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tv   The Papers  BBC News  October 10, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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will be bringing us the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. and with us tonight. lizzy buchan, chief political correspondent at the daily mirror & henry zeffman, chief political correspondent at the times. welcome to you both. tomorrow is from pages then. let's start with the metro which splashes on the war of words between the business secretary and chancellor over extra support for industry during the energy crisis. the telegraph goes with the same story, describing how quasi— quieting was slapped down by the treasury with one number 11 source saying this was not the first time the secretary of state for business made things up in interviews. the i newspaperfocuses on the effect of the labour crisis and energy crisis for snoopers with supermarkets warning they may have to turkeys at christmas. the ft explains where the cash has come from to enable liberty to reopen the plant rotherham bringing welcome relief to thousands of uk employees on the guardian reports on a tide of
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abuse from patients towards nhs staff as they face long waits for care. the paper quotes one medical leader on the notable change from people clapping the health service to blaming individual staff or the consequences of decades of underinvestment and staff shortages. the sun newspaper declares i am the greatest following the moment that tyson fury secured his stunning victory. the daily star goes with a recent warning of bad weather. that might not feature, funnily enough. let's start with the metro and the war of words as it is being called, and we do like a and over egging things. look who's not talking. henry. this is the business secretary on the chancellor at odds over whether they are going to intervene and what they will do about the energy crisis. it’s
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intervene and what they will do about the energy crisis. it's even weirder than _ about the energy crisis. it's even weirder than that, _ about the energy crisis. it's even weirder than that, there - about the energy crisis. it's even weirder than that, there are - about the energy crisis. it's even | weirder than that, there are odds over whether they are talking about whether they should intervene. it is a really, really peculiar story this and it's been a peculiar day trying to report what on earth is going on here. kwasi kwarteng did the morning media round interview on various outlets about the problem is that different factories and industries are having with surging energy prices and said that he and the chancellor were looking together at possible ways they might be able to help and very quickly, in fact at such a point that kwasi kwarteng had not finished his round of interviews came word from the treasury that said, oh, no, you are not, we've not been talking about this at all. really strange, really unusual slapped down and has produced a series of bad headline for the government because what else would they expect? i’m government because what else would they meet?— they expect? i'm 'ust going to exlain they expect? i'm 'ust going to explain that _ they expect? i'm 'ust going to explain that lizzy]— they expect? i'm just going to explain that lizzy can't - they expect? i'm just going to explain that lizzy can't hear i they expect? i'm just going to | explain that lizzy can't hear us they expect? i'm just going to i explain that lizzy can't hear us at the moment and only the colleagues
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in the gallery, so we will hopefully establish contact with her but until then, it's all on you. like the old days when we had one guess. i am glad you are laughing are not running for the hills. so, the problem here is the government needs to be speaking with one voice and businesses and consumers want to know what the covenant is doing. they would rather believe kwasi kwarteng, wouldn't they? absolutely the would kwarteng, wouldn't they? absolutely they would because _ kwarteng, wouldn't they? absolutely they would because kwasi _ kwarteng, wouldn't they? absolutely they would because kwasi kwarteng. they would because kwasi kwarteng was saying we are thinking about what more we can do. and if you listen to businesses, and it's not all businesses, it is energy intensive businesses, so chemicals, steel, paper, ceramics, businesses that basically have factories in which you need a lot of energy to do the work, and they are saying that they need the situation to change within weeks if not days, otherwise they might end up having to halt
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production, so it's quite serious if the government is not even able to say whether they are considering how they might help, let alone what they are considering that they might do. that is the substantive problem for business but then there is the weird second order problem that is not as important for lives and businesses but there is this weird question of what on earth has been going on between the treasury and the business department. i was speaking to treasury sources today he said look, in simple, it was a matter of correcting the record but it's a bit odd too in the process of correcting the record declare the business secretary has made things up in media interviews before. that secretary has made things up in media interviews before. that is the daily telegraph _ media interviews before. that is the daily telegraph headline, _ media interviews before. that is the daily telegraph headline, slapping l daily telegraph headline, slapping down kwasi kwarteng, accused of making up talks about bail out keep factories open and as you say, really undermining him. in quite unpleasant terms, saying we are not
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surprised, he's got form. yes. unpleasant terms, saying we are not surprised, he's got form.— surprised, he's got form. yes, and i asked treasury _ surprised, he's got form. yes, and i asked treasury sources, _ surprised, he's got form. yes, and i asked treasury sources, 0k, - surprised, he's got form. yes, and i asked treasury sources, 0k, what l surprised, he's got form. yes, and i | asked treasury sources, 0k, what is the form? no example sprang to my mind and i suppose i wouldn't necessarily know because the government always come out and accuse their own ministers of making things up, and i didn't get an answersoi things up, and i didn't get an answerso i kind things up, and i didn't get an answer so i kind of don't know. but the tone of the rebuke from the treasury does suggest there have been examples that have irked them before but i can't tell you what they are. but also, i think this is very unusual in borisjohnson's government. if this had happened in late 2018 and theresa may's government, and they would blame each other left right and centre, i wouldn't have been so surprised. but the fact it is happening now is very odd indeed. what does it tell you about what is going on in government that they allow it to become public. i think it says something about
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rishi sunak. rishi sunak has only had a very smooth run and that sounds weird for a chancellor who became chancellorjust before an unprecedented pandemic and financial emergency, but some of rishi sunak�*s critics say that the fellow scheme has been relatively straightforward and he has been handing money to people in the state has basically been paying peoples wages but now a lot of the difficult decisions are starting to bite and we have a budget coming up towards the end of the month, spending review and every department and government thinks it has the most pressing and urgent needs from him and rishi sunak is having to make difficult decisions so i do wonder whether a part of this is frustration that as he grapples with difficult decisions, yet another difficult decision has come out of nowhere and he feels like the business secretary blindsided him by going on tv this morning and saying the chancellor was going to be helping. let morning and saying the chancellor was going to be helping.— was going to be helping. let me exlain was going to be helping. let me exalain what _ was going to be helping. let me explain what is _ was going to be helping. let me explain what is going _ was going to be helping. let me explain what is going on. - was going to be helping. let me explain what is going on. you i was going to be helping. let me - explain what is going on. you might have heard a few voices breaking
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through there. that is the gallery trying to contact lizzy and i think she is with us. have you joined us now? i she is with us. have you “oined us now? ~' she is with us. have you “oined us now? ~ ,., ., she is with us. have you “oined us now? ~ ., i. she is with us. have you “oined us now? ~ ., , ., ., m now? i think so. can you hear me? we can, what now? i think so. can you hear me? we can. what a — now? i think so. can you hear me? we can, what a relief. _ now? i think so. can you hear me? we can, what a relief. sorry— now? i think so. can you hear me? we can, what a relief. sorry i'm _ now? i think so. can you hear me? we can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. - can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. it's one of— can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. it's one of those _ can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. it's one of those things. - can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. it's one of those things. we - can, what a relief. sorry i'm late. it's one of those things. we are l it's one of those things. we are kind of use to it and henry has done a fantasticjob. lizzie's turn now. yes, are you poised? we are moving onto the financial times and the headline is, gupta buys time with fresh £50,000,000 cash injection for uk steel plants and this is the story that broke this evening where liberty, the third biggest steel maker in the country are to reopen the rotherham plant, much to the relief, i guess, of about a thousand workers. , ., �* , workers. yes, that's right. so there have been clouds _ workers. yes, that's right. so there have been clouds of— workers. yes, that's right. so there have been clouds of uncertainty - have been clouds of uncertainty hanging — have been clouds of uncertainty hanging over thousands of workers 'obs hanging over thousands of workers jobs for— hanging over thousands of workers jobs for quite a long time now since
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the collapse of green cell capital in march — the collapse of green cell capital in march and viewers might remember because _ in march and viewers might remember because of— in march and viewers might remember because of david cameron's the former— because of david cameron's the former conservative prime minister's involvement with that firm. they were _ involvement with that firm. they were the — involvement with that firm. they were the big backer of this firm, and it's— were the big backer of this firm, and it's been an issue for the future — and it's been an issue for the future of— and it's been an issue for the future of the steel plants in the uk at liberty— future of the steel plants in the uk at liberty steel, so this is a really— at liberty steel, so this is a really good bit of news that basically the parent company of liberty— basically the parent company of liberty steel has done some restructuring which has meant that they have — restructuring which has meant that they have the money, i think {50,000,000 to put into their uk operations, so saving potentially hundreds— operations, so saving potentially hundreds ofjobs at their plant in rotherham but obviously there are still long—running questions about the future — still long—running questions about the future of the company and it is still a _ the future of the company and it is still a huge — the future of the company and it is still a huge amount of debt, so lots of people _ still a huge amount of debt, so lots of people will be breathing a sigh of people will be breathing a sigh of retief— of people will be breathing a sigh of relief about this tonight but
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there — of relief about this tonight but there are still ongoing questions about— there are still ongoing questions about the long—term future. just about the long-term future. just briefl , about the long-term future. just briefly. they _ about the long-term future. just briefly, they are _ about the long—term future. jut briefly, they are reopening a steel plant at a time when energy costs are soaring in an energy intensive industry. are soaring in an energy intensive indust . .,~ ., are soaring in an energy intensive indust . ., ., industry. speaking to government toda , industry. speaking to government today. steel _ industry. speaking to government today. steel is — industry. speaking to government today, steel is one _ industry. speaking to government today, steel is one of— industry. speaking to government today, steel is one of the - industry. speaking to government today, steel is one of the two - today, steel is one of the two industries, chemicals being another that they are most immediately worried about and the steel sector sounding the alarm saying that they are grappling with energy costs five times higher than at this point last year so in the very near term, it's good news for the employees of liberty steel, but give it a few weeks and things might turn sour again particularly rishi sunak has not taken kwasi kwarteng's call. jn not taken kwasi kwarteng's call. in the top corner of the eye newspaper, health chief warns of office return amid twin pandemic fears. this is people being encouraged to go back to the office and some people
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running a campaign to get people to go back to the office but the warning that it you come down with coronavirus and flew at the same time, it's very dangerous.- coronavirus and flew at the same time, it's very dangerous. yes, we had doctor— time, it's very dangerous. yes, we had doctorjenny — time, it's very dangerous. yes, we had doctorjenny harries _ time, it's very dangerous. yes, we had doctorjenny harries the - time, it's very dangerous. yes, we | had doctorjenny harries the former deputy— had doctorjenny harries the former deputy chief medical officer who was a familiar— deputy chief medical officer who was a familiar face from quite a lot of government press conferences, particularly last year, she is heading _ particularly last year, she is heading up this new health security agency— heading up this new health security agency and has given this warning about— agency and has given this warning about the — agency and has given this warning about the twin threat of coronavirus and flu _ about the twin threat of coronavirus and flu circulating at the same time because _ and flu circulating at the same time because this time last year we were heading _ because this time last year we were heading into effectively the november lockdown and there are already— november lockdown and there are already widespread restrictions on daily life _ already widespread restrictions on daily life and the tier system was in place — daily life and the tier system was in place around this time of year, so people — in place around this time of year,
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so people won't circulating in the community the way they are now, so there _ community the way they are now, so there is— community the way they are now, so there is this — community the way they are now, so there is this issue of everybody returning — there is this issue of everybody returning to daily life in the normal— returning to daily life in the normal way and trying to live with coronavirus — normal way and trying to live with coronavirus with this kind of added flu that— coronavirus with this kind of added flu that normally exists anyway at this time — flu that normally exists anyway at this time of year. doctor harries made _ this time of year. doctor harries made an— this time of year. doctor harries made an interesting point in the piece _ made an interesting point in the piece about the fact that flu is quite — piece about the fact that flu is quite a — piece about the fact that flu is quite a serious condition and we often _ quite a serious condition and we often think a cold is flu and you take _ often think a cold is flu and you take a — often think a cold is flu and you take a day— often think a cold is flu and you take a day off work and you feel a bit take a day off work and you feel a hit rotten— take a day off work and you feel a bit rotten and that's it. but actually _ bit rotten and that's it. but actually something like 11,000 people — actually something like 11,000 people have died of flu —related complications in the last five years so the _ complications in the last five years so the flu — complications in the last five years so the flu is — complications in the last five years so the flu is nojoke and coupled with coronavirus it is something that the — with coronavirus it is something that the government and the wider health— that the government and the wider health service in particular are worried — health service in particular are worried about.— health service in particular are worried about. �* ., ., , ., , worried about. another health story with the guardian _ worried about. another health story with the guardian within _ worried about. another health story with the guardian within nhs - worried about. another health story| with the guardian within nhs waiting list triggers tide of abuse against staff and the point being how times have changed when people were standing out at eight o'clock on a thursday night to applaud the nhs.
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it's really concerning the story. i supposed to some extent it might be an indication that things might be going back to normalfor ill or good. because the problem of abuse and in the health service is not a new one on though it might have abated in the period of time where so that people were so grateful to health workers, but, yes, this is very concerning and probably is a problem that is not going away any time soon because there are all sorts of warnings about staff shortfalls, notjust nurses, so it's problem that there are practical measures that can reduce the problems for nurses who have worked so hard without much break at all as coronavirus was sweeping the country, getting on for two years
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ago. country, getting on for two years auo. ~ ., country, getting on for two years a a 0. . ., ., country, getting on for two years auo.~ ., ., ago. well done for coping with another curve _ ago. well done for coping with another curve ball _ ago. well done for coping with another curve ball because - ago. well done for coping with | another curve ball because that ago. well done for coping with - another curve ball because that was not supposed to be on the running order. j’d not supposed to be on the running order. �* ., not supposed to be on the running order. �* . ., , | not supposed to be on the running order-_ i knowl order. i'd read it anyway. i know ou did, order. i'd read it anyway. i know you did, because _ order. i'd read it anyway. i know you did, because you _ order. i'd read it anyway. i know you did, because you are - order. i'd read it anyway. i know you did, because you are a - order. i'd read it anyway. i know you did, because you are a pro, | order. i'd read it anyway. i know- you did, because you are a pro, back to what we were meant to be discussing, here we have the back page of the metro and i imagine you are massive boxing fans, i am the greatest, i could beat any man in history says tyson fury after stunning victory. this was a real slugfest. 11 rounds of these two future men hitting each other very hard. and both of them going down. it's an extraordinary spectacle and it's an extraordinary spectacle and i don't know if you are a fan, lizzy, whether you approve a boxing or not, but millions of people were gripped by this bout last night. j’m gripped by this bout last night. i'm not normally a huge boxing fan but it was— not normally a huge boxing fan but it was quite the spectacle and one of the _ it was quite the spectacle and one of the things i found entertaining in the _ of the things i found entertaining in the papers is that they have gone
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round _ in the papers is that they have gone round for— in the papers is that they have gone round for round and absolutely pummelled each other and then tyson fury went— pummelled each other and then tyson fury went on a huge night out afterwards to celebrate his great victory, — afterwards to celebrate his great victory, which i think is absolutely in the _ victory, which i think is absolutely in the spirit — victory, which i think is absolutely in the spirit of somebody who has declared — in the spirit of somebody who has declared themselves the greatest of all time, _ declared themselves the greatest of alltime, so declared themselves the greatest of all time, so i very much enjoyed that _ all time, so i very much en'oyed that. , , ., ., that. this is a headline where you think of muhammad _ that. this is a headline where you think of muhammad ali _ that. this is a headline where you - think of muhammad ali immediately, this was his catchphrase. most of us have far too modest to ever comment on how good we are at anything. but this is what boxing is about. are this is what boxing is about. are not a huge _ this is what boxing is about. fife: not a huge boxing this is what boxing is about. fif'e: not a huge boxing fan this is what boxing is about. fife: not a huge boxing fan but it always seems from the way in odd one — onwards it's about as much a clash of personality and psychology and you do think of mohamed ali when you see the headline. tyson fury is not far off and having a similarly big personality and i'm sure it doesn't match mohamed ali, but whether he is the greatest actual boxer, i think people who have watched a fair few mounts than me would be a better
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judge. at mounts than me would be a better 'udue. : :, , , . mounts than me would be a better 'udue.: :, , , . , judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st- _ judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st. - _ judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st. - 20st, _ judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st. - 20st, i— judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st. - 20st, i wouldn't- judge. a towering presence, six foot nine and 10st. - 20st, i wouldn't go| nine and 10st. — 20st, i wouldn't go near him, i would run a mile. nine and 10st. — 20st, i wouldn't go near him, iwould run a mile. j near him, iwould run a mile. i would definitely run a mile. near him, i would run a mile. i| would definitely run a mile. i'm near him, i would run a mile. 1. would definitely run a mile. i'm not surrised would definitely run a mile. i'm not surprised either— would definitely run a mile. i'm not surprised either of _ would definitely run a mile. i'm not surprised either of you _ surprised either of you seem particular aficionados of the great game. that incredible sport. lizzie, i am glad you joined us in the end and we will see more of your half—past 11, i hope, and henry, thank you for getting started in this first paper review and they will be back again for another look at the front pages at half past 11 and join us then. coming up next it is ros adkins examining of the uk is on target to reach its 2050 net zero emissions goal.
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the cop26 the c0 p26 climate the cop26 climate summit in glasgow is almost here, and one goal keeps coming up. net zero. met is almost here, and one goal keeps coming up. net zero.— is almost here, and one goal keeps coming up. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom _ coming up. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is _ coming up. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is committed - coming up. net zero. net zero. the united kingdom is committed to i united kingdom is committed to achieving — united kingdom is committed to achieving net— united kingdom is committed to achieving net zero _ united kingdom is committed to achieving net zero greenhouse l united kingdom is committed to . achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions — achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions lry— achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. _ net zero is defined as the point where: . in other words, a country reaches net zero when its c02 output matches the c02 it takes out of the atmosphere. and commitments are being made. china wants to reach net zero by 2060, the us by 2050 and, as we heard, the uk by 2050, too. in total, more than 130 countries have either set or are considering a net zero target. and as host of cop26, the uk is pushing its importance. we need to pledge collectively to achieve carbon neutrality, net zero, by the middle of the century, and that will be
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an amazing moment if we can do it. so far, so enthusiastic. but the climate activist greta thunberg is unimpressed by what she is hearing from world leaders. "build back better", blah, blah, blah. cheering and applause. "green economy", blah, blah, blah. "net zero by 25 — 2050", blah, blah, blah. the demand is for more actions, not more words, and ahead of its hosting of cop26, i want to look at the uk and how it is approaching net zero, because there are concerns. we've cop26 coming up and the world needs to see real progress at that cop and one of the things that will really help is if the host nation is seen to be really serious about it, and that entails looking coherent, notjust having a few headline statements. now, borisjohnson has outlined some aspects of his net zero plan. this week, he announced all the uk's electricity will come from clean energy by 2035.
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already, he'd said no sales of new petrol or diesel cars from 2030. there will be a ban on gas boilers in new homes from 2025, too. and there are other commitments as well. but they may not be enough. back injune, we heard this warning from the chief executive of a committee that advises the government. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very off track — very, very substantially off track. really only about 20% of the policy commitments that the government has made would take us towards the goal of net zero emissions. in a report to parliament, that same committee noted: . it went on: now, the uk government does not dispute that more detail is needed, and it's coming. here's this the financial times reporting:
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and in a major speech this week, the chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak did not mention how to fund net zero. in fact, he did not mention climate at all. so we'll have to wait for his spending review. and some argue the delay in releasing the net zero strategy has already created a problem — lord devon's chair of the same advisory committee we heard from earlier — and he told the guardian the delay has left a space for people to: ..and says that net zero: well, one of the people lord devon refers to is steve baker. he is an influential backbench conservative mp. and while they have quite different views of net zero, steve baker echoes the need for more detail. what politicians have not done — and enthusiasts for all of this have not done — is explain to the publicjust
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how real and impactful this will is gonna be. it will change the way we work, the way we relax, the way we transport ourselves, it will change even what we eat. no doubt there are going to be real and impactful changes and central to the discussion around them is cost. mark wallace of the conservative home website thinks steve baker has a point. i think people hear an awful lot of discussion about the importance of net zero. quite a lot less, as steve says, discussion about how. and almost no discussion about how the actual cost — the financial and economic implications. but there have been studies on this. the uk's independent office for budget responsibility says reaching net zero by 2050 could cost £1.1i trillion. it also said it would be cheaper to act than not to act. another report from last year concludes that: ..and adds:
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now, to clear, these are costs to be shared between the state, business and households. and not everyone sees the pursuit of net zero in terms of rising costs. this is the chairman of the conservative party. i don't believe that there is this trade—off between addressing the environment and the cost of living because i think if we get these measures right, we can actually save people money — for example, better insulation over time will reduce your energy bills. and if that is a positive projection for households, some see net zero as an economic positive on a national level. sam hall from the conservative environment network argues: and as we consider the uk and net zero, there is one issue that combines these national and household considerations. it's heating. domestic heating accounts for around
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14% of all uk emissions. home gas boilers produce twice as much c02 — the main greenhouse gas — as all of the uk's gas—fired power stations — that's according to one recent study. those gas boilers need to go and they will be replaced with technology like heat pumps. the question is how? my newsnight colleagues turned to this. reporter: can you see 30 million | of these going into british homes| over the next 30 years? is it feasible at the moment, do you think? personally, no, idon't. i don't think we will get there. there's power issues as well as supply issues as well as labour issues. i can't get enough engineers for my company, and i'm only a small company. shifting the uk's heating will require labour, skills and persuasion. and for net zero to be persuasive, well, it will need to feel fair. that issue came up in this article by the conservative mp esther mcvey. she wrote:
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now, of course, many don't agree with that, but esther mcvey�*s article illustrates the broader point that if net zero does not feel fair, some woln't buy into it. one recent survey found that half of people support making technological and lifestyle changes. a separate poll found almost half of uk adults support the plan to ban gas boilers. it is, though, hard to gauge this because people still have not been told exactly what they will have to do. what is certain, though, is that half the population on side will not be enough for net zero. as the business body the cbi puts it: we will see if more detail on what this involves helps or hinders that. and while we wait for that detail,
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there is a risk the focus on the long—term goal of net zero distracts from doing something right now. let's return to that clip of greta thunberg. this is all we hearfrom our so—called leaders — words. words that sound great but so far has led to no action. the un's language is different but its message is similar. it says: unless there is any doubt, that is not happening yet. the un says planned cuts by 2030 fall far short, and this is the uk's climate action champion. all of this is worth bearing in mind
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as we watch borisjohnson and his father stanley promoting the net zero policy. it's a goal that is at once hugely important and potentially irrelevant because net zero only matters if governments take action now to sharply reduce emissions and take action now to make net zero possible by the middle of the century. if that does not happen, by the time net zero arrives, it will be too late. last week brought as heavy rain followed by warm weather and the week ahead, things will be dry and rain merely confined to the north of scotland but it will be cooler temperatures will be average but there will be incursions of chilly air towards the north and east at times, all running round the eastern edge of an area of high pressure that will dominate through the week
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which is what is happening into monday but we are on the edge of it so we will have a chilly start, certainly compared with the morning commute we saw at the end of last week, much cooler out there with temperatures in mid— to single figures as we start the day. a lot of dry weather to begin with for england, wales and northern ireland and a bit patchy mist and fog with good sunny spells. hazy sunshine with a weather front pushing on across the north of scotland where the rain will be persistent in the highlands and western isles and some of the rain will extend erratically to parts of southern scotland, may be the far north of england that most places away from the north will stay dry. still breezy not as much as it has been in northern scotland but still pleasantly warm with a hazy sunshine further south up to around 16 or17, hazy sunshine further south up to around 16 or 17, a degree or so above where we should be four october at this stage. 0n above where we should be four october at this stage. on monday night the weatherfront october at this stage. on monday night the weather front is still there bringing rain and drizzle across parts of scotland and also across parts of scotland and also across eastern parts of england but it means more cloud around and
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temperatures should drop too much but there will be clear skies in the south and some mist and fog and a chilly start to tuesday and we could also see some aurora hopefully on monday night but cloud amounts will be crucial and that is because we have a weather front draped in across the eastern edge and the exact position could change a little bit but certainly across parts of scotland, may be in the north and east of england, the chance of light rain or drizzle and on the eastern edge we will have colder air with temperatures around ten or 12 in parts of eastern england whereas the rest of the weather will see 18 possible with sunshine breaking through in the cloud, a bit more sunshine and dry on wednesday and a westerly drift which should warm up again, back into the mid teens and only a few showers across the far north and north—west of scotland but as we going to thursday, heavy rain pushes south across scotland which will bring colder conditions into the north as we go through the latter stages of the week with potentially overnight frost but it does get colder, although it stays dry.
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welcome to newsday. the headlines. inside the world of north korea. a former official tells us they will never give up their nuclear powers. tina klara daesh and will never be achieved. it is tied to his power level. , ., achieved. it is tied to his power level. , :, level. tie when says it will not bow to bei'ina level. tie when says it will not bow to beijing because _ level. tie when says it will not bow to beijing because my _ level. tie when says it will not bow to beijing because my pressure - level. tie when says it will not bow to beijing because my pressure to| to beijing because my pressure to reunite with china. warnings in the uk that factories could be shutdown as high energy costs bite. new

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