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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 11, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. a warning to pregnant women. get a carfit vaccine. today in six people in england is critical error from covid—19 and pregnant. the risks are much greater with the spread of the delta variant.— delta variant. they were taking the decisions on _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life thinking - delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life thinking ok, i decisions on my life thinking ok, this woman not make it and i would not want anyone in to face what i face. , . ~ ., ., not want anyone in to face what i face. , . ., ., face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffre face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein _ face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is _ face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is expected - face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is expected to i ofjeffrey epstein is expected to learn which of her alleged co—conspirators will give evidence against her in the criminal trial in new york. austria's chancellor stands aside and made allegations he spent government money on a corrupt deal that ensured positive media coverage. and forgive and forget.
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donald trump remains the standard bearer for the republican donald trump remains the standard bearerfor the republican party as donald trump remains the standard bearer for the republican party as a senior party figures who earlier this year denounced him now line up behind them. welcome to the programme. welcome to the programme. in welcome to the programme. in england, winning six of the most critically ill covid—i9 patient is pregnant and unvaccinated. the latest data suggests the risk to pregnant women of severe illness posed by the delta variant is much greater than it was during the first two waves of the virus. i'm so concerned is the royal college of obstetricians and gynecologists here in england they are calling on all expectant mothers if they have not already to go and get the vaccine. you will see from this study conducted by the uk obstetrics surveillance system and there are others worldwide reach a similar how much worse it got as the delta variant became the dominant strain.
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in the first wave of the coronavirus, 24% pregnant woman admitted for thevarus have moderate or severe disease. 36% infected with the alpha or attempt variant developed serious symptoms. but 45% infected with the delta variant where in need of hospital treatment. our health editor has been at the delta variant were in need of hospital treatment. our health editor has been active while royal bright hospital in cambridge. we have bright hospital in cambridge. - have been trying to have a baby for a long time now, i can't believe we are still both had to be honest. it's not long now he is going to be in the world. it's not long now he is going to be in the world-— in the world. seriously ill and she was 26 weeks _ in the world. seriously ill and she was 26 weeks - _ in the world. seriously ill and she was 26 weeks - weeks _ in the world. seriously ill and she was 26 weeks - weeks pregnant. in the world. seriously ill and she i was 26 weeks - weeks pregnant and was 26 weeks — weeks pregnant and been on a ventilator in intensive care for 12 b. i been on a ventilator in intensive care fori2 3-— been on a ventilator in intensive care for 12 b. i thought i was going to die and i — care for 12 b. i thought i was going to die and i thought _ care for 12 b. i thought i was going to die and i thought he _ care for 12 b. i thought i was going to die and i thought he was - care for 12 b. i thought i was going to die and i thought he was going l care for 12 b. i thought i was going l to die and i thought he was going to die and we waited so long for this family that that was the greatest fear that my husband was going to lose us both.
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fear that my husband was going to lose us both-— lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh _ lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh a _ lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh a sexy _ lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh a sexy but - lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh a sexy but it - lose us both. claire was about to book her fresh a sexy but it was| lose us both. claire was about to i book her fresh a sexy but it was too late, she got the virus. along with medical experts, she is appealing to all expectant mothers to get vaccinated. some say the guidelines earlier this year were confusing but health leaders say covid—i9 creates serious risks for pregnant women. it serious risks for pregnant women. if they become unwell it covid—19 been they become unwell it covid—i9 been more likely they will need intensive care. there are also more likely to give birth prematurely and that has long—term effects for the baby. they are unfortunately more likely to have a stillbirth and much more likely to have a cesarean section. here at royal typewriter hospital in cambridge, there is a specialist unit using technology known as a commode in effect an artificial lung. some women who have just had their babies have become so sick that they had to be brought here to this unit for treatment with the most intensive form of support available for covid—i9 patients.
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rachel is a consultant in intensive care. she witnessed a heart ache for her mother is separated from their babies. i her mother is separated from their babies. ~ �* , ., , ., ., babies. i think it's devastating for the mother— babies. i think it's devastating for the mother and _ babies. i think it's devastating for the mother and for _ babies. i think it's devastating for the mother and for the _ babies. i think it's devastating for the mother and for the family i babies. i think it's devastating for| the mother and for the family and for our staff seeing a woman being separated from their babies for weeks, could be months. we often see tears in the unit from both sides. sultana was one of those mothers. her twins were delivered by emergency cesarean because she was emergency cesarean because she was so emergency cesarean because she was so ill with covid—i9. she had to be transferred without them to intensive care at royal typewriter hospital. intensive care at royal typewriter hosital. ~ ., , intensive care at royal typewriter hosital. ~ , , hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were _ hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were born. _ hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i— hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had _ hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had no - hospital. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had no idea i hospital. while i was asleep, my | twins were born. i had no idea my babies are born, and they are kept somewhere else, i am lying down somewhere else, i am lying down somewhere else, i am lying down somewhere else deteriorating and they were taking the decisions on my life thinking 0k they were taking the decisions on my life thinking ok this woman might not make it. she life thinking ok this woman might not make it— not make it. she says she did not aet not make it. she says she did not net to not make it. she says she did not get to hold _
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not make it. she says she did not get to hold her _ not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby _ not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby girls - not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby girls for i get to hold her baby girls for weeks. ., ' , , get to hold her baby girls for weeks. ., ' , ., weeks. for 41 days this will always be a aa- weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in — weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my _ weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. _ weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. my— weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. my husband i weeks. for 41 days this will always i be a gap in my life. my husband was taking care of them, changing their diapers, my sister was doing that while i was not doing that. that gap can never be filled regardless if i have the diaries and the photos, and i was seeing them through the screen so i would not want any woman to face what i face. we are so excited today? face what i face. we are so excited toda ? , ., face what i face. we are so excited toda ? , . ., ,, , face what i face. we are so excited toda ? , . . ,, , ,, today? these are happier times. she had not had — today? these are happier times. she had not had a — today? these are happier times. she had not had a vaccine _ today? these are happier times. she had not had a vaccine because i today? these are happier times. she had not had a vaccine because she i had not had a vaccine because she got air in the early stages of the vaccine will allow it. but her plea to all expectant mothers is to get vaccinated as it can help families as well as protecting mothers. in the united states the percentage of pregnant covid—i9 patients requiring hospitalization in late august and early september is more
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than double what it was at this time last year. doctor anna is an associate professor of medicine for the university of colorado school of medicine and she was 32 weeks pregnant when she received a vaccine herself last year. you talked the talk but he also walked the walk, where you are always going to get the vaccine or wbss because delta was so variant? i the vaccine or wbss because delta was so variant?— the vaccine or wbss because delta was so variant? i got the back-seat as early as — was so variant? i got the back-seat as early as i — was so variant? i got the back-seat as early as i could _ was so variant? i got the back-seat as early as i could predominantly i as early as i could predominantly because of a health care provider i have been taking care of the sick woman in the hospitals since covid—i9 started and finally being able to get the vaccine myself both as a person and as a mother felt like the best thing i can do and i was very happy and excited to get it. but for myself and for my daughter. it. but for myself and for my daughter-— it. but for myself and for my dau.hter_. ., , ., , it. but for myself and for my dau:hter. ., , ., daughter. what complications can arise among _ daughter. what complications can arise among pregnant _ daughter. what complications can arise among pregnant women i daughter. what complications can | arise among pregnant women who daughter. what complications can i arise among pregnant women who test positive for covid—i9? arise among pregnant women who test positive for covid-19?_ positive for covid-19? similar to an bod positive for covid-19? similar to anybody else. — positive for covid-19? similar to anybody else, we _ positive for covid-19? similar to anybody else, we have - positive for covid-19? similar to anybody else, we have not i positive for covid-19? similar to | anybody else, we have not really understood by someone and get so sick and why someone and have a friend and have a friend and i think
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he says. but we do know that in pregnancy you have about twice as likely risk that you may be hospitalized with it than someone who is your own age and otherwise similar health because they are pregnant. and similar to other reports we know they are at higher risk for needing those intensive care treatments when someone is pregnant. care treatments when someone is reunant. ., , care treatments when someone is reunant. . , ., care treatments when someone is reunant. ., , . ., pregnant. that is a get more complicated _ pregnant. that is a get more complicated when _ pregnant. that is a get more complicated when a - pregnant. that is a get more| complicated when a pregnant pregnant. that is a get more - complicated when a pregnant woman pregnant. that is a get more _ complicated when a pregnant woman is into the third trimester? it complicated when a pregnant woman is into the third trimester?— into the third trimester? it can. any trimester — into the third trimester? it can. any trimester of _ into the third trimester? it can. any trimester of pregnancy i into the third trimester? it can. any trimester of pregnancy you | into the third trimester? it can. i any trimester of pregnancy you have to keep in mind both patients, the mother and baby in general and the first and second trimester is a filing fee whatever is better for the mother will be betterfor the baby because that environment is what the baby needs so healthy mum and that i trimesters sometimes we are talking about delivering a baby early so that we can separate the baby from the mother so we have that as an option but that comes in its own concerns of prematurity and the complications that may come up from that. 50 complications that may come up from that, y., , complications that may come up from that. i. , , that. so you may be delivering my babies prematurely _ that. so you may be delivering my babies prematurely to _ that. so you may be delivering my babies prematurely to ensure i that. so you may be delivering my babies prematurely to ensure the |
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babies prematurely to ensure the babyis babies prematurely to ensure the baby is safe. so i was going to ask you what are the effects of covid—i9 on the unborn child? that is probably more worrying development that you have to deliver them early? and there is a very high rate of premature delivery in covid—i9 patients but that is because they are doing that to try to help the mother and potentially help the baby as well really does come with its own concerns. it's popular that covid—i9 causes women to deliver early in other ways but right now it looks like most of the early deliveries from covid—i9 because access are making that decision and dramatic — recommending that for families they somehow the mother is. we are dealing with women, parents, who may be vaccine hesitant for obvious reasons. they may not be ordinarily hesitant but they are hesitant because they are pregnant. that is entirely natural isn't it? it is, i think any woman who wants to be very careful about how they take care of themselves and what medications they take an 80 vaccine may during pregnancy and they want people to feel confident that we are not making these recommendations may
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be. we feel very comfortable using vaccines and pregnancy up to protect both the mother and baby. and we would not be making these recommendations if he felt there were any concerns or safety concerns and right now the risks of getting covid—i9 while pregnant as a much higher than any theoretical concerns that there may be from the vaccine. and that of course is the important point. covid—i9 more dangerous by every measure than the vaccine. if you more difficult to say to her mother, take this vaccine for you and your health and the health of your unborn child when a vaccine is not yet been approved for infants? and what it becomes easier when the fda takes that decision in november we think to allow vaccines for the over five? we think to allow vaccines for the overfive? i we think to allow vaccines for the over five? ~' ., ., over five? i think right now that actually makes _ over five? i think right now that actually makes a _ over five? i think right now that actually makes a stronger- over five? i think right now that actually makes a stronger case | over five? i think right now that i actually makes a stronger case for getting the vaccine during pregnancy because he may view this is the one time you can get a vaccine and get those antibodies to your baby and
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currently we don't know when infants are going to receive approval to get the vaccine for themselves and so similar to other vaccines this is a way that you can get those protective antibodies for your baby and gives your body to pass that onto your child and protect them in a way that is not available once they're born. a way that is not available once they're born-— a way that is not available once they're born. has there actually been any study _ they're born. has there actually been any study done _ they're born. has there actually been any study done on - they're born. has there actually been any study done on what i they're born. has there actually been any study done on what a | been any study done on what a vaccine does to an unborn child? is there any research on that level? we know there any research on that level? - know that vaccines given in pregnancy will pass antibodies onto the child. we have done that with flu vaccine for a long time and we recommend for anyone in the third trimester for this recommend for anyone in the third trimesterfor this very recommend for anyone in the third trimester for this very reason and there is data that poland and who receive the covid—i9 vaccine their babies have been pointed antibodies against covid—i9. and so we know this is a way of getting some of that immune protection for babies. if you have a boy or girl? i that immune protection for babies. if you have a boy or girl?— if you have a boy or girl? i have a little airl if you have a boy or girl? i have a little girl and _ if you have a boy or girl? i have a little girl and her _ if you have a boy or girl? i have a little girl and her name _ if you have a boy or girl? i have a little girl and her name is - if you have a boy or girl? i have a little girl and her name is marla. | little girl and her name is marla. congratulations. you are a doctor and also a mother. thank you for
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coming and what a mountain is a bank holiday over there. they have been developments today in the criminal case involving their former girlfriend ofjeffrey epstein former girlfriend of jeffrey epstein the former girlfriend ofjeffrey epstein the prosecution was asked to supply names of the co—conspirators will be called as witnesses. maxwell who is on my mind is accused of helping the six offenderjeffrey epstein to recruit and sexually abuse girls and from a period of 1990 43 2004. jury selection is due to begin in a month and expected to start on the 29th of november. bringing ourfriend november. bringing our friend caroline. november. bringing ourfriend caroline. thank you for being with us. plenty of people will have watched the netflix documentary filthy rich and so they will know that there was this network of recruiters and groomers who served
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up recruiters and groomers who served up young girls tojeffrey epstein. would be expected of people to be an important part of the prosecution case? ~ , ,., , important part of the prosecution case? ~ , , ., important part of the prosecution case? ~ , ., ., important part of the prosecution case? �* , ., . �*, case? absolutely. now that maxwell's trail is drawing _ case? absolutely. now that maxwell's trail is drawing closer, _ case? absolutely. now that maxwell's trail is drawing closer, the _ trail is drawing closer, the government has disclosure obligations to the defense and to maxwell's lawyers just like you reported on, they will be disclosing the names of these witnesses that may be testifying against maxwell and reading the indictment you will see that there are unnamed co—conspirators that with maxwell helped in this wide—ranging conspiracy grandma these young girls and recruits other young women for the purpose of providing jeffrey epstein with multiple underage girls. and so i think we are about to hear a lot more about that government's theory of the case pretty soon. government's theory of the case pretty soon-— government's theory of the case pretty soon. government's theory of the case re soon. ., ., , pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense — pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense wants _ pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense wants to _ pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense wants to get _ pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense wants to get their - pretty soon. so, one can imagine why the defense wants to get their hands |
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the defense wants to get their hands on these names. what advantage does a gift to them? what will they be able to do once they know the identity of these people? i note that it's not _ identity of these people? i note that it's not beyond _ identity of these people? i note that it's not beyond alabama i that it's not beyond alabama possibility that they could figure it out from the indictment itself. i would imagine that maxwell has told her attorneys what she thinks in terms of how and who the government's witnesses will be but it gives them a chance to defend themselves and prepare their case. in all criminal trials the prosecution is required to provide what's known as material to the defendants so that they can mount a fair case and i defense himself obviously the knowledge of who will be testifying is going to be key. but what will the prosecution has to prove? clearly, maxwell will know these people and clearly they have beenin these people and clearly they have been in her orbit at some point. did they have to go further than that? absolutely. these unindicted co—conspirators have not been charged yet and it could very well
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be that they have not been charged yet because the government would like them to testify at the trial against maxwell and they could be a friend than immunity in exchange for their truthful testimony and their help in securing the conviction of maxwell. so, certainly those people are going to be providing their relevant evidence with respect to what the government has to prove essentially what the alleged is a very wide—ranging conspiracy. a six trafficking conspiracy and i would note a underage six trafficking conspiracy and they have to prove that maxwell knew what she was doing in terms of grinning and obtaining these young women. if you read the indictment the reason which she went about that include providing comfort to the victims in the form of talking to them and getting to know them and becoming their friends and taking them shopping and things of that nature and normalizing the six
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acts that took place apparently in epstein and's house. in a separate issue we learn _ epstein and's house. in a separate issue we learn from _ epstein and's house. in a separate issue we learn from them - epstein and's house. in a separate issue we learn from them at i epstein and's house. in a separate| issue we learn from them at police here this weekend i they will take no further action looking into the claims that virginia jeffreys made against prince andrew and what they say is they received several documents including one relating to this ongoing us civil lawsuit in new york and the decide on the basis of this documents to take no further action. is it likely that they have seen all the paperwork they would need to see if find that opinion? it's always murky territory when you have two separate sovereigns. it's unclear what the level of cooperation between the southern district of new york and the british authorities is at this point. there was talk of prince andrew voluntarily speaking with the fbi and even wheeled that back in and said on the advice of counsel he was not going to do that. so the
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question is we don't know the extent of whatever cooperation he may have provided to the fbi and he does not see maggie has provided much but in all likelihood they have not seen everything the southern district has and it seems like i would not put a lot of stock in this press release that they are not moving forward because any prosecution of prince andrew would take place here if it were going to happen. {lilli andrew would take place here if it were going to happen.— were going to happen. 0h christ, prince andrew _ were going to happen. 0h christ, prince andrew always _ were going to happen. 0h christ, prince andrew always denied i were going to happen. 0h christ, prince andrew always denied the | prince andrew always denied the charges and his yesterday it came as no surprise to them that the net police were not perceiving it. the two things they said it is they would look at the jurisdiction and whether there was clear evidence of crime committed. it may be that they say look, the plaintiff is in america, the witness is in america, the evidence is in america, the entirejurisdiction for this the evidence is in america, the entire jurisdiction for this case is over there so it's not one for us to look into. over there so it's not one for us to look into-— look into. absolutely. and again there is a lot _
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look into. absolutely. and again there is a lot we're _ look into. absolutely. and again there is a lot we're going - look into. absolutely. and again there is a lot we're going to i look into. absolutely. and again there is a lot we're going to find j there is a lot we're going to find out but we don't know what's going on behind the scenes in terms of what level of cooperation as well as intercontinental cooperation is going on in this case.- intercontinental cooperation is going on in this case. thank you for that. sta going on in this case. thank you for that- stay with _ going on in this case. thank you for that. stay with us _ going on in this case. thank you for that. stay with us on _ going on in this case. thank you for that. stay with us on bbc— going on in this case. thank you for that. stay with us on bbc news. i that. stay with us on bbc news. still to come. it's chump's path for the republican nominee 2020 for election now unstoppable? people speak to our correspondent who was there. the inquiry into the 27th to manchester arena bombing heard that a health care worker who died might have survived if he had been treated more quickly. today the family refused to accept an apology from the ambulance services operational commander on the night. mr atkinson suffered a fatal cardiac arrest more than an hour after the blast. that is headed statement his family made it through their lawyer. we
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is headed statement his family made it through their lawyer.— it through their lawyer. we lost our beloved john _ it through their lawyer. we lost our beloved john two _ it through their lawyer. we lost our beloved john two and _ it through their lawyer. we lost our beloved john two and a _ it through their lawyer. we lost our beloved john two and a parting i beloved john two and a parting atrocity went on a night out and an atrocity went on a night out and an atrocity which could and should have been prevented by property sick — proper security. to compound this, john was badly let down by some from the emergency services. mistake after mistake was made and precious time was allowed to wait while he needed urgent hospital treatment. this should never have been allowed to happen. john had so much more to give. austria has a new leader. he is formerly the foreign minister and taken overfrom formerly the foreign minister and taken over from sebastian as chancellor. he resigned on saturday have to been placed under investigation for corruption. from vienna, bethany reports. another
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change of chancellor in austria. alexander schellenberg, the country's top that takes over from sebastian who stepped down after his coalition partners, the greens said he was unfit to govern. they had been placed under investigation on suspicion they used government money to pay a newspaper group to publish poles, favorable to his conservative party. accusations he denies. in his first remarks as chancellor, mr schellenberg said he would work to bridge the gap in the coalition. and cooperate closely with him. let bridge the gap in the coalition. and cooperate closely with him.- cooperate closely with him. let me make one thing _ cooperate closely with him. let me make one thing quite _ cooperate closely with him. let me make one thing quite clear- cooperate closely with him. let me make one thing quite clear from i cooperate closely with him. let me | make one thing quite clear from the beginning. i would of course work very closely with sebastian kurtz, the head of the new people's party, the head of the new people's party, the largest party in parliament — parliament. anything else would be absurd in terms of democratic politics. moreover, i considerthe accusations to be false and i am
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convinced that at the end of the day they will turn out to be baseless. he was one of the eu's youngest leaders. he vowed to fight accusations against him and remains the leader of his party. mr�*s opposition fairies he will continue to call the shots. political observers say he has not gone far. sebastian is not gone. i think you could say this is a real resignation, it'sjust a halfway solution and his plan is to return as soon as possible. that solution and his plan is to return as soon as possible.— solution and his plan is to return as soon as possible. at the swearing in ceremony. — as soon as possible. at the swearing in ceremony. i _ as soon as possible. at the swearing in ceremony, i shall's _ as soon as possible. at the swearing in ceremony, i shall's president i in ceremony, i shall's president said hard work was needed to astern — restore public trust in politics. his supporters hoped this resignation would be temporary and that he'll be able to stage a comeback. but other austrians say
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it's time for him to leave politics altogether. america's republican establishment treads april nine when it comes to donald trump us by the lies about the 10th 20 election. 0n the one hand they don't want to anger the former president lest he turned his ire on the base of the party against him and the other day misdirect with the current administration and planning for elections yet to come. so he had an unusual side this weekend, where was president trump in... he unusual side this weekend, where was president trump in. . ._ president trump in... he did not get elected, president trump in... he did not get elected. forget _ president trump in... he did not get elected, forget that. _ president trump in... he did not get elected, forget that. there - president trump in... he did not get elected, forget that. there with i president trump in... he did not get elected, forget that. there with him | elected, forget that. there with him on the stage — elected, forget that. there with him on the stage five _ elected, forget that. there with him on the stage five term _ elected, forget that. there with him on the stage five term senator i elected, forget that. there with him on the stage five term senator to i on the stage five term senator to whom mr trump has offered his complete and total endorsement. the 88—year—old has been billing for another six—year term and he's appreciative. ii i another six-year term and he's appreciative-— appreciative. ifi did not accept the endorsement _ appreciative. ifi did not accept the endorsement of _ appreciative. ifi did not accept the endorsement of a - appreciative. ifi did not accept the endorsement of a person l appreciative. if i did not accept i the endorsement of a person that's got 91% of their republican voters
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in iowa i would not be too smart. i'm smart enough to accept that endorsement.— i'm smart enough to accept that endorsement. . , , ., endorsement. that might be smart olitics for endorsement. that might be smart politics for the _ endorsement. that might be smart politics for the senator _ endorsement. that might be smart politics for the senator but - endorsement. that might be smart politics for the senator but it's i endorsement. that might be smart politics for the senator but it's a i politics for the senator but it's a far cry from his position after january six riots when he was poking holes in the president's lights. here's his statement after the assault on the capital. we were at trump's valley on saturday in iowa and he is in washington tonight. when you look at who was on stage it was a who's who of the hierarchy in iowa right? absolutely. in addition to chuck there was the governor of iowa including two members of ila's house congressional delegation and other delegations. the thing you have to remember is he is the senior member of the republican party and the us
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senate. he has won the past for elections by an average of 34% and he did not even have a primary challenger last time he ran in 2060. if anyone is insulated from donald trump's pull from the need to bow down to donald trump in order to gain that precious and i spent think he would be demand but he was there and he was defending donald trump and he was defending donald trump and defending his claims about the election and interviews surrounding that appearance on stage. i suppose for the gop, — that appearance on stage. i suppose forthe gop, if— that appearance on stage. i suppose for the gop, if they _ that appearance on stage. i suppose for the gop, if they could _ that appearance on stage. i suppose for the gop, if they could focus i that appearance on stage. i suppose for the gop, if they could focus him | for the gop, if they could focus him on the here and now and what biotin is not doing and why the democratic party erupt to match our up to and the mess they're in, it would be all the mess they're in, it would be all the better but of course donald trump wants to do it himself and an election that happened last year. there is always to donald trump us in writing events like this. there is a script that donald trump and improvisation in donald trump. descriptive donald trump started his mighty speech going afterjoe biden
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and the democrats record so far and the nine months of the biden presidency but he did there off and start talking about election fraud again and he said at one point i like to talk about election fraud because that's their biggest applause line. it was not really the biggest applause alignment, the crowd seemed not interested in donald trump's conversations about the election but clearly it's something donald trump cares a lot about. , ., ., , ., , about. there is another story in the -a ers about. there is another story in the papers today _ about. there is another story in the papers today that — about. there is another story in the papers today that tickled _ about. there is another story in the papers today that tickled me. i about. there is another story in the papers today that tickled me. that | papers today that tickled me. that is the story about donald trump's visit to saudi arabia. taking you back all the way to 2070. you might remember some of these pictures they're about to show you. on this trip as is typical than any leader goes to saudi arabia, his team was showered with lots of gifts and in that hall of gifts they brought back to washington was a cheater and white tiger for. to washington was a cheater and white tigerfor. so to washington was a cheater and white tiger for. so far blankets made from cheetah and white tiger at
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least that's what they thought it was and it was a solicitor in the white house who was worried that these might violate the endangered species act. what did they discover? they ended up handing it over to the wildlife service within the government and did an analysis of this and discovered they were dieted to look like tiger skin and cheetah skin and there were other kind of animalfur. essentially skin and there were other kind of animal fur. essentially they were fake, they were imposter skin and not in danger of violating the endangered species act. thea;r not in danger of violating the endangered species act. they gave fake further — endangered species act. they gave fake further to _ endangered species act. they gave fake further to the _ endangered species act. they gave fake further to the president i endangered species act. they gave fake further to the president of i endangered species act. they gave fake further to the president of the | fake further to the president of the united states. at the saudis know they were fake?— they were fake? that's the big question- _ they were fake? that's the big question. there _ they were fake? that's the big question. there has _ they were fake? that's the big question. there has not i they were fake? that's the big question. there has not beenl question. there has not been confirmation that the new are the supplier may them.— confirmation that the new are the supplier may them. were they in the hallwa of supplier may them. were they in the hallway of the _ supplier may them. were they in the hallway of the malaga _ supplier may them. were they in the hallway of the malaga hotel? - supplier may them. were they in the hallway of the malaga hotel? they i hallway of the malaga hotel? they warrants. adding _ hallway of the malaga hotel? tue: warrants. adding the ended hallway of the malaga hotel? ti21: warrants. adding the ended up in hallway of the malaga hotel? tu21 warrants. adding the ended up in a storage is that somewhere usually there is very careful track of the sorts of things by the covenants but
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with the trump administration there was not. they did not keep track of this and a lot of the gifts turned up this and a lot of the gifts turned up missing or were found somewhere where they rent supposed to be. 0ver over all the weather is fine for most of us to speak with some hazy sunshine. it has been cloudy in the north of scotland today. for example outbreaks of rain in the northwest highlands and i think it will stay cloudy, particularly across northern and eastern parts of the country through this week. that's because the weather front is brightening around an area of high pressure which is sitting further towards the south. you can see where the high pressure ease and the wind is blowing around in a circularfashion around eight we have got this weather front which is stretching from scotland and grazing the north sea coast and cloudy and damp into the night. not too cold, ten, 11 degrees where it's closer to the center of the high pressure where we
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have the light news and clear spells first thing in the morning. here is tomorrow's weather forecast. 0nce tomorrow's weather forecast. once again, that old weather funds with the cloud and bits and pieces of rain collect — closer to the north sea coast. with some pleasant breaks in the clouds with sunny spells up to around 17 celsius. not much changes until wednesday. the high pressure still with us and we have that and the lands that the weather front with the cloud and egg and outbreaks of rain for northern scotland but generally speaking they made a part of the week is looking fine and settled for most of us. not clear as blue skies but decent sunny spells with some sunshine temperatures make it up as high as 18 celsius. not a bad wednesday on the way. after that it changes a bit because the high pressure at least temporarily he will slip away to the south and spit and the high pressure here and there in between we have a
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cold front linked with the low close to scandinavia and a look at the big change in preventive action. it's coming from the north with rain i had it and that's introducing cold air to northern scotland. not much colder but it will be a lot fresher. we are talking about 13 degrees and south of that on thursday across the country still relatively mild as he had through the course of the week and you can see by friday it's only around 10 degrees in edinboro and next week mrs into next week it looks as though the weather will turn unsettled.
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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. in england a warning to pregnant women to get covid jabbed, due to the high risk of serious illness, if infected. secrets in suburban america: the fbi arrests a married couple on suspicion of spying. we'll be talking to professor david card live, who today was crowned joint winner of the nobel economics prize. and we pay a visit to pattern project, a microfactory startup in south london part of the zero waste fashion revolution.
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welcome back. fbi agents have arrested a couple in west virginia on suspicion they were attempting to sell us nuclear secrets to another country, in exchange for cryptocurrency. jonathan te bee delivered data cards to an undercover fbi agent in return for about $100,000 of crypto currency. mark lobel reports. this alleged below—the—radar attempt to reveal nuclear submarine secrets, now sunk, could have been a thriller worthy of the name a spy who fed me with a data card slipped into a peanut butter sandwich. and then a chewing gum package. and, finally, a plaster wrapper. neighbours of the detained couple who live here in this discreet neighbourhood of maryland are in disbelief. wow! he chuckles. it's a... no, it's pretty incredible, it's, like, out of a movie, you know? it's a quiet neighbourhood and everyone's very law—abiding, so it was a little surprising!
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it began in april last year, when us navy nuclear engineer jonathan toebbe offered to sell restricted data concerning the design of nuclear—powered warships to an unnamed foreign power. he wrote... but the fbi says one of its foreign undercover agents was passed the letter, which had a return address in pennsylvania and used encrypted e—mails to smoke the sender out. after a sweetener of $10,000 in cryptocurrency and a further diplomatic gesture to win trust, jonathan bit. the fbi says he agreed to drop off data injune at a secret location in west virginia with his wife, a humanities teacher, on the lookout. there, a data card was fed
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into a peanut butter sandwich, for which he received a further $20,000. then, in august, a further drop off in eastern virginia involving a chewing gum package and a $70,000 payoff. finally, the fbi pounced during a third drop off in west virginia on saturday. the secrets were up for sale on these nuclear—powered warships weeks after america agreed to sell similar secrets to the australians in an attempt to counter chinese influence in the asia—pacific region. but no more, as this spy, who has been dragged in from the cold, will now appear at court on tuesday. mark lobel, bbc news. i'm suddenly wondering where they are a data disc would surprise survive peanut butter. i'm joined now by washington post reporter devlin barrett, who worked on the story. what have you learned about the couple today? anymore? it’s
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couple today? anymore? it's interesting. _ couple today? anymore? it's interesting, i— couple today? anymore? it�*s interesting, i think this is what a lot of people say in spy cases — there appeared to be nothing untoward about them. she liked knitting and like videos about knitting... knitting and like videos about knitting- - -_ knitting. . . laughter. brilliant. _ knitting. . . laughter. brilliant. one - knitting. . . laughter. brilliant. one of i knitting. . . laughter. brilliant. one of the i knitting... laughter. - brilliant. one of the things that comes u- brilliant. one of the things that comes up across _ brilliant. one of the things that comes up across in _ brilliant. one of the things that comes up across in the - brilliant. one of the things that comes up across in the emails. | comes up across in the emails. these folks were sending to who they thought was their foreign correspondent was that he had apparently spent a lot of thought on this and had been quietly making a plan for this. and it seems they did not tip off many hands, except obviously in the fact that the fbi found out about it. . his obviously in the fact that the fbi found out about it. ._ found out about it. . his trade is a bit rus , found out about it. . his trade is a bit rusty. it's _ found out about it. . his trade is a bit rusty, it's fair to _ found out about it. . his trade is a bit rusty, it's fair to say. - found out about it. . his trade is a bit rusty, it's fair to say. where i bit rusty, it's fair to say. where was he employed? he bit rusty, it's fair to say. where was he employed?— bit rusty, it's fair to say. where was he employed? he worked on a nuclear propulsion _ was he employed? he worked on a nuclear propulsion systems - was he employed? he worked on a nuclear propulsion systems for - was he employed? he worked on a nuclear propulsion systems for the i nuclear propulsion systems for the us primarily about submarines, and these virginia class submarines are technological marvels, they cost about $3,000,000,000 apiece to make
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just one of them. so there's a lot of technology here that the government is very protective of. and there's a limited market for this information, the number of countries who could actually have use of this information is quite small. so the big hunt right now is to try to figure out which of these countries did he make this appeal to, and that apparently gave him up. but no suggestion that the country —— which ever country it was acted or in any way encouraged this unsolicited offering? they handed it immediately to the fbi, correct? correct, and i only did they handed to the fbi, they also may have helped the fbi do more to catch him, because he wanted a signal placed at that country's embassy in washington. according to the papers, such a signal was placed. it is hard to imagine the fbi pulling it off without the cooperation of another country. without the cooperation of another count . ~ ., ., ,, without the cooperation of another count . ~ ., ., , , ., country. what will happen to him. ? the both country. what will happen to him. ? they both face _ country. what will happen to him. ? they both face life _
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country. what will happen to him. ? they both face life in _ country. what will happen to him. ? they both face life in prison, the - they both face life in prison, the law that he's charged under carries a potential life sentence. what does that mean in practice? that means will be a lot of pressure on both of them to plead guilty in the hopes of getting a lesser than life sentence. so there's no leeway for them, the admitting humanities teacher? i will sa in the admitting humanities teacher? i will say in the past _ admitting humanities teacher? ii“ ii say in the past spying admitting humanities teacher? in ii say in the past spying cases, you often see is —— the husband agrees to a plea deal and to co—operate in exchange for leniency for his spouse. so that is certainly a pattern that has existed until now, and we will see if that pattern plays out here. fin and we will see if that pattern plays out here-— and we will see if that pattern -la s out here. ., , ., , ., plays out here. on a serious note, i su ose plays out here. on a serious note, i sunpose the — plays out here. on a serious note, i suppose the nuclear _ plays out here. on a serious note, i suppose the nuclear propulsion - suppose the nuclear propulsion system of a virginia class submarine is something that a lot of countries would want to get their hands on, so if it had fallen into the wrong hands, this would've been serious? i mean, theirs is admittedly very few countries who could do anything useful with this information, but to
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that handful of countries this is incredibly valuable information. . great story, thanks very much for coming on the. great story, thanks very much for coming on the-— great story, thanks very much for coming on the.- -- - great story, thanks very much for coming on the.- -- for. great story, thanks very much for- coming on the.- -- for coming coming on the. thanks. -- for coming on the programme. _ an economist who used real—world events to demonstrate that low—skilled immigration did not undermine wages and job prospects, has won a share of this year's nobel prize for economics. david card, a professor at the university of california, berkeley, won one half of the award, for what the committee describes as his "empirical contributions to labour economics". they also point to professor card's work on the minimum wages. in another "real—world experiment", he proved that an increase in the minimum wage in newjersey, but not in neighbouring pennsylvania, had not resulted in more unemployment, despite higher staffing costs. professor card, nobel prize winner, is with us. many congratulations, how does it feel? , ., ., many congratulations, how does it feel?_ laughter - many congratulations, how does it feel?_ laughter. - feel? pretty good. laughter. pretty good- — feel? pretty good. laughter. pretty good. we've _ feel? pretty good. laughter. pretty good. we've done -
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feel? pretty good. laughter.| pretty good. we've done pretty feel? pretty good. laughter. - pretty good. we've done pretty well on this programme, we've had nobel winners for medicine, chemistry, and now economics which are all my weakest subject, i don't know why they funnel them towards me, but it's great to have you with us will stop but i am really interested because what you've done is debunk a claim that many politicians worldwide have made, and that is that if we lift the minimum wage, it creates more costs for employers, therefore we have more unemployment. not so, tell us about newjersey and what you discovered? not so, tell us about newjersey and what you discovered?— what you discovered? well, this is work i with — what you discovered? well, this is work i with alan _ what you discovered? well, this is work i with alan krueger, - what you discovered? well, this is work i with alan krueger, who - what you discovered? well, this is i work i with alan krueger, who passed away last year, but in our analysis — we were both teaching and princeton, newjersey at the time, and we learned that newjersey was going to raise its minimum wage — so we thought about how we could study that, and we realised if we got working quickly, we could conduct a survey on two sides of the delaware river stop on one side is new
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jersey, where minimum wage was going to go up, and on the other side was pennsylvania where it was not. so at the time just before the memo went out in newjersey, they had the same with minimum wage, and similar conditions. after the minimum wage went out, we thought it would allow us to see what happened and nurtured —— in newjersey and philadelphia. there was no loss of employment in newjersey — not something you could say was an increase to make a significant increase in newjersey. significant increase in new jersey. . now do you know why employers now -a in: . now do you know why employers now paying employees _ . now do you know why employers now paying employees more _ . now do you know why employers now paying employees more on _ . now do you know why employers now paying employees more on not - paying employees more on not salary—cap people on? . paying employees more on not salary-cap people on?- salary-cap people on? . that conclusion _ salary-cap people on? . that conclusion has _ salary-cap people on? . that conclusion has actually - salary-cap people on? . that conclusion has actually been| conclusion has actually been concluded in subsequent papers that followed after hours, our paper was done almost 30 years ago, there's been a lot of time for follow—up work. the idea is something like this — if you go down the street and
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if you had gone down the street at princeton at the time, you would've seen a lot of stores with help—wanted signs. at times the —— at that time there was a real shortage of labour, like now. economists will say, why doesn't everyone just raise wages? the answer is, the employer doesn't want to raise wages notjust for the new people, but for the people they already have in house. and in that situation, if you force them to raise wages, they'll be able to hire more workers. what they were doing was suppressing wages so they can keep their total pickle —— payroll costs low at the cost of some vacancies. peoplejust didn't costs low at the cost of some vacancies. people just didn't think it applied to the fast food industry. it applied to the fast food industry-— it applied to the fast food indust . .. ., ., ., industry. even i can follow that, it's very simple _ industry. even i can follow that, it's very simple and _ industry. even i can follow that, it's very simple and logical. - industry. even i can follow that, it's very simple and logical. in l industry. even i can follow that, l it's very simple and logical. in the context of what we just heard from our prime minister this past week — he wants a high skilled, high wage economy. does it follow then that if
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you lift the wages of the lowest, if you lift the wages of the lowest, if you lift the wages of the lowest, if you lift the minimum wage, you automatically then start to get a higher wage society? in automatically then start to get a higher wage society?— automatically then start to get a higher wage society? in the long run, i think— higher wage society? in the long run, i think if— higher wage society? in the long run, i think if you _ higher wage society? in the long run, i think if you were - higher wage society? in the long run, i think if you were to - higher wage society? in the long run, i think if you were to look i run, i think if you were to look between the 1700s in today, you'd see that almost all wages went up, some more than others. but we have become a higher wage society, you know, in england and the rest of britain, and north america. buti think his goal is missing — there are millions and millions of workers today who are somewhat unskilled, and those workers would be willing to work for a slightly lower wage and provide a lot of services that hire skilled workers could use and a lot of countries. in the us right now, there's a real shortage of people taking a lot of skilled jobs — and it seems a tragedy because there's so many workers who would be
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willing to take those jobs. let there's so many workers who would be willing to take those jobs.— willing to take those 'obs. let me ask ou willing to take those 'obs. let me ask you another _ willing to take those jobs. let me ask you another question - willing to take those jobs. let me ask you another question about i ask you another question about the other part of your studies, and that is about the effect of immigration on wages and conditions — again, borisjohnson said last week here that it borisjohnson said last week here thatitis borisjohnson said last week here that it is his view, because we had already supplied pre— brexit of low skilled, low—paid workers from europe, but employers have done is they've not put better conditions in place, and that's one of the reasons why we have a shortage in the haulage industry because it became an industry where people didn't want to work. part of the blame was attributed to that flow of immigrant labour — what would you say about that? i labour - what would you say about that? 4' labour - what would you say about that? ~ ., �* , labour - what would you say about that? ~ that? i think that's possibly a theo . i that? i think that's possibly a theory. i think _ that? i think that's possibly a theory. i think it's _ that? i think that's possibly a j theory. i think it's compelling that? i think that's possibly a i theory. i think it's compelling on its face that there's something to it. it's not entirely clear if that theory is correct, however, that restricting the number of workers who can come in to britain, to work
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in that industry — it seems like it's going to have some short—term problems, like there won't be anyone to fill the jobs. whether there problems, like there won't be anyone to fill thejobs. whether there is some native workers out there who would be willing to take those jobs if you raised it 50p an hour, ijust don't see that that response is necessarily going to happen. i think the adjustment to this idealised world he has where everybody�*s paid a lot more will take a long time. professor card, it's good of you to apply your nobel prize winning theories to our country. many congratulations to you and the other winners, great to have you on the programme. winners, great to have you on the programme-— stay with us on bbc news, still to come: pa rt part of the zero waste fashion revolution. the business secretary,
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kwarsi kwarteng, has now made a formal request to the chancellor, to support industries affected by soaring energy prices. yesterday, treasury officials accused him of making up claims he'd already discussed the issue with them. the steel industry has asked ministers to stop "sitting on their hands" and come up with a swift solution. here's colletta smith. welcome to europe's biggest bottling plant. they make five million bottles a day here. and these furnaces have to get up to 1,600 celsius. it's incredibly hot in here! and it is all powered by gas. it is extraordinary times, we haven't seen anything like this since we started in business. at the moment, domestic customers are partly shielded from the current price spike because of the price cap and fixed deals, but but big companies like this one are feeling the heat right now. they are charged a new rate for gas each day, reflecting the global market, so the price they are having to pay to run this place feels nearly as high as the temperature.
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we have little option but to pass these prices on to our customers who will, in theory, pass them onto retail and consumer is and that should be a big concern, i guess, for government and for all of us. we are only a couple of miles down the road but this is where we will all feel the impact because products made using that expensive gas will be hitting the shelves within the next couple of weeks and we will all be having to pay more as a result. so should the government step in to help big business? a few weeks ago, the government decided they would step in and pay their gas bill for cf industries so they could keep making carbon dioxide. that funding has come to an end and today we heard a deal has been raised for food companies to just pay more for the carbon
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dioxide they buy. but, with gas prices staying high, other industries are now demanding the same treatment. either the government foots the bill or customers will be paying more at the tills. the prince of wales has told the bbc he understands why campaigners from organisations like extinction rebellion are taking to the streets to demand action on climate change. he doesn't believe the tactics are very helpful but he understands the "frustration". prince charles says there will be "catastrophic" consequences if more ambitious action isn't taken on climate change when world leaders come together in glasgow next month. he's been speaking to our climate editor, justin rowlatt, at the balmoral estate in scotland. great to see you. you made it. this was a rather empty field that the farm didn't need any more. the great thing was i managed to plant it the same year my grandson was born, the eldest, george. so i thought i'd call it prince george's wood. but this is what is so interesting, coming back sort of 50 years later, and talking here in this beautiful garden of yours, that the narrative has changed. lots of the things that you said
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are now mainstream... it's taken far too long. world leaders are gathering in glasgow to talk about the kind of issues that you were... yeah, but they just talk. and the problem is to get action on the ground, which is what i've been trying to do for the last li0 years! what about the people who protest? what about kind of extinction rebellion? do you understand why they go out and disrupt the streets? yes, of course i do, yes. but it isn't helpful, i don't think — to do it in a way that alienates people. so, i totally understand the frustration. the difficulty is, how do you direct that frustration in a way that is more constructive, rather than destructive. the point is that people should really notice how despairing so many young are. so let me ask you this... is our government doing enough to make these things happen? i couldn't possibly comment. you've got a pretty hefty carbon footprint. yes. i mean, put it like this, it must take a lot of gas to heat a palace. yes, yes. but i have tried for a very long time to make sure
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the heating is done in a way that is as sustainable as possible. i've put in, you know, biomass boiler systems, and then the solar panels, i've got electric cars. it's been so difficult. one thing not everybody knows about you is you are bit of a clarkson, is it fair to say? jeremy clarkson. not really, no. a bit of a kind of petrol head. you've always enjoyed cars. no, no... no, you've enjoyed cars. well, yes, yes. but that was before we knew what the problems were particularly. my old aston martin, which i've had for 51 years, that runs on, can you believe this, surplus english white wine and whey from the cheese process. what would you say to people watching this in terms of diet? should they be eating less meat? the business of what we eat is, of course, important. imean, i... for years, i've... i haven't eaten meat and fish on two days a week and i don't eat dairy products on one day a week. that's one way to do it.
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if you did that, if more did that, you would reduce a lot of the pressure on the environment and everything else. lovely interview. white wine in a car? how many of you do that? can't be good for the engine. on thursday, we devoted the entire back half of this programme to the challenges in the global supply chain. and if you were watching, you might have well have rushed out to do a spot of early christmas or thanksgiving shopping. but if you can't find the shirt or the dress you had in mind, there is another solution — it might be an increasingly popular solution make your own. and that is what thousands of people have been during the lockdown. the movement is inspired by a growing understanding of what we might call "conscious consumption" and the damage fashion is doing to the environment. so let me introduce you to the people behind pattern project, a microfactory in south london that now offer locally—sourced sew—it—yourself kits, for those wanting take part in a clothes revival. i'm joined now by co—founders of pattern project,
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simonjohnson and shruti glover, from their studio in south london. lovely to see you both. is it true that more and more people through the pandemic, through the lockdown made their own? it’s the pandemic, through the lockdown made their own?— made their own? it's very true, there's been — made their own? it's very true, there's been about _ made their own? it's very true, i there's been about million people who were already... through the pandemic mostly as a hobby, but increasingly during the pandemic, because first, the ppe shortage then the for making masks, people started to so. —— 7.1 million. and sewing is now cool! to so. -- 7.1 million. and sewing is how cool!— to so. -- 7.1 million. and sewing is. how cool!_ i've now cool! did you do so before? i've been sewing — now cool! did you do so before? i've been sewing for _ now cool! did you do so before? i've been sewing for about _ now cool! did you do so before? i've been sewing for about two _ now cool! did you do so before? i've been sewing for about two years, i been sewing for about two years, and the reason i started to so was because i didn't want to buy fast fashion any more. everything else was really expensive. simon is a recent sober. i was really expensive. simon is a recent sober-— recent sober. i started sewing in the last year. — recent sober. i started sewing in the last year, and _ recent sober. i started sewing in the last year, and the _ recent sober. i started sewing in the last year, and the jacket - recent sober. i started sewing in the last year, and the jacket i'm| the last year, and the jacket i'm wearing — the last year, and the jacket i'm wearing tonight is one of our
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products _ wearing tonight is one of our products-— wearing tonight is one of our roducts. ., �* ., ., , ., , products. you've made that yourself! be honest, before _ products. you've made that yourself! be honest, before you _ products. you've made that yourself! be honest, before you begin - products. you've made that yourself! be honest, before you begin this - be honest, before you begin this process, could you have made something like that? hot process, could you have made something like that?— process, could you have made something like that? not a chance, it's all been — something like that? not a chance, it's all been learnt _ something like that? not a chance, it's all been learnt in _ something like that? not a chance, it's all been learnt in the _ it's all been learnt in the last year~ — it's all been learnt in the last year~ |— it's all been learnt in the last ear. . , , it's all been learnt in the last ear. . ,, year. i am perpetually buying ill fitted, ill suiting _ year. i am perpetually buying ill fitted, ill suiting close, - year. i am perpetually buying ill fitted, ill suiting close, so - year. i am perpetually buying ill fitted, ill suiting close, so i'm i fitted, ill suiting close, so i'm interested in this — reverse the camera for me, if you could, and show me what you've set up there, then explained to me why you're doing this, what happens if someone comes in and wants to do this? we like to comes in and wants to do this? , like to show you our machine. what we imagine the future of fashion to be is your local neighbourhood micro factory. we want everybody to say no to garments being produced abroad and travelling in with a huge ecological footprint. we think garments should be madejust like food is made, after you place an order. that's what our machine does — after you place an order either
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online or in—store, the machine puts together all the orders on same factory and cuts them like they are in front of you. it's a tiny bit noisy, which is why we don't have it on right now... 50 noisy, which is why we don't have it on right now- - -_ on right now... so if i was to come into our on right now... so if i was to come into your micro _ on right now... so if i was to come into your micro factory _ on right now... so if i was to come into your micro factory and - on right now... so if i was to come into your micro factory and said, i into your micro factory and said, "0kay, simon, ican't into your micro factory and said, "0kay, simon, i can't find a shirt that fits me," do you measure me up and give me two pieces of shirt that i go and sits together? we and give me two pieces of shirt that i go and sits together?— i go and sits together? we are working on _ i go and sits together? we are working on parametric - i go and sits together? we are working on parametric designs i go and sits together? we are i working on parametric designs at i go and sits together? we are - working on parametric designs at the moment, _ working on parametric designs at the moment, which means turning garments into code _ moment, which means turning garments into code so— moment, which means turning garments into code. so you'd enter your measurements, the clothing just to fit for— measurements, the clothing just to fit for you. — measurements, the clothing just to fit for you, so we would offer you two options, so it yourself at home, or ask— two options, so it yourself at home, or ask someone in store to sell it for you — or ask someone in store to sell it foryou. here's an or ask someone in store to sell it for you. here's an example of one of our kits _ for you. here's an example of one of our kits - _ for you. here's an example of one of our kits - we — for you. here's an example of one of our kits — we market with all the instructions _ our kits — we market with all the instructions you need to make, like i instructions you need to make, like i care _ instructions you need to make, like i care for— instructions you need to make, like i care for clothing —— ikea. this
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i care for clothing -- ikea. this underwear _ i care for clothing -- ikea. this underwear composed _ i care for clothing —— ikea. try 3 underwear composed entirely, which is another issue. i underwear composed entirely, which is another issue.— is another issue. i was about to ask, is another issue. i was about to ask. you _ is another issue. i was about to ask. you talk — is another issue. i was about to ask, you talk about _ is another issue. i was about to ask, you talk about producing l ask, you talk about producing locally, but where do you source the fabric? 50 locally, but where do you source the fabric? . locally, but where do you source the fabric? , , ., , . ., fabric? so this short piece that i showed you _ fabric? so this short piece that i showed you was _ fabric? so this short piece that i showed you was irish _ fabric? so this short piece that i showed you was irish linen, - fabric? so this short piece that i showed you was irish linen, it's| showed you was irish linen, it's from a factory that runs 100% on renewable electricity. we've also got some organic cotton linen which is woven in yorkshire, and we got italian fabric — so we are trying to know exactly where fabric comes from, who's made it, and we tested as well because the uk is also very well known for excellent labs, and well known for excellent labs, and we work with one of them to ensure everything meets the standards. we t to everything meets the standards. we try to source every thing as local as possible. try to source every thing as local as possible-— try to source every thing as local as possible. try to source every thing as local as ossible. . ., ., ., as possible. and you have a room for eo - le to as possible. and you have a room for people to come _ as possible. and you have a room for people to come in — as possible. and you have a room for people to come in and do _ as possible. and you have a room for people to come in and do it - people to come in and do it themselves?— people to come in and do it themselves? , ., ., , ., ., themselves? they are open now on
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thursdays. — themselves? they are open now on thursdays. we _ themselves? they are open now on thursdays, we started _ themselves? they are open now on thursdays, we started doing - themselves? they are open now on i thursdays, we started doing lockdown in april 2020. haifa thursdays, we started doing lockdown in april 2020-— in april 2020. how many customers? we've never — in april 2020. how many customers? we've never had _ in april 2020. how many customers? we've never had any _ in april 2020. how many customers? we've never had any walk-in! - in april 2020. how many customers? we've never had any walk-in! we'vel we've never had any walk—in! we've had to be entirely online. but now we are open on thursdays for people to come by and say hello to us. we are in south london. we to come by and say hello to us. we are in south london.— are in south london. we hope next earto are in south london. we hope next year to have _ are in south london. we hope next year to have a _ are in south london. we hope next year to have a store _ are in south london. we hope next year to have a store on _ are in south london. we hope next year to have a store on the - are in south london. we hope next year to have a store on the high - year to have a store on the high street so— year to have a store on the high street so anyone could walk in at anytime — street so anyone could walk in at anytime ~ — street so anyone could walk in at any time- -_ any time. . it's an excellent project. _ any time. . it's an excellent project. just _ any time. . it's an excellent project, just finally, - any time. . it's an excellent project, just finally, simon, any time. . it's an excellent. project, just finally, simon, do any time. . it's an excellent - project, just finally, simon, do you it's because people — i said in the introduction it's because people are now environmentally conscious and they know the damage, the amount of water that goes into making close — is that part of it? i water that goes into making close - is that part of it?— is that part of it? i think people are looking _ is that part of it? i think people are looking for _ is that part of it? i think people are looking for an _ is that part of it? i think people are looking for an alternative i is that part of it? i think peoplej are looking for an alternative to the fast — are looking for an alternative to the fast fashion model, it doesn't exist— the fast fashion model, it doesn't exist in— the fast fashion model, it doesn't exist in a — the fast fashion model, it doesn't exist in a way that everyone can access — exist in a way that everyone can access we _ exist in a way that everyone can access. we hope in this new model, everyone _ access. we hope in this new model, everyone can — access. we hope in this new model, everyone can buy sustainable clothes _ everyone can buy sustainable clothes. . .. everyone can buy sustainable clothes. ., ~ , ., everyone can buy sustainable clothes. . ~' , ., , everyone can buy sustainable clothes. ., ~ , . clothes. thank you both very much and we wish _ clothes. thank you both very much and we wish you _ clothes. thank you both very much and we wish you the _ clothes. thank you both very much and we wish you the very - clothes. thank you both very much and we wish you the very best - clothes. thank you both very much and we wish you the very best with your project. i'll have to come in and get my next suit from you. i'm
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not sure that's the right colour for me but i'm sure you've got something in irish linen. thank you very much for talking, we will see sometime tomorrow. hello. well, let's see what the weather is up to for the week ahead and beyond. and it's looking relatively settled, because high pressure has arrived. it'll wobble about the uk for most of the week, then thursday into friday, temporarily it will shift a bit to the south and allow this cold front to move through, bringing slightly fresher air, the cold front, and then the high pressure will return again. so overall, it'll be a settled week for most of us, largely dry, often cloudy particularly across some northern and eastern areas, then towards the end of the week, we think somewhat fresher air at least reaching the northern half of the uk. so here's the forecast for tuesday — with the high pressure here and the winds blowing around like so, there's a weather front
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that's stuck on the periphery of this high pressure, so often cloudy with maybe some spits in spots of rain out towards the east of the uk, but the further south and west you are, the brighter it'll be in temperatures can get to around 17 celsius, for example, in cardiff. this is tuesday night, into wednesday, not much changes, the high pressure is here. where the wind comes off the atlantic, it's a little bit milder, 12 celsius where the winds fall light in the skies clear, temperatures dip to around six celsius, for example, in norwich. so here's wednesday, then — high pressure pretty much across the uk, or at least slightly south, meaning that breeze continues in scotland, dragging in the cloud so there might be some spits and spots of rain here. but the vast majority of us will have a dry day on wednesday with temperatures in the mid or even high teens. actually, the sunny spells will be pleasant. and then, that change happens on thursday — see that big change in the wind direction, it comes in from the north. this is a cold front here,
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high pressure to the south temporarily, you can see slightly lower temperatures — and that cold front will move across the country during the course of thursday into friday, but because high pressure is building back in again, it's basically going to dry the cold front out. this is dry air here, there's not much rain on that cold front at all, and the high pressure is sitting right on top of northern england by that stage. and actually it will be a pretty decent day, but because the cold front has gone through and introduced fresher air, look at the temperatures — ten in aberdeen, 13— 15 across the south of the country, and we don't think there'll be an awful lot of changes we had two into the weekend as well. friday and saturday will see that high—pressure, but later in the weekend and into next week, we will start to see a different weather pattern developing. we will have a look at that just a second, here's saturday — still under the influence of high—pressure, some sunny spells here, but temperatures beginning to
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nudgein here, but temperatures beginning to nudge in here, so something a cloud and rain in northwestern areas of the uk on saturday. then sunday and into monday, there is a change in the atmosphere and the patterns we see, thejet the atmosphere and the patterns we see, the jet stream starts to develop, low pressures and weather fronts will our come way, so rather than high—pressure, it'll be low pressure, you can see the blobs of blues sweeping across the country and increasing jet streams sending those in our direction, meaning it will turn a lot more unsettled. so this outlook for the weekend ahead, you can see it still settled this weekend looks relatively settled, but from sunday night into monday, it certainly looks like it'll turn wetter. so if you've if you got anything planned out doors, like gardening, you can do it this week. bye—bye.
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tonight at ten. pregnant women are urged to get fully vaccinated against covid because they face a higher risk of serious illness. we speak to one mother of twins who was seriously ill with covid when her children were born. she'd not been able to get vaccinated in time, her life was at risk and her message is clear. they were taking the decisions on my life. thinking ok, this woman might not make it. i wouldn't want any woman to face what i faced. we'll have more details of the study conducted by nhs england. also tonight... the energy needs of industry need more government attention, according to business leaders. to cross iranian territory, hoping to reach turkey.
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the journey is full of risk, but some afghans still feel

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