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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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thank you very much. that's it, i'll be back with the late news at ten.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm... the business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the way the government has handled the energy crisis after suppliers said the price cap system was not fit for purpose. i think it is a critical situation. clearly, i am speaking to industry is all the time. gas prices, which have quadrupled this year, are making an impact. a warning on catching covid and flu
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at the same time. the irish foreign minister says the uk's new demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause �*a breakdown in relations�* with the european union. it's a knockout britain's — tyson fury defeats the american deontay wilder in the 11th round in las vegas. scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into �*ecological meltdown�*. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the business secretary says rising gas prices have created a critical situation for many industries, but he�*s defended the government�*s handling of the energy crisis. steelmakers are among those warning that they may have to stop
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production. kwasi kwarteng said he was working with the chancellor for support, but the treasury says no talks about the taken place. cooking up a classic sunday brunch for hungry punters, but plating up in this leeds cafe is getting more expensive. as energy bills rise, they can�*tjust turn off the coffee machine. i mainly worry that in the long term the prices won�*t change and there will be that this idea that because we dealt with the current situation, it will be normalised to keep those prices the same. we might have to change our prices in the future if prices don�*t go down, which could have a knock—on effect on the people who don�*t feel like they can come in. the business secretary this morning would not commit to extra support for energy bills for company like this one. i think it is a critical situation. i'm speaking to industry, as you said, all the time, and high gas prices, they quadrupled this year, are making an impact, and that is why i am, as you say, speaking to people and listening and trying
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to work out a way forward. those industries that use a lot of energy for manufacturing say the time for working out a way forward has long gone. if the situation is critical which i certainly know it is, then why isn�*t government acting now, today, to address this problem for energy intensive sectors such as the steel industry, because without that help now, today, in the next week, we are going to see a significant, permanent damage to the sector. here is how dramatic price spikes have been over the past year. households are protected by the energy cap, which kicks in at 65p, but prices are now almost four times that. companies would like to see something similar in place in order to protect them from the worst of global price spikes. but will it happen? to cushion businesses through this period, the business secretary says he has
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asked for help from the treasury, a statement the treasury denies. labour says the government needs to act. businesses are tremendously worried, as ourfamilies. everything is getting more expensive, fuel, energy costs, their weekly shop, and while all that is going on, we have a government that is in chaos, isn�*t getting a grip on what is needed and is not taking action to protect businesses and support families at this time. here it is not the political ping—pong that matters, rather what the cost of energy might do to the price of a cup of tea. katie prescott, bbc news. i�*m nowjoined by the shadow chief secretary to the treasury, bridget phillipson. thank you very much for being with us. should the government, should the treasury be bailing out some of these industries, some of these companies, that are having a desperate struggle because of rising energy costs? the? desperate struggle because of rising energy costs?—
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energy costs? they are under enormous _ energy costs? they are under enormous pressure _ energy costs? they are under enormous pressure right - energy costs? they are under| enormous pressure right now, energy costs? they are under - enormous pressure right now, and thatis enormous pressure right now, and that is particularly acute for small business, who have seen rising cost. the government is also putting up taxes on businesses as well, which isn�*t something we support. we need to see much more action from the government to prepare expensive, the weekly shop, filling up expensive, the weekly shop, filling up your car, and are pulling that 20 point a week universal credit from farmers when they just point a week universal credit from farmers when theyjust cannot afford to make up that difference. specifically companies like steel companies, glass companies, all those who have been hit by these huge spikes in energy prices, should be given government subsidies, cash bail outs, potentially billions of pounds, to help them survive this? we have not had over the last decade if you�*re plan to supporter industries. there are proposals around different ways to do that, and the government should look carefully at them. more broadly, i
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would say we are far more exposed as a country because a government pulled away that gas storage facility in 2017, so we are more exposed in that way. and we haven�*t had a proper plan from the government to support businesses about energy efficiency. the emissions from buildings are going up, and the symmetry of houses, and families are facing enormous pressures. there is a whole range of measures that the government can and should be taken, but this comes back to come over the last day could have not planned ahead, they have not looked ahead, and we are more exposed. the question is, how much to be spent supporting, subsidising some of these companies? we were talkin: to some of these companies? we were talking to the _ some of these companies? we were talking to the chief _ some of these companies? we were talking to the chief executive - some of these companies? we were talking to the chief executive of - talking to the chief executive of the british glass, and he was seeing a lot of these companies are going to go to the wall and the next few days, the next few weeks, because of the spiralling energy costs. they have to have the furnaces on 2a/7, they cannot just turn have to have the furnaces on 2a/7, they cannotjust turn them off. so
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how much of the government spent? if labour were in government, how many billions but you spent to support these companies?— billions but you spent to support these companies? first of all, we would listen _ these companies? first of all, we would listen to _ these companies? first of all, we would listen to business, - these companies? first of all, we would listen to business, unlike l would listen to business, unlike this government has spent the last week going around blaming businesses are not taking responsibility. i�*m aware proposals are being put forward by others, and the government should look at all available options to support businesses. but this is always the wider support... businesses. but this is always the widersupport... but businesses. but this is always the wider support. . ._ wider support... but they are lookin: wider support. .. but they are looking for— wider support... but they are looking for money. _ wider support... but they are looking for money. they - wider support... but they are looking for money. they are l wider support... but they are - looking for money. they are looking for bailouts, frankly, to get them through this. for bailouts, frankly, to get them through thie— for bailouts, frankly, to get them throu:hthis. ~ ., ., ,, ., ., through this. would you approve of that? we think — through this. would you approve of that? we think the _ through this. would you approve of that? we think the government - through this. would you approve of. that? we think the government should look at all options to see businesses supported. we are still emerging from the pandemic, the recovery is still so fragile, but that also means it makes even less sense to be second up taxes for businesses. we also believe we should reform our tax system and make it fairer to support many of the smallerfirms by make it fairer to support many of the smaller firms by a complete overhaul of the business rate system, freeze it for now, scrap in the long run. that would provide tremendous support and relief right not to businesses that are
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struggling. so, it is a range of measures we need to see from the government today. ilint" measures we need to see from the government today. our overreliance on as, government today. our overreliance on gas, particularly? _ government today. our overreliance on gas, particularly? in _ government today. our overreliance on gas, particularly? in terms - government today. our overreliance on gas, particularly? in terms of- government today. our overreliance on gas, particularly? in terms of an | on gas, particularly? in terms of an energy source? we need to be more reliant on other fronts, like renewables. and we know that one has been a problem in terms of creating enough energy recently. that has been one of the issues. as a safe ought notjust of this government but previous governments? we have not planned on energy supplies well. the comes down to the failure we have seen over 11 long years of success of tory governments that haven�*t looked at the future. the haven't looked at the future. the last labour _ haven't looked at the future. the last labour government plan on this? they brought in legislation to tackle climate change, that a game... tackle climate change, that a name. .. , , tackle climate change, that a tame". , , tackle climate change, that a name... , , game... this is about energy provision _ game... this is about energy provision for _ game... this is about energy provision for this _ game... this is about energy provision for this country, . game... this is about energy i provision for this country, about storage of energy as well. {3.35 storage of energy as well. gas stora . e storage of energy as well. gas storage is _ storage of energy as well. gas storage is an _ storage of energy as well. gas storage is an issue. _ storage of energy as well. (17.3 storage is an issue. that which storage of energy as well. 6:3 storage is an issue. that which is why it is incomprehensible the government got rid of the main
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storage facility back in 2017. we haven�*t seen any real progress in making homes more energy efficient. that is why we set out a really ambitious plan to get homes insulated, notjust because it will help tackle climate change, it will create lots of really greatjobs around the country, but it means that farmers will be paying less on their household bills and will be less exposed.— their household bills and will be less exosed. ., , ., ., ._ less exposed. kwasi kwarteng today was sa in: less exposed. kwasi kwarteng today was saying that _ less exposed. kwasi kwarteng today was saying that he has been in - with the treasury about support for industry. the business secretary appears to making it up when i industry. the business secretary - appears to making it up when he goes along. that is frightening. it is really difficult time for businesses and families. is more expensive. the government need to get a grip, stop
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blaming other people, and act as a responsible government, which i think is what people would expect, commanders what they deserve. share commanders what they deserve. are ou commanders what they deserve. are you saying the prime minister should not have gone on holiday, or that he should come back? i not have gone on holiday, or that he should come back?— should come back? i understand --eole should come back? i understand people want _ should come back? i understand people want to _ should come back? i understand people want to go _ should come back? i understand people want to go on _ should come back? i understand people want to go on holiday, i should come back? i understand| people want to go on holiday, we should come back? i understand - people want to go on holiday, we all enjoy a holiday. keir people want to go on holiday, we all enjoy a holiday-— enjoy a holiday. keir starmer has had a holiday _ enjoy a holiday. keir starmer has had a holiday this _ enjoy a holiday. keir starmer has had a holiday this year. - enjoy a holiday. keir starmer has had a holiday this year. when - enjoy a holiday. keir starmer has| had a holiday this year. when keir starmer is away _ had a holiday this year. when keir starmer is away on _ had a holiday this year. when keir starmer is away on holiday - had a holiday this year. when keir starmer is away on holiday to - had a holiday this year. when keirl starmer is away on holiday to make sure that he knows what is going on. i don�*t think keir starmer would be going on holiday in the midst of this crisis, but of the prime minister is a bit, maybe he could stop his ministers arguing with each other, squabbling. 0nly last week, they were blaming businesses, the public, now they are blaming each other. and it becomes more extraordinary and more chaotic by the day. extraordinary and more chaotic by the da . . ~ extraordinary and more chaotic by the da. ., ,, i. extraordinary and more chaotic by theda. ., , . divisions between the eu and the uk over the northern ireland protocol look set to come to a head again this week, with the government trying
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to make significant changes to what was agreed under the brexit deal. the eu is also due to put its own proposals forward. let�*s speak to our correspondent jessica parker who�*s in brussels... this is going to come to ahead this week. we this is going to come to ahead this week. ~ . . , this is going to come to ahead this week. ~ ., ., , ., ., week. we have a bit of a timeline this week on _ week. we have a bit of a timeline this week on tuesday, _ week. we have a bit of a timeline this week on tuesday, lord - week. we have a bit of a timeline| this week on tuesday, lord frost, the brexit minister is going to make a speech. i don�*t think we are expecting anything particularly new from that, but it looks like he me reiterate some of the points he has been making about the what do you he wants in terms of changes to the northern ireland protocol, in particular this issue of how the treaty is policed. the uk wants to remove the oversight role of the european ofjustice, eu�*s topcoat, and i think the eu will probably not that the european union is not set to propose that when it brings forward its plans for reforms to the northern ireland protocol on wednesday. and i think that is a big day look out for, the eu but
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responded to what the year he has been saying in terms of the northern ireland protocol. likely, brussels will offer up some compromises on reducing tax from great britain to northern ireland, allowing the continued import of chilled meats, you might have seen or read some headlines around sausages. that is all to do with that. we do expect some negotiations to begin, but it does look like this issue of how the protocol is policed as one of the quite serious dividing lines at the moment. ., , ., ., moment. the headlines around sausa . es moment. the headlines around sausages but — moment. the headlines around sausages but about _ moment. the headlines around sausages but about sausage i moment. the headlines around i sausages but about sausage wars. moment. the headlines around - sausages but about sausage wars. as a sense in brussels that this is still a conflict with the british government over the future of the protocol? there�*s a sense of irritation as well, perhaps? i protocol? there's a sense of irritation as well, perhaps? i think there is definitely _ irritation as well, perhaps? i think there is definitely a _ irritation as well, perhaps? i think there is definitely a sense - irritation as well, perhaps? i think there is definitely a sense in - there is definitely a sense in brussels that they want to resolve this. this is certain what diplomats tell me, that they feel that this has been going on for a very long time. it is worth remembering that, as in the uk, there are various issues going on at the moment, and
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the european union a lot going on as well, and european leaders, whether it is the leaders of member states but that the commission here, have got quite a lot to do what at the moment, not least of all soaring energy prices. i think there is a sense that they don�*t want to exert too much energy and political energy on fighting with the uk, but having said that, at the moment, from what we can see, this issue of how the protocol as a police, this issue of the european court ofjustice�*s in terms of its oversight, that does look to be something of a red line for brussels, something they are not likely to propose that they will budge on on wednesday. certainly, you could see some conflict going on. we have seen today the foreign affairs ministerfor on. we have seen today the foreign affairs minister for ireland, on. we have seen today the foreign affairs ministerfor ireland, simon coveney, suggesting the uk�*s are risks a further breakdown in relations. so already some tension building up to this wednesday. at the uk are saying that it has made known its proposals for some months now, but of course worth
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remembering, worth pointing out that the northern ireland protocol was signed up to and agreed by both sides. with the nhs winter flu jab campaign under way there�*s a warning about the risk of catching both flu and covid at the same time. early evidence suggests you are twice as likely to die if you become infected with both viruses. those eligible for a flu jab are being encouraged to get it as soon as possible. here�*s our health correspondent anna collinson. viruses are released into the air when people infected with flu or covid—19 breathe out, speak, sing or sneeze... as this latest nhs campaign video warns, this winter will bring with it other dangers, not just covid. after very little of the flu virus circulating last year, it�*s feared no immunity could result in tens of thousands of deaths it�*s feared low immunity could result in tens of thousands of deaths
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in the coming months. then there is the threat of catching covid and flu at the same time. research shows those infected with both viruses are twice as likely to die, compared to covid alone. this is probably the first season where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating as well as flu. we do know, from the small amount of data that we�*ve had previously, that people are at more significant risk of death and of serious illness if they are co—infected with flu and covid, and that doesn�*t seem to be, from our studies, a fact which many of the public understand. where are we now? england was the first nation in europe to fully unlock injuly. other countries have followed but have taken a more cautious approach. after a summer of increased human contact, infections have increased. as this graph shows, the uk has one of the highest covid rates in europe, well above that of france or germany. but if you look at the daily covid deaths, while the uk is still higher, a real concern for health leaders, the gap
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between the countries shrinks. this is an example of the power of the vaccination programme, providing vital protection to those most at risk. how will we cope this winter? the government hopes vaccines will protect us this winter, with more than two million boosterjabs administered in england alone. to protect schoolchildren where infections are highest, covid vaccines are being rolled out to over 12s, while the nasalflu jab is available to under 16s. issues obtaining consent have caused delays, potentially to the end of november. concerned about health risks and disruption to education, experts say other measures should be brought in. we know that ventilation is highly effective. if you put an air filter in classrooms that can reduce by about 30 times the amount of virus particles circulating. we know that masks work. in many other countries, children from the age of six have to wear masks when they are in schools.
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the nhs has much less capacity compared to other countries, so it�*s feared even a small surge in demand could cause real problems. but so much is still unknown, with this stage of the pandemic described as one of the most difficult times to predict what will come next. anna collinson, bbc news. let�*s have a look at the latest figures. 0n let�*s have a look at the latest figures. on average, more than 37 thousand cases each day in the last week. as of thursday, 6500 people in hospital. another 38 deaths have been recorded or people who died within 28 days of a positive test result. and on average, we have had 112 deaths per day in the last week. on vaccinations, 85.5% of the
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0n vaccinations, 85.5% of the population is 12 over have had the first dose, and have had both. sport now, and tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavyweight champion of the world. fury knocked out wilder in the 11th round of the trilogy fight in las vegas. let�*s speak to the daily telegraph�*s boxing correspondent gareth a davies, who saw the fight live in las vegas how did you see the fight? it was an amazing encounter. we always believed that tyson fury was a favourite going into this, but we could not have anticipated the
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spectacle, the drama, the thrills that they had. heavyweight boxing has always been about markets, because these are the big guys. but as the chill effect, it will go down as the chill effect, it will go down as an epic encounter. wilder down and the third round, fury down twice in the fourth round, wilder fighting back, fury fighting back. it went back, fury fighting back. it went back and forth. wilder depleting all his resources as fury took over in that later round, down in the tense, and still back. it was unbelievable, and still back. it was unbelievable, and to think that there wasn�*t a huge british code, becausejoe biden doesn�*t open the borders for general british travellers until november the 1st. it was an extraordinary atmosphere. well it was largely an american audience, this one over like a coliseum for fury during the fight. it was an extraordinary thing to witness. did fight. it was an extraordinary thing to witness. , , ., ~' ., fight. it was an extraordinary thing to witness. , , ., ,, ., ., , to witness. did you think at only state
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to witness. did you think at only stage that _ to witness. did you think at only stage that day — to witness. did you think at only stage that day wilder _ to witness. did you think at only stage that day wilder could - to witness. did you think at only | stage that day wilder could have to witness. did you think at only - stage that day wilder could have won it? ., ., ., ., , it? could it have gone either way? we know that _ it? could it have gone either way? we know that when _ it? could it have gone either way? we know that when fury _ it? could it have gone either way? we know that when fury went - it? could it have gone either way? | we know that when fury went back from that type in the rather nice when he wasn�*t well and he won the world title and he had been bingeing on cocaine and alcohol, and his life went wrong and he fell into depression and put on ten stone in weight and then lost it and came back to fight michael six and the first time, in 2008. fury was not don�*t them by wilder, and he got up off the canvas like lazarus. and he did it again last night, knocked down twice in the fourth round. wilder was always dangerous and he did it again last night, knocked down twice in the fourth round. wilder was always dangerous in this fight. he ever seen. wilder was always dangerous in this fight. he everseen. but wilder was always dangerous in this fight. he ever seen. but it was still an amazing victory for fury, who didn�*t box at his birth last night. the best way i can describe it, it was a world rough as a pro, but it will go down in history as one of the epic heavyweight
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encounters.— one of the epic heavyweight encounters. �* , ,., , _ encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great — encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great fight. — encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great fight, i _ encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great fight, i won't _ encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great fight, i won't make - encounters. and tyson fury saying it was a great fight, i won't make any i was a great fight, i won�*t make any excuses, while not as a top fighter, he gave me a run for my money. i5 he gave me a run for my money. i3 that the more you sought? is he dead, and weirdly deontay wilder, who has knocked out 41 of his 42 opponents before he met tyson fury, he has the highest ratio of knockouts in heavyweight history, but are stock rose last night, because he went out on his shield. he is so dangerous. i would like to see him again is anthonyjoshua, those big names who are still in the british heavyweight division. there are lots of huge fights out there for wilder. as a stock rose. he went to hospital last night. he was catapulted across the ring from the bank right hand. but it is a night that people here will never forget.
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there are reports from home that people were fascinated and are thrilled by the fight as well. indeed. tyson fury is saying he is the best fighter, bears heavyweight boxer of his generation. has the best fighter, bears heavyweight boxer of his generation.— the best fighter, bears heavyweight boxer of his generation. as such are now beyond — boxer of his generation. as such are now beyond doubt? _ boxer of his generation. as such are now beyond doubt? definitely. - boxer of his generation. as such are now beyond doubt? definitely. he i now beyond doubt? definitely. he calls himself the champion going back to the great days of the very first heavyweight champions in boxing, and he deserves that title. there is no doubt he is a count of the era, he is unbeaten in 31 fights, has had two reigns as a world champion. vladimir tsco dominated the heavyweight division for ten years in 2015, and fury fell into the wilderness. he has come back and won the other belt against wilder, beats twice, probably beats him a subject the controversial draw. anthonyjoshua had just been beaten two weeks ago, and doesn�*t
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hold any of the belts. fury is the number one. this is the era of the gypsy number one. this is the era of the gypsy can, no doubt about it. —— the gypsy king. the conservationist and tv presenter chris packham says a suspected arson attack outside his home won�*t stop him from campaigning against hunting and animal cruelty. the broadcaster said two masked men set fire to a vehicle at the gate of his home in the new forest on friday morning, causing extensive damage. i will, of course, just carry on because i have no choice. i cannot and will not let your intimidation sway me from my course. and that�*s why i don�*t really understand why you would do it. a new study from the natural history museum has found that the uk only has around half of its biodiversity left, making it one of the most nature—depleted places in the world. researchers said there was little
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room for nature in a country where so much of the land is built on or used forfarming. helen briggs reports. just outside the busy city of york, as this blog. it is brimming with biodiversity. that is the name for all living things and how they fit together. but the uk is one of the most nature depleted countries in the world. a new reports are such as 53% of our biodiversity is left. that is compared to a global average of 75%. that matters because biodiversity affects the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food to eat. breathe, the water we drink and the food to eat-— food to eat. biodiversity is more than something _ food to eat. biodiversity is more than something that _ food to eat. biodiversity is more than something that is - food to eat. biodiversity is more than something that is beautifulj food to eat. biodiversity is more i than something that is beautiful to look at and we love. it is also what provides us with so many other basic needs. it is the foundation of our society.
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we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains break down. the uk�*s lack of biodiversity is linked to the industrial revolution. intensive farming also plays its part. so what more can be done to protect special places like this? last year, the secretary of state turned down a plan to build 500 homes next door to this nature reserve. it is an extraordinary place, it holds between five and 10% of all the species in britain, and yet if we don�*t do anything at all we will lose more species than we already have from a place like this. if we get it right, if we allow the wider countryside to become nature rich again, this is the place from which the surrounding land will be colonised, and that is true of all the other nature reserves across the country. tomorrow a week—long un biodiversity conference will begin virtually, hosted by china. negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting
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nature over the next ten years. a decade ago, 20 targets were set, but none of them were met. scientists say this is our best chance for a sustainable future. 0livia richwold, bbc news, near york. let�*s just bring you the latest on the volcano in la palma. it has been erupting for the last three weeks. you can see from these images that the north flank of the volcano collapsed yesterday, creating new and really powerful lava flows. more than 1000 buildings have been destroyed, 6000 people have been evacuated from their homes as the eruptions continue. we can so you some live pictures. this is the volcano erupting now. it has been gone for some three weeks now. a total of 1186 buildings destroyed so
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far. 1218 acres of land destroyed as well. as i said, about 6000 people evacuated. la palma has a population of 83,000, so a large number of the population there have been evacuated because of the volcano. and lightning was seen near the eruption early yesterday as well. so, it is still really active and posing quite a threat to la palma, the volcano, there. time for a look at the weather. plenty more sunshine for many to end the day, even the weather front across the south is tending to clear away. there will be a lot of tripe weather for the week ahead. cooler than last week, but more cloud than we have had today. we do have a scattering of quite heavy showers, and brisk winds, near gale force
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across the northern isles. a much fresher day for many, hanging on the bombs in the form south. that will go overnight, and it will be notably cooler and southern parts, where we had the cloud last night. they kill at night generally, temperatures in single figures, except the far north—west. that is the difference as we move into monday, for many just the odd pockets of mist and fog, not a big problem, just the odd pockets of mist and fog, nota big problem, but something to watch out for at this time of year. for scotland, it looks cloudier, with some patchy rain event and particularly heavy in northern and western areas. as a cold around average for all. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the government has been accused of failing to act on high energy costs affecting manufacturers, as businesses appeal for help, the government acknowledges the problem.
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