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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 11, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. they have friends at eight p.m.. fresh calls for pregnant women to get their covid—19 vaccines as new data shows one in six of those critically ill with the disease are unvaccinated pregnant women. , ., ., ~ , ., women. they are more likely to need intensive care. _ women. they are more likely to need intensive care, there _ women. they are more likely to need intensive care, there are _ women. they are more likely to need intensive care, there are also - women. they are more likely to need intensive care, there are also more i intensive care, there are also more likely to give birth prematurely and that has long—term effects for the baby. that has long-term effects for the bab . , . ~ that has long-term effects for the bab . , w . , ., , baby. they were taking the decisions on m life. baby. they were taking the decisions on my life. thinking _ baby. they were taking the decisions on my life. thinking 0k _ baby. they were taking the decisions on my life. thinking ok this - baby. they were taking the decisions on my life. thinking ok this woman l on my life. thinking ok this woman might— on my life. thinking ok this woman might not_ on my life. thinking ok this woman might not make it. i would not want any woman— might not make it. i would not want any woman to face what i faced. they talk and the — any woman to face what i faced. they talk and the pub _ any woman to face what i faced. they talk and the pub to _ any woman to face what i faced. they talk and the pub to get action on the ground — talk and the pub to get action on the ground which _ talk and the pub to get action on the ground which is— talk and the pub to get action on the ground which is what - talk and the pub to get action on the ground which is what had - talk and the pub to get action on l the ground which is what had been trying _ the ground which is what had been trying to— the ground which is what had been trying to tie — the ground which is what had been trying to tie for— the ground which is what had been trying to do. for the _ the ground which is what had been trying to do. for the last _ the ground which is what had been trying to do. for the last 40 - the ground which is what had beeni trying to do. for the last 40 prince charles_ trying to do. for the last 40 prince charles is— trying to do. for the last 40 prince charles is bbc_ trying to do. for the last 40 prince charles is bbc politicians - trying to do. for the last 40 prince charles is bbc politicians should i charles is bbc politicians should take hold — charles is bbc politicians should take bold action _ charles is bbc politicians should take bold action against -
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charles is bbc politicians should take bold action against climate| take bold action against climate change — take bold action against climate change rather— take bold action against climate change rather than _ take bold action against climate change rather thanjust- take bold action against climate change rather than just talk- take bold action against climate . change rather than just talk about it. change rather than 'ust talk about it. , , ., , change rather than 'ust talk about it. , , . , change rather than 'ust talk about it. industry leaders say they should sto sittin: it. industry leaders say they should step sitting on _ it. industry leaders say they should stop sitting on their— it. industry leaders say they should stop sitting on their hands - it. industry leaders say they should stop sitting on their hands and - it. industry leaders say they should stop sitting on their hands and find | stop sitting on their hands and find solutions to the soaring energy prices. so paul mccartney breaks his silence to the bbc on who was to blame for the pre—— beatles breaking up blame for the pre—— beatles breaking up and boldly going, where no one has gone before. captain kirk explains why at the ripe old age at 90 he is blasting off into space for the first time. i 90 he is blasting off into space for the first time.— the first time. i wanted to claim that i the first time. i wanted to claim that i was _ the first time. i wanted to claim that i was the _ the first time. i wanted to claim that i was the oldest _ the first time. i wanted to claim that i was the oldest person, i the first time. i wanted to claim i that i was the oldest person, what the first time. i wanted to claim - that i was the oldest person, what i think to have, he is the oldest guy to go into space. if you have just joined
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if you havejustjoined us, welcome to bbc news. the nhs is appealing to to bbc news. the nhs is appealing to our pregnant wanting to get there, novartis vaccines as new figures show one in six of the most critically ill covid—i9 patients are pregnant and are vaccinated. pregnant women are at greater risk of becoming severely ill from the virus. nhs england south that between and september of this year, of 118 people who needed the most intensive life support, 20 where pregnant women. 19 of them unvaccinated. with more details on those findings, here is our health editor. we have been trying to have a day before a long time now. it's not long now and he would be in the world. claire is reliving her covid—i9 idea injuly. seriously ill and she was 26 weeks pregnant and then on a ventilator in intensive care for 12 days. i
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then on a ventilator in intensive care for 12 days.— care for 12 days. i thought i was ttoin to care for 12 days. i thought i was going to die _ care for 12 days. i thought i was going to die and _ care for 12 days. i thought i was going to die and i _ care for 12 days. i thought i was going to die and i thought - care for 12 days. i thought i was going to die and i thought he i care for 12 days. i thought i was i going to die and i thought he was going to die and i thought he was going to die and i thought he was going to die and he waited so long for this family that that was the greatest fear that my husband was going to lose is both.— going to lose is both. claire was about to book _ going to lose is both. claire was about to book her— going to lose is both. claire was about to book her first - going to lose is both. claire was about to book her first vaccine l going to lose is both. claire was i about to book her first vaccine but it was too late. she caught the virus. along with medical experts she is appealing to our expectant mothers to get vaccinated. some say the guidelines earlier this year were confusing but health leaders say covid—19 creates risks for women. it say covid-19 creates risks for women. , ., say covid-19 creates risks for women. ,, , _, women. if you become unwell if covid-19 there _ women. if you become unwell if covid-19 there are _ women. if you become unwell if covid-19 there are more - women. if you become unwell if covid-19 there are more likely l women. if you become unwell if| covid-19 there are more likely to covid—19 there are more likely to need intensive care and more likely to give birth prematurely and that has long—term effects for the baby. there are unfortunately more likely to have a stillbirth and much more likely to have a cesarean section. here at royal pipe with hospital in cambridge there is a specialist unit using technology known as a co—mode and effect and artificial lung. some
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women whojust had and effect and artificial lung. some women who just had their babies had become so sick that they practically brought here to this unit for treatment. with the most intensive form of life support available. for covid—19 patients. rachel is a consultant in intensive care. she has witnessed the high—tech form mothers separated from their babies. i think it is devastating for the mother and for the family and for our staff seeing a woman being separated from their babies for weeks, could be months. we often see tears in the unit from both sides. she was one of those mothers. her twin sprays delivered by emergency cesarean because she was so ill with covid—19 she had to be transferred without them to intensive care at royal pipework. without them to intensive care at royal pipework— without them to intensive care at royal pipework. while i was asleep, m twins royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were _ royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were born. _ royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i _ royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had _ royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had no - royal pipework. while i was asleep, my twins were born. i had no idea . royal pipework. while i was asleep, | my twins were born. i had no idea my babies are born. they are kept somewhere else. i am lying down
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somewhere else. i am lying down somewhere else. i am lying down somewhere else. deteriorating and they were taking the decisions on my life thinking 0k they were taking the decisions on my life thinking ok this woman might not make it. she life thinking ok this woman might not make it-_ not make it. she says she did not tet not make it. she says she did not net to not make it. she says she did not get to hold _ not make it. she says she did not get to hold her _ not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby _ not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby girls - not make it. she says she did not get to hold her baby girls for - get to hold her baby girls for weeks. ., ' , , get to hold her baby girls for weeks. ., ' , ., weeks. for 41 days this will always be a ta- weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in — weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my _ weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. _ weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. my— weeks. for 41 days this will always be a gap in my life. my husband i weeks. for 41 days this will always i be a gap in my life. my husband was taking care of them and changing their diapers. my sister was doing that while i was not doing that. that cat — that gap can never be filled regardless. i have the diaries in the photos and i was seeing them through the screen so i would not want any woman to face what i faced. we are so excited today? what i faced. we are so excited toda ? , ., . , what i faced. we are so excited toda ? , . . , ,, today? these are exciting times. she had not had — today? these are exciting times. she had not had a — today? these are exciting times. she had not had a vaccine _ today? these are exciting times. she had not had a vaccine because - today? these are exciting times. she had not had a vaccine because she i had not had a vaccine because she got it in the early stages of the vaccine were but her plea to all expectant mothers is to get vaccinated as it can help families
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as well as protecting mums to be. professor lucy chapel is the chief scientific advisor at the department of health and social care and she is professor of obstetrics at queens couege professor of obstetrics at queens college london. thank you for being with us to help explain these findings. i suppose the first question people ask is why have we only realized or been able to confirm their link at the stage? irate confirm their link at the stage? we have confirm their link at the stage? - have been monitoring the numbers of pregnant women who have needed hospitalization or admission to intensive care and one of our real concerns is the rising numbers of women needing intensive care including excavating a story in the recent third wave. it's been a real concern to us. so we are really encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated which has been recommended since december so they can avoid all the complications of covid—19 disease. can avoid all the complications of covid-19 disease.— covid-19 disease. what is it that vaccination _ covid-19 disease. what is it that vaccination does _ covid-19 disease. what is it that vaccination does to _ covid-19 disease. what is it that vaccination does to the - covid-19 disease. what is it that vaccination does to the human l
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covid-19 disease. what is it that. vaccination does to the human body that perhaps might make pregnant women particularly nervous about it? it's good that january pregnant women are concerned about what putting into their bodies but that's way we have been really careful to look at the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine for pregnant women. and that's why it's been recommended by the jcb i from and that's why it's been recommended by thejcb i from last december. first of all it was well that the health and social care workers and those in particular increased risk of complications from covid—19 but it's now rolled out to all ages and all pregnant women at any age can access the vaccine. we are really keen to see pregnant women to up the offer of the vaccination so that we can avoid all these complications, notjust can avoid all these complications, not just for the can avoid all these complications, notjust for the women can avoid all these complications, not just for the women themselves but also because one in three pregnant women who are hospitalized with covid—19 will need preterm birth. with covid-19 will need preterm birth. �* with covid-19 will need preterm birth. . , ., with covid-19 will need preterm birth. . ., with covid-19 will need preterm birth. ., , birth. and you are satisfied, in actual numbers _ birth. and you are satisfied, in actual numbers that _ birth. and you are satisfied, in actual numbers that they - birth. and you are satisfied, in actual numbers that they do i birth. and you are satisfied, in l actual numbers that they do not birth. and you are satisfied, in - actual numbers that they do not look huge. are talking about 21 women across the country but your
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satisfied that statistically that gives you enough of a data set to be able to make this judgment? yes. gives you enough of a data set to be able to make thisjudgment? able to make this 'udgment? yes. we are seeint able to make thisjudgment? yes. we are seeing numbers _ able to make thisjudgment? yes. we are seeing numbers much _ able to make thisjudgment? yes. we are seeing numbers much higher- able to make thisjudgment? yes. we are seeing numbers much higher thanj are seeing numbers much higher than that are hospitalized and also had numbers needing intensive care units. the impact of meeting intensive care prep for pregnant woman and her baby is really stark. so, we worked so hard on understanding more about the safety and the effectiveness of the vaccine so that we can recommend it confidently. that recommendation is coming from royal college of obstetricians and the royal college of mixed midwives and the royal couege of mixed midwives and the royal college of general practitioners to any pregnant woman can access a health care professional and get good advice. health care professional and get good advice-— health care professional and get tood advice. , , ., , ., ., good advice. this is a question that i susect good advice. this is a question that i suspect a — good advice. this is a question that i suspect a lot _ good advice. this is a question that i suspect a lot of _ good advice. this is a question that i suspect a lot of would-be - good advice. this is a question that i suspect a lot of would-be parents| i suspect a lot of would—be parents will be asking. it's a blunt question, how many of those women lost their baby? irate question, how many of those women lost their baby?— lost their baby? we have set the scene stillbirths. _ lost their baby? we have set the scene stillbirths. we _ lost their baby? we have set the scene stillbirths. we do - lost their baby? we have set the scene stillbirths. we do see - scene stillbirths. we do see stillbirths in pregnancy without covid—19 but the are seeing what
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appears to be a higher rate of stillbirths. we are also needing to see warning delivered very early for example if you need delivery at 23 at 24 weeks and that's the case. what is so heartbreaking is that 99% of pregnant women who have been hospitalized instead they have not been vaccinated in the early days that was because the roll—outs was still in its early stages but we would really like to encourage an uptake of the covid—19 vaccine at the point now where it's available. so that we don't continue with losing babies and sadly losing some mums at this stage of the pandemic. thank you very much. their latest coronavirus figures show there were 80,224 infections recorded on monday that means on average about 38,000 new cases every day over the last week. as of friday they were more than six and a half people in
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hospital in the uk with coronavirus. and in the last 24 hours another 28 deaths have been notified, that people who died within 28 days of testing positive and that means on average dabbur were 111 deaths every day over the past week. vaccinations 85.5% of the population age 12 and over have had their first dose of the vaccine and 78.6% have received both doses. prince charles has told the bbc that world leaders gathering at the conference in glasgow at the end of this month must take bold action on global warming rather than just talk. in a wide—ranging interview the prince also said he understands why climate change activists take to the streets and disrupt traffic and he warned that blocking roads was not helpful. he spoke to our climate editor in the gardens of balmoral. lovely to see you. gardens of balmoral. lovely to see ou. , ., , ., gardens of balmoral. lovely to see ou. , ., ., gardens of balmoral. lovely to see
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ou. , ., _ you. this was a rather empty field and denigrating _ you. this was a rather empty field and denigrating was _ you. this was a rather empty field and denigrating was a _ you. this was a rather empty field and denigrating was a notice - and denigrating was a notice ischemia my grandson was born, the eldest, george. it’s ischemia my grandson was born, the eldest. george-— eldest, george. it's a legacy and inheritance _ eldest, george. it's a legacy and inheritance for _ eldest, george. it's a legacy and inheritance for your _ eldest, george. it's a legacy and l inheritance for your grandchildren. how worried are you about the state of that inheritance? dp how worried are you about the state of that inheritance?— of that inheritance? dp worried. i alwa s of that inheritance? dp worried. i always felt _ of that inheritance? dp worried. i always felt that _ of that inheritance? dp worried. i always felt that there _ of that inheritance? dp worried. i always felt that there are - of that inheritance? dp worried. i l always felt that there are somehow trained to believe that nature is a separate thing from us and we can just exploit and control and suppress everything about it without suffering the consequences. the narrative has _ suffering the consequences. the narrative has changed. lots of the things you said are nonmainstream. world leaders are gathering to talk about the kind of issues. timer;r world leaders are gathering to talk about the kind of issues.— about the kind of issues. they 'ust talk on the — about the kind of issues. they 'ust talk on the problem is i about the kind of issues. they 'ust talk on the problem is to i about the kind of issues. they 'ust talk on the problem is to get h about the kind of issues. they just| talk on the problem is to get action on the ground which is what i been trying to do for the last 40 years. what about the people who protest and the extension rebellion? the understand _ and the extension rebellion? tie: understand why they and the extension rebellion? tias understand why they go out? yes, but it is not helpful i don't think to do it in a way that any of this people have so i understand the
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frustration and the difficulty is how do you direct their frustration in a way that is more constructive rather than destructive. so people should really notice how despairing so many are. is should really notice how despairing so many are-— should really notice how despairing so man are. , ., ., ., so many are. is our government doing enouth to so many are. is our government doing enough to make _ so many are. is our government doing enough to make these _ so many are. is our government doing enough to make these things - so many are. is our government doing| enough to make these things happen? i couldn't possibly comment. it’s i couldn't possibly comment. it's true to say _ i couldn't possibly comment. it's true to say that you have a pretty hefty carbon footprint. it must take a lot of gas to heat up islands. it a lot of gas to heat up islands. it is, i have tried for a very long time to make sure the heating is donein time to make sure the heating is done in a way that is a sensible as possible. i've cut electric cars and runs on cyprus english white wine. what was you see people watching this in terms of diet, should they be eating less meat? for this in terms of diet, should they be eating less meat?— this in terms of diet, should they be eating less meat? for years, i not eating _ be eating less meat? for years, i not eating meat _ be eating less meat? for years, i not eating meat and _ be eating less meat? for years, i not eating meat and fish - be eating less meat? for years, i not eating meat and fish on - be eating less meat? for years, i not eating meat and fish on two l be eating less meat? for years, i - not eating meat and fish on two days a week and i don't eat dairy products on one day a week. it’s
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a week and i don't eat dairy products on one day a week. it's an autumn garden _ products on one day a week. it's an autumn garden isn't _ products on one day a week. it's an autumn garden isn't it? _ products on one day a week. it's an autumn garden isn't it? it's - products on one day a week. it's an autumn garden isn't it? it's really l autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn _ autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn color _ autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn color and _ autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn color and a _ autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn color and a bit - autumn garden isn't it? it's really for autumn color and a bit for- for autumn color and a bit for spring. a lot of britain are just farms, avenues, it's one of the things i've been wanting to do, avenues of trees. i want to help plant avenues of trees which could commemorate all the people who died during this pandemic. in fact, it was a wonderful example in australia part of the first world war when they planted avenues of trees to commemorate all the people who died in bringing tickly difference urban trees make and be are wonderful in the landscape as well. let trees make and be are wonderful in the landscape as well.— the landscape as well. let us ask a cou-le of the landscape as well. let us ask a couple of questions _ the landscape as well. let us ask a couple of questions about - the landscape as well. let us ask a couple of questions about this - the landscape as well. let us ask a couple of questions about this to i couple of questions about this to make it this evening. thank you for being with us. i'm intrigued first of all the way this as i'm sure a lot of people will be by this car
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run on white wine and cheese production. it's fun but is it sustainable? to production. it's fun but is it sustainable?— production. it's fun but is it sustainable? ., ,, , , ., sustainable? to think it depends how much wine you _ sustainable? to think it depends how much wine you drink _ sustainable? to think it depends how much wine you drink i _ sustainable? to think it depends how much wine you drink i guess. - sustainable? to think it depends how much wine you drink i guess. we - sustainable? to think it depends howl much wine you drink i guess. we have known about this for years so i think prince charles... the general approach is yes, it is sustainable and it can be scaled up for example the dutch airline run a flight this evening that runs on 30% biofuel generated from waste industrial and commercial refuge. the problem with using biofuel is that it's carbon neutral which means the carbon dioxide is taken up by the plants is then released back into the air when then released back into the air when the fuel is burned. and unfortunately we have let the cat out of the bag with carbon dioxide
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levels because carbon dioxide levels are now so high that we need to go one step further with sustainable field and as he developed fuels that pull carbon out of the atmosphere so what prince charles car and calen are doing is a first step but as time so it's slowing down. that's raisint a time so it's slowing down. that's raising a very — time so it's slowing down. that's raising a very good _ time so it's slowing down. that's raising a very good question - time so it's slowing down. that's raising a very good question because a lot of the pledges that have made moving, a lot of them use the phrase carbon neutral. seeing if we have a lot of promises with carbon neutral and actually we should regard that as disappointing and possibly as failure in terms of the ambition? yes. i think so. the fossil fuels release carbon and carbon has been locked up in the ground and its parent and the carbon that was in the ground is now in the air. we
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really should be looking to generate fuel with carbon capture and storage and possibly looking at new fuels like hydrogen and bio hydrogen so rather than converting biomass into bioethanol which contains carbon and into hydrogen which does not contain carbon. ~ ., into hydrogen which does not contain carbon. ~ . ., , ., ., , carbon. what about biomass? he talked more _ carbon. what about biomass? he talked more generally _ carbon. what about biomass? he talked more generally to - carbon. what about biomass? he talked more generally to justin i talked more generally tojustin about how that's used in a number of the whale residences as a way to try and reduce the reliance on fossil fuels. , , . ., fuels. yes. so the distinction between biomass _ fuels. yes. so the distinction between biomass which - fuels. yes. so the distinction between biomass which is i fuels. yes. so the distinction | between biomass which is the fuels. yes. so the distinction - between biomass which is the stock and raw material for which between biomass which is the stock and raw materialfor which biofuel is made and biomass is in many ways more important than biofuel because biomass is the actual renewable resource that you are putting out of somewhere to turn into fuel and the questionnaire is what we actually harvest any sustainable fashion? if
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you have got balmoral estate and actually you have enough land to grow trees, biomass for the people that live on the balmoral estate. the uk, if all the land in the uk were distributed evenly, we would have about one football picks per person. that is not enough land to actually grow enough biomass to provide the uk energy resources from biomass. ., ., provide the uk energy resources from biomass. ., ,, , ., ., �* , ., , biomass. thank you. that's really fascinating _ biomass. thank you. that's really fascinating explanation _ biomass. thank you. that's really fascinating explanation and i'm i biomass. thank you. that's really i fascinating explanation and i'm sure we'll be talking to you a lot over the next month or so. we need to go further. we will find out how this story and others are covered in the front pages of tuesday's newspaper is at 10:30pm and 11:30pm enjoy me
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tonight. he will speak to deputy political editor at the daily express. look forward to speaking to them. stay with us on bbc news. let us pause the music and catch up at the sporting events and headlines of the sporting events and headlines of the day. that evening to you. and to everyone watching. rails taking on estonia in the game that could see them move to second and depending on them move to second and depending on the result. that one from a scrappy corner around 33 minutes played in that one so far. the new owner of newcastle has met the manager at the training grounds and speculation about his future. he earns 10% of the four players along with her partner as the squad cut preparations under way for their match this weekend. a large proportions of fans wanting to leave after a poor start to the season.
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the owners where a saudi led consortium who took over the club and they have been linked with primary department manager and for chelsea boss as part of the replacement. dan evans is a real scrap in california. his third round match against diego schwartzman. he had to battle against the argentinian sportsmen who was in evidence coming from 4—1 down to take the first set and he's already a break—up in the second. mark selby moved into the second round of snuka but only after being taken to the wilds by chain is compelling there. he had the chance to win it before missing and leaving the finish for the reigning world champion who claimed forframes. commonwealth claimed for frames. commonwealth games claimed forframes. commonwealth games follow next years burning and games follow next years burning and games will be able to choose all but two sports on their programme of
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events. they will be encouraged in athletes village will no longer be required in an attempt to attract more bidders. on the athletics and swimming will be protected sports. what we want to do is cut it down so much that our hosts can see all the buildings but i've got a bill that... let them choose what they want to have and what they can do and who can they share with you to host the event. and i think that would be a win—win situation for everybody. would be a win-win situation for everybody-— would be a win-win situation for eve bod . ., everybody. the anti-while there will not tuit everybody. the anti-while there will not quit boxing _ everybody. the anti-while there will not quit boxing despite _ everybody. the anti-while there will not quit boxing despite losing i everybody. the anti-while there will not quit boxing despite losing to i not quit boxing despite losing to the theory. the american heavyweight was knocked out in the 11th round in their wbc world championship fight las vegas on saturday. the second time that he lost to tyson fury. amy has become the youngest player male or female to hit an international century. the school girl from belfast turned 16 today and she
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reached 121 not outs in one day victory against zimbabwe. she said she was not even sure how to celebrate a milestone. it she was not even sure how to celebrate a milestone. it feels really good — celebrate a milestone. it feels really good and _ celebrate a milestone. it feels really good and a _ celebrate a milestone. it feels really good and a bit - celebrate a milestone. it feels really good and a bit surreal. celebrate a milestone. it feels i really good and a bit surreal right now. i wanted to get there and i had now. i wanted to get there and i had no idea what to do whether to take the helmet off or keep it on. i'm more nervous and they did not do so well in the first three games so i'm delighted to be out there and from there to from 50 to 100 felt like it went by much quicker so it's really good. went by much quicker so it's really tood. ., went by much quicker so it's really food, ., . ., went by much quicker so it's really tood. ., u. ., ., , good. you can hear the world cup tuali int good. you can hear the world cup qualifying in _ good. you can hear the world cup qualifying in action _ good. you can hear the world cup qualifying in action and _ good. you can hear the world cup qualifying in action and only i good. you can hear the world cup qualifying in action and only nine | qualifying in action and only nine minutes until half—time. netherlands and germany are in action and that went well in their match and they're winning at the moment and you can also get more on dan evans is playing in india and he won the
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opening set and enjoyed by seven games. thank you very much, always lots on the bbc sport website. it's always constantly changing almost wherever you are somebody is playing something somewhere. the business energy has made a formal request for chancellor to help support industries affected by soaring energy prices. on sunday, treasury officials accused them of making up claims he made in the morning and they already discussed the issue with the treasury. they asked him if to stop sitting on their hands and come up with a solution. welcome to europe's biggest bottling plant. they make 5 million bottles a day here and they have to get it to 1600 celsius. it's all powered by gas.
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it's extraordinary times, we have not seen anything like this since he started the business. rhtt not seen anything like this since he started the business.— not seen anything like this since he started the business. at the moment, domestic customers _ started the business. at the moment, domestic customers are _ started the business. at the moment, domestic customers are shielded i started the business. at the moment, | domestic customers are shielded from the current price because of the price gap and fixed deals. but big companies like this when i feeling the heat right now. they are charged a new rate for gas each day reflecting the global markets and the price they're having to pay to run this place gives nearly as high as the temperature. eat run this place gives nearly as high as the temperature.— run this place gives nearly as high as the temperature. eat we have a little option _ as the temperature. eat we have a little option with _ as the temperature. eat we have a little option with the _ as the temperature. eat we have a little option with the prices - as the temperature. eat we have a little option with the prices on i as the temperature. eat we have a little option with the prices on to l little option with the prices on to our customers who will pass them onto retail consumers and that should be a big concern for government and for all of us. they're only a couple of miles down the road but this is where we are all feeling the because products made using expensive gas will be hitting the shelves within the next couple of weeks and he will all be having to pay more as a result. should the government stepped in to help big business. lerlsl’hfzit should the government stepped in to help big business.— help big business. what about all companies? _ help big business. what about all companies? even _ help big business. what about all companies? even in _ help big business. what about all companies? even in the - help big business. what about all companies? even in the small- companies? even in the small independent shops and headdresses
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and all companies desperate for the families on the street as well and why should we just be companies it's just something about the prices need addressing. if that government is going to pay their gas bill patient by should the taxpayer pay? things are totin by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up _ by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up all _ by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up all the _ by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up all the time. - by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up all the time. a - by should the taxpayer pay? things are going up all the time. a few- are going up all the time. a few weeks ago _ are going up all the time. a few weeks ago the _ are going up all the time. a few weeks ago the government i are going up all the time— weeks ago the government decided they would step in and pay the gas bill for cf industries so they could keep making carbon dioxide. that funding has come to an end and today we heard a beer has been reached for food companies to just pay more for the carbon dioxide de bie. but with gas prices being high, other industries are demanding the same treatment. eitherthe industries are demanding the same treatment. either the government foots the bill customers will be paying more. our political
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correspondent has been given us the latest from westminster. that's pretty remarkable public spats between the treasury and the business department. yesterday, the business department. yesterday, the business secretary told the bbc that he was in talks with the chancellor about trying to find solutions but it treasury so i said that was a mistake. the treasury nor the chancellor when involved in this process at all. and we depend minister on holiday left to the spokesman to pick up the pieces and say of course ministers are working across departments to try and come up across departments to try and come up with a solution. this evening we have some clarity on what's going on behind closed doors. the business secretary has made a formal application to the treasury for help for these high energy intensity companies over at the next few weeks and months. there is some reluctance in government to prop up some companies that are otherwise
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profitable in the long term so i think if there is any separate it will be target and temporary but it's worth remembering the last 36 hours have shown us that the departments leading this charge and the relations between them are far from rosie. a coroner concluded that the university missed opportunity to engage with the student to take his own life last year. he stopped submitting coursework and attending exams and responding to e—mails. the universities says procedures have not changed since staff is training since the second year students death. metropolitan police had decided to take no further action against andrew duke of york following such allegations against him. an american woman is suing him in the united states claiming she was assaulted by him when she was a teenager. he is consistently denied any wrongdoing. time for a look at
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the weather with matt taylor. i have to say it was a rather lovely day in london today. it's a bit different london today. it's a bit different further north. we have much more cloud and rain particularly across the northern half of scotland but it was the exception and it could bring some view of the aurora tonight. if it does show its hand although strong gusty winds it will feel colder here. clear skies with across the south like last night temperatures could be down to around 2 or three degrees. another cool start with more cloud on tuesday. a web front from northwest scotland into the eastern coast of england. they will be some light rain and drizzle at times pushing further west. close to london by the end of the day. west of that in the light winds in the milder air, temperatures could be in the high teens but with just some — cold air pushing towards the coast and
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temperatures 11 degrees. it will be a cool day across the eastern areas tomorrow.
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hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines... fresh calls for pregnant women to get their covid jabs as new data shows one in six of those most critically ill with the disease were unvaccinated pregnant women. mystery leaders tell ministers to stop sitting on their hands and find a solution to the soaring energy costs. prince charles has told the bbc he wants more ambitious action on climate change, and that he understands why some protesters have been taking to the streets. half a century after the break—up of the beatles, sir paul mccartney breaks his silence on who was to blame. and boldly going where no nonagenarian has gone before: star trek�*s captain kirk, the actor william shatner, explains why at the age of 90, he's blasting off into space at last. let's go back to one
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of our top stories tonight — nhs england has warned that one in six of the most critically ill people in hospital with coronavirus are pregnant women who haven't had a covid vaccine. health leaders are making a new appeal for expectant mothers to get vaccinated. let's speak now to dr chrissie jones, who's an associate professor of paediatric infectious diseases at the university of southampton. doctor at the university of southampton. jones, thanks vs joining doctorjones, thanks very much for joining us this evening. were you surprised when you saw the statistics casilla i think it is surprising to hear- statistics casilla i think it is surprising to hear what a high proportion — surprising to hear what a high proportion of— surprising to hear what a high proportion of pregnant - surprising to hear what a high | proportion of pregnant women surprising to hear what a high i proportion of pregnant women are getting so severely ill. i think we've known for some time during this pandemic that pregnant women are at increased risk of getting more severe disease from covid, and that's why there's been a push for pregnant women to get the vaccine as the same time as woman in their same age. the same time as woman in their same a a e. h, , the same time as woman in their same ate. ,, ., _ age. does pregnancy itself compromise _ age. does pregnancy itself compromise the _ age. does pregnancy itself compromise the immune i age. does pregnancy itself- compromise the immune system. ?
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age. does pregnancy itself— compromise the immune system. ? i think it's probably a bit more complicated thanjust think it's probably a bit more complicated than just the immune system being compromised. the immune system being compromised. the immune system definitely adapts in pregnancy and we know other infections that can be more severe during pregnancy. for instance, pregnant women have been informed to get vaccinated against the flu because we know they can become more severely ill in their third trimester stop so it's an adaptation of the immune system and other physiological changes which put them at increased risk of disease. same at increased risk of disease. some ex-ectant at increased risk of disease. some expectant parents _ at increased risk of disease. some expectant parents and _ at increased risk of disease. some expectant parents and people i at increased risk of disease. some expectant parents and people who maybe aren't pregnant, but perhaps want to conceive my think of it this way and say, "look, what worries me is the body is supporting another growing human body, that's an extra strain — vaccination generally involves giving someone a small amount of the infection to generate amount of the infection to generate a natural reaction that will create
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antibodies to fight off that infection. and all of that feels risky somehow." l infection. and all of that feels risky somehow. '— infection. and all of that feels risky somehow. " risky somehow." i think we can understand _ risky somehow." i think we can understand why _ risky somehow." i think we can understand why pregnant i risky somehow." i think we can i understand why pregnant women and women who are wanting to become pregnant might be hesitant and might want to think very carefully about this. but i think it's important to look at all the evidence that we've got now from real world settings, seeing that over 200,000 pregnant women in the us and uk have had the vaccine and there have been no safety concerns for those pregnant women. we know the most effective way to prevent covid both for the mother and also the risk to the baby, as well. and there are other vaccines which we've given for several years now to pregnant women without any evidence of harm or any adverse effect on their immune system. . llp adverse effect on their immune system- -_ adverse effect on their immune s stem. . , ., ., system. . up until now, the health service has— system. . up until now, the health service has been _ system. . up until now, the health service has been doing _ system. . up until now, the health service has been doing enough i service has been doing enough to this message out to pregnant couples, do you think? l this message out to pregnant couples, do you think? i think the messaging _ couples, do you think? i think the messaging has — couples, do you think? i think the messaging has perhaps _ couples, do you think? i think the messaging has perhaps become i messaging has perhaps become stronger, as for what the risks are
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to pregnant women and how severely they can be affected. so pregnant women have been advised for several months now, to have it, but this shows how severely they can be affected and is causing us to urge pregnant women to think about this again and to consider having the vaccine. ., . ., , again and to consider having the vaccine. ., , ., , vaccine. doctorjones, thanks very much. the family of a health care worker, who died after the manchester arena bombing, have criticised some emergency services saying they made "mista ke, after mistake. " the inquiry into the bombing has heard john atkinson might have survived, if he'd been treated more quickly. today his family refused to accept an apology from the ambulance service's operational commander on the night. mr atkinson suffered a fatal cardiac arrest, more than an hour after the blast, in 2017. with more details, here's judith moritz. john atkinson was badly hurt in the bombing at manchester arena but it was nearly an hour before he got professional medical help. ambulances raced to the scene, but most paramedics stayed outside
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the building and it was decided that casualties should be lifted downstairs to the station next door for treatment. but there were no stretchers and john atkinson was dragged along this bridge on a display board, which broke. a police officer asked for help but the paramedic in command said he should be left where he was, and last week apologised to mr atkinson's family. all the paramedics, all the emergency responders that went to that scene wanted to do their very best, and i am truly sorry if any decision that i made, any decision, impacted on his survivability. john atkinson's father, his mother and sisters have listened to days of heartbreaking evidence and say they believe mistake after mistake was made in his case. this should never have been allowed to happen. john had so much more to give. we heard the apology last week from mr smith from the north west ambulance service —
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we cannot accept this apology. actions speak louder than words and we want to see what actions are taken to ensure that this never happens again. in stark contrast to their anger at the emergency services, john atkinson's family have called the member of the public who stayed withjohn for an hour a hero, saying that the kindness of strangers has offered them a glimmer of hope in their darkest moments. john atkinson had a caring nature. he worked with autistic children. his family say his death has left a massive void and raises so many questions which need to be answered. judith moritz, bbc news, manchester. anyone in wales wanting to visit nightclubs, or large events will, from today, need to prove they've had two doses of a covid vaccine, or produce a negative lateral flow test. the welsh government says it hopes the rules will ease pressure on the nhs this winter. hywel griffith reports
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now from cardiff. rickets. — there's the tickets. upper circle. - and your covid passes. produce your pass, pick out your paperwork. and your lateral flow test, please. or proof of a negative test. there is no way into this concert without one. i don't see any issue with it at all, to be honest. it's very straightforward and, yeah, no problem at all. it rejected my identity, so i've done a lateral flow test instead. covid passes have already been used at some festivals and, ahead of this gig, not everyone got the message. it's a small venue, we're wearing masks and, yet, you know, they won't let us come in. so how do you get your hands on one? stephen is a double—jabbed student in swansea. so it's asking me to record a short video. a video? of my face while i tell... well, you tell it four numbers. two, one, seven, six. after all that, it arrived. stephen wouldn't mind the pass becoming permanent.
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i am happy to do this continuously now, like, forever. if that's what it takes. it's like a new thing, if that's what it takes now, it's just the new normal, that's what we do have for the rest of our lives, then that's what it is. but research suggests around about a third of people are opposed to the idea of having to show a pass. for some people, mandation can be counter—productive, you know? we do see this, that some people will say, well, actually, now, i don't want to get it. and there have been criticisms that perhaps the system is open to gaming, or people putting in fake covid—19 tests. there is a £60 fine for faking a test, but it depends on people reporting their own result. the point of the fine is mostly to be a deterrent to somebody... who's going to police it? well, the policing of it can be done through the checking system that we have, but it's not the point of it. the point of the system is to keep you safe and other people safe. having a pass isn't the same as not having the virus, but, from today,
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these students will need one for a night out. have you got your covid pass yet? no, i have not, sorry. do you know about the scheme? do you know what you have to do? i found out a few hours ago. i think if you want to go out, suck it up, get- soon, passes may notjust be for entry to clubs, concerts and stadiums. the welsh government says it could add care homes and hospitals to the list if covid cases rise. hywel griffiths, bbc news. and the health secretary, sajid javid, has written to secondary school students, urging them to getjabbed. the government has pledged to offer vaccinations to all 12—15—year—olds before the half term break this month, beginning on friday. so far only 11% of youngsters in their age group have been vaccinated in england. in wales, that figure is 24%. as yet, northern ireland hasn't begun vaccination in this age group, as dominic hughes reports. the decision to vaccinate all 12 to 15—year—olds was complicated. the health case was finely balanced,
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but other factors, like the impact on education through missed school days, meant the uk's chief medical officers decided it should go ahead. for this head teacher in greater manchester, it was the right decision but not one he wants to force on parents. we make sure we give all the information to the parents from the local authority. we've been very clear that we are not a vaccination centre. we haven't been effectively promoting vaccinations and we've left it up to the parents and the pupil to make that decision. well, it's now three weeks since the launch of this vaccination programme for 12 to 15—year—olds but there are some concerns that, in england at least, it's been a bit of a slow start. a number of factors have affected the roll—out. schools need to get parents to sign consent forms. parents who are hesitant about vaccines need to have a discussion with a health professional to address their concerns. and while drop—in centres are used in scotland, jabs in england are only delivered in schools. high infection rates among pupils have also delayed the process. you have to wait 28 days after testing positive before
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you have the vaccine. so far, vaccination rates in scotland are much higher. perhaps reflecting that use of drop—in centres. the nhs in england says almost 200,000 children have already been jabbed and experts believe the programme will make a difference. not only does this vaccine help to prevent severe disease and hospitalisations and, of course, deaths, but it also helps to reduce transmission, so if we have 12 to 15—year—olds vaccinated, they are not only less likely to be sick, but they are also much less likely to give this virus to someone else. and the parents we met in altrincham were happy to give their consent. they need to be secure as well. for their education, too? that's correct, to stop spreading the virus, definitely in the class, because there are many students in there, so why not? we just looked at both the positives and the negative sides of the vaccinations and we decided, in terms of avoiding the risk for covid,
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we would like to take the pfizer for my son, actually. there are some concerns that, after a good start, the vaccination programme across the uk has stalled, at least compared to other european nations. the progress of this latest roll—out will be an important test. dominic hughes, bbc news, altrincham. shares in the online fashion retailer, asos, have fallen by 14% after it warned that its profits would be much lower this year than last. the company says customers are now returning more clothes as the pandemic eases. let's get more on this with richard lim, chief executive of retail economics. thank you very much for being with us. is that the only explanation? it seems to be a very significant drop that they are estimating. l seems to be a very significant drop that they are estimating.— that they are estimating. i think there are a _ that they are estimating. i think there are a combination - that they are estimating. i think there are a combination of- that they are estimating. i think. there are a combination of factors that they are estimating. i think- there are a combination of factors - there are a combination of factors — rising inflationary costs will be really challenging for asos going
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forward, but for the wider interest rate too. there are a number of inflationary pressures, from sourcing costs, commodity costs, increase shipping costs, transport costs, even the delivery driver shortage in the uk is all pushing up costs, particularly for online retailers who rely heavily on that delivery. the other important thing to consider as well as that online retailers typically run off of much thinner margins than other parts of the industry. so rising costs will have a significant impact on their profitability. . iiit have a significant impact on their profitability- -_ profitability. . in terms of the business model— profitability. . in terms of the business model though, i profitability. . in terms of the business model though, is i profitability. . in terms of the i business model though, is part of the problem that they generally don't carry a huge amount of stock? they rely on deliveries from warehouses, unlike a shop where you need to have the product physically there for people? if you get this problem with people returning stuff, that gets much harder to manage. i suppose people expensing delays are less likely to return to the
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website?— less likely to return to the website? �* , , ., website? it's true. the pure online model is a — website? it's true. the pure online model is a very — website? it's true. the pure online model is a very different _ website? it's true. the pure online model is a very different model i website? it's true. the pure online i model is a very different model from the traditional brick—and—mortar model. they are much more reliant on variable costs the demand of their product. to put it really. simply, returns are a significant cost to retailers and is damaging to their profitability. and our research shows that in the apparel sector, around 30— 40% of what is bought is then returned it to that retailer. so providing really efficient ways of getting that stock back into the supply chains is really limiting the amount of returns that comes back is crucially protecting profitability. . iiit crucially protecting profitability. . in a period where we talk so much about the need _ . in a period where we talk so much about the need to _ . in a period where we talk so much about the need to reduce _ . in a period where we talk so much about the need to reduce carbon i about the need to reduce carbon footprints, that need to make supply chains more sustainable, 30— 40% of
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products people buy are being sent back to get a replacement or money back to get a replacement or money back with mike that's crazy, isn't it? �* , ., ' . back with mike that's crazy, isn't it? '. ,.,., ., it? it's a difficult situation to sustain, it? it's a difficult situation to sustain. in — it? it's a difficult situation to sustain, in terms _ it? it's a difficult situation to sustain, in terms of- it? it's a difficult situation to sustain, in terms of all- it? it's a difficult situation to i sustain, in terms of all of these pressures that i've just been talking about and the pressure on profitability, when there is such a high proportion of stock that is returned to the retailers. of course retailers have a number of different strategies to deal with this, and asos themselves have introduced a strategy where they essentially penalise serial returners. so there are things retailers can do to try to reduce the amount of stock coming back. but broadly, the broad horizon of where sustainability and the pressure on retailers to reduce their carbon footprint will only become more intense and become more under the spotlight — so it's a more challenging outlook for the whole sector, with asos included in that.
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14% drop in the value of shares as a result of this announcement, the departure of the chief executive in a sense as punishment for these results. ijust wonder if results. i just wonder if the markets have just been a bit unrealistic? 40% in profits, the company's estimating —— 40% fall in profits. but it was never going to stay at that level during the pandemic. . t stay at that level during the pandemic- -_ pandemic. . ithink lots of retailers _ pandemic. . i think lots of retailers are _ pandemic. . i think lots of retailers are facing - pandemic. . i think lots of retailers are facing the i pandemic. . i think lots of- retailers are facing the situation where the impact of the pandemic, we saw this huge shift towards online and many retailers benefited from that, asos being one of them. lots of consumers were exposed to new customerjourneys of consumers were exposed to new customer journeys where, of consumers were exposed to new customerjourneys where, because of the closure of stores, they shifted their spending towards online. and even as the economy has reopened and shops have reopened, a proportion of that shift towards online has
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remained sticky. but not all that will remain online, so it'll be really difficult to meet those sales from last year. this year. but in combination with those rising costs, it'll be putting profitability under pressure. . it'll be putting profitability under pressure- -_ it'll be putting profitability under tressure. . s s, y ., y pressure. . richard lim, you very much. the headlines on bbc news... fresh calls for pregnant women to get their covid jabs as new data shows that one in six of those most critically ill with the disease are unvaccinated for pregnant women. industry leaders tell ministers to stop sitting on their hands and find a solution to rising energy costs. prince charles tells the bbc he wants more ambitious action on climate change, and that he understands why protesters take to the streets. sir paul mccartney has been blamed for breaking up the
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beatles. in a new interview with the bbc to be broadcast later this month, he says the split was actually initiated byjohn lennon. here's what he's been telling the bbc�*s programme. i'm not the person who instigated the split. you brought the lawyers in, though, didn't you? oh, no, no, no. john walked into the room one day and said, "i'm leaving the beatles." and he said, "it's quite thrilling, it's rather like a divorce." and then we were left to pick up the pieces. but i didn't instigate the split — that was ourjohnny! that interview will be hosted on 23 october. philip moorman is a biography for many of her people —— biographer, most notably the beatles. his book came out at the beginning of the 1980s is and was a international bestseller. they give so much for being with us. i suspect, as somebody who's research this is so thoroughly as you have,
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it doesn't come as a great surprise. should it come as a surprise to us. 7 . should it come as a surprise to us. 7 should it come as a surprise to us. ? ~ , , should it come as a surprise to us. ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john didn't walk _ ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john didn't walk into _ ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john didn't walk into the _ ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john didn't walk into the room, i ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john didn't walk into the room, he i ? . oh, it keeps freezing. john - didn't walk into the room, he tried to pull up and say that he was leaving the beatles. but it was taken to be the break—up with the mayor of the beatles when... packaged with that was a sort of selfie 0&a which said he couldn't see himself recording with the other beatles again. john announced paul was leaving the beatles, which meant the end of the break—up. the previous september, he asked the journalist to keep it quiet because there was still negotiations going under with the final recording
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contract, capitol records. so it was in the air for all those months. but it didn't really happen until mccartney took them to court to dissolve the partnership in 1971. but mccartney hard to keep everyone together. but mccartney hard to keep everyone touether. ., ' . ., together. how difficult had relations gotten _ together. how difficult had relations gotten between l together. how difficult had l relations gotten between the together. how difficult had - relations gotten between the four of them at that stage? fin relations gotten between the four of them at that stage?— them at that stage? on one level, them at that stage? on one level, they couldn't _ them at that stage? on one level, they couldn't stand _ them at that stage? on one level, they couldn't stand each _ them at that stage? on one level, they couldn't stand each other, i them at that stage? on one level, | they couldn't stand each other, but as soon as they got into a room with each other and picked up instruments, they were 0k. the very last album that they recorded was abbey road, and they sounded as tight and cohesive as they always had. because as paul said in a song dedicated tojohn," couldn't dedicated to john," couldn't understand dedicated tojohn," couldn't understand a thing, but could always sing." understand a thing, but could always sin ." . understand a thing, but could always sin _" ., ~ . ., , understand a thing, but could always sin~." ., a ., , , sing." paul mccartney said he still thou~ht sing." paul mccartney said he still thought the _ sing." paul mccartney said he still thought the stuff _ sing." paul mccartney said he still thought the stuff they _ sing." paul mccartney said he still
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thought the stuff they were - sing." paul mccartney said he still thought the stuff they were doing | thought the stuff they were doing was. not bad — was itjust thatjohn lennon musically felt he wasn't in the right place? he lennon musically felt he wasn't in the right place?— the right place? he was on his way out of the beatles _ the right place? he was on his way out of the beatles for _ the right place? he was on his way out of the beatles for a _ the right place? he was on his way out of the beatles for a long time, | out of the beatles for a long time, very discontent. paul sort of revelled in applause and attention, but very weary of touring. john then met yoko ono, who he thought was a real artist, she did colour and john always wanted to you colour in sculpture. yoko ono said he could — and john also hired a crooked accountant to be there. manager, which alienated paul, and paul was marginalised and pushed out, almost sacked from them during 1969. yet they could still get into the studio
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with yoko ono on a bed in the corner of the studio, and they could still make a great album. ._ of the studio, and they could still make a great album. . i wonder why ou think make a great album. . i wonder why you think that _ make a great album. . i wonder why you think that so _ make a great album. . i wonder why you think that so much _ make a great album. . i wonder why you think that so much of— make a great album. . i wonder why you think that so much of the - you think that so much of the popular perception has been preserving john lennon's reputation, saying it wasn't his fault. was it just that paul mccartney was the one who went to court? he just that paul mccartney was the one who went to court?— just that paul mccartney was the one who went to court? he had to do that to break out — who went to court? he had to do that to break out of— who went to court? he had to do that to break out of the _ who went to court? he had to do that to break out of the business - who went to court? he had to do that to break out of the business part... i to break out of the business part... because he was deeply unhappy. particularly to the generation who grew up with the beatles, they thought they all belong together in the '60s. people would do that
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today, a band would make a solo album and still record together. but not for the beatles, each one of them was irreplaceable.- them was irreplaceable. philip norman, thank— them was irreplaceable. philip norman, thank you _ them was irreplaceable. philip norman, thank you very - them was irreplaceable. philip| norman, thank you very much, them was irreplaceable. philip norman, thank you very much, sorry we had some technical problems. thank you for persisting and getting through to us, because i think it's one of the stories i will feature very largely in the papers tomorrow. thank you very much for that. the commander of the uk strike group has told the bbc that the uk will base more ships in asia, as it wants to demonstrate a stronger military presence. having departed the uk in may, hms queen elizabeth is currently docked in port in singapore — where its commodore steve moorhouse spoke to our reporter katie silver. this is the hms queen elizabeth. she's an impressive vessel — 280 metres in length, and taller than the niagara falls. she left the uk in may and has been travelling through asia, where the british navy has conducted joint military exercises with british allies, including south korea and here in singapore. most recently, she's been travelling
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through the south china sea — and it's being seen as a real demonstration of british military might. this is a part of the world where, you know, the navy has probably retreated. the last 20 years. but the recent review has made it quite clear, we want to have a more persistent, enduring presence here. queen elizabeth is the first step. i think you'll see the air force exercising with other air forces, and the british army exercising with other armies, exchange programmes and education programmes, and science and technology — i think that's how we will symbolise that the indo pacific is important to the united kingdom. one third of the world's trade flows through the south china sea, the growing economy's here — so it's only natural that the uk wants to have a presence and a say, and be involved in this really important region. there are two new vessels on their way now from panama to singapore, and they'll stay here on an ongoing basis. a clear sign that the uk's pivot to asia is for the long haul. katie silver their reporting.
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star trek�*s captain kirk, aka actor william shatner, has been explaining why he wants to go into space as part of a four—person crew aboard blue origin�*s new shepard rocket. the launch has now been delayed to wednesday because of high winds. the 90—year—old told this morning on cbs why he wanted to be part of the mission. i wanted to claim that i was the oldest person that went into... well, what a thing to have — "he's the oldest guy that went into space!" i want to have the vision, i want to see space of stuff i want to see the earth, i want to see what we to save earth. i want to have a perspective that hasn't been shown to me before. that's what i'm interested in seeing. sorry about that, i lost my earpiece at that point. it does make you wonder how much the ambition has lasted all these years, ever since he stopped making star trek more
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than half a century ago. what makes a great new building? over these last few days we've been looking at the shortlist for britain's best new building award. on thursday, we will be live at the awards ceremony. this year's riba stirling prize shortlist includes key worker housing, an eco friendly mosque and a footbridge. today we're looking at a project at kingston university in south west london. the town house incorporates a library as well as dance studio space. in a way, you may not feel like you're in a university building at all. that you're in a structure that kind of is asking you, what do you want to do here? we are sitting in the town house at kingston university, which is a building we realised as a result of an riba competition in 2013. the building is surrounded on three sides and that is an urban experience which connects the university back to the town. the university aspired to reveal the activities of the interior of the building to the wider public.
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i really love being in the foyer because you watch the buses going up and down and you see people on buses looking in, and they probably say to themselves, "what goes on in there? i must come back and have a look some time." for me, the thing that makes town house really special is the combination of things, i suppose it's the light, it's the space, is the views from the building. it's quite soft, i think, actually, for a building that is predominantly concrete. it really lends itself to encounters between staff and student, student to students, and that's really important to us, that's the feel we were hoping to create with the building. the ceiling has these specially—made acoustic baffles which absorb sound. they wall panelling itself is kind of striated. in this building, you have two different aspects, a library and a dance faculty, in the one space. from an acoustic point of view, you have to keep them apart but from an ideological and cultural point of view, you want
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to connect them, so that was the challenge of this project. we've designed the surrounds to the staircase so they're overlooked, so people can actually work there by standing at the edges overlooking the staircase. because there is something really phenomenal about people watching. the building is a concrete building, it is a concrete frame. we have a thermally active system which allows the building to be cooled through that concrete. so not only is the concrete structure, but it's also environmental. for me, the one word that epitomises this building is open. it's very important to our students that they feel that this building is here for them, and they can move into it and occupy it and use it the way that they want to. the town house contains two aspects — it contains town which has a civic dimension, and it contains house, which has a sense of belonging, sense of home. it's open and it is porous. it's a democratic space. that is one of six shortlisted entries for the riba stirling prize
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for britain's best new building. and we will be live at the awards ceremony on thursday at 7.30pm. ido i do hope you'lljoin us for that. the interview we saw earlier between justin rowlands and prince charles can be found online on the bbc iplayer service. can be found online on the bbc iplayerservice. prince can be found online on the bbc iplayer service. prince charles and his battle for our planet, you just need to log on to the iplayer. you'll find it very easily from the main menu. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. well, it's not been a bad day across most of the uk today. some hazy sunshine out there, but not everywhere. northern parts of the uk have been fairly overcast, a weather front has been brushing the north all day long, and it's been wet in the northwest highlands, the he rides, as well, —— hebrides. this
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will continue overnight, the clearest of the weather over southern and central areas, western scotland and to an extent the north sea counties, it will be fairly overcast. but where the skies clear, that's where we'll have the lowest numbers, around that�*s where we'll have the lowest numbers, around 6— that's where we'll have the lowest numbers, around 6— seven in the south. tomorrow's weather, again cloudy across much of scotland in northeast england, on that north sea coast, the further west and south you are, the brighter the weather will be. light winds, sunny spells in cardiff, and 17 celsius — not bad how democrat all, that's how it will be. on the whole, it's a fine day all week.
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this is bbc news. a warning to pregnant women. get a carfit vaccine. today in six people in england is critical error from covid—19 and pregnant. the risks are much greater with the spread of the delta variant.— delta variant. they were taking the decisions on _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life _ delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life thinking - delta variant. they were taking the decisions on my life thinking ok, i decisions on my life thinking ok, this woman not make it and i would not want anyone in to face what i face. , . ~ . not want anyone in to face what i face. , ., ~ ., ., not want anyone in to face what i face. , ., ., ., face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein _ face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is _ face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is expected - face. give a maxwell, an associate of jeffrey epstein is expected to i ofjeffrey epstein is expected to learn which of her alleged co—conspirators will give evidence against her in the criminal trial in new york. austria's chancellor stands aside and made allegations he spent government money on a corrupt deal that ensured positive media coverage. and forgive and forget.
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donald trump remains the standard bearer for the

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