Skip to main content

tv   Newsday  BBC News  October 11, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

1:00 am
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm at mariko oi. the headlines the seller. inside the world of kim jong—un, a former north korean spy jong—un, a former north korean spy tells us pyongyang will never give up its weapons. translation: in never give up its weapons. translation:— translation: in the end, denuclearisation _ translation: in the end, denuclearisation cannot. translation: in the end, denuclearisation cannot be achieved. why? north korea's nuclear deterrent is tied to kimjong—un�*s nuclear deterrent is tied to kim jong—un�*s survival. the nuclear deterrent is tied to kim jong-un's survival. the spy who fed me- — kim jong-un's survival. the spy who fed me. the _ kim jong-un's survival. the spy who fed me. the fbi _ kim jong-un's survival. the spy who fed me. the fbi says - kim jong-un's survival. the spy who fed me. the fbi says it - kim jong-un's survival. the spy i who fed me. the fbi says it has uncovered a plot to sell a national secret concealed in a sandwich. after more than 100 days of lockdown, new south wales begins to open up,
1:01 am
providing you have had the jab. and new research warns that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown. live from our studio in singapore, this is bbc news, it's newsday. hello and welcome to the programme. kimjong—un hello and welcome to the programme. kim jong—un will never give up his nuclear weapons, according to a former senior officer in north korea's spy senior officer in north korea's spy agencies. the colonel, who defected from north korea in 2014, says he was involved in targeted attacks and assassinations and even built an illegal drug slab for the leader. in an exclusive interview with the bbc has been speaking to our corresponded
1:02 am
insole, laura bicker. for decades, one family has maintained a brutal grip on north korea. but occasionally, some slip through their grasp and reveal their secrets. translation: north korea's intelligence agency _ is the eyes, ears and brains of the supreme leader. colonel kim spent 30 years in pyongyang's spy agencies. he defected in 2014 but has now, for the first time, decided to speak out. translation: there are many cases where i directed spies i to go to south korea on missions. many cases. he claims kimjong—un gave an order to kill off one of the leaders's main critics. the target was this man, hwang jang—yop. back in 2009, he was a high—profile defender in south korea. translation: it was a gift i to demonstrate kim jong-un's loyalty to his father.
1:03 am
that's why this act of terror was organised. the attempt failed. pyongyang always denied it was involved. although some were caught, along with all their kit, the kernel claims agents infiltrated many areas of south korean society, including in the early 90s, the presidential office. this level of starvation is unprecedented... that same decade, as thousands of north koreans staffed in a disastrous famine, the colonel said the cash—strapped leader ordered him to produce and sell illegal drugs. translation: i brought three foreigners into north korea . and built a base to produce crystal meth. all the money into north korea belongs to kimjong il and kim jong—un. with that money, he built villas, bought cars, bought food, get clothes, enjoy the luxuries.
1:04 am
as pyongyang stepped up its weapons programme, it too became a way to raise funds. translation: | know - that the operations department made arms deals with iran. as for the types, special midget submarines, semisubmersibles. north korea was very good at building cutting—edge weapons like this. north korea continues to build and test new weapons and missiles. it's been accused of selling arms and technology to a number of countries, which it denies. efforts to encourage the regime to disarm have repeatedly failed. translation: the international community was excited - when kimjong—un and trump met. saying it was for denuclearisation. but i didn't view it that way. in the end, denuclearisation cannot be achieved. why? north korea's nuclear
1:05 am
deterrent is tied to kim jong—un�*s survival. as the young dictator executed many of his political rivals, the colonel realised he too was at risk. translation: i was the reddest of the red and to abandon my - country and to escape to south korea was the worst grief stricken decision, made in utter distressed. while the colonel�*s account is impossible to verify, it serves as a timely reminder that the young leader has proved to be an attempt dictator, with only one goal in mind. the survival of his regime. laura bicker, bbc news, seoul. we will have more from laura later in the programme. next, fbi agents have arrested a couple in west virginia on suspicion of selling nuclear warships secrets to what the
1:06 am
pair believed was a foreign power. they say he delivered data to an undercover fbi agent in return for about $100,000. joining me is mark lobel. talk us through how they were caught. to us through how they were cau:ht. ., , ., ., caught. to understand how the fbi have alleged _ caught. to understand how the fbi have alleged that - caught. to understand how the fbi have alleged that the - fbi have alleged that the nuclear engineer did something wrong, we need to understand the curious case of the peanut butter sandwich, the curious case of the peanut buttersandwich, half the curious case of the peanut butter sandwich, half a peanut butter sandwich, half a peanut butter sandwich, half a peanut butter sandwich, and this data disc full of nuclear secrets which was either packed on top of a plastic bag or squeezed inside the sandwich like that, this all began in april 2020 with a nuclear package sent to an unnamed foreign country and attached to that was a letter. let's look at that letter. it said "i apologise for this poor translation into your language, please forward this letter to your military intelligence agency." that package was
1:07 am
actually passed to the fbi in this unnamed foreign country in december and they use encrypted e—mail to try to find out. and jonathan toebbe was insured —— sure adfa so they sent him a suite of $10,000 through cryptocurrency, after signalling tojonathan as well using the embassy of the unnamed foreign country on memorial day, they caught his trust and he made three crucial errors on their drops. dead rubber where you are not there, you don't have to meet them in person. the first one was leaving the data inside a peanut butter sandwich, portugal paid $20,000 through the currency. he then sent the password to the fbi to get the secrets. there was a second drop—off in a chewing gum wrapper, he got 70,000 us dollars for that, and it was the third drop—off on saturday with the fbi finally caught both jonathan and with the fbi finally caught bothjonathan and his wife, a school teacher in america, was apparently in charge of the lookout for these drop—offs.
1:08 am
what were the secrets are so important to hide inside a peanut butter sandwich and a chewing gum wrapper?- peanut butter sandwich and a chewing gum wrapper? well, this menu does _ chewing gum wrapper? well, this menu does what _ chewing gum wrapper? well, this menu does what do _ chewing gum wrapper? well, this menu does what do nuclear - menu does what do nuclear propulsion. this is important because it powers the silent submarines that play around the world. they are the kind of ones that you could find that chinese submarines can't find other submarines if they have this technology. it was the technical details to this type of information for these submarines that were being passed on, allegedly, to the fbi, as it turned out. and jonathan had actually said in one of these exchanges he thought, he had his passport and money ready to leave the country if he was caught. as it happens, he has now been charged for attempted espionage and this could potentially be treasonous, there could be a serious time in prison if he is found guilty of these charges, him and his wife.— him and his wife. mark lobel with a fascinating _ him and his wife. mark lobel with a fascinating story. - him and his wife. mark lobeli with a fascinating story. thank you so much that update.
1:09 am
let's now take a look at some other stories in the headlines. 16 people have died in a plane crash in russia 1000 kilometres east of moscow. a further six people who were on board the light aircraft were rescued, with serious injuries, and have been taken to hospital. the plane, owned by the local flying club, christ soon after takeoff. most of those on board were members of a parachute team. ireland's foreign minister has said that the uk's demand for changes to the northern ireland protocol could cause a breakdown in relations with the eu. the brexit minister, lord frost, has said he was the european court of justice removed from oversight of the deal. tens of thousands of the deal. tens of thousands of people have protested in the belgium capitol, brussels, for ambitious action to tackle global warming. ambitious action to tackle globalwarming. it ambitious action to tackle global warming. it comes three weeks before the start of a major united nations climate summit which is to be held in scotland. the issue gained a great deal of political
1:10 am
traction in belgium in the wake of deadly floods that hit the country and the wider region in july. a team of young, female afghan footballers who fled the country after the taliban took control have been told they can live in the uk with their families. 35 members of the afghan women's development team, who are aged between 13 and 19, escaped from kabul to pakistan last night. the british government says it is finalising visas for the team. china has accused i's president of inciting competition as tensions mount of the island's future. beating says the president distorted the facts in a speech marking taiwan's national day. the president had responded, defiantly to a warning to xijinping responded, defiantly to a warning to xi jinping that china would have to unify with china. she said taiwan would continue to bolster its defences. china's commins leaders consider the island a
1:11 am
part of the territory. last week, china sent an unprecedented number of military aircraft into taiwan's air defence zone. translation: ~ . ., translation: we will continue to bolster our _ translation: we will continue to bolster our national- translation: we will continue to bolster our national defence l to bolster our national defence and our determination to defend ourselves in a body could divorce taiwan to take the path china has laid out for us. this is because the path china has laid out offers neither a free no democratic way of life for taiwan north of entry for our 23 million people stop right here is the latest from john sudworth, who is in taiwan. i think it is unlikely that tsai ing—wen�*s address today was a direct response void for what xijinping said was a direct response void for what xi jinping said yesterday. her remarks would have been planned long in advance. as you say, china has reacted. this clearly is china pushing back. you know, it showsjust
1:12 am
clearly is china pushing back. you know, it shows just how far we have come, i think, from the era, just a decade or so ago, when the two sides look to, at least potentially, able to find a compromise, ring aside their differences, essentially kicking the vexed question of exactly what taiwan was down the line unjust strengthening business ties. the president today was making it very clear that that area is over because of the direction china is taking, it is growing increasingly authoritarian, she said, she saad awad is happening in hong kong as a warning to the people of taiwan. she is saying it is taiwan's democracy, its unique identity that needs emphasising and this was really an appeal to allies, two allies in the region like japan, but also further afield and, in particular, an appeal to washington. particular, an appealto washington.— particular, an appealto washinuton. ., ., ., . washington. you are watching ou sta washington. you are watching you stay on — washington. you are watching you stay on the _ washington. you are watching you stay on the bbc. - washington. you are watching you stay on the bbc. still, - washington. you are watchingj you stay on the bbc. still, the programme: scientists warned
1:13 am
that the increasing loss of our precious biodiversity is risking the foundation of global supply chains. parts of san francisco least affected by the earthquake are returning to life, but in the marina area where most of the damage was done, they are more conscious than ever of how much has been destroyed. in the 19 years since he was last here, he has gone from being a little—known revolutionary to an experienced and successful diplomatic operator. it was a 20—pound bomb which exploded on the fifth floor of the grand hotel, ripping a hole in the front of the building. this government will not - weaken, democracy will prevail. it fills me with humility and gratitude to know that i have been chosen as the recipient of this foremost of earthly honours. this catholic nation held its breath for the men they called the 33. and then, bells tolled nationwide to announce the first rescue and chile let
1:14 am
out an almighty roar. welcome back. you are watching you stay on the bbc. i am mariko 0i in singapore. 0ur headlines this our: a former top headlines this our: a former t°p spy headlines this our: a former top spy for north korea tells the bbc pyongyang will never give up its weapons. a us navy nuclear engineer and his wife have been charged with trying to sell nuclear secret to what they thought was a foreign state. let us get more on our main story on that former top north korean spy. a little earlier i spoke to our correspondent laura becker in seoul. she told
1:15 am
me about the possible timing behind the defector�*s interview. i think when it comes to why now, that is a question i have asked him over several occasions we have met over the last couple of months. i think when he answers he talks about trying to free his northern brethren, but i also sent some frustration. he believes that he has all of this political knowledge, all of this inside knowledge, all of this inside knowledge, that he would like to impart to others. i think also, when it comes to really kind of alerting our viewers, remember, he defected in 2014. much of what he alleges is historical, but it does give us an insight into the inside of the regime, just as a new, young kimjong—un came the regime, just as a new, young kim jong—un came to power. young kim jong-un came to ower. . , power. indeed, and this revelation _ power. indeed, and this revelation that - power. indeed, and this revelation that kim - power. indeed, and this - revelation that kim jong-un revelation that kim jong—un would never give up nuclear weapons — what kind of message does it send to the biden administration, as well as north korea's neighbours, like south korea and japan? i don't
1:16 am
thinki south korea and japan? i don't think i have — south korea and japan? i don't think i have met _ south korea and japan? i don't think i have met a _ south korea and japan? i don't think i have met a north - south korea and japan? i don't| thinki have met a north korean think i have met a north korean defector who has said that north korea would ever be willing to give up its nuclear weapons. i think it serves as a timely reminder to those who may be willing to negotiate and are looking to negotiate with north korea. remember, within the last few weeks kim jong—un has indicated that he might be willing to talk to seoul if conditions are met. and when it comes to that, i think seoul are looking and desperately hoping that the north will start to engage with them too. when it comes to disarmament, that might be a separate conversation. certainly north korea is under huge, strict international sanctions to try to get them to give up their nuclear weapons, to get them to give up their nuclearweapons, but to get them to give up their nuclear weapons, but within the last month alone they have tested four new weapons systems, which shows that even under dire economic conditions, which they are at the moment, they are able to continue to build weapons. it shows also —
1:17 am
this interview shows also the kind of activity the regime is willing to go to to survive, whether it comes to selling weapons, whether it comes to perhaps producing counterfeit money, as he also alleges, when it comes to making drugs, as they have been in the past, these are allegations that have come from notjust these are allegations that have come from not just this current defector but other north korea defectors in the past. it is an open secret within the north korea watching community. but it shows that when it comes to this regime, they are prepared to survive at all cost. that is something which, when it comes to making calculations with regard to negotiations, that perhaps negotiators might need to take into account. the father of pakistan's nuclear weapons programme, later accused of smuggling technology to iran, libya north korea, has died at the age of
1:18 am
85. the atomic scientist died in the capital, islamabad. 0ur correspondent�*s report starts with flashing images. the father of pakistan's nuclear programme was given a herald farewell. he was laid to rest with full state honours in the capital, islamabad. wrapped in the pakistanis flag, his coffin was carried by a contingent of the pakistan military. despite heavy rain, his funeral prayers were attended by cabinet ministers, high—ranking civil and military officers and a large number of people. officers and a large number of --eole. �* ,, �* �* . people. translation: a great man, people. translation: a great man. loyal— people. translation: a great man. loyal to _ people. translation: a great man, loyalto pakistan, - people. translation: a great man, loyalto pakistan, has- man, loyalto pakistan, has died. he is the only pakistani to have been honoured twice with the highest civilian award. �* , ,, . with the highest civilian award. �* , ., ., ., with the highest civilian award. �* , ,, ., ., , award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as _ award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as a _ award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as a national - award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as a national hero i award. abdul qadeer khan is| revered as a national hero for giving the islamic world it's only nuclear bomb, but his legacy was also marred by allegations of smuggling the
1:19 am
technology to countries like iran, north korea and libya. he was put under house arrest in 2004 after he confessed on state television to selling nuclear secrets. i state television to selling nuclear secrets.— state television to selling nuclear secrets. i take full responsibility _ nuclear secrets. i take full responsibility for - nuclear secrets. i take full responsibility for my - nuclear secrets. i take full l responsibility for my actions and seek your pardon. international condemnation did nothing to dent his popularity among the masses. translation: toda the among the masses. translation: today the whole _ among the masses. translation: today the whole nation _ among the masses. translation: today the whole nation is _ today the whole nation is saddened. he was loyal to the country— saddened. he was loyal to the country and made pakistan and nuclear— country and made pakistan and nuclear power. it is regrettable how he was treated. doctor_ regrettable how he was treated. doctor abdul qadeer was widely respected in pakistan for his contribution to the country's security, especially for bringing pakistan on par with arch rival india in nuclear technology. his house arrest was ended in february 2009, but his movements were strictly guarded until his death.
1:20 am
the people of new south wales will enjoy new freedoms from this monday as the state begins its path to opening up. with 70% of the adult population double jabbed, the loosening of restrictions will be enjoyed only by those who have had the vaccine. those who haven't will have to wait until the first of december. residents of greater sydney have been on stay—at—home orders for 3.5 months, but the premier of new south wales cautioned against being too relaxed and encouraged people to be responsible. if we take personal responsibility, we will get through this difficult time. it is a time of optimism, it is a time of hope. we know that business confidence is crucial in getting our economy through last year, but importantly, we need to do it in a safe way. it is an exciting day for our state, but i do want to reiterate: we need to do this in a safe way. please treat everybody with respect, with kindness. it will be key as we
1:21 am
move through this period of time. al australia corresponded shaima kalil is in sydney with more details of what people are allowed to do. it more details of what people are allowed to do.— allowed to do. it is a very exciting _ allowed to do. it is a very exciting day _ allowed to do. it is a very exciting day for _ allowed to do. it is a very - exciting day for sydneysiders and people in new south wales in general, because after more than 100 days in the town and stay—at—home rules, today fully vaccinated residents of new south wales can go to pubs, two restaurants, two cafes. i was getting my morning coffee this morning and i noticed that the local cafes in my area have opened up. the tables and chairs are ready, albeit at a limited capacity of 20 people indoors. people have to be wearing masks and there will be social distancing, but, for example, retailshops social distancing, but, for example, retail shops will open. gyms, hairdressers and schools. families will be sending children to school from next week as well. now, businesses are responsible to
1:22 am
ask for proof of vaccination. there has been talk about vaccination passports, but as of now, you can always show it just on your phone as a certificate of a double vaccination, but generally life will look very different for those who are fully vaccinated thanit those who are fully vaccinated than it did 100 or so days ago. how nice that you can get a cup of coffee now, but as you said, this only applies to people who have been vaccinated. so is there much resentment about people who haven't actually got the jabs? people who haven't actually got the “abs? , . ~ , the “abs? yes, and i think this is the jabs? yes, and i think this is really a _ the jabs? yes, and i think this is really a big _ the jabs? yes, and i think this is really a big point _ the jabs? yes, and i think this is really a big point of- is really a big point of contention, especially for those who have had their first jabber but are not yet fully vaccinated. there has been a big delay for those who are under 40, for example, who say that we have been waiting for weeks if not months for our vaccination appointments, and it has been a long wait for so many people. so you will get people who say, look, it is not
1:23 am
our fault that we haven't been vaccinated yet. we have put ourselves forward to get the jabs and we haven't gotten it yet. i think this week will be a very interesting testing ground in how all of this will work, in how businesses are going to enforce this proof of vaccination — whether or not they will, for example, deny people who haven't been vaccinated services, but also how people who haven't been fully vaccinated will react. because as you say, with all of these new freedoms, albeit that this is just the first step into the roadmap of full freedom, until new south wales gets to 80% vaccination, this is going to be only limited to those who are double jabbed to be able to enjoy all of these freedoms in the state. new research suggests that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown. the data suggest that the uk is one of the most nature depleted places in the world, ranking in the bottom 10% of all countries.
1:24 am
0livia richwood has been to a nature reserve in northern england. just outside the city of york is askham bog, created by a retreating glacial here 15,000 years ago. it is brimming with biodiversity, but a new report says that the uk is one of the most nature—depleted countries in the world. a new report says thatjust 53% of our biodiversity is left, thatis of our biodiversity is left, that is compared with the global average of 75%. that matters because biodiversity affects the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. �* ., , , , ., ., eat. biodiversity is more than something — eat. biodiversity is more than something that _ eat. biodiversity is more than something that is _ eat. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful i eat. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and that we love. it is also what provides us with so many of our basic needs. it is the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when
1:25 am
supply chains breakdown. nature is at the base of our supply chains. ., ., ., ., ~ ., chains. tomorrow, a week-long un biodiversity _ chains. tomorrow, a week-long un biodiversity conference - chains. tomorrow, a week-long un biodiversity conference willl un biodiversity conference will begin virtually, hosted by china. negotiators will flesh out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. a decade ago, 20 targets were set but none of them were met. scientists say this is our best chance for a sustainable future. let us just bring you some breaking news, because police in the uk are dropping a review of sexual assault allegations against prince andrew, the duke of york. an american woman claims that she was trafficked to london age 17 by the convicted sex offenderjeffrey epstein and forced to have sex with prince andrew, but the metropolitan police say they
1:26 am
have now completed a review and no further action will be taken in the uk. the prince has consistently denied all the allegations. hello. last week brought us some heavy rain followed by some heavy rain followed by some particularly warm weather. the week ahead, well, things will be much drier. rain mainly confined to the north of scotland, but it will be also cooler. temperatures will actually be around average but there will be incursions of chilly air towards the north and east at times, all running around the eastern edge of an area of high pressure which will dominate through this week. that is what is happening into monday, but we are on the edge of it, so we are going to have a rather chilly start, certainly compared with the morning commits we saw at the end of last week. much cooler out there, temperatures down into mid— single figures as we start the day. they will be a lot of dry weather to begin with for england, wales and northern ireland. a bit of patchy mist and fog with some
1:27 am
good sunny spells. the sunshine will be a bit hazy, and that is because we have a weather front pushing and mainly across the north and west of scotland, where the rain will be persistent in the highlands and the western isles. some of that renaljust the western isles. some of that renal just extend the western isles. some of that renaljust extend erratically to parts of southern scotland, may the far north—east of england, but most places away from the north will stay dry. still breezy but not as busy as it has been across northern scotland. lerwick in the cold air at nine degrees, still pleasantly warm with the heavy sunshine further south, 16 or 17, had we also where we should —— above where we should be for the stage in october. as we go into monday night that weather front is still there, bringing rain and drizzle across parts of scotland, also down across some eastern parts of england. but it does mean more cloud around. the temperatures should drop too much and there will be clear skies on the south. some mist and fog initially start to tuesday. we could also see some aurora, hopefully, on monday night, but cloud amounts will be crucial. that is because we do have that weather front draped in across the eastern edge of a high—pressure system for tuesday. the exact position could change a little bit certainly across parts of
1:28 am
scotland, maybe into the north and east of england, the chance of some light rain and drizzle. on the eastern edge of it we will dragon some cold air, temperatures around ten to 12 degrees for scotland and parts of eastern england. where as to the west of that weather front, 18 degrees possible with some sunshine breaking through the cloud. a bit more sunshine and dry on wednesday, more of a westerly drift so those eastern areas should want a little bit once again, back into the mid—teens. only a few showers across the far north and north—west of scotland. but as we going to thursday, heavy rain pushes its way southwards across scotland. that's going to bring some colder conditions into the north as we go through the latter stage of the week and potentially some overnight frost. furthersouth and potentially some overnight frost. further south it does get colder, but it stays dry.
1:29 am
this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and all the menu
1:30 am
stories for you at the top of the hour straight after this programme. —— main news stories. one in three internet users is a child. pizza, who wants some yummy pizza? children's attention is worth billions. it's an industry fuelled by personal data... ad tech and big tech sometimes know more about a young person than their parents do. ..where young users don't always understand what they're sharing. they've got messages stored here from when i was... - i must have been 13, 14. should more be done to control this massive market? are they kind of influencing children's life's choices? absolutely. tonight... who's watching the kids? i love social media. i've had a digital life since i was about 13. facebook, instagram, youtube, tiktok.
1:31 am
now, these days i almost feel my digital life is indistinguishable from my real one.

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on