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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 10, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with ben brown. the latest headlines at 2.00 — the business secretary kwasi kwarteng defends the way the government has handled the energy crisis after suppliers said the price cap system was not fit for purpose. i think it is a critical situation. i think it is a critical situation. i am speaking to industry leaders all the time, and gas prices have quadrupled this year, they are making an impact, and that is why, as you say, i am speaking to people listening is trying to work out a way forward. the irish foreign minister says the uk's new demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause "a breakdown in relations" with the european union. it's a knockout — britain's tyson fury defeats the american deontay wilder
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in the 11th round in las vegas. and scientists warn that the loss of biodiversity risks tipping risks tipping the world into "ecological meltdown." and coming up — 75 years after the nuremberg military tribunals convicted some of the most senior nazis of war crimes and crimes against humanity, hardtalk repeats its 2017 interview with the last surviving prosecutor from the trials. good afternoon. the business secretary says rising gas prices have created a critical situation for many industries but he's defended the government's handling of the energy crisis. kwasi kwarteng said he is continuing to hold talks with energy suppliers and the treasury about possible support. however the treasury denies any talks have taken place. our business correspondent katie
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prescott has the latest. not least for the owner, is making coffee gets more expensive. i not least for the owner, is making coffee gets more expensive. i mainly wor that coffee gets more expensive. i mainly worry that the _ coffee gets more expensive. i mainly worry that the prices _ coffee gets more expensive. i mainly worry that the prices won't _ coffee gets more expensive. i mainly worry that the prices won't change, l worry that the prices won't change, because we have dealt with them in the current situation, the idea that in those places the same as 0k will be normalised. the in those places the same as 0k will be normalised.— be normalised. the business secretary — be normalised. the business secretary this _ be normalised. the business secretary this morning - be normalised. the business| secretary this morning would be normalised. the business - secretary this morning would not commit to lower energy bills for companies like this one. i commit to lower energy bills for companies like this one.- commit to lower energy bills for companies like this one. i think it is a critical _ companies like this one. i think it is a critical situation. _ companies like this one. i think it is a critical situation. i _ companies like this one. i think it is a critical situation. i am - is a critical situation. i am speaking _ is a critical situation. i am speaking to industry all the time, and the _ speaking to industry all the time, and the gas prices which have quadrupled this year are making an impact, _ quadrupled this year are making an impact, and that is why as you say speaking _ impact, and that is why as you say speaking to— impact, and that is why as you say speaking to people, listening, trying — speaking to people, listening, trying to— speaking to people, listening, trying to work out a way forward. those _ trying to work out a way forward. those industries that use a lot of energy from manufacturing say the time for working out a way forward has long gone. 50
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time for working out a way forward has long gone-— has long gone. so if the situation is critical, — has long gone. so if the situation is critical, which _ has long gone. so if the situation is critical, which i _ has long gone. so if the situation is critical, which i certainly - has long gone. so if the situation is critical, which i certainly knowl is critical, which i certainly know it is, then why isn't government acting now today to address this problem for energy intensive sectors such as the steel industry, because without that help, now today for the next week or so, then we are going to see a significant and permanent damage to the uk steel sector. here is 'ust how damage to the uk steel sector. here is just how dramatic _ damage to the uk steel sector. here is just how dramatic price damage to the uk steel sector. here isjust how dramatic price rises is just how dramatic price rises have been over the past year. while households are protected by the energy price cap, that was a set when the price was 65 p. it is now almost four times that. companies would like to see something similar in place to protect them from the global markets bikes. to cushion businesses through this period, the business secretary says she has requested extra funds from the treasury, a statement the treasury denied. �* , . treasury, a statement the treasury denied. �*, ., . ., ., ., ., denied. there's a certain amount of briefin: denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going _ denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going on — denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going on behind _ denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going on behind the - denied. there's a certain amount of briefing going on behind the scenesi briefing going on behind the scenes where _ briefing going on behind the scenes where kwasi kwarteng is the same warm _ where kwasi kwarteng is the same warm words, quite like this, got to -et
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warm words, quite like this, got to get it_ warm words, quite like this, got to get it past— warm words, quite like this, got to get it past the treasury, the truth is we _ get it past the treasury, the truth is we need — get it past the treasury, the truth is we need to have a plan and we need _ is we need to have a plan and we need to— is we need to have a plan and we need to get— is we need to have a plan and we need to get on with it. but also the truth _ need to get on with it. but also the truth is _ need to get on with it. but also the truth is we — need to get on with it. but also the truth is we should not be in a situation _ truth is we should not be in a situation where we wait until there's— situation where we wait until there's a _ situation where we wait until there's a crisis and then react. here, _ there's a crisis and then react. here, though, it is not the political ping—pong that matters, rather what the cost of energy might do to the price of a cup of tea. our political correspondent ione wells is with me. people up and down the country are very worried about energy prices over the winter, so it is industry, so it is business. what is the government plan to deal with this? the reason for this, as you say, is that everybody is dealing with these rising gas prices and energy bills, but are energy intensive firms, things like steel, cement, ceramics, chemicals, they use huge amounts of energy every day for their production costs, these rising energy bills have had them incredibly hard. they have been meeting with government over the last couple of weeks: for some kind of intervention. the two main things
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are really calling for, some kind of subsidies to get them to this period of high gas prices, or some kind of energy price cap a bit like we had with household consumers mean we cannot pay more than a certain amount in our energy bills. today, business secretary kwasi kwarteng did not really see what if anything the government is going to do, he did not give any more detail and that other than saying he is in discussion with these industries to try to come up with some kind of solution. he try to come up with some kind of solution. ., ,., try to come up with some kind of solution. ., , solution. he also said he is in discussion — solution. he also said he is in discussion with _ solution. he also said he is in discussion with the _ solution. he also said he is in discussion with the treasury, | solution. he also said he is in - discussion with the treasury, but the treasury said actually, no he isn't. . , , the treasury said actually, no he isn't. ., , , ., ., ., isn't. there has been a lot of back-and-forth _ isn't. there has been a lot of back-and-forth about - isn't. there has been a lot of back-and-forth about the . isn't. there has been a lot of- back-and-forth about the study. back—and—forth about the study. firstly, some newspaper reports earlier today claimed that the business secretary had requested billions from the treasury to try and help some of these firms, something the business secretary denied. but he did say he was working with the chancellor to get through this situation. soon after he said that, the treasury source then told me that was not the case, he was mistaken in the chancellor has not been involved in any kind of
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talks, so i think what this kind of reveals is that the government itself does not yet have the answer for this, they do not have the pot of cash these firms are calling for, and this is certainly something that will be an ongoing talk of discussion particularly with the government's own spending review coming up later this month. meanwhile, pressure really building on them both from the firm, some of them have already had to halt production in the last couple of weeks, but also in the opposition, too. labourtoday weeks, but also in the opposition, too. labour today accusing these two departments of spending the morning fighting over whether or not they are in talks, while the prime minister is on holiday, and the shadow chancellor rachel reeves has also said, the treasury is not in talks with the department for business, then why are they not. thank you very much, ione wells there, a political correspondent with the latest. the irish foreign minister simon coveney says the uk's demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause "a breakdown in relations" with the eu. it comes after the brexit minister lord frost repeated that the uk wants the european court ofjustice
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removed from oversight of the deal. the protocol was agreed as part of the brexit negotiations to ensure there's no need for checks along the land border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. and the irish foreign minister's comments were supported by another senior minister in dublin speaking to rte earlier today. i think there is a line beyond which the european union cannot go. we have _ the european union cannot go. we have an _ the european union cannot go. we have an agreement here that has been signed _ have an agreement here that has been signed up _ have an agreement here that has been signed up to— have an agreement here that has been signed up to by the uk government and by— signed up to by the uk government and by the — signed up to by the uk government and by the eu, and i think there is space _ and by the eu, and i think there is space within the parameters of how you operate the protocol, and i think— you operate the protocol, and i think that — you operate the protocol, and i think that is where the focus should be. think that is where the focus should be it— think that is where the focus should be it is— think that is where the focus should be. it is absolutely legitimate for the people of northern ireland to want to— the people of northern ireland to want to have seamless trade with great _ want to have seamless trade with great britain, and we believe that that can _ great britain, and we believe that that can be accommodated within the parameters of the protocol as part of the _ parameters of the protocol as part of the overall brexit agreement. but let's see _ of the overall brexit agreement. but let's see what the eu come forward with later— let's see what the eu come forward with later this week. there will need _ with later this week. there will need to— with later this week. there will need to be intensive negotiations here to _ need to be intensive negotiations here to resolve this, but it is a
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product — here to resolve this, but it is a product of— here to resolve this, but it is a product of the type of brexit that was chosen by the uk government. john campbell is in belfast. talk us to the latest developments, because that is a pretty stark warning from the irish foreign minister saying that this could cause a breakdown in relations with the european union.— cause a breakdown in relations with the european union. certainly some irritation from _ the european union. certainly some irritation from simon _ the european union. certainly some irritation from simon coveney, - the european union. certainly some irritation from simon coveney, the i irritation from simon coveney, the republic of ireland's foreign minister. the context of all this is that on wednesday of next week, the eu is bringing forward some new proposals to ease the operation of the northern ireland protocol to make it much easier to get goods from great britain into northern ireland. the head of that on tuesday, lord frosty brexit minister is due to make a speech in portugal where he will say those sort of practical changes will not be enough, they also needs to be changes to the oversight of governance of the deal, and specifically of the european court ofjustice to be removed or do watered down. the ec] was in there
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in the deal which was agreed in 2019, but lord frost is essentially saying there was a unique set of circumstances there, and we were effectively bounced into that, but we now want a change and we want a system of independent arbitration. simon coveney is saying, this is a new red line, which the eu's not to be able to accommodate, and the uk will know that, so it raises the question about whether the uk actually wants a deal, or whether it is set on worsening relationships. lord frost hit back on twitter and said it has been known sincejuly when he published his command paper that the uk was looking for these changes. the issue is that people were not paying enough attention to that. but he did say that he is willing to negotiate on whatever the eu comes up with next week. john. eu comes up with next week. john, thank ou eu comes up with next week. john, thank you very _ eu comes up with next week. john, thank you very much _ eu comes up with next week. john, thank you very much indeed, - eu comes up with next week. john, thank you very much indeed, john campbell in belfast. one of the uk's top public health officials is warning of the threat posed by catching covid and flu at the same time this winter. the head of the uk health security agency, jenny harries,
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said that would double a person's chances of dying and that everyone eligible should book a flu jab now. she spoke to the bbc�*s andrew marr earlier. this is probably the first is where we will have significant amounts of covid circulating as well as flu full stop people's behaviours have changed, we are wanting more —— mixing more, winter weather is coming along mixing and everyone's enclosed spaces. and we do know from the small act of data we have had previously that people add more significant risk of death serious illness if they are infected with flu and with covid, and that does not seem to be from our studies a fact which many of the public understand. at this point in the pandemic, it is one of the most difficult times to predict what will come. we have different levels of vaccination, we have a little bit of immunity weaning in older individuals, which is why we are now starting to put in a covid booster
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vaccine. we have slightly different effectiveness in different vaccinations that have been provided, and we settled down to a slightly uncertain period, and i think one of the important things as well here isjust think one of the important things as well here is just to remind think one of the important things as well here isjust to remind people that this winter, with the flu, we are actually very focused on nhs capacity as well, so it is both covid, it's flu, and the ability of the nhs to cope including with its routine caseloads where people are now coming with their longer term conditions for treatment as well. czech president milos zeman has been rushed into intensive care at a hospital in prague, a day after the country's general election. the 77—year—old has had long term health problems but details of condition have not been revealed. he had just held talks with the prime minister, andrej babis, a close ally. mr babis and his populist party suffered an electoral set back, and he appears unlikely to be able to form a coalition to retain power
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iraqis are voting in a parliamentary election called in response to months of anti—government protests. the poll had been due next year but was brought forward due to the unrest in which hundreds of people were killed. iraq faces an economic crisis, corruption and sectarian division. president barham saleh says the poll is an opportunity to rebuild the state. bbc arabic�*s murad shishani is ine the iraqi city of mosul and has more on what the issues are for voters. there are lots of issues the protesters were asking for back in 2019, but so far the first thing that has been met now is the early election as we can see it today here. however, still those protesters are not happy because the said their demands were a package that involves fighting corruption, disarming militiass, political
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reform, which won main party in an early election. however, today we have been hearing in mosul, for instance, in the mosques as well as the military vehicles, speakers, and urgently for people to take part in the selection. boycotting polls seems to be very strong among iraqis, because this seems to be the case all over the country. on the technical level, iraqis have presented a new low, which requires 75% of the seats, as well as ready technology led system for counting, as well as guaranteeing no breaches will the voting process. also there are international involvement. now the major question is the political question, and a divided country with
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a 21 coalition is running in the selection, how they can be able to reach compromises and create a functioning government, functioning administration that can run the country, with all these problems they are facing whether it is economy, corruption, orthe division on sectarian levels, so these are the main questions that will be on the main questions that will be on the table, this the major question iraqis are facing, notjust the technicalities of the election. lebanon's main electricity grid has been restored, 2a hours after the whole country lost supply. yesterday's blackout meant the whole of lebanon was running solely on powerfrom private generators. its energy ministry says the lebanese central bank has granted it $100 million of credit to buy fuel and keep its power stations operating. the state electricity provider says it's now delivering the same level of power as it was before the outage. but that is only a tiny amount,
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just one or two hours a day. the conservationist and tv presenter, chris packham, says a suspected arson attack outside his home won't stop him from campaigning against hunting and animal cruelty. the broadcaster said two masked men set fire to a vehicle at the gate of his home in the new forest on friday morning causing extensive damage. i will, of course, just carry on because i have no choice. i cannot and will not let your intimidation sway me from my course. and that's why i don't really understand why you would do it. the headlines on bbc news — the business secretary kwasi kwarteng has defended the government because my handling of the energy crisis after suppliers said the price gap system is not fit for purpose. the irish foreign minister says the uk's new demands on the
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northern ireland protocol could cause a breakdown in relations with the european union. —— price cap system. it's a knockout — britain's tyson fury defeats the american deontay wilder in the 11th round in las vegas. more on that now. tyson fury has knocked out deontay wilder to retain his title as wbc heavy weight champion of the world. fury knocked out wilder in the 11th round of the trilogy fight in las vegas. fury has now extended his undefeated professional record to 32 fights. well, our sport correspondent ade adedoyin was watching the fight in las vegas and gave us this assessment. it was a brilliant fight, this will go down as one of the great nights in heavyweight boxing history. and the rivalry between deontay wilder and tyson fury will go down as one of the greatest in history as well. there have been some great fights, the likes of muhammad ali and joe frazier, they had three bouts, three good bouts. the second, though, was not anything really to write about, but as far as deontay wilder
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and tyson fury are concerned, every bout they have had has been better than the previous. there was so much hype in the build up to this fight because of the rivalry between the pair. there is no love lost between them. not particularly respectful of each other, there was a lot of abuse sent either way from both fighters, but the fight more than lived up to expectation and they had five knock—downs in this fight, it was incredible. at one moment, it looked like one fighter was about to win, only for the other to rally back. fury finally won it in the 11th round, as you say, with a knockdown and it ends what is a brilliant trilogy emphatically. i caught up with fury as he was making his way out of the arena and he acknowledged it was one of the greatest nights of his career so far. there were some shaky moments in there, but i never lost faith and i continued on and i carried on and persevered and got that single punch knockout. as soon as i landed and jumped on the ropes, i knew it was over, he was not getting back up from that. it was a great trilogy. you need a good dance partner for trilogies and wilder has been a good dance partner. but there is no rematch clause. it is actually done. wilder is done, there is no more deontay wilder.
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a deserved rest for tyson fury now, but i think the long—term goal will be to win all the belts in the heavyweight division. 0leksandr usyk has the other belt after dethroning anthonyjoshua. they will have a rematch next year. tyson fury�*s promoter, frank warren, said the end goal will be to perhaps challenge the winner of that bout sometime in the autumn next year. they both have to get, as you say, the rematch with usyk and joshua, so that will take place and whoever wins wins and they will have the belts, and then maybe we can make the winner of that fight. and as you say, regarding dillian whyte, i don't know what the wbc, which is the belt titleholders, are going to do, but i think dillian whyte is fighting wallin first and that is no easyjob, so that will be interesting. so there will be some options and we will look at them, but there is no rush. he needs some time out now and whatever he wants to do is what we will do. in terms of a unification bout, realistically, when do you think that will happen? it could not happen, i don't think, until autumn, maybe this time next year, because obviously i think
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they are talking about putting that fight on sometime in march, so they will need six months after that, so that is when it would happen. it would be an ideal world for anthonyjoshua not to go for the rematch and we could go straight to it. i think the unification bout is one for the future, but for now, i think tyson fury will have a well—deserved rest. he put in a really good performance and he said something on stage in the press conference afterwards and he said i always find a way to win. his issues with alcohol and drugs in the past have been well—documented, his battle with mental health and he said i have been down and out but i always find a way to come back and in a lot of ways he showed that tonight in this bout against deontay wilder, because when he went down in the fourth round, there was a look in his eyes that i thought he will not make it, but he did, he found a way to win. brilliant, brilliant performance by him and as i say, his long—term goal now would be to unify the division and finish his career as the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world.
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the man regarded as the father of pakistan's nuclear programme, abdul qadeer khan, has died at the age of 85. the atomic scientist was hailed by many pakistanis as a national hero for making his country the first islamic nuclear power in 1998 but widely condemned elsewhere. from islamabad, secunder kermani looks back on his life. in pakistan, a0 khan is considered a national hero, paying tribute to the scientist to date, prime minister imran khan described as a national icon. a state funeral at the largest mosque in islamabad is being held today. translation: b, mosque in islamabad is being held today. translation:— mosque in islamabad is being held today. translation: a great man at lo alto today. translation: a great man at loyal to pakistan _ today. translation: a great man at loyal to pakistan has _ today. translation: a great man at loyalto pakistan has died, _ today. translation: a great man at loyal to pakistan has died, the - loyal to pakistan has died, the prime minister instructed that he
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will be buried with all official respect and honour. but will be buried with all official respect and honour.- will be buried with all official respect and honour. but in 2004, abdul qadeer _ respect and honour. but in 2004, abdul qadeer khan _ respect and honour. but in 2004, abdul qadeer khan was _ respect and honour. but in 2004, abdul qadeer khan was placed i respect and honour. but in 2004, i abdul qadeer khan was placed under house arrest after confessing to sharing nuclear technology with north korea, iran, and libya. he was pardoned, but also retracted his confession, and many suspect other senior pakistani figures must have known about his alleged activities. the controversy is largely glossed overin the controversy is largely glossed over in pakistan, and a0 khan has always remained a hugely popular figure. a new study from the natural history museum has found that the uk only has around half of its biodiversity left, making it one of the most nature—depleted places in the world. researchers said there was little room for nature in a country where so much of the land is built on or used forfarming. helen briggs reports. the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat.
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all rely on biodiversity, the variety of all plant and animal life on earth. but biodiversity is dwindling fast, because of us, with an estimated 1 million species at risk of extinction. the uk's no exception. it has just 53% of its biodiversity left, well below the global average of 75%, according to a new study from the natural history museum. researchers say there's little room for nature in a country where so much of the land has long been built upon or used for intensive agriculture. and they warned the world's lost so much natural biodiversity we risk an ecological meltdown, a future in which we can't rely on nature to provide the energy, food and timber we need. biodiversity is more than something that is beautiful to look at and that we love. it is also what provides us
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with so many of our basic needs. it's the foundation of our society. we have seen recently how disruptive it can be when supply chains breakdown. nature is at the base of our supply chains. the team from the natural history museum hope their data will help global leaders meeting for the un biodiversity conference next week. during a week of virtual talks hosted by china, negotiators will thrash out plans for protecting nature over the next ten years. none of the targets for the previous decade were met, and scientists say this is our last best chance for a sustainable future. helen briggs, bbc news. you saw the natural history museum's professor andy purvis in that report. hejoins me now.
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what would you see is the chief culprit in the fact we have lost so much biodiversity in this country? it is a great question. i think it is a long—standing answer. basically, the uk is where the agriculture and industrial revolutions kicked off, which opened up revolutions kicked off, which opened up new ways of extracting natural resources, and exploiting and managing ecosystems. and so we sort of lead the way in a sense of cashing in our nature for economic and societal benefit, so, you know, there was a lot of progress that arose from that, and i am not suggesting we need to go back to the stone age or anything, but we do have an issue now that we are very nature depleted. 50 have an issue now that we are very nature depleted.— have an issue now that we are very nature depleted. so 'ust comparing us with european _ nature depleted. so just comparing us with european neighbours - nature depleted. so just comparing us with european neighbours like . us with european neighbours like france or germany or italy, we are doing much worse, are we, in terms of holding onto our biodiversity?
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much of western europe is not doing particularly splendidly, but yes, we are definitely in the bottom handful of countries within the eu, and we are bottom of the g7, for instance, as well. 50 are bottom of the g7, for instance, as well. ., are bottom of the g7, for instance, as well. . , are bottom of the g7, for instance, as well. ., , ., , ., as well. so what needs to be done? peole as well. so what needs to be done? people are — as well. so what needs to be done? people are more _ as well. so what needs to be done? people are more and _ as well. so what needs to be done? people are more and more - as well. so what needs to be done? people are more and more aware i as well. so what needs to be done? people are more and more aware of this is an issue. what would you like to see done by government and by all of us?— by all of us? another great question- _ by all of us? another great question. so _ by all of us? another great question. so i _ by all of us? another great question. so i think- by all of us? another great question. so i think there l by all of us? another great i question. so i think there are by all of us? another great - question. so i think there are roles for governments. a lot of financial institutions have called on governments to regulate to safeguard nature, to remove subsidies from the nature, to remove subsidies from the nature depleting activities, and instead redirect efforts towards things that are a nature positive, if you like. we cannot really blame the businesses for behaving in such a way as to make a profit. the difficulty at the moment is that if a business' actions degrade nature,
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then nobody has to pay for that damage, itjust gets done and impoverishes nature and, you know, everybody, basically. it means that our ecosystems are less resilient. so putting businesses all on a level playing field, but levelling up that playing field, but levelling up that playing field, but levelling up that playing field so that it safeguard nature. that is definitely the role of government. this nature. that is definitely the role of government.— nature. that is definitely the role of government. �* , ., ., of government. as i say, we are more aware of this _ of government. as i say, we are more aware of this as — of government. as i say, we are more aware of this as an _ of government. as i say, we are more aware of this as an issue, _ of government. as i say, we are more aware of this as an issue, we - of government. as i say, we are more aware of this as an issue, we have - aware of this as an issue, we have got the cop 26 climate change summit coming up as well, a lot of the focus now really on saving the planet. are you essentially in the end optimistic that we can halt this loss of biodiversity, or are you pessimistic? it loss of biodiversity, or are you pessimistic?— loss of biodiversity, or are you pessimistic? loss of biodiversity, or are you essimistic? ., , ., ., pessimistic? it varies from day to da . all pessimistic? it varies from day to day- all of _ pessimistic? it varies from day to day- all of the — pessimistic? it varies from day to day. all of the modelling - pessimistic? it varies from day to | day. all of the modelling suggests that there is time to time this around. it is not going to be easy, it is going to require a lot of effort, but it is possible to direct us towards a sustainable pathway which will have better outcomes in
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terms of human well—being, as well as furniture. terms of human well-being, as well as furniture-— as furniture. good to talk to you. professor — as furniture. good to talk to you. professor andy _ as furniture. good to talk to you. professor andy purvis _ as furniture. good to talk to you. professor andy purvis from - as furniture. good to talk to you. professor andy purvis from the l professor andy purvis from the natural history museum, many thanks for your time this afternoon. time for a look at the weather forecast with helen now. a lot of dry weather forecast this week if thatis dry weather forecast this week if that is what you like, that at times some weak weather fronts just invading with more cloud. and compared with the weekjust gone, where it has been quite mild, it will feel a little cooler. behind this cold weather front, we are introducing this cooler air, dragging its heels, giving some drizzly conditions in the south and east. some sharp showers across northern and western scotland, just one or two elsewhere, by and large a fine and dry day, but close to gale force winds for the northern ireland. they will continue to blow a few showers in overnight, perhaps some more cloud and rain arriving in the western isles area. but for most, notably cooler night,
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temperatures down into single figures, possibly a touch of grass frost in the glens of scotland, and possibly some fog but not as extensive as in recent mornings because we have lost the humidity somewhat. the big difference tomorrow as for scotland, it is cloudier, with rain particularly across north and western areas. for most of us, fine and dry.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... business secretary quality class quiet and has defended the way the government is handling the energy crisis of the suppliers said the energy system was not fit for purpose —— business secretary kwasi kwarteng. i purpose -- business secretary kwasi kwartenr. ~ , ., . kwarteng. i think it is a critical situation and _ kwarteng. i think it is a critical situation and high _ kwarteng. i think it is a critical situation and high gas - kwarteng. i think it is a critical situation and high gas prices l kwarteng. i think it is a critical. situation and high gas prices have quadrupled this year and making an
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impact analysis as you say speaking to people, listening, and trying to work our way forward. the to people, listening, and trying to work our way forward.— work our way forward. the irish foreirn work our way forward. the irish foreign minister— work our way forward. the irish foreign minister says _ work our way forward. the irish foreign minister says the - work our way forward. the irish | foreign minister says the capers make new demands on the northern ireland protocol could cause a breakdown in relations with the european union. britain's tyson fury has defeated the american deontay wilder wild it with a knockout in the 11th round in las vegas in the wbc championship. and scientists warn that a loss of biodiversity risks tipping the world into ecological meltdown. well, those are our headlines. seventy five years after the nuremberg military tribunals convicted some of the most senior nazis of war crimes and crimes against humanity, hardtalk repeats its 2017 interview with the last surviving prosecutor from the trials, ben ferencz. welcome to hardtalk, with me, zeinab badawi, here in florida, where my guest is 98—year—old ben ferencz. he is the last surviving prosecutor at the nuremberg nazi trials.

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