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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm... the government as if he is a feeling to ask in high energy costs impacting on manufacturers, as businesses call for help. the government _ businesses call for help. tue: government acknowledges businesses call for help. tte: government acknowledges the problem. i am speaking to the industry all the time, and gas prices have quadrupled this year, and they are making an impact. a warning on catching covid and flu at the same time and how that could double the risk of death. the irish foreign minister says the uk's new demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause �*a breakdown in relations' with the european union. it's a knockout britain's tyson fury defeats the american deontay wilder in the 11th round to retain his heavyweight title in las vegas.
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scientists warned that the loss of biodiversity risks are tipping the world into ecological meltdown. good afternoon. the business secretary says rising gas prices have created a critical situation for many industries and that he is looking at whether existing government support is sufficient. steel makers are among those warning that they may have to stop production because of the cost of energy. kwasi kwarteng said he was working with the chancellor on possible support but the treasury said no talks have taken place. here's our business correspondent katie prescott. catching up over sunday brunch. in the run up to winter, rising energy bills were the top talking point in this cafe.
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not least for the owner, as making coffee gets more expensive. i mainly worry that the prices won't change, because we have dealt with them in the current situation, the idea that in those places the same as 0k will be normalised. the business secretary this morning would not commit to lower energy bills for companies like this one. i think it is a critical situation. i am speaking to industry all the time, and the gas prices, which have quadrupled this year, are making an impact, and that is why, as you say, i'm speaking to people, listening, trying to work out a way forward. those industries that use a lot of energy for manufacturing say the time for working out a way forward has long gone. so if the situation is critical, which i certainly know it is, then why isn't government acting now, today, to address this problem for energy—intensive sectors such as the steel industry? because without that help, now,
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today, in the next week or so, then we are going to see significant and permanent damage to the uk steel sector. here is just how dramatic price rises have been over the past year. while households are protected by the energy price cap, that was a set when the price was 65p. it is now almost four times that. companies would like to see something similar in place to protect them from the global markets spikes. to cushion businesses through this period, the business secretary says he has requested extra funds from the treasury, a statement the treasury denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going on behind the scenes where kwasi kwarteng is saying warm words, quite like this, got to get it past the treasury, the truth is we need to have a plan and we need to get on with it. but also the truth is we should not be in a situation where we wait until there's a crisis and then react. here, though, it is not the political ping—pong that matters, rather what the cost
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of energy might do to the price of a cup of tea. earlier, bridget phillipson told us that the government needs to do more to support consumers and business. small businesses are seen risin: and business. small businesses are seen rising cost, _ and business. small businesses are seen rising cost, and _ and business. small businesses are seen rising cost, and the _ and business. small businesses are l seen rising cost, and the government is also putting up taxes at the moment, but isn't something we support. we need to see much more action to protect families and business. everything is getting more expensive— the weekly shop, finishing up your car, energy prices. on the government are also pulling away the £20 a big universal credit when families across the country just cannot afford to credit when families across the countryjust cannot afford to make up countryjust cannot afford to make up that different. we have not had, over the last decade, a real plan to support our energy industries, there are crucial to the future of our country. there are proposals, and the government should look carefully
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at them. more broadly, we are far more exposed as a country because safe government for the government pulled away that gas storage facility in 2017. also, we haven't had a proper plan from the government to support businesses around energy efficiency. the emissions from our buildings are going up and have been in recent years. the same is true in houses, and families are facing enormous pressures. there is a whole range of measures the government can and should be taken, but this government, overthe should be taken, but this government, over the last decade, they have not planned ahead. let's talk to one of the sectors affected by the rise in energy prices. simon ellin is the chief executive of the recycling association and joins me now. earlier, bridget phillipson told us that the government needs to do more how is your sector being affected? like everyone else, our costs are going through the roof. the humble
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cardboard box, for example, used in food, medicalsupplies, everything food, medical supplies, everything else, food, medicalsupplies, everything else, covid, home deliveries, the demand has been phenomenal. 85% of the car would be produced in europe comes from recycled sources. we need more capacity in the uk. the government are asking us to increase our recycling to 65% over the next ten years, and we are asking yourself, where all going? our energy costs of the highest in europe, and we cannot compete. and i think at the moment, with a high energy cost, the inevitability is that the consumable pack up the tab, i'm afraid. , ,., , . , that the consumable pack up the tab, i'm afraid. , , ., , i'm afraid. everybody wants some kind of government _ i'm afraid. everybody wants some kind of government support. - i'm afraid. everybody wants some kind of government support. why| kind of government support. why should it be _ kind of government support. “th3 should it be you? kind of government support. “my should it be you? on kind of government support. tie“t;: should it be you? on several kind of government support. m“t;.' should it be you? on several fronts, first, the government are asking us to increase to 65% recycled by 2035, and to do that we need markets for
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the material, we need investment. and while energy costs are high, we won't be able to get that investment. and we are very carbon efficient as an industry. the recycled paper industry, wejust efficient as an industry. the recycled paper industry, we just 44% less greenhouse gases discuss more emotion. we use 10% less energy than virgin materials, 50% less water, and already 50% comes from renewables. in terms of carbon efficiency, we are an amazing industry. to continue with that, we need a subsidy. it makes sense to invest in industries that are carbon efficient and can get carbon neutral to meet the targets. mite; efficient and can get carbon neutral to meet the targets.— to meet the targets. why wouldn't the government _ to meet the targets. why wouldn't the government say, _ to meet the targets. why wouldn't the government say, we _ to meet the targets. why wouldn't the government say, we will- to meet the targets. why wouldn't the government say, we will not . the government say, we will not subsidise shoe and send it abroad and have a with elsewhere? that subsidise shoe and send it abroad and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem. — and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem. and _ and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem, and to _ and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem, and to give _ and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem, and to give you - and have a with elsewhere? that is a big problem, and to give you an - big problem, and to give you an example, we collect 8 million tonnes of paper a year in the uk from your
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bins at home and from commercial sources. and 60% of that, we have to export. export is good and it's healthy for the balance of payments, and a lot of the time we send it back from peru came from, but overseas markets are shrinking. we also have overzealous regulation in the uk as well, so sometimes it is a perilous thing to do, and we are very exposed to global changes. so, it makes sense that we recycle more at home, and that is notjust going to happen unless we get these energy costs down and be competitive, because at the moment the rest of the world and europe, and with brexit, the they are all out competing us.— brexit, the they are all out competing us. brexit, the they are all out cometin us. ., ., , ., , competing us. how many “obs does our competing us. how many “obs does your sector — competing us. how many “obs does your sector support _ competing us. how many “obs does your sector support in _ competing us. how many jobs does your sector support in this - competing us. how many jobs does| your sector support in this country? i don't know the figure specifically, but across the whole supply chain, it“s massive, because
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it goes through from transport to collection to processing, you know, local council collections and commercial collections. and then there is a reprocessing sector. you know, it is in the millions. it is significant. and particularly after covid and everything else we face, under brexit, the perfect storm has been cooked up now with our fuel costs and increase customs costs, and less drivers and less vehicles. we are very worried that we will have a sustainable industry going forward. this requires investment, and plants, in machinery and in people. we will not achieve that if we go there where we're heading at the that is quite clear.— the that is quite clear. thank you very much _ the that is quite clear. thank you very much for— the that is quite clear. thank you very much for talking _ the that is quite clear. thank you very much for talking to - the that is quite clear. thank you very much for talking to us. - with the nhs winter flu jab campaign under way,
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there's a warning about the risk of catching both flu and covid at the same time. early evidence suggests you are twice as likely to die if you become infected with both viruses. those eligible for a flu jab are being encouraged to get it as soon as possible. here's our health correspondent anna collinson. viruses are released into the air when people infected with flu or covid—19 breathe out, speak, sing or sneeze... as this latest nhs campaign video warns, this winter will bring with it other dangers, not just covid. after very little of the flu virus circulating last year, it“s feared low immunity could result in tens of thousands of deaths in the coming months. then there is the threat of catching covid and flu at the same time. research shows those infected with both viruses are twice as likely to die, compared to covid alone. this is probably the first season where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating
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as well as flu. we do know, from the small amount of data that we've had previously, that people are at more significant risk of death and of serious illness if they are co—infected with flu and covid, and that doesn't seem to be, from our studies, a fact which many of the public understand. where are we now? england was the first nation in europe to fully unlock injuly. other countries have followed but have taken a more cautious approach. after a summer of increased human contact, infections have increased. as this graph shows, the uk has one of the highest covid rates in europe, well above that of france or germany. but if you look at the daily covid deaths, while the uk is still higher, a real concern for health leaders, the gap between the countries shrinks. this is an example of the power of the vaccination programme, providing vital protection to those most at risk. how will we cope this winter? the government hopes vaccines
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will protect us this winter, with more than two million booster jabs administered in england alone. to protect schoolchildren where infections are highest, covid vaccines are being rolled out to over 12s, while the nasal flu jab is available to under 16s. issues obtaining consent have caused delays, potentially to the end of november. concerned about health risks and disruption to education, experts say other measures should be brought in. we know that ventilation is highly effective. if you put an air filter in classrooms that can reduce by about 30 times the amount of virus particles circulating. we know that masks work. in many other countries, children from the age of six have to wear masks when they are in schools. the nhs has much less capacity compared to other countries, so it's feared even a small surge in demand could cause real problems. but so much is still unknown, with this stage of the pandemic described as one of the most difficult times to predict
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what will come next. anna collinson, bbc news. in the latest official figures on coronavirus, 34,574 new infections were recorded in the latest 2a hour period. that means on average there were more than 37,000 new cases per day in the last week. as of thursday, there were more than 6,500 people in uk hospitals with coronavirus. another 38 deaths have been recorded of people who died within 28 days of a positive test result. just a reminder, at the weekend, that figure can be lower because results are not up—to—date. on average, we've had 112 deaths a day in the past week. on vaccinations, 85.5% of the population aged 12 or over have had their first dose of a vaccine, and 78.5% divisions between the eu and the uk over the northern ireland protocol look set to come to a head again this week, with the government
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trying to make significant changes to what was agreed under the brexit deal. the eu is also due to put its own proposals forward. let“s speak tojess sargent, senior researcher on brexit, devolution and the ni protocol at the institute for government. a very busy time for you. what has changed about what britain once compared with what they were saying earlier in the year? in compared with what they were saying earlier in the year?— earlier in the year? in july, the uk government _ earlier in the year? in july, the uk government published _ earlier in the year? in july, the uk government published its - earlier in the year? in july, the uk. government published its combined paper, which propose some quite major changes to how the protocol operates. at them moment, any goods can between great britain and northern ireland are subject to checks, paperwork and models those aren“t checks, paperwork and models those aren't being fully implemented at the moment because of the grace period. what the uk once in the future is to ensure that only good going from great britain into northern ireland and then on to the eu are subject to those cheques, and are put forward those proposals in july. the european commission is
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expected to respond this week and put forward counterproposals and some of those areas, after which i think there will be a period of quite intense negotiations to see if the two sides can find a way forward. ., .,, ., ., ., , forward. lord frost, who negotiates forward. lord frost, who negotiates for the british _ forward. lord frost, who negotiates for the british government, - forward. lord frost, who negotiates for the british government, says - forward. lord frost, who negotiates| for the british government, says not having northern ireland subject to thejurisdiction having northern ireland subject to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice is a red line for the uk. how sympathetic is the eu likely to be to disposing of that? t likely to be to disposing of that? i think the eu is unlikely to be very receptive to changes to that particular aspect of the protocol. i think they see the principle of where eu law is being applied as it is in northern ireland under the protocol, then the european institutions should be responsible for policing that. one of the interesting things is, after lord frost's announcement that ended the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice would be a red line, several business groups in northern ireland came forward and said that this was never an issue they had raised. that was a particular
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problem for northern ireland was causing problems in the northern ireland economy. unlike some of the trade —related issues, this perhaps there is more down to the fact that there is more down to the fact that the uk government is uncomfortable with the eu institutions having jurisdiction in the uk at rather than specific problems have been identified in the operation of the protocol and its impact in northern ireland. fist protocol and its impact in northern ireland. �* ., ., ., ireland. at the moment, we have that border in the — ireland. at the moment, we have that border in the eye _ ireland. at the moment, we have that border in the eye receive _ ireland. at the moment, we have that border in the eye receive which - border in the eye receive which unions say cuts off in a constitutional fashion, unions say cuts off in a constitutionalfashion, and their constitutional fashion, and their view, constitutionalfashion, and their view, northern ireland from the rest of the uk. the idea was suggested some time ago that the problems of the pushing goods from the republic of ireland into northern ireland could be resolved with technology. how far away are we from that? repeatedly, it seems to come back to that issue for the technology is capable of managing that border. uncertainly, there are a solution is already on the shelf that can be implemented tomorrow, which is part
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of the reason this has become difficult. —— there are not. there are certain areas that could be digitised, and the government is looking to do that. at other aspects, accepting livestock or other products of animal origin, which are very important to the eu, it is difficult to see how this can be done virtually. there might be solutions, but one of the thing the eu has said is that the uk government has not been forward those detailed technical proposals of how things could work differently. lord foster said that he will be publishing more details of the uk“s proposal, so we might see more, but fundamentally, i“m of the uk“s proposal, so we might see more, but fundamentally, i'm not sure technology is going to solve all these problems. the need to be a political compromise on both sides. the eu is expected to come up with their own scales back its own proposals this week.- their own scales back its own proposals this week. what is likely to be in that? _ proposals this week. what is likely to be in that? for— proposals this week. what is likely to be in that? for papers, - proposals this week. what is likely to be in that? for papers, one - proposals this week. what is likely to be in that? for papers, one on | to be in that? for papers, one on agri—food, one on the northern ireland assembly“s and the eu
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institutions,... i think the european vice president said that these were going to be very wide reaching proposals. we think there is going to be something on areas like the sausage bank, which is often spoken about, which prevents sausages gone from great britain to northern ireland. we have to see whether lord frost believes that goes far enough. he has already said that if they don't, there is the rest that uk government might trigger what is known as article 16, which is unilateral safeguarding merger, creating further uncertainty. i think there is a real need for the uk government to engage seriously with the eu“s proposals and try to find a way forward. seriously with the eu's proposals and try to find a way forward. thank ou ve and try to find a way forward. thank you very much- _ four people have been killed after a car crash in kent. those who died were aged 18, 19, 25 and 44 years old. a 15—year—old boy, who was also a passenger, was taken to hospital with life threatening injuries.
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the crash happened in the villlage of headcorn shortly before 1am this morning. sport now, and tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavyweight champion of the world. fury knocked out wilder in the 11th round of the trilogy fight in las vegas. fury has now extended his undefeated professional record to 32 fights. let“s speak to the boxing trainer and former british, commonwealth and european championjaime moore. how much did you enjoy the fight? absolutely loved it. it is one of those fights were sometimes on the big stage, sometimes it can be an anti—climax, the actual fight itself, but it more than lived up to expectations. itself, but it more than lived up to exoeetations-_ itself, but it more than lived up to exectations. , . . ., , ., , expectations. hyclate eventually was it reall ? expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for— expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for it _ expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for it to _ expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for it to go _ expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for it to go above - expectations. hyclate eventually was it really? for it to go above them - it really? for it to go above them —— to have gone 11 rounds? in it really? for it to go above them -- to have gone 11 rounds? in many
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wa s, it -- to have gone 11 rounds? in many ways. it was — -- to have gone 11 rounds? in many ways, it was probably _ -- to have gone 11 rounds? in many ways, it was probably the _ -- to have gone 11 rounds? in many ways, it was probably the most - ways, it was probably the most conclusive one and the fact that tyson fury himself was in a lot of trouble, and came through that patch and still dominated afterwards. i think deontay wilder, i don't think he did himself any favours coming in that much heavier. i think it slowed him down a little bit. and i think, after three fights, tyson fury himself will feel, even though the first one was an official draw, he is over the line. he can finally move on, he“s is over the line. he can finally move on, he's gone through with it. i am sure that wilder felt he had a better chance this time, because fury taken by surprise a little in the second fight, but they can sort of draw a line under it now. you mention how — of draw a line under it now. you mention how heavy _ of draw a line under it now. you mention how heavy tyson fury is, six written on, about 20 stones. how fit as he really? it feels quite rude to talk about 20 stones. how fit as he
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really? it feels quite rude to talk but someone“s physique when they have just won that title particularly, but is he is fit as it should be? his particularly, but is he is fit as it should be?— should be? his actual physical conditioning _ should be? his actual physical conditioning and _ should be? his actual physical conditioning and has - should be? his actual physical conditioning and has body - should be? his actual physical conditioning and has body fat| should be? his actual physical. conditioning and has body fat is should be? his actual physical- conditioning and has body fat is two totally separate sort of incidents. tyson fury is a phenomenal athlete. he might not look at, but you can't deny he is a heavy weight champion of the bra. we saw a couple of weeks ago per anthonyjoshua lost his title, and to look at anthonyjoshua on the skills, he is a phenomenal athlete himself, but he doesn't like tyson fury does. that doesn't mean he is not a fantastic boxer. his skill set is second to none. he has great fishing. he has an unbelievable tactician, but you can fight also. the way he looks on the skills does not represent him in terms of being an athlete. tyson fu has terms of being an athlete. tyson
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fury has said _ terms of being an athlete. tyson fury has said that _ terms of being an athlete. tyson fury has said that he _ terms of being an athlete. tyson fury has said that he believes i terms of being an athlete. tyson fury has said that he believes he terms of being an athlete. tyson i fury has said that he believes he is the greatest heavyweight boxer that has ever been and that he could have beaten anybody in the sport at any point. but of course, he accepts that you can only be judged against his current generation. i know boxing is full of lots of bluster and that is part of the showbiz aspect, but is he really that good? these sort of debates have gone on for years and years, and he is right, you can only bejudged against the opposition you come across. and i think people“s appears, they are better charged with a bit of time in between and with a bit of time in between and with a bit of time in between and with a bit of hindsight. that explains, for instance, i don't think what the credit he deserved for his career. —— lennox lewis. now he is regarded as one of the best heavyweights are ever walked the planet. i think in the long run, tyson fury will be held in much higher esteem than he even is today. i think a lot of boxing fans across
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the world are now standing up and appreciating him for what he is. i think a lot of heavyweights over the years, especially ones like muhammad ali, they have got a sort of underlying a story that goes along with it, and i think that will help tyson fury in the long run, because he struggles with depression and outside the ring problems. i think for him to be able to overcome them and do it publicly, has an helped other people along the way, that will add weight to his legacy. outside the way, that will add weight to his legacy. outside of boxing, but at the same time, i think it adds to the fact that he is more attractive as a commodity, so it is notjust about more attractive as a commodity, so it is not just about the more attractive as a commodity, so it is notjust about the boxing, it is about the type of person he is and the problems he has overcome and the way he inspires people.— the way he inspires people. finally, it is likely to — the way he inspires people. finally, it is likely to challenge _ the way he inspires people. finally, it is likely to challenge him - the way he inspires people. finally, it is likely to challenge him next? i it is likely to challenge him next? i think it will be dillian whyte. i think it will be a crying shame if he didn't, because it has been about three years waiting in line for this
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opportunity. i think everybody would like to see the usyk fight, but i think next in line will be dillian whyte. think next in line will be dillian wh e. ., ~ think next in line will be dillian wh e. ., ,, , ., think next in line will be dillian wh e. ., ., ., ,, ., think next in line will be dillian wh e. . ., . ~' ., , the uk is one of the most nature depleted countries on the planet. researchers say that as little room for nature but none has been built on or used forfarming. just outside the busy city of york is the askham bog, created by a retreating glacier 15,000 years ago. it“s brimming with biodiversity. that's the name for all living things and how they fit together. but the uk is one of the most nature depleted countries in the world. a new report says thatjust 53% of our biodiversity is left — that is compared to a global average of 75%. that matters because biodiversity
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affects the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and that we love. it is also what provides us with so many other basic needs. it is the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains break down. nature is at the base of our supply chains. the uk“s lack of biodiversity is linked to the industrial revolution. intensive farming also plays its part. so what more can be done to protect special places like this? last year, the secretary of state turned down a plan to build 500 homes next door to this nature reserve. it is an extraordinary place, it holds between five and 10% of all the species in britain, and yet if we don't do anything at all we will lose more species than we already have
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from a place like this. if we get it right, if we allow the wider countryside to become nature—rich again, this is the place from which the surrounding land will be colonised, and that is true of all the other nature reserves across the country. tomorrow, a week—long un biodiversity conference will begin virtually, hosted by china. negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. a decade ago, 20 targets were set, but none of them were met. scientists say this is our best chance for a sustainable future. olivia richwold, bbc news, near york. chris packham says a suspected arson —— outside to some but not stop him campaigning against arsenal cruelty.
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i will, of course, just carry on, because i have no choice. i cannot and will not let your intimidation dissuade me from my course. and that is why i don't really understand why you would do it. time for a look at the weather. soa so a bit of cloud across the channel islands, that will clear overnight. the cooler night than of late. the big exception will be across the western isles of scotland. a warm front approaching bringing patchy rain and drizzle to broadstone. temperatures in the western isles at ten and 11. most of the single figure temperatures to get their morning commute under way. a much chillier start than we are just to at the end of last week. increase cloud across scotland and then later northern england from that weather front. only a few splashes of rain the further south you get, the bulk of the rain across the highlands and
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islands, the western isles in particular. lighter ones for the south, and some sunny spells. the vast majority staying high. quite pleasant out there. temperatures closer to the seasonal average of this time at 13 to 16 or 17 degrees. next week will be cooler, but for most it will stay dry.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines. government is accused of failing to act on high energy costs manufacturers, as businesses call for help, the government acknowledges the problem. a warning on catching covid and flu at the same time and how it could double the risk of death. the irish foreign minister says the uk“s new demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause a breakdown in relations with the eu. it is a knockout. britten“s tyson fury defeats american deontay wilder in the 11th round to retain his heavyweight title in las vegas. scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown. sportsday will be coming up shortly. but before that,
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as the first ever audit of people with secondary breast cancer is about to begin, jeremy cooke speaks to patients about the importance of being counted, being heard and getting the best treatment to live as long as possible. i got my diagnosis two years ago. i had a tumour in my breast that was relatively large. are you 0k to step on the scales, please? yeah. alina is a young mum with a devastating diagnosis. i was automatically stage iv, metastases in my liver, spleen, spine, hips and sternum. secondary breast cancer. stage iv is classed as terminal, and to hear that language at the age of 32 with a ten—month—old is quite scary. come on, darling. with her husband on the speakerphone... hi, andy, can you hear me? hi. prof _ 0k. ..alina is here to see breast cancer specialist, professor carlo palmieri. how are you feeling?
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i'm feeling great. i've got an appointment for some scan results.

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