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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. taiwan's president uses the island's national day to insist it won't bow to beijing's pressure to reunify with china. we will continue to bolster our national defence and demonstrate our determination to defend ourselves, so that no one can force taiwan to take the path china has laid out for us. uk�*s steel maker, liberty, announces plans to re open its rotherham steel plant, with the majority of its furloughed workers all set to return when operations restart later this month. pakistan has held a state funeral for the the man regarded as the father of its nuclear programme, abdul qadeer khan. and new research warns that the loss of biodiversity
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risks tipping the world into �*ecological meltdown�*. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. china has accused taiwan's president of inciting confrontation, as tensions over the island's future continue to escalate. beijing says president tsai ing wuhn distorted the facts in a speech marking the island's national day. she had responded defiantly that to a message about responding with china. china's communist needle is
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the other part of the territory had last week china sent on unprecedented number of military aircraft into taiwan's air defence zone. translation: we will continue to bolster our national defence and demonstrate our determination to defend ourselves, so that no one can force taiwan to take the path china has laid out for us. this force taiwan to take the path china has laid out for us.— has laid out for us. this is because the ath has laid out for us. this is because the path that _ has laid out for us. this is because the path that china _ has laid out for us. this is because the path that china has _ has laid out for us. this is because the path that china has laid - has laid out for us. this is because the path that china has laid out. the path that china has laid out offers neither free nor the path that china has laid out offers neitherfree nor democratic way of life or taiwan nor sovereignty for our 23,000,000 people. we have got the latest from john sudworth who is in taiwan. i think it is unlikely that the address today was a direct response, word for word with what xi jinping said yesterday, her remarks will have been planned in advance, but as you say, china has reacted. this been planned in advance, but as you say, china has reacted.— say, china has reacted. this is clearly china _ say, china has reacted. this is clearly china pushing - say, china has reacted. this is clearly china pushing back. . say, china has reacted. this is clearly china pushing back. it| say, china has reacted. this is - clearly china pushing back. it shows you just how far we have come, i
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think, from the era just a decade or so ago, when the two sides looked to potentially be able to find a compromise, putting aside their differences, essentially kicking the vexed question of exactly what taiwan was down the line and strengthening business ties. the president made it very clear today that that era is over because the direction that china is taking, it is growing increasingly authoritarian and she sight of what happened in hong kong as a warning to the people of taiwan and she is saying that it is taiwan's democracy, its unique identity that needs emphasising and this was really an appeal to allies, two allies in the region like japan, but also further afield and particular, an appeal to washington. so, tensions between china and taiwan are at their worst for a0 years. but how did we get here? china and taiwan were divided during a civil war in the 1940s,
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but beijing insists the island will be reclaimed at some point, by force if necessary. taiwan has its own constitution, democratically elected leaders and about 300,000 active troops. flint? democratically elected leaders and about 300,000 active troops. only a few countries — about 300,000 active troops. only a few countries recognise _ about 300,000 active troops. only a few countries recognise taiwan, - about 300,000 active troops. only a | few countries recognise taiwan, most recognise the chinese government in beijing instead. the us has no formal diplomatic relations with taiwan but does have a law that requires it to provide the island with the means to defend itself. rana mitter, director of oxford university's china center says there's a battle of narratives across the taiwan strait: essentially, the people's republic of china under xijinping argues that the reunification of the mainland of china with the island of taiwan is the last unfinished business of the cold war, it was 1949 when the two parts essentially slipped from each other and they are getting more urgent in their
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rhetoric about them coming together. on the taiwan site, as you heard, the story is very different. that is of an island that has been separated for more than seven decades from the mainland, which has become a liberal democracy, free media, very different from the authoritarian state on the mainland and cannot see anything attractive about the idea of being unified. two sides of a narrow strip of water but with very different stories about the future. things have been simmering for a long time, why do you think things have started to bubble now? fine have started to bubble now? one could argue _ have started to bubble now? one could argue that _ have started to bubble now? que: could argue that the have started to bubble now? iez could argue that the leader have started to bubble now? i2 could argue that the leader of china is in a big hurry, because he has now stated over and over again as part of his own assertion of identity that unifying china with taiwan is part of the wider sense of what he calls the great renaissance of china and in his view that means bringing the territory together and then projecting china's influence and power, economically and otherwise around the world. because
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taiwan is now a democracy, over and over again, the population, more than 25,000,000 people has voted not to support parties who look for that close a relationship, so he knows he will not get through an electoral decision and he knew this is why threats of military or perhaps more economic sanctions or pressure are becoming more audible in the voices from beijing. that becoming more audible in the voices from beijing-— from beijing. that puts the international— from beijing. that puts the international community i from beijing. that puts the international community in j from beijing. that puts the i international community in an awkward position, doesn't it? that is riaht, i awkward position, doesn't it? that is right, i would _ awkward position, doesn't it? that is right, i would say _ awkward position, doesn't it? t�*iat is right, i would say that president joe biden of the us is probably the person at the moment doing the most worrying about where this will go. there was a news item that leaked out a week ago that about a couple of dozen us military trainers have been working on taiwan to try and train up the aisle and's own defences, this had not previously been known but leaked out and it seemed to be symbolic of a wider sense, although the us will not officially recognise taiwan as a
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separate state, it is making it clearer that it wants to help it defend itself against any attack from the mainland and that would be a concern notjust to the us but also japan, south korea, the philippines and a range of other us allies in the region and taiwan's spaceis allies in the region and taiwan's space is important for the people who live there but notjust important to them. here in the uk, it'sjust been announced that the third largest steel maker, liberty, has announced plans to re open its plant in rotherham in the north of england the company says the large majority of its one thousand workers who have been on furlough, will return when operations restart later this month. our business correspondent, katie prescott is here tell us more. this has been long in the planning and it is all part of our refinancing of the liberties steel plants and the workers will be delighted today that this has been confirmed. it may raise questions
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with viewers about why now, we are hearing a lot about steel industries being in difficulties because of high energy prices and this is probably not the time that liberty would have chosen to reopen the plant, but at the moment they are trying to sell its sister plant and by keeping this one alive, as it were, keeping workers in place, showing it is viable, it is a way of attracting a buyer, but it is really, really a difficult time to be running a steel plant. the chink of light here is really that demand for steel has remained pretty high, the price is still pretty high as well, as a result and if they can keep going through this difficult period of high energy prices, the hope is that the plant will emerge stronger than before. you hope is that the plant will emerge stronger than before. you touched on it a little bit. — stronger than before. you touched on it a little bit, but— stronger than before. you touched on it a little bit, but give _ stronger than before. you touched on it a little bit, but give the _ it a little bit, but give the audience more of an understanding of where the uk economy is right now, things have been very tough. essen; things have been very tough. every time i things have been very tough. every time i speak— things have been very tough. every time i speak to _ things have been very tough. every time i speak to business _ things have been very tough. e2 time i speak to business leaders i hear it described as an absolutely
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perfect storm, there are so many issues hitting businesses as we have come out of the pandemic, talking about supply chain issues that are hitting businesses around the globe, rising energy costs, they said that they are particularly hitting heavy industry very hard, a shortage in labour supplies, difficult industry very hard, a shortage in laboursupplies, difficult for labour supplies, difficult for businesses laboursupplies, difficult for businesses here to get workers and thatis businesses here to get workers and that is partly a result of leaving the european union and losing the free movement of people that we used to have between uk and europe. there is a huge amount going on that businesses are really trying to juggle. it may well surprise people to have this piece of good news, but there are things that are quite specific to this company and quite specific to this company and quite specific to this plant and the hope is, i think, specific to this plant and the hope is, ithink, as specific to this plant and the hope is, i think, as with all businesses at the moment, that they can ride out this perfect storm until things come down. out this perfect storm until things come down-— out this perfect storm until things come down. katie, thank you very much. the man regarded as the father of pakistan's nuclear programme, abdul qadeer khan, has died
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at the age of eighty five. the atomic scientist was hailed by many pakistanis as a national hero for making his country the first islamic nuclear power in 1998 but widely condemned elsewhere. he was given a state funeral. shumaila jaffery�*s report from islamabad starts with flashing images. abdul qadeer khan, the father of pakistan's nuclear programme was given a hero's farewell, he was laid to rest with full state honour in islamabad. wrapped in the pakistani flag, his coffin was carried by a contingent of the pakistan military. despite heavy rain, his funeral players were attended by cabinet ministers, high ranking officials and a large number of people. translation: a great man, loyalty pakistan has died. he translation: a great man, loyalty pakistan has died.— pakistan has died. he is the only pakistani to _ pakistan has died. he is the only pakistani to be _ pakistan has died. he is the only pakistani to be honoured - pakistan has died. he is the only pakistani to be honoured twice i pakistan has died. he is the only i pakistani to be honoured twice with the highest civilian award. bbdui
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the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan _ the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan is _ the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan is revered - the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as - the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as a - the highest civilian award. abdul qadeer khan is revered as a national hero for giving the islamic world its only nuclear bomb. but his legacy was also marred by allegations of smuggling the technology to countries like iran and libya. he was put under house arrest in 2004 after he confessed on state television of selling nuclear secrets. i state television of selling nuclear secrets. . ~ state television of selling nuclear secrets. ., ~ , , , , secrets. i take full responsibility and secure _ secrets. i take full responsibility and secure pardon. _ secrets. i take full responsibility| and secure pardon. international condemnation _ and secure pardon. international condemnation did _ and secure pardon. international condemnation did nothing - and secure pardon. international condemnation did nothing to - and secure pardon. internationall condemnation did nothing to dent and secure pardon. international- condemnation did nothing to dent his popularity among the masses. translation: today, the whole nation is saddened. he translation: today, the whole nation is saddened. . , translation: today, the whole nation is saddened. ., , ., ., is saddened. he was loyal to the country and _ is saddened. he was loyal to the country and made _ is saddened. he was loyal to the country and made pakistan - is saddened. he was loyal to the country and made pakistan a - is saddened. he was loyal to the - country and made pakistan a nuclear uowen _ country and made pakistan a nuclear uowen it_ country and made pakistan a nuclear uowen it is— country and made pakistan a nuclear power. it is regrettable _ country and made pakistan a nuclear power. it is regrettable how- country and made pakistan a nuclear power. it is regrettable how he - country and made pakistan a nuclear power. it is regrettable how he was. power. it is regrettable how he was treated~ _ power. it is regrettable how he was treated. �* , ,, ., ., ., , treated. abdul qadeer khan was widely respected _ treated. abdul qadeer khan was widely respected in _ treated. abdul qadeer khan was widely respected in pakistan - treated. abdul qadeer khan was widely respected in pakistan for| treated. abdul qadeer khan was i widely respected in pakistan for his contribution to the country's security, especially for bringing pakistan on a par with india nuclear technology. his house arrest was
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endedin technology. his house arrest was ended in february, 2009, but his movements were strictly guarded until his death. let's get some of the day's other news. at least five people are reported to have been killed and others wounded in a car bomb attack in the city of aden in yemen. local reports say the blast targeted a convoy accompanying the local governor and a government minister. both men are reported to have survived. the government has been fighting the rebel houthi movement for many years. the czech president milos zeman has been rushed to intensive care at a hospital in prague. he was in the middle of deciding who he'll invite to form a new government, following parliamentary elections. he'd just held talks with prime minister andrej babis, a close ally. thousands of people in poland have been attending rallies in support of the european union, following a controversial court ruling questioning the primacy of eu law. poland's opposition has accused the governing law and justice party of wanting to take the nation out of the eu a charge the government denies.
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today's rallies are supported by the former european council president, donald tusk, who now leads poland's biggest opposition party. energy officials in lebanon say the army has handed over some of its fuel to help restore the main electricity grid, a day after it shut down. the supply is only expected to last three days, but it means the country's two main power plants can start working again. iraqis have voted in a parliamentary election that was held early in response to mass protests that erupted two years ago. iraqi leaders said the vote was a chance for reform, but there appears to have been a low turnout in much of the country. some iraqis boycotted the vote, while others felt that there was little point in participating as it was unlikely to bring change. viola von cramon from the eu election observation mission to iraq oversaw the vote.
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the relatively low turnout of this election says a lot, but it is not up election says a lot, but it is not up to me now to make a final judgment and assessment on this, it is a clear political signal and one can only hope that it will be heard ljy can only hope that it will be heard by the politicians and by the political elite of iraq. bbc arabic�*s murad shishani told me about the leadup to the election, from the iraqi city of mosul. the progress in 2019, they presented a sort of package of demands, as they told me. this package included an early election, but the government authorities thought of only one condition, they asked for fighting corruption, disarming the militias, asking for political reform, more engagement for youth, therefore as the government, as it did not meet all the demands for the
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protesters, then the boycotting campaigns have become stronger, day after day here in iraq. this is what we have noticed in a city like mossel, which has been liberated for years from the so—called islamic state, but the devastating situation is still there and people were reluctant to go to the polling stations. what could change that? the iraqi people are asking for a new country, notjust our iraq divided by sectarianism,. they are asking for more share in the power. all this service of political demands are in the presence in these elections. the headlines on bbc news... taiwan's president uses the island's national day to insist it won't bow to beijing's pressure to reunify with china. uk�*s steel maker, liberty, announces plans to re open steel plant in rotherham,
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with the majority of its furloughed workers set to return later this month. new research warns that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into �*ecological meltdown�*. sport and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, thank you. let us start with formula 1 because max verstappen has retaken the lead of the drivers championship after a turkish grand prix won by valtteri bottas, after starting from 11, lewis hamilton got as high as third until a late pit stop dropped him back down to fifth. his mercedes team—mate took the chequered flag for the first time this season. i feel like i should have stayed out, my gut feeling was to stay and i
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feel i should have done that. frustrated at myself for not following my gut, but i work as a team. i did the best i could with the advice i was given. irate team. i did the best i could with the advice i was given. we maximise the advice i was given. we maximise the result, valtteri _ the advice i was given. we maximise the result, valtteri bottas _ the advice i was given. we maximise the result, valtteri bottas was - the result, valtteri bottas was faster. — the result, valtteri bottas was faster, but this weekend way behind in pace _ faster, but this weekend way behind in pace compared to mercedes and his race was— in pace compared to mercedes and his race was all— in pace compared to mercedes and his race was all about managing the tyres. _ race was all about managing the tyres, then we had to pit. it was not the — tyres, then we had to pit. it was not the most fun to drive it, normally— not the most fun to drive it, normally you want to push more, but as a team, _ normally you want to push more, but as a team, to— normally you want to push more, but as a team, to finish second and third _ as a team, to finish second and third tier— as a team, to finish second and third tier was a very good result. the dusi— third tier was a very good result. the dust is— third tier was a very good result. the dust is settling in las vegas after what was described as one of the greatest fights in history, it is after tyson fury retained his wbc heavyweight title with a gripping and brutal 11th round knockout victory over deontay wilder. it was a spectacular finish to what has been a bitter rivalry with tyson fury crowning himself as the
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greatest heavyweight of his era. i struggle to think of a better heavyweight boxing match up in recent years, the rivalry really built up because of bad blood and the fight more than delivered. tyson fury put him down in the third round and looked it will go down the same pattern as the first and then he put tyson fury down and their momentum shifted and then shifted back and then tyson fury eventually stopped him in the 11th round. it was a brilliant performance, both men deserve a lot of credit for the show they put on. deontay wilder will go down as the beta man but he should leave with his head held high, he took a lot of punishment but he survived and tyson fury, i spoke to him and he said it was one of the greatest nights of his life, he acknowledged he was hurt a few times and he said when he went down in the fourth round, it was a struggle to get up, but he always finds a way to win, that is what he said. he says
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he always finds a way to come back and he did that. this will go down as one of the greatest trilogies in heavyweight boxing history and for tyson fury, his quest to become the unified heavyweight champion of the world, to hold all the major belts, this keeps him on course to challenge for all of them and from the way he performed, you will struggle to see a better man, a truly brilliant performance and it puts an emphatic end to what was a brilliant rivalry between him and deontay wilder. to cricket, the england head coach says he is delighted to have the commitment from his strongest available players after naming the 17 man squad he is planning to take to australia for the ashes series later that in the year. injuries have ruled outjofra archer and ben stokes. he is recovering from finger surgery and taking an indefinite breakfrom recovering from finger surgery and taking an indefinite break from the game to parties his mental health whilejosh butler is included, ten out of the 17 will be touring for an
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ashes series for the first time. here is the full list. joe root leads the side to australia. james anderson and stuart broad are included but sam karen misses out after suffering a stress fracture in his lower back. just before we go, time to tell you that the nation league final between spain and france is ongoing and it is 1— one at the moment in milan. spain went ahead before karim benzema equalised ahead before karim benzema equalised a couple of minutes later for france. still one all, 50 minutes to go. sarah, thank you. the french authorities are calling on the british government to honour its promise to contribute more than 68 million dollars to help them prevent migrants from crossing into england by boat. hundreds of people have attempted the journey in the past two days alone, leading to further tension between france and the uk. simonjones reports.
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on a visit to calais, the french interior minister meets the officers on the frontline in the battle to stop migrants crossing the channel. some of their work is funded by the british taxpayer. very good injuly, home secretary priti patel promised an extra £54 million to double the number of patrols on the beaches in northern france and to pay for increased surveillance. but mr darmanin says that cash has yet to come. translation: the british - government has not yet paid us what they promised us. at the moment not a single euro has been handed over by the british, following the deal that i negotiated several months ago with priti patel. the english are an honourable nation, and i�*m sure it�*s just a small delay and they will keep their promise. priti patel recently threatened to withhold the money if the french authorities didn�*t prevent more crossings. france says it�*s now stopping 65% of those who attempt to set off. but hundreds of migrants have reached the uk on small boats in the past two days,
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including children and a baby. that brings the total for this year to around 18,000 people. the number arriving by lorry, though, is comparatively small — around 850 people detected between january and august. and overall, asylum claims fell by 4% in the past year. both britain and france agree that the dangerous journeys must be stopped, but there�*s no consensus on the best way to achieve this. the home office has said it�*s doing everything it can to support the french response and to target the criminals organising the crossings. simon jones, bbc news. new sign to say there is a risk nation�*s will be increasingly unable to meet the needs of their populations. the data suggest that the uk is one of the most nature depleted places in the world, ranking in the bottom 10% of all the
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countries. we have been to a nature reserve in the north of england. just outside the busy city of york is the askham bog, created by a retreating glacier 15,000 years ago. it�*s brimming with biodiversity. that�*s the name for all living things and how they fit together. but the uk is one of the most nature depleted countries in the world. a new report says thatjust 53% of our biodiversity is left — that is compared to a global average of 75%. that matters because biodiversity affects the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and we love. it is also what provides us with so many other basic needs. it is the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains break down.
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nature is at the base of our supply chains. the uk�*s lack of biodiversity is linked to the industrial revolution. intensive farming also plays its part. so what more can be done to protect special places like this? last year, the secretary of state turned down a plan to build 500 homes next door to this nature reserve. it is an extraordinary place, it holds between five and 10% of all the species in britain, and yet if we don�*t do anything at all we will lose more species than we already have from a place like this. if we get it right, if we allow the wider countryside to become nature which again, this is the place from which the surrounding land will be colonised, and that is true of all the other nature reserves across the country. tomorrow a week—long un biodiversity conference will begin virtually, hosted by china. negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. a decade ago, 20 targets were set, but none of them were met.
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scientists say this is our best chance for a sustainable future. olivia richwold, bbc news, near york. tens of thousands of climate protesters have marched through brussels, the first major climate march in belgium since the start of the pandemic. thousands call for further action to combat global warming. protesters carried banners and paraded in front of eu headquarters just and paraded in front of eu headquartersjust three and paraded in front of eu headquarters just three weeks ahead of the cup 26 climate conference. just time to show you live pictures from lipoma where a volcano has been erupting for the past three weeks. you can hear the sound as well if you listen carefully. molten lava as high as three story buildings have been rolling down the hillside while a series of tremors have rocked the area. we will leave you with those
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pictures on bbc news. goodbye. matt taylor has the weather. goodbye. good evening. if last week was described as warm, but also wet, especially earlier on, the week head looking cooler and drierfor especially earlier on, the week head looking cooler and drier for the vast majority of the country, some of the wettest conditions in the highlands and islands, cooler when the sunshine is out, quite pleasant, there will be sunshine and high pressure dominating the charts, but we will see high pressure creeping around into monday with increasing amounts of cloud over night in the western isles of scotland, patchy rain and drizzle by dawn, partly clear skies elsewhere, mist and fog and a much cooler night. temperatures still above where we would normally see them in october, but a fresh start to the monday morning commute. a lot of sunshine to begin, varying amounts of cloud,
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but a wet start to the highlands of scotland, the rain is relentless throughout the day, rain shadow to the south and days, a few spots of rain in the south of scotland, mainly dry, sunny spells and even though not as windy as we saw in the north on monday, a gentle breeze in the south when the sun is out will still feel very pleasant, temperatures peaking around the mid teens for the vast majority. as we go into monday evening and overnight, still feeding on rain, that weather front in the north of scotland, but icy is starting to creep in south, east of england again, and that will bring increasing amounts of cloud keeping temperatures relative into monday, tuesday morning cellist in the south with a high pressure hose on. here is that whether front, it becomes a bit stuck. through the heart of scotland into the east of scotland, increasing amounts of cloud, the chance of rain and drizzle at times, either side a little bit of sunshine, temperatures could get to
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around 17 or 18 but that weather front also limits warmer to colder air, chillier conditions across the east and that is the same as we go into wednesday, that pushes out as we develop more of a westerly breeze, temperatures lifting along the eastern coast relative to what we have seen on tuesday, the best of the sunny spells in the west, one or two showers dotted around, a lot of dry weather to come, but an incursion of cold air and rain into friday in the north—east of scotland and were generally in the west this weekend. see you soon.
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the headlines. beijing has criticised a speech from the taiwan president saying it incited confrontation and distorted facts.
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the president used the island�*s national day to insist it would not bow to beijing�*s pressure to reunify with china. uk steel liberty has announced plans to reopen its rotherham plant with around 1,000 furloughed workers returning to operations later this month. the man regarded as the father of pakistan�*s nuclear programme has died. he was regarded by many pakistanis as a national hero but was widely condemned elsewhere for having smuggled nuclear technology to iran, libya and north korea. polls have closed and votes are being counted in iraq in an election called early after months of anti—government protest. the vote has been marked by iraq�*s emma not — economic crisis and sectarian division. new research suggests the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown and scientists say it is possible nations will be able to meet the needs of their populations.

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