church has become one of the surprise if unorthodox travel trends of recent months. so why is it proving so popular? we sent breakfast�*sjohn maguire to find out. there's been a church on the site in the somerset town of langport for more than 1,000 years. but, with a decreasing congregation, all saints hasn't held weekly services since the 19905. there was a huge amount of upset. it may not have been there was a regular congregation that suddenly were thrown out because the numbers were quite small. people who really didn't come to the church still saw it as something that was a precious part of their community. so to save it, in common with 350 others, it's looked after by the churches conservation trust. one way the charity raises money is through church camping, or champing, as it's known. mirren and her two young sons are the guests tonight. first priority is to explore the unique accommodation.
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i've seen the pillars, the golden eagle, the stained glass. it certainly makes a change from their usual holidays. we normally go to cornwall and stay in a bed—and—breakfast. that's been our idea of a getaway for the last two or three years. so this is different because we've never gone to sleep in a church before and this is amazing, it's everything i expected. staying here, i really shouldn't be saying this, is like staying inside a ghost story. ghost stories may attract some but one of the volunteers here, annie, says there's no need to be scared. i've been here with a group of young people, there were about 12 of us. you would think it is scary but it's not. it's got a really nice atmosphere. you wake up in the morning and the light is coming through the windows. it just feels really calm and relaxing. you've got this glorious space all to yourself and it's really good for hide and seek, really good. her husband bill believes bringing young people into churches is one of champing's great advantages.
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if i went to church as a youngster, you were dressed in your sunday best. a freer and more easy way to enjoy the space is very much the whole experience of champing for people. like all charities and indeed tourist accommodation, the pandemic has has meant a severe loss in revenue. so there's a determination to bounce back and to breathe new life into history. john maguire, bbc news, somerset. in the united states the republican governor of texas, greg abbott, has issued an executive order banning any and all covid vaccine mandates in the state, including private businesses. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has the details. this is a sweeping ban in texas on covid—19 mandates and it means that, for now, through an executive order being brought in by governor abbott,
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that private entities, private companies, whether they be restaurants or gyms or stores, along with government agencies, as well, will not be able to require that their employees have the covid—19 vaccination or indeed customers of businesses. now, previously, there was an order in effect that essentially applied this ban on the covid—19 mandate to government agencies, but it didn't apply to private companies, so that is the change now being brought in by executive order with the governor urging the state legislature to pass a law to the same effect. governor abbott has been tweeting about this, saying the covid—19 vaccine is safe, effective and he said "our best defence against the virus, but should always remain voluntary and never forced". this seems, at least in part, to be a response to what president biden announced last month at the national
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and federal level, that companies with more than 100 employees should indeed require those employees to have the vaccination, or at least have regular tests. it prompted a couple of major the airlines, american airlines and southwest airlines, to say they would go along with that mandate, but in texas governor abbott says it amounts to the bullying of companies and certainly, as far as he sees it, hampering those companies as they try to recover from the pandemic.
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senior black scientists have told bbc news that they believe uk research is institutionally racist and contains systemic bias. the latest figures also show that black scientists are more likely to drop out of their field and less likely to become professors. i would like to talk to my guests straightaway he is mentioned in that report that you referenced, that has been published by the student employees ? the institute of student employers today. he is a senior assistant engineer and he joins employers today. he is a senior assistant engineer and hejoins me like now. many thanks for sparing the time. you have a greatjob, but how easy was it for you to get moving? how easy was it for you to get movin: ? . ~' ,, ., ., moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy — moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy at _ moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy at all. _ moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy at all. i _ moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy at all. i think— moving? thank you for having me. it wasn't easy at all. i think the - wasn't easy at all. i think the journey was very challenging right from the start. i think you first need to understand the opportunities
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in science technology engineering and maths. it is quite hard to see what is available going through the education system. it is quite an opaque structure. when you look up the chain didn't see representation, either. that put you on the back foot mentally. you are thinking to yourself, if i don't see people like myself how can i achieve that? when you go to university, you do see that diversity. i was fortunate to be able to work with a nonprofit organisation that provided coaching and mentoring, which started my journey in engineering, to eventually get to the position i am out. it was by no means easy and i was quite fortunate to be able to connect with the right organisations to put me in that position. what
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connect with the right organisations to put me in that position.— to put me in that position. what do ou think to put me in that position. what do you think universities _ to put me in that position. what do you think universities and - to put me in that position. what do. you think universities and employers can do better to help graduates such as yourself. i can do better to help graduates such as ourself. ~ , can do better to help graduates such as ourself. ,, , ., as yourself. i think it is important to understand _ as yourself. i think it is important to understand what _ as yourself. i think it is important to understand what the _ as yourself. i think it is important to understand what the issues - as yourself. i think it is important. to understand what the issues are, and that ranges from unconscious bias with the recruitment process to also supporting people once they are in those jobs to deal with the cultural issues that they face that causes that lack of pretension. employers should look at understanding a bit more about what the challenges are for people in the black community and to actually be able to provide the mentoring and coaching, the guidance to support them, as well as some form of training for the recruiters and hiring managers about things like unconscious bias, microaggression to help deal with those barriers. really useful to get those insights.
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many thanks. time now for a look at the weather. if you are taking a stroll along eastern counties today you will notice it feels very cool, but tomorrow temperature shall be up again. we have a weak weather for producing splashes of rain across the central belt of the country. some sunshine in the south of the country, brightening up by the end of the day across eastern areas. in the west we could get up to 16 or 17 degrees. this evening and overnight still a fair bit of clarity around with patchy drizzle across some western posts ? western coasts and hills. there will be some rain moving into the far north of scotland and the northern isles. the
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overnight low 5—11. tomorrow we say goodbye to the rain. we have a day of variable amounts of cloud, sunny skies breaking through, some showers at tyneside towards the western temperatures between 12 and 16, but milder in the east.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: —— 12: "one of the worst public health failures ever" — a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. and while there was praise for the uk's vaccine roll—out, relatives of those who died say a public inquiry should begin right away. my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial enquiry.
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in other news, a deal to support companies struggling with high energy bills — the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. the uk will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when brexit minister lord frost makes a speech in lisbon. superman's creators announce that the superhero's son will reveal he's bisexual in the next edition of the comic. an inquiry by mps has described the government's initial response to coronavirus in england as "one of the worst failures of public health in the uk's history". the study was carried out by two commons committees, both chaired by former
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conservative cabinet ministers, and is highly critical. it says both ministers and scientists waited too long to bring in lockdowns last year, costing many lives. the report mainly focuses on the response to the pandemic in england and did not look at steps taken individually by wales, scotland and northern ireland. the first lab—identified cases of covid 19 in the uk were recorded on the 31st of january 2020. but it wasn't until eight weeks later, on the 23rd of march, that the prime minister ordered the uk's first national lockdown. the report said too little was done in the early weeks, and that the "uk did not take enough advantage of the learning being generated in other countries". the committee said the response ranked as "one of the most important public health failures the uk has ever experienced". despite the uk being one of the first countries in the world to develop a test for covid, the report described the roll—out of the test and trace system as "slow,
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uncertain and often chaotic". but, the report has praised the uk's vaccination programme and government support for the development of vaccines describing the programme as "one of the most effective initiatives in history". a government spokesperson said that it never shied away from taking quick and decisive action to save lives, protect the nhs and bring in restrictions. this report is from our health correspondent, jim reed. we are still living through, says this report, the biggest health crisis of the last 100 years. millions have been infected, many thousands of lives have been lost to covid. when we brought back people from wuhan injanuary... for a year now, two influential groups of mps have been taking evidence on the pandemic from people involved in key decisions at the time. now in this report, they strongly criticise the early response.
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instead of locking down hard and fast like some other countries, they say ministers, guided by scientific advisers, made a deliberate decision to introduce social distancing rules gradually until it was clear the nhs could be overwhelmed. the mps describe that as a serious error which proved fatal to many. we were too slow in that initial lockdown. we were operating in a fog of uncertainty. even the government's advisers, professor neil ferguson, in evidence to my committee, said if we had locked down a week earlier we might even have saved half the number of deaths in that initial wave. so everyone accepts that we locked down too late. across 150 pages of the report, there is more criticism. it describes the roll—out of the test and trace programme in england as "slow and chaotic".
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it says the uk did not impose rigorous border controls, letting in high numbers of infections from france and spain. and it criticises the treatment of care homes, saying the risks were not recognised soon enough, leading to devastating and preventable repercussions. the report has actually picked up things we were saying from the outset, that social care was an afterthought. the mantra was, "nhs, we have to keep it safe." we understood some of that. what we did not know was the discharge out of hospitals was actually not through testing. they were not safe discharges. there was, though, praise for parts of the national response. the vaccine programme was described as one of the most effective initiatives in the history of uk science. treatments for covid were also singled out as well. one, dexamethasone, was widely used first in this country and has saved more than a million lives around the world. the government says throughout
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the pandemic it has been guided by scientific experts and has not shied away from taking quick action, including on lockdowns. it says it is committed to learning lessons and will hold a full public inquiry in the spring. jim reed, bbc news. jeremy hunt, the chair of the health and social care committee, has been giving his assessment of the goverment�*s response to coronavirus in england. the national response to covid was a bit like a football game with two very different halves and in the first half, we had some serious errors. we could have avoided a lockdown, but having got into the position where we had to have one, we should have locked down earlier but in the second half, we had the vaccine will— outreach we described as the most effective initiative in the history of uk science and public administration, the discovery of treatments which have saved a million lives around the world. and the fascinating thing that makes it very difficult to sum up in one,
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clean sentence or instinct, how we did, is that it was very often the same people who were responsible for both sets of decisions. lindsay jackson's mother died in a care home during the first wave of coronavirus in april 2020. lindsay is part of the group covid 19 bereaved families forjusice, and says the government is still taking unecessary risks. i think mistakes are being made now. if i canjust make mention of what i find to be a despicable remark this morning from mr hunt, the former secretary of state for health, that this is a game of two halves... this isn't a game. my mother didn't lose her life in a game. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government and i want to know about that. i want to hear about it in a full judicial enquiry and i don't want political decisions being taken now which are not based on the
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best advice. we know from this report that in autumn last year, this time last year, later than this last year, the government did not follow scientific advice and that seems, to me, to have lead to a larger loss of life in the second wave than even in the first, and i fear those mistakes are being made again. 0ur political correspondent pete saulljoins us now from westminster. what do you think the implications of this report are? it’s what do you think the implications of this report are?— of this report are? it's hard to say at this stage- _ of this report are? it's hard to say at this stage. there _ of this report are? it's hard to say at this stage. there are _ of this report are? it's hard to say at this stage. there are many - at this stage. there are many surprises from the different evidence sessions in the leaks to the media over the past 18 months but this document, 150 pages setting out in dispassionate terms the sheer number of mistakes that have been made by the government from the decision to not enter the first
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lockdown early enough to the test and trace programme to the problems with social care, to the regional tears. i could go on. there is obviously preys on there, lots for the vaccine roll—out. but this is a difficult moment for the government and it was up to the cabinet office minister steve barclay to go out and defend the government's actions on the airwaves this morning. we followed the scientific advice, we protected the nhs from the surge of pressure that we saw in other countries and one cannot apply hindsight to the challenges we faced. at the time of the first lockdown, the expectation in terms of the tolerance in terms of how long people would live with lockdown was a far shorter period than has proven to be the case and there is an issue timing of the lockdown to make sure it was done at the point of optimal impact so it is a point
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of hindsight to now say the way that decision was shaped and how long we could lockdown for because we now know that there was a much more willingness for the country to ensure that that was originally envisioned. the government saying it's all well and good in hindsight but the committee also made it clear that early on in the pandemic, other countries were doing things differently and we failed to learn from them, like south korea which is mentioned in particular. the committee concludes it handled the first part of the pandemic much better than we did. what will concern minister's is the response from families who have lost loved ones like we heard. they clearly feel like they have not got the closure of the justice that they would like and this isn't over. we've got a big public enquiry due to get under way in the spring. those families would like it to start sooner. that enquiry could go on for years though. joining me now is labour's shadow health secretary, shadow
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health secretary, jonathan ashworth. thank you for your time today. due to weight of the detail that went into this report, the testimony given to those two committees —— you are aware of the detail. the publication today is a significant moment and it says that the government approached back by scientists was to manage the situation and achieve herd immunity effectively by infection. your reaction to that point? it’s effectively by infection. your reaction to that point?- reaction to that point? it's a damning _ reaction to that point? it's a damning report _ reaction to that point? it's a damning report and - reaction to that point? it's a damning report and that - reaction to that point? it's a | damning report and that was reaction to that point? it's a - damning report and that was the strategy. there were jokes within government that the strategy was akin to allowing mass chickenpox parties, apparently oblivious to the fact this would mean huge levels of sickness and people losing their lives as a result. i think this is a significant report today, a report produced by a majority of conservative members of parliament and to former conservative cabinet members so it's not a political
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report on a partisan report or a report on a partisan report or a report from the labour party, it is damning and it details a litany of errors and details monumental mistakes on behalf of ministers who were complacent, who were not questioning, who took the wrong decisions around testing, around sick pay, around failing to protect our care homes and of course those failures had the most tragic of consequences.— failures had the most tragic of consequences. failures had the most tragic of conseuuences. , ., ~ consequences. does the report make it clear to you — consequences. does the report make it clear to you while _ consequences. does the report make it clear to you while more _ consequences. does the report make it clear to you while more learning i it clear to you while more learning from what was happening abroad wasn't taken on board as this virus made its way from east to west? we saw initially once the virus reached europe what was happening in italy. is it clear in your mind from this report about why that learning wasn't taken on board? some of the mitigations suggested government ministers are felt if a lockdown was to be brought in sooner, the public would not have accepted that. i would not have accepted that. i thought it was a staggering comment
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from the conservative minister in the package just now accusing us of acting with hindsight. people could see what was happening in germany and spain and france and italy, they did not understand why we were not locking down sooner. why were fans from madrid able to fly into liverpool for the game but the other way round, liverpool fans would not have been able to fly to madrid? other countries were making decisions, we were not and that's because we embarked on a strategy of allowing the infection to run through the population in the hope that it built up immunity. that was a catastrophic mistake. so it's not with the benefit of hindsight. and when we did lockdown, we were slow to lock down a second time in the autumn christmas time. we didn't fix the testing and tracing system, we didn't have sick pay for people and ministers were not following the scientific advice at every step because there were scientific voices warning them at every step that they
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were embarking on the wrong course. they were warned about sick pay and lockdowns and it was ignored so they were wrong. lockdowns and it was ignored so they were wrong-— were wrong. sorry to interrupt, we have to say — were wrong. sorry to interrupt, we have to say goodbye _ were wrong. sorry to interrupt, we have to say goodbye to _ were wrong. sorry to interrupt, we have to say goodbye to viewers - were wrong. sorry to interrupt, we have to say goodbye to viewers on | have to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. we are continuing with our interview with the shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth. sorry to interrupt you. the officials suffered from groupthink, the report says. that's an interesting phrase. in a situation like this, pretty unparalleled i would say in the uk, do you think there is an excuse for a groupthink or in government should there be voices if they disagree with the majority who are cutting through and saying, i think we are out to be doing something different here? does that phrase try to
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absolve any individuals from responsibility? the absolve any individuals from responsibility?— absolve any individuals from responsibility? absolve any individuals from resonsibili ? , , responsibility? the buck stops with the prime minister _ responsibility? the buck stops with the prime minister and _ responsibility? the buck stops with the prime minister and is _ responsibility? the buck stops with the prime minister and is his - the prime minister and is his responsibility to ask the urgent questions of the advice he is receiving from sage and to make a judgment because these things are not always black—and—white, you need to make a judgment and understand why different nations are making judgments different to what we are making. you need to understand why there were not advisers on the sage committee at the start of this and why we were listening to behavioural modellers who were allowed to pontificate around herd immunity which happened early on in the crisis. in the end it is ministers who make decisions and even if they were wrong about the timing of the first lockdown, they knew the significant implications around the second time and they were late to lockdown then as well. by that point it was obvious we need a decent test and trace system and we didn't have one. by that point it was obvious we need a decent sick pay, people were
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not getting it, and early on in the crisis, people were asking, what are you going to do to protect care homes? you know when you have a flu outbreak of the norovirus outbreak what that could mean for care homes and you move quickly to protect them. that didn't happen here and i think that's unforgivable. the government _ think that's unforgivable. the government is _ think that's unforgivable. the government is talking about a public enquiry in the spring. would you like to see that sooner or at this stage would it simply be too late in terms of setting something up to bring that forward? i terms of setting something up to bring that forward?— terms of setting something up to bring that forward? i think we need to brina bring that forward? i think we need to bring that _ bring that forward? i think we need to bring that forward _ bring that forward? i think we need to bring that forward and _ bring that forward? i think we need to bring that forward and that - to bring that forward and that enquiry again. sadly because what is happening around the world in terms of climate change and diversity loss, we are likely to see more infectious disease outbreaks, hopefully not on the scale of this pandemic but this will not be the final infectious disease outbreak we are going to have to content with your lessons are going to have to be learned, we never want to see these mistakes made again.
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the headlines: one of the worst public health failure is ever, a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. while there was praise for the vaccine will out, relatives of those who died said a public enquiry should begin right away. ideal to support uk companies are struggling with high energy bills, the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. germany have become the first country to qualify for the world cup. england will be looking to move another step closer towards automatic qualification for them if they can beat hungary later this evening. they are playing at wembley after andorra last time. momentum is
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certainly with gareth southgate's side reaching the finals of the euros last summer but does the manager feel his euros last summer but does the managerfeel his side euros last summer but does the manager feel his side are getting the credit they deserve?- the credit they deserve? across euro -e the credit they deserve? across europe we've — the credit they deserve? across europe we've gained _ the credit they deserve? across europe we've gained a - the credit they deserve? across europe we've gained a lot - the credit they deserve? across europe we've gained a lot of. europe we've gained a lot of respect. when i talk to european coaches, there's probably a greater of what we've done than there has been here. that's always reassuring because you want the respect of your peers and i think they have recognised where we have been over the last 30 years or so and the signs that we are starting to show and the ability of the players to play in a certain style. tonight, scotland can get one of the two wins they need to secure
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a place in the play offs, after their thrilling comeback against israel on saturday. they're taking on the faroe islands. steve clarke's side are second in group f, seven points behind leaders denmark but four ahead of israel and austria. british number one dan evans is out of the indian wells masters in california after losing to argentina's diego schwartzman. having beaten former us open finalist kei nishikori in the previous round, his game fell apart. he took the first set and was a break up in the second, but lost eight consecutive games, losing the deciding set 6—0, while cameron norrie continued his excellent run of form coming through a three—set battle with the spaniard roberto bautista agut to reach the last 16. a panel will hold a discussion over a female british and irish lions
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team. former british and irish lion ieuan evans will chair a 13 person group that will decide whether a women's lions team would be feasible. england and harlequins prop shaunagh brown will also be part of the group, whose aim will be to determine if a women's team could be formed, as the game continues to grow. the men's lions have been touring since 1888 and most recently played south africa in a series. i'll be back at around 1:30pm. borisjohnson is expected to give his backing to a support package for firms struggling with the soaring cost of wholesale gas. the treasury is considering a proposal submitted by the business secretary yesterday. ceramic, paper and steel manufacturing firms have warned that without an energy price cap, some factories could be forced to close. our business correspondent, theo leggett, reports. forging steel requires a lot of heat and that consumes a great deal of energy. small wonder then that steelmakers want the government to help them cope with a steep rise in energy costs. it isn't just steel. cement manufacturers, chemicals firms, glass—makers
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and ceramics businesses are also appealing for support. not all companies are affected in the same way by rising costs. some have bought their gas and electricity in advance and are protected from price rises, at least for the time being. others though are not. for them, this is an incredibly serious predicament, leading some to scale back production or to raise product prices. of course the longer this period of high prices continues, the more companies are impacted and the more severe those impacts are and, at some point, it starts to threaten their company viability. the government faces a dilemma. it wants to help viable businesses cope with soaring costs but it doesn't want to prop up failing companies. direct subsidies would add to the burden on taxpayers, while a cap on electricity or gas prices would risk simply passing on extra costs to energy companies. but labour says what businesses are asking for is reasonable. they felt a package of support is needed through the winter when gas and electricity prices
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are usually higher and to get through this temporary spike in gas and electricity prices. that's what they're looking for. they're not looking for a permanent bailout or a subsidy. what they are looking for is targeted support now, which is what is happening in other european countries. the chancellor now does at least have concrete proposals to look at, passed on by the business secretary after consultations with industry. whatever options he chooses, someone, somewhere is going to have to pay in the end. theo leggett, bbc news. the uk will set out its demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when the brexit minister, lord frost, makes a speech in lisbon. the protocol, agreed by both sides, prevents a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu 5 single market for goods.
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the economic think tank, the institute for fiscal studies, has warned there may be no room for big spending announcements on public services in this month's budget. the ifs says the chancellor will need to keep a tight rein on government finances despite planned tax rises. a treasury spokesman said the budget would reflect the public�*s key priorities. carl emmerson, the deputy director of the ifs, explained its assessment of the economy as it emerges from covid measures. actually, if you look at the headline numbers, it looks like the chancellor should have lots of money to spend. he has put up taxes significantly in the last year, big tax rises announced. the uk has not seen levels like this very often outside of unusual gears. the reason why we still think it it will be pretty tough for many government departments is that low growth over the next few years
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combined with pressures from covid on many public services, combined with the fact he has already tied his hands by allocating monies to areas like the nhs, schools, defence and aid, means that the rest of the budget, about a third of the budget, actually faces a bit of a spending squeeze over the next two years. that includes areas like prisons, courts, local authorities, where there has been a considerable squeeze over the last ten years, so it will be a tough spending review for at least the next two years in those areas. leaders and senior ministers from 20 of the world s biggest economies are holding a special summit to discuss afghanistan. they'll consider financial support and how best to contain the threat of terrorism. the un secretary general has urged the international community to find ways to get money into the afghan economy to avert its collapse.
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we need to find ways to make the economy breathe again. this can be done without violating its national laws or compromising principles. we must seek ways to create the conditions that will allow afghan professionals and civil servants to continue working to serve the afghan population. i urge the world to take action and inject liquidity into the afghan economy to avoid collapse. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in the afghan capital, kabul. this is a virtual summit of g20 nations, it's an extraordinary meeting on afghanistan. at the top of the agenda is expected to be humanitarian assistance for the people here in afghanistan. it comes ahead of a full g20 summit in rome at the end of this month and i think the big challenge before the international community is how do
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they continue to provide and deliver humanitarian aid in this country to millions of people who are in dire need of it, but without it falling into the wrong hands are being misused? the taliban seized control of this country on the 15th of august, countries around the world do not recognise the taliban government and that's what makes this particularly difficult, is how do you continue to reach the civilians, the people of afghanistan when you do not want to transfer the money or humanitarian aid to the taliban forfear that it money or humanitarian aid to the taliban for fear that it might be misused? in the united states, the republican governor of texas, greg abbott, has issued an executive order banning any and all covid vaccine mandates in the state, including private businesses. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has the details. this is a sweeping ban in texas on covid—19 mandates and it means that, for now, through an executive order being brought in by governor abbott,
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that private entities, private companies, whether they be restaurants or gyms or stores, along with government agencies, as well, will not be able to require that their employees have the covid—19 vaccination or indeed customers of businesses. now, previously, there was an order in effect that essentially applied this ban on the covid—19 mandate to government agencies, but it didn't apply to private companies, so that is the change now being brought in by executive order with the governor urging the state legislature to pass a law to the same effect. governor abbott has been tweeting about this, saying the covid—19 vaccine is safe, effective and he said "our best defence against the virus, but should always remain voluntary and never forced". this seems, at least in part, to be a response to what president biden
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announced last month at the national and federal level, that companies with more than 100 employees should indeed require those employees to have the vaccination, or at least have regular tests. it prompted a couple of major the airlines, american airlines and southwest airlines, to say they would go along with that mandate, but in texas governor abbott says it amounts to the bullying of companies and certainly, as far as he sees it, hampering those companies as they try to recover from the pandemic. now it's time for a look at the weather. the weather is not bad, not ideal, quite overcast in some parts of the country but sunshine too. the best of the sunny spells in the far north—eastern corner of scotland
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where incidentally last night we also had clear skies and in the north we had sightings of aurora borealis and some chance of seeing it in the coming days. this is the weather through the afternoon and in the second half you can still see a lot of cloud. i think tonight will be very overcast in the north with bits and pieces of rain. lowest temperatures once again across the south of the country where the winds are light and the skies are clear, so 5 c in norwich and perhaps colder outside of town. tomorrow is a generally cloudy day but there will be spells of sunshine here and they are and top temperature is really not bad for this time of year, up to 17 and colder in the north of scotland around 12 to 1b c.
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hello, this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: "one of the worst public health failures ever" — a report by mps condemns the uk response to the early stages of the covid pandemic. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. and while there was praise for the uk's vaccine roll—out, relatives of those who died say a public inquiry should begin right away. my mother didn't lose her life in a game.
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i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government. and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a full judicial enquiry. in other news, a deal to support companies struggling with high energy bills — the government is expected to announce details in the coming days. the uk will set out demands for changes to the northern ireland protocol today when brexit minister lord frost makes a speech in lisbon. superman's creators announce that the superhero's son will reveal he's bisexual in the next edition of the comic. as we've been hearing, thhe government says there are lessons to be [earned after a report found serious failings in its early response to the pandemic.
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the inquiry by mps said it was "astonishing" that ministers waited so long to impose a lockdown in march last year, describing the delay as one of the worst public health failures ever seen in the united kingdom. but there was praise for the vaccine rollout. gez 0ssai is general manager at wentworth court in cheltenham a care home for people with dementia. earlier, iasked him what he thought of the report. it what he thought of the report. doesn't inspire conf just it doesn't inspire confidence, it is just saying what we already knew, that we were playing russian roulette with people's lives, or we were at the time.— were at the time. take us back to earl last were at the time. take us back to early last here — were at the time. take us back to early last here and _ were at the time. take us back to early last here and there - early last here and there conversations you are having with your colleagues about what you should do to keep your residents and yourself safe. brute should do to keep your residents and yourself safe-— yourself safe. we made the decision ve , ve yourself safe. we made the decision very. very early _ yourself safe. we made the decision very. very early so _ yourself safe. we made the decision very, very early so at _ yourself safe. we made the decision very, very early so at the _ yourself safe. we made the decision very, very early so at the end - yourself safe. we made the decision very, very early so at the end of- very, very early so at the end of february, possibly the 1st of march, we made it official. we lock down.
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that was four weeks before the government that we had to. because we look after a particularly vulnerable set of individuals we made that decision that it was in their best interests, we had a tuesday of care to do so. 50. their best interests, we had a tuesday of care to do so. so, that was about — tuesday of care to do so. so, that was about 3-5 _ tuesday of care to do so. so, that was about 3.5 weeks _ tuesday of care to do so. so, that was about 3.5 weeks before - tuesday of care to do so. so, that was about 3.5 weeks before the i tuesday of care to do so. so, that - was about 3.5 weeks before the prime minister announced the first lockdown, but you took the decision much earlier because of the vulnerable residents. what are you looking at in terms of use from abroad, what was happening in italy to the elderly population there. are you looking at that and thinking that you needed to do something now? absolutely. we had to be forward thinking. the statistics were there for everybody to see in europe. it was a matter of time before the pandemic, and i think the clue is in
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the name pandemic, before it reached this country and the numbers that it was in italy, spain and other european countries. we had to be forward thinking and we had a tuesday to the staff, the people who live here and the relatives of the people who live here to make everything as safe as we possibly could. did everything as safe as we possibly could. , , , , i. everything as safe as we possibly could. , , , , ., could. did it surprise you that the full national _ could. did it surprise you that the full national lockdown _ could. did it surprise you that the full national lockdown wasn't - full national lockdown wasn't announced until several weeks later? would you have expected the government to demonstrate the same foresight that you did?— foresight that you did? without oliticisina foresight that you did? without politicising the _ foresight that you did? without politicising the situation, - foresight that you did? without politicising the situation, yes. . foresight that you did? without i politicising the situation, yes. as a management team here, we looked at what was happening elsewhere and we made thatjudgments, that proved to be right. i would have expected other people to have done the same. sadly, despite your best efforts, you lost a number of residents to
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covid, and you were ill, as well? yes, i was extremely ill. i was hospitalised and ventilated and i have hail issues that it didn't have before, i have injections 3 or [i before, i have injections 3 or 11 times a day and i know i need to wear glasses. it makes me more passionate having been through it. i think i am fairly fit and healthy and the people we look after, it would devastate them if they were ever exposed to the illness as i got it. ., ., ~ ., ., ever exposed to the illness as i got it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? _ it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would _ it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you _ it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you like - it. looking ahead, what would you like to see? would you like to - it. looking ahead, what would you. like to see? would you like to see a public enquiry into this sooner than next spring? 0ur risks still being taken or do you feel in terms of the communication you get that the government is now handling the situation as you would like it to be? ~ ., ., ._ , ,
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be? we hear, we always believe in reflective practice, _ be? we hear, we always believe in reflective practice, whether - be? we hear, we always believe in reflective practice, whether good . be? we hear, we always believe in| reflective practice, whether good or bad, and we reflect on what we have done, and we improve upon it. i think i hear is too long to wait. i think i hear is too long to wait. i think there are lessons to be learnt and we have to accept that and move forward with that. essential to all of this, there are people, some of whom you had listened to already, have lost loved ones and to minimise the effects i think would be wrong, but i can only really speak about what we do here at wentworth court, we still wear masks all the time because we look after vulnerable groups. we haven't lost sight of the dangers, having taken a fit of the paddle, we are extremely cautious.
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let's stay with this story. joining me now is our head of statistics, robert cuffe. robert, in yourjob you often take a break overview of what is happening with regards to a particular story. let's begin with this one. take the yukari ? did the uk started with its lockdowns?— yukari ? did the uk started with its lockdowns? ., ,., , lockdowns? there were reasons in the da to to lockdowns? there were reasons in the day to to justify _ lockdowns? there were reasons in the day to to justify delaying _ lockdowns? there were reasons in the day to to justify delaying the - day to to justify delaying the lockdowns, parts why was that the question? if you remember italy last spring, this was a chart that we used at the time. if you start counting on the day you see ten covid deaths in the country, there is not that much difference between the two countries. italy was locking down just lombardi, the two countries. italy was locking downjust lombardi, the uk the two countries. italy was locking down just lombardi, the uk lockdown the whole country. italy lockdown on
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the whole country. italy lockdown on the 9th of march, the uk lockdown two full weeks later. you could look at countries like south korea where the test and trace systems were out in force to stop the spread, he really stamped on hajj and say why didn't we do that? or the example of france or germany who lockdown just a couple of days earlier. they were still taking the precautionary route. that is what the report will ask, why did we delay instead of adopting a different approach? the re ort adopting a different approach? the report refers to [earnings not be made from what was happening in other countries. what did that initial response means for the rest of the uk throughout the pandemic? you can see an immediate response during the first wave. this first pick that we result in deaths, about
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a month after the decision to lockdown, that is the worst that wastes during the pandemic. if we had shut down just a week earlier, you would have dropped the top of that mountain. you can see how things have changed in the uk. countries like the us clocked up with the uk during the course of the summer. by the end of the year, the uk was no longer an outlier. we are now saying that despite think the number of cases that we did last december and january, the number of deaths we are seeing are far, far lower than they were back now, that is testament to the faxing programme. is testament to the faxing programme-— is testament to the faxing rouramme. , ., ., ,., is testament to the faxing rouramme. , ., ., ., programme. tell us more about how we stand compared — programme. tell us more about how we stand compared to _ programme. tell us more about how we stand compared to other— programme. tell us more about how we stand compared to other countries. - stand compared to other countries. no longer clearly the worst hit. among the worst hit certainly, but the question now is where will we go throughout the rest of the year. in
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the uk we have made some very different decisions, we opened up earlier and we are seeing cases running may be five times higher than european neighbours. the death rates in the uk are probably twice as high, so not as high as the cases might suggest. we are seeing are lot of cases among young people who have not been vaccinated as much as other age groups. we opened up earlier, we are hoping that the combination of vaccinations plus infections will give us the immunity to keep the virus that day over the winter. we were an outlier in locking down late, that didn't go well. we were an outlier in the vaccination programme, that has gone brilliantly. thank you, robert. the uk will set out its demands for changes to the northern ireland
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protocol today when the brexit minister, lord frost, makes a speech in lisbon. the protocol, agreed by both sides, prevents a hard border on the island of ireland by keeping northern ireland in the eu 5 single market for goods. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris explained what the discussions are all about. it is part of the brexit withdrawal agreement that the deal that took us out of the eu. it sets up a series of checksum goods moving from between great britain and northern ireland, especially on foodstuffs, but other things as well. the reason clues are there is that both sides agree that there should not be the return of a heart border between northern ireland and the republic, which is in the eu. it is a reminder that once goods get into the republic of ireland they can move anywhere across the eu single market and the eu protects its single market pretty fiercely. that is why it is saying if you are not having jets gone from northern ireland into
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ireland, then you need checks between northern ireland and great britain. 0ur government is saying that that restricts trade within our own country. for unionists in northern ireland puts questions on northern ireland puts questions on northern ireland puts questions on northern ireland because my constitutional place within the united kingdom. teiiii constitutional place within the united kingdom.— constitutional place within the united kinudom. , ., ., united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk — united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk wants _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk wants to _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk wants to see _ united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk wants to see in - united kingdom. tell us more about what the uk wants to see in terms l united kingdom. tell us more about| what the uk wants to see in terms of changes. brute what the uk wants to see in terms of chan . es. ~ ., what the uk wants to see in terms of chances. ~ ., ., ., ., changes. we will hear more from lord frost this afternoon _ changes. we will hear more from lord frost this afternoon but _ changes. we will hear more from lord frost this afternoon but the _ changes. we will hear more from lord frost this afternoon but the uk - frost this afternoon but the uk already set at right back injuly. first of all, no more custom checksum goods gone between great britain and northern ireland. business it would self regulate. they wanted dual regulatory regime, which means that kid that circulates in northern ireland can either meet eu standards or uk standards. at the moment they are meant to meet eu standards, but if they could follow uk standards as well for most of those checks would disappear. also, no role for the european court of
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justice overseeing the implementation of the deal. the uk doesn't want the eu institutions involved, even though they did sign up involved, even though they did sign up to that in 2019, because they don't think they are a neutral arbitrators. brute don't think they are a neutral arbitrators.— don't think they are a neutral arbitrators. ~ ., , . ., arbitrators. we are expecting from the eu tomorrow, _ arbitrators. we are expecting from the eu tomorrow, but _ arbitrators. we are expecting from the eu tomorrow, but we - arbitrators. we are expecting from the eu tomorrow, but we have - arbitrators. we are expecting from the eu tomorrow, but we have a l the eu tomorrow, but we have a pretty good idea of what that will be. ~ . pretty good idea of what that will be. . ., ., pretty good idea of what that will be. ~ ., ., . ., . . pretty good idea of what that will be. ~ ., . . ., be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to _ be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak _ be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on _ be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on one - be. we have. no coincidence that lord frost to speak on one day . lord frost to speak on one day before the eu releases its proposals. he is putting out what he doesn't like about them before the public has seen them. he is saying that we will scrap the need for many of the controls, so things like the idea that there could be a ban on sausages and other chilled meat is moving from great britain to northern ireland. overall, a lot more flexibility. they have been wounded that they are being too legalistic in what is a very
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sensitive situation, the eu. the critical bit is that they have made it very clear from the stance that there will be no overall renegotiation of the protocol itself. the uk would want to rewrite parts of it, the eu is saying no, we will find ways to implement it in a more practical way. the nuclear option for the uk is to trigger article 16 of the northern ireland protocol, which allows either side to suspend parts of the deal and take unilateral safeguard measures if it is perceived that there are economic or social difficulties being created by the way the protocol is being implemented. the eu would say that as being essentially a declaration of a trade war in many ways. they eu's nuclear option would be to suspense the terms of the overall uk ? eu free trade deal. things could get quite nasty quite quickly in the next few
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weeks. on the other hand, what we are hearing now, tough talk ? tough talk from both sides, lord frost had a twitter row with the simon foreign minister over the weekend. we have seen this before, tough talk before a negotiation that the deal is announced. if the eu wants to get rid of the protocol, they could be on a collision course. it is a football team of... they describe themselves as the club no one wants to be a part of a football team of bereaved fathers united by the loss of a child. angels united fc grew out of an online support group for dads dealing with grief and players wear the names of their child on the back of their shirt. katie walderman went to meet them. forjake, forjimmy and steve, it's more than a game, more than just football. i think it's the fact that they get it. i know that's quite simple but most people don't understand what it's like to lose a child. you get to pull on your baby's shirt and baby's name and get to play
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in their honour and that's massive. that 90 minutes, whatever it is, that i'm on the field, _ i play 120% for him because he'll never get to kick a ball. - you know? i'll never know what he | looked like or anything. jimmy and his partner lost their little boy alfie at 28 weeks. we went into the hospital. and we knew straightaway. when the scanner looked at us, i we just spent four days hugging. that's all you can do. just be there for one another. for myself, i tried i to be the strong one. i think a lot of men try to be - strong, and i kept everything in. after finding support online from others experiencing the same heartbreak, they decided to club together and angels united was formed. it's given me a purpose again. realising you're not on your own, you're not the only person it is happening to. steve and his partner have also been through a number of miscarriages. the names on the shirt
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aren't actually our names, it's the names of all the children we've lost, the babies. my shirt says arlo because we've had six miscarriages. it's "always remember little ones." we probably will name him arlo if we have a little boy in the future. one of the club's newest members is jake. his little girl lily may died last summer from cancer. # into the unknown...# she was a little princess. cheeky, funny, full of character. she was so loud. loved being centre of attention. she was an absolute angel when she was here. she is an angel now. if we are having a bad day, we know that every other member of that team truly knows what we are going through. no—one who i've come across in my life before angels knows what it's like to sit in a room with all of lily's things but without lily.
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i know that we still have a can of beans and sausage because that was the last thing that lily asked for to eat and so we can't get rid of that can. that will sit in our cupboard forever. some people don't want to talk about lily because they think it might be a trigger, it might upset me but actually i want to talk about her because she's still my daughter. it's just that we can't make any new memories but i can still look at the old memories with joy and regardless of the fact that sometimes i might get upset. the next day, the same conversation might fill me with joy and that's just part of the process. this month, the club turns one. as part of baby loss awareness week, we join them for a special memorial match. they've teamed up with sands united, another team brought together by bereavement. because of what this week represents, i think it will touch
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base with a lot of players. to have another team that's i celebrating our children means everything to everybody on this pitch. _ before kick—off, a minute's silence is held to remember all their lost little ones. being on the pitch with people who have gone through the same things as you, it makes you feel whole again and it gives you a purpose again. i think that's what we've all needed and that's why we're all here to support each other. it's notjust playing football. it's also the family side and involving the partners, the other children, extended family in this club as well, it means so much to everyone involved. i hope that there's a dad out there today that's watching that will be inclined to give us a call, give us a message on facebook. 30 lads that will text you and ring you and just see how you are. i katie walderman, bbc news. if you've been affected by any of these issues you can get information and support on the bbc action line. the website is bbcco.uk/action line.
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we have just had a statement from sally rooney, the acclaimed irish author, to not allow her new novel to be translated into hebrew. she joined signatories of a later of accusing israel of apartheid and asking for its isolation internationally. this is the statement she has issued. she says, firstly i was very proud to have my previous two novels translated into hebrew. it would be an honourfor me to have my latest novel translated into hebrew. but she says for the moment i have decided not to sell these translation rights to an israeli —based publishing house.
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earlier this year, the international campaign group humid rights watch published a report entitled a crossed. the australian... tab report coming on the heels of a seemingly damning report confirms what palestinian humid rights groups have long been saying, israel's system of domination and segregation against palestinians meets the definition of apartheid under international law. this statement from sally rooney continues, she goes on to express support for the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement led by palestinian campaigners. she goes on, many states other than israel are guilty of grievous civil rights abuses, the same was true of south africa during apartheid. in this particular case i am responding to the call from
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palestinian civil society, trade unions and brightest kenyans. she says, i understand not everyone will agree with my position, but i do not feel it would be right for me to accept a new contrast with an israeli company that does not publicly distanced itself from apartheid. the hebrew language translation rights to my novel are still available and if i can find a way to sell these rights let is compliant with this movement i will be very pleased and proud to do so. this issue has been getting a lot of traction on social media today and thatis traction on social media today and that is the statement released by sally rooney in response to that news. the shortlist for this year's riba stirling prize for architecture includes an eco friendly mosque in cambridge, a museum in the lake district and the centrepiece of a university in south west london. what makes a good building?
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today we're travelling to the north cornwall coast. the tintagel footbridge spans a gorge about 60 metres wide and creates a link that reunites the two halves of tintagel castle for the first time in more than 500 years: 0ur for the first time in more than 500 years. when we proposed it to english heritage, i never thought they'd accept. but sometimes, the crazy ideas are actually the best ideas. my name's william matthews and, along with laurent ney and matthieu mallie, from ney & partners, we are the engineers and the designers of the tintagel castle footbridge. the footbridge reconnects the two sides of the medieval castle, built in the 12th century by richard, earl of cornwall. the mainland ward and the island ward were connected by an isthmus of rock which, in a sense, eroded away, and the bridge recreates that link between the two sides. one of the key drivers behind the project — indeed, its very raison d'etre — was to improve accessibility to the site.
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one of the major problems that tintagel has is this incredibly rocky landscape. we wanted to be able to get lots of people here who couldn't get here before. because there were so many steps up to the island, a lot of people couldn't because they had bad knees, they used wheelchairs, whatever it was. now we have essentially step—free access right from the car park all the way through onto the site. and it was so satisfying on the opening day to see literally a queue of wheelchair users from the local village queue up to be the first person to cross the bridge and onto the island. something that they might not have done for many years. in my mind, this was a textbook example of how you should design a major piece of engineering, on a really sensitive heritage or archaeological site. you can look at all sorts of designs for bridges that would have to go through the archaeology on the surface of the island. the elegance of this solution was that it is anchored into the rock on either side, below the sensitive archaeology. very, very clever.
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the materials we used were important not just structurally, but also, how it would tie into its landscape, its situation. for the bridge deck, we've used slate which is mined from the quarryjust two miles away. 40,000 hand—split and hand—cut slates will have been laid. and it gives that wonderful sound as you walk across and that unique experience that you feel under your foot. when you step out onto the bridge, it is really amazing _ because you hear clitter—clatter of the slate _ it's such a clever design. and the views are i absolutely astonishing. it's wonderful. one word that sort of encapsulates the building, it's not a very architectural word, but for me, it's fun. and it's a kind of project that you can see easily in the cases of users. the fun and enjoyment that they are getting from the project, that's extremely gratifying.
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the queen has observed an third ? service of thanksgiving to celebrate 100 years of the royal british legion. ben brown will be here with you in a couple of minutes for the pgpgcy you in a couple of minutes for the papacy needs at one o'clock, first, the weather. it remains quiet on the weather front. variable amounts of cloud, it will not change much for the rest of the week. some rain for scotland on thursday, but generally it is high pressure dominating the scene. the amount of cloud is linked to how the wind blows around this high pressure. the wind is blowing around in a clockwise fashion, dragging in this extended weather front from the north atlantic, which is keeping things overcast. the winds will push further south.
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things overcast. the winds will push furthersouth. in things overcast. the winds will push further south. in the extreme north—east of the country it is quite bright here, so some sunshine here, also the clouds breaking up across the south today and where the sun pops out it will be around 17 degrees. at times the cloud will be thick enough to produce a few spots of rain, nothing too heavy so that dampness will be in the air. with the breeze blowing up the atlantic through the night that the cloud will roll in, so at times it will be wets and miles, particularly in western parts of scotland. in the east, temperatures will fall to about five degrees first thing. on wednesday, we are more or less in the centre of the area of high pressure. a lot of dry weather. the clouds will break. temperatures will rise to 70 degrees. if it stays overcast, it will not feel particularly warm because of the lack of sunshine. on thursday, some rain heading towards scotland. we
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have this cold front which sneaks in. some rain around on thursday and an increasing breeze. the wind switches direction, introducing colder air to the north of scotland. it remains relatively mild, at least in the sunny spells. there is not much in the cold front, so we are not expecting much rain. it is out of the wave at the time to capture friday afternoon. friday afternoon for many of us stays dry and bright but temperatures are lower, 11, 12, 13 degrees, that is because the cold front is introducing colder airfrom the north atlantic. it will stay dry through saturday, but saturday night into sunday, it turns unsettled.
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a damning report from mps, who call the government's early handling of the pandemic one of the worst public health failures in uk history, costing many lives. i think she lost her life because of mistakes that were made by the government, and i want to know about that, i want to hear about it in a fulljudicial inquiry. today's parliamentary report says big mistakes by the government and scientists included a delay in locking down which cost lives, and a chaotic system of test and trace. early decisions, in particular our slowness to lock down, did have consequences, and we've got to confront the need to learn lessons from it. but the mps' report also praises
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the vaccine roll—out

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